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Walking the west highland way in 4 days


walking the west highland way in 4 days

Scotland's West Highland Way walk. A Pack Free guided 6-day walk. Spectacular landscapes of the Scottish Highlands' towering mountains, open moorlands and. Walking Scotland's West Highland Way is an epic walk through some of the best scenery in Scotland. Learn about when to go, the route and. Itinerary · Day 1: Arrive Tyndrum · Day 2: Tyndrum to Kingshouse/Glencoe | km · Day 3: Kingshouse/Glencoe to Kinlochleven | km · Day 4: Kinlochleven to.

Walking the west highland way in 4 days -

My trip to the West Highland Way was different than any other trip I have been on before. The varying terrain types made it truly unique. We passed through lowland moors, dense woodlands, and high mountainous regions. All these terrain types are perfect for an adventurer’s holiday. The first few days of walking brought us through the Glasgow suburbs via riverside walks and by following the path of the Blane Valley Railway.

Arrival in Milngavie

We arrived in Milgavie by train from Glasgow. Milngavie is located in the valley of the River Allander and marks the beginning of the West Highland Way. The Milngavie Precint is where we spent most of our time on the first day. Right in the town centre, it houses a variety of shops and restaurants that we hopped around. We spent our night resting up for the next few days of walking.

The Start of the Walk of West Highland Way

Our first day of walking, we planned to complete 19 kilometres. The walk began in Milngavie at a spot marked with an obelisk. From there, we followed the Allander Water River, with Mugdock Park at our right. The easiest part of the walk was that the only high grounds of the day were Dumgoyach and Dumgoyne. The first day of walking wrapped up in Drymen, where we had a pint, ate a warm meal, and put our feet up.

From Drymen, we were set to carry on 23 km along the West Highland Way. This route took us up to the top of Conic Hill. This hill offers breath-taking views of Loch Lomond and its islands. The descent brings us to Balmaha, where we had lunch and rested up for the rest of the days walk. The continuation of the day brought us towards Rowardennan, where our accommodation was waiting for us for the night.

Halfway There

Our fourth day of our trip, and third day of walking, was a beautiful day. We began in Rowardennan. The walk offered views of Ben Lomond, a distinctive mountain. The grand mountain is situated on the eastern shore of Loch Lomond, which we had views of during the walk as well. The path was more rustic than days prior, but is generally a flat walk. At the halfway mark we stopped and had lunch and a breather before continuing on to our destination, Invernan. Invernan is well-known as the home to the Drover’s Inn, which dates back to It claims to be one of the most haunted pubs in Scotland. Of course, we had to venture over there and check it out. It was definitely well-worth the visit.

Loch Lomond

We were sad to say goodbye to Inverarnan, but excited to carryon to see the rest of the beautiful countryside. We continued on to less rustic, better-preserved roads, compared to that of yesterdays. This made the walk exponentially easier. We were accompanied by excellent views of the mountains with sections of forests, farmland, and riverside paths.

As we approached Tyndrum, we noticed plaques lining the road signaling the historic impacts of the lead mining industry in the local area. This was a great way to keep our interest in the homestretch of the 19km walk. We arrived in Tyndrum and settled into our accommodation before heading out to explore more.

Shorter Distances of the West Highland Way

Day six was set to be an easier day as we were only planned to walk 14 km. This part of the route provided us with some beautiful views of the River Orchy and the Bridge of Orchy Railway station. After we reached these, the trail became a little more difficult to travel as we had to ascend feet but, of course, the views at the top made the rougher part of the walk worth it. The views at the top were beautiful views of Loch Tulla. We continued on our way to end our days walk in Inveroran.

From Inveroran we continued on, set to walk km. We started at Victoria Bridge. This walk was beautiful as we walked along the edge of the forest along with through open spaces. We continued on through one of Britain’s largest moors: Rannoch moor. The mid-point of this part of the walk is Ba Bridge. Not much further along, we stopped and had a picnic-style lunch around some cottages. We went on until our final destination for the night, Kings House.

From King’s House, we were to walk 14 km to reach our destination, this is not long, but there are some difficult aspects to this part of the route. About km in from our hike, we reached the Devil’s Staircase. This is the sharpest climb we experienced throughout the entire walk. It is very attainable as long as you pace yourself and are conscious of your breathing. Once we made our way to where we were staying for the night, Kinlochleven, we were ready for a drink. We settled into our accommodation and scurried out to a local pub and ordered a pint and some food- the perfect ending to a semi-difficult walk.

Concluding the Walking Holiday

Our final day of walking was a bit longer, a little over 24 km. The day began with some climbing, but the path didn’t stay too difficult for too long. The views along the path were incredible but the most stunning landscapes were around the time we reached Lairigmore. The last few kilometres took us through forestry plantations. The path was a bit rough at this point again. After, we found Dun Deardail which is a unique Iron Age Fort. We walked along until reaching Fort William, where we spent the night and concluded our walking tour.

Continuing On

Fort William is the second largest settlement in the Highlands of Scotland, so there is plenty to do. It is a major tourist centre, so we decided to continue on our holiday here at the completion of our walking holiday. From here you can embark on day trips to Loch Ness, or if you are a Harry Potter fan as I am, you can take the famous train seen in the films. The Jacobite Steam Train was a highlight for me as not only did I get to feel as though I was on my way to Hogwarts, but I also was able to see the amazing panoramic views and iconic sites from the films.

The nearest airports to Fort William are Glasgow, Inverness, and Edinburgh, so depending on where your next destination is, there are a few options for you to depart from.

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Originally published on 2nd November

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Источник: mynewextsetup.us

West Highland Way -Scottish Walking Holiday

8 Nights Self Guided - 95 Miles
Available late March-mid Oct
£ Per Person Based Upon 2 Sharing

The West Highland Way is the most popular walking holiday in Scotland, running south to north along Loch Lomond and on into the Highland Glens and moors.

Basic Itinerary

BELOW IS JUST ONE OF THE ITINERARIES WE OFFER. PLEASE ENQUIRE IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO VARY THE NUMBER OF DAYS/MILEAGES AND WE WILL PROVIDE A QUOTE.

Day 1 Arrive Milngavie
Day 2 Milngavie to Drymen ~ 12 miles
Day 3 Drymen to Rowardennan ~ 14 miles
Day 4 Rowardennan to Inverarnan ~ 14 miles
Day 5 Inverarnan to Tyndrum ~ miles
Day 6 Tyndrum to Kingshouse ~ 19 miles
Day 7 Kingshouse to Kinlochleven ~ 9 miles
Day 8 Kinlochleven to Fort William ~ 15 miles
Day 9 Departure

What's included:
* Bed and Breakfast accommodation
* Maps and guidebook
* Luggage transfers
* Emergency support

West Highland Way-Glen NevisBook This Trip

 

The West Highland Way runs from south to north linking the edge of Scotland's largest city, Glasgow, to the foot of its highest mountain, Ben Nevis, passing along the shores of its largest loch, Loch Lomond. The route takes you through some of the finest scenery Scotland has to offer.  In this passage from Lowlands to Highlands you will experience contrasts in geology, in flora and fauna and in human land use.  Much of the West Highland Way walking route follows historic trails making use of old footpaths and drove roads.

Grade: Moderate

Meals:
You will normally be staying in a town or village where there is at least one place to buy an evening meal. On the rare occasion that this is not possible, we will book you into an accommodation which provides an evening meal (this is not included in the holiday price). Lunches can usually be bought on route and we can advise you of the days when this is not possible. On these days you can book a packed lunch from your accommodation by letting them know the night before or we can book it for you. These usually cost about £5. Alternatively, most of the towns and villages in which you stay have shops where you can buy items to make up your own packed lunch.

When to Go:
April, May and June are when everything comes to life so it is very green, wild  flowers are abundant and blossom abounds. July and August tend to be the  warmest months, but it is rarely so warm as to be uncomfortable for walking or  cycling. September tends to be one of the most pleasant times in the
countryside and is quieter as most people with children have finished their  holidays. By October the days are getting shorter and the weather is much more  changeable.

Day 1 Arrive Milngavie (has a railway station).

Day 2 Milngavie to Drymen.
The first day's walking on the West Highland Way is through relatively lowland terrain. You are soon passing through the delightful Mugdock Wood which leads you to Craigallian Loch. Beyond Carbeth you walk through rich farmland, pass the Dumgoyach Standing Stones and follow the track of the old Blane Valley Railway. Your route then takes you along the Drumquassle ridge and into the small town of Drymen. ~ 12 miles

Day 3 Drymen to Rowardennan.
From Drymen the walking route leads up into the Garadhban Forest and on to the prominent Conic Hill, from where you descend to the village of Balmaha on the shore of Loch Lomond. For the rest of the day the loch is your companion as you walk north along its east shore. Covering 27 square miles it is the largest body of inland water in Britain. The scenery constantly changes as you pass under the towering slopes of Ben Lomond as you reach the pleasantly situated RowardennanHotel. ~ 14 miles

Day 4 Rowardennan to Inverarnan.
The remainder of the route alongside Loch Lomond is rough walking, especially beyond Inversnaid. Here there is a large hotel and a landing stage for ferries across the loch. Continuing north you reach the end of the loch and enter Glen Falloch before arriving at your accommodation in Inverarnan. ~ 14 miles

Day 5 Inverarnan to Tyndrum.
As it tumbles down Glen Falloch, the river passes through gorges, over cascades and through rapids. You cross the river at Derrydaroch and soon join a grassy track, one of Scotland's old military roads, which passes above the village of Crianlarich. The scenery of the West Highland Way Walk gets more dramatic as you turn up Glen Fillan, the route meandering across the valley and its sides to reach Tyndrum, with its two railway stations. ~ 13 miles

Day 6 Tyndrum to Kingshouse.
From Tyndrum another military road is joined which you will be following on and off all the way to Fort William. You pass under the slopes of Beinn Dorain before arriving at Bridge of Orchy. Crossing the bridge, the path leads you over a shoulder of the hill to Inveroran, with views across pretty Loch Tulla. Beyond here you cross the western edge of Rannoch Moor, a wild and remote part of The Highlands. The scenery is magnificent with peaks surrounding you, reaching a climax towards the end of the day with views of Buachaille Etive Mor, guarding the entrance to the dramatic valley of Glen Coe. ~ 19 miles

Day 7 Kingshouse to Kinlochleven.
Today is relatively short giving you ample opportunity to soak up the scenery through which you are passing. You soon reach Altnafeadh and then climb up the Devil's Staircase. From here it is a gradual descent to Kinlochleven and sea level! ~ 9 miles

Day 8 Kinlochleven to Fort William (has a railway station).
The last day's walking is initially steep and then more gradual on a good track high above Loch Leven. The route then leads you north away from the old military road and towards Glen Nevis. This last section is different again and you are rewarded with views across the glen to Britain's highest peak, Ben Nevis. The path drops down into Glen Nevis and follows it to the finish of the West Highland Way in Fort William. ~ 14 miles

Day 9 Departure.


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Источник: mynewextsetup.us

WEST HIGHLAND WAY ECONOMY PACKAGE 1 ( 4 DAYS & 4 NIGHTS )


At West Highland Way Adventures we have put together packages to suit everyone, from staying in bunkhouses, wigwams, bed & breakfasts to hotels.

If you have any queries about our packages or you would like something different then feel free to contact us through our contact section.

Please ask yourself!     Am i fit enough to participate in this sort of holiday.

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The West Highland Way

The West Highland Way (WHW) is a very popular walking route in Scotland. At over km in length, and with moderate elevations, it crosses the most western (as its name suggests) and the most southern (dare we say) regions of the Highlands.

A superb hike, marked by the diversity of landscapes, the omnipresence of water (lochs, rivers, streams, waterfalls and the rain), and the wild beauty of the landscape. Last but not least, you are likely to make a few friends along the way!

Technical sheet

No.

A East Dunbartonshire walk posted on 20/08/19 by Netra. Update : 15/01/20

Author's timeAuthor's time : 7 days
DistanceDistance : km
Vertical gainVertical gain : m
Vertical dropVertical drop : m
Highest pointHighest point : m
Lowest pointLowest point : 5m
DifficultDifficulty : Difficult
Back to starting pointBack to starting point : No
WalkingWalking
LocationLocation : East Dunbartonshire
Starting pointStarting point : N ° / W °
ArrivalArrival : N ° / W °

Step by step walk

This walk needs several days, please find the details below.

Milngavie to Drymen

Milngavie to Drymen

The first stage of the WHW which presents no other difficulty than its distance takes us through the Scottish countryside and a taste of the first hills of the Highlands.

From Drymen to Rowardenann

From Drymen to Rowardenann

This second stage of the WHW is superb! It consists of three distinct parts. First of all, we cross a pretty forested area. Then, after a pleasant crossing of meadows, we climb Conic Hill, from where the panorama over the Highlands and Loch Lomond is very extensive. After a steep descent to the port of Balmaha, you alternate between the lakeside passages and climbs and descents in the forest.

From Rowardennan to Inverarnan

From Rowardennan to Inverarnan

The third stage of the WHW consists of going up Loch Lomond. We start by climbing steadily in a very beautiful forest, for superb views of the lake, while crossing waterfalls that descend from Ben Lomond. Once back at the edge of the lake, follow the shore for a long time, more or less closely, on paths that lead you on a rollercoaster ride winding between the rocks. A brief ascent between beautiful landscapes and a descent to Inverarnan rounding off this long stage.

From Inverarnan to Bridge of Orchy

From Inverarnan to Bridge of Orchy

The fourth stage of the WHW takes us first up the Falloch river, then across a beautiful forested area and finally sneaks around the foot of high hills. There is much talk of bridges in this stage, two of them having been damaged during a recent flood, which leads to a detour and a ford that is refreshing.

This very long stage can be shortened by taking public transport for the last section, from Tyndrum to Bridge of Orchy.

Bridge of Orchy to Kingshouse Hotel

Bridge of Orchy to Kingshouse Hotel

This fifth stage of the WHW brings us to yet more superb landscapes! The ascent of the small hill of Màm Carraigh offers a very beautiful point of view on Loch Tulla. Then, for about ten kilometres, we follow a very comfortable old military road and we climb gently and very regularly towards a pass in the middle of the moor. Ahead during the descent you will see the classic pyramid silhouette of the Buachaille summit.

From Kingshouse Hotel to Kinlochleven

From Kingshouse Hotel to Kinlochleven

The sixth stage of the WHW takes us through the highest point of the entire hike, an unnamed pass at an altitude of m. After a pleasant walk at the foot of Beinn a’ Chrùlaiste, you reach the pass by climbing the Devil's Staircase, an easier climb than the name of this path suggests. We then descend on good paths or wide tracks on the former small industrial town of Kinochleven.

From Kinlochleven to Fort William

From Kinlochleven to Fort William

The seventh and last stage of the WHW makes us evolve in a beautiful setting, at the foot of the Mamore hills. We then cross lightly wooded areas, from which we benefit from a prominent view of Ben Nevis, the highest point in Great Britain. Arrival in the city of Fort William marks the end of this long hike.

Useful Information

Equipment:
Bring the usual equipment for long-distance hikes, while taking care not to overload your backpack. Items which to me seem essential for the WHW:
- Waterproof hiking shoes.
Rain protection: rain cape, backpack protection, etc.
- Clothing to protect against the cold and/or wind.
- Midge repellent, can be bought locally.
- An electrical outlet adapter for the United Kingdom (in particular to be able to recharge your phone battery).
NB There are companies on site that organise luggage transportation from point to point, which allows you to hike with a small bag during the day and keep the rest dry.

Signage:
- The route is very well marked on site, mainly at major intersections and changes of direction, by three complementary means: sign posts with thistle flower; posts with a yellow arrow for changes of direction; signposts.
- Having the route instructions on your phone via the Visorando application is an undeniable plus. Remember to save the basemaps (OSM Hiking) of all stages before departure. This will allow you to precisely follow progress on a map regardless of the quality of your network connection and even in the absence of a network.
- Physical maps on a British map background (pdf file of each stage) are a back-up.
- A compass does not weigh very much and can very useful.

Water:
It is best to fill your water containers from the tap at your accommodation. There are no real water refilling points along the way. Admittedly, there are countless streams and torrents on the course but the potability of this water is not guaranteed (bring water purification tablets if you plan to use these).
In some places, especially along the first two stages, locals will provide bottles of water or other drinks at the side of the route which should be paid for by putting the amount indicated in an Honesty Box (the system is based on trust).

Supplies:
Details of opportunities to resupply are mentioned in the sheets for each stage.
- Shops: Glasgow; Milngavie; Drymen; Inverarnan (sundry supplies); Tyndrum; Kinlochleven; Fort William.
- Cash machines: Glasgow; Milngavie; Kinlochleven; Fort William.
- Some hotels offer packed lunches to order the day before for the next day’s trek.

Accommodation:
Hotel type accommodation (with bar-restaurant) or Bed and Breakfast are recommended, being more or less numerous depending on the stage. These suggestions do not claim to be exhaustive: for more addresses, use your preferred search engine. Remember to book well in advance.

Camping:
Many hikers follow the WHW while camping (bring a really waterproof tent). On the route, the camping is highly regulated, with official campsites, places where camping is allowed (for example near a hotel) and several sites where it is strictly prohibited. Inquire beforehand and respect the indications found on site. And remember to take your refuse with you to the next village.

Recommendations:
- The WHW crosses sensitive areas, nature reserves and national parks. Do not leave any refuse on site! Take everything with you to the next village.
- The moors and pastures of the highlands are grazed by (Scottish Blackface) sheep and, to a lesser extent, (Highland Cattle and Aberdeen Angus breeds) of cattle. The route therefore crosses many fields and hikers must open and close countless barriers: these are generally equipped with an automatic closing system, but it is considered responsible to check it has closed properly after passing through.

Breakdown of stages:

7-day trek - This is what is offered here and represents an average of 22km and m of elevation gain per day. As this is already a long daily distance, and a non-negligible elevation, that the whole route is classified as Difficult, even though the course itself does not involve any technical difficulty.
NB The longest stage (km), from Inverarnan to Bridge of Orchy, can be reduced to 20km if you complete your last section by public transport. See the indications in the "Practical information" section of the corresponding hiking guide.

The 8-day trek - represents an average of km and m of elevation gain per day. Depending on the accommodation available, the route can be broken down as follows: Milngavie - Drymen - Rowardennan - Inverarnan - Tyndrum - Inveroran - Kingshouse Hotel - Kinlochleven - Fort William.

6-day trek (an average of 26km and m of elevation gain per day) or a 5-day trek (average of 31km and m of elevation gain per day) - Requires excellent physical condition and proven endurance.

In any event, plan a route in line with your own capabilities.

Useful links:
- Official site of West Highland Way.
- Trains: ScotRail website ScotRail.
- Bus: Citylink website Citylink.

'’Hiked by the author in August ''

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

The whole route goes through superb landscapes: hills, tall landscapes, lakesides, rivers and waterfalls, moors and meadows, etc. Wilderness lovers will be delighted!

For more details, see the different stages of the hike.

The GPS track and description are the property of the author.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

West Highland Way
Self-guided walking holiday

Start of the West Highland Way in Milngavie

Arrival day: Arrive in Milngavie
Your trip starts on arriving at your hotel in Milngavie. This quiet suburb of Glasgow offers plenty of shops, pubs and restaurants, and is only half an hour from Glasgow Queen Street Station. (Some hikers prefer to stay in Glasgow's West End near restaurants and museums.)
Hotel in Milngavie (breakfast)

Milngave to Drymen on the West Highland Way

Stage 1: Milngavie to Drymen
Blue 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
Wake up to your first breakfast of the trip, then put on your boots for the short walk to the official start of the WHW at Milngavie station. This first stage is an easy introduction to life on the trail. You'll start by passing through rolling pastoral terrain, first in the Mugdock park and then alongside the Campsie Fells. The village of Drymen is a welcoming base at the end of the day, with shops and hotels around the green.
B&B in Drymen (breakfast)

Drymen to Rowardennan on the West Highland Way

Stage 2: Drymen to Rowardennan
Red 3 (grade) 22km with m ascent, m descent
The big feature of today's stage is Loch Lomond. Before reaching the loch, we offer an optional climb up Conic Hill (m) for high views. In any case the WHW meets Loch Lomond at Balmaha, a lively village for lunch, then heads North along the shore to Rowardennan. This path twists in and out of wooded promontories with glimpses of the Highlands ahead.
Hotel at Rowardennan (breakfast)

Rowardennan to Inverarnan on the West Highland Way

Stage 3: Rowardennan to Inverarnan
Red 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
Loch Lomond is the theme for most of today's stage. Later you leave behind the loch's wide Southern end and follow its narrower Northern stretch. The high mountains cluster around the glen, first opposite Ardlui then at Inverarnan. The walking is mostly on wooded paths by the loch shore with some twisty and rocky sections today, just above the shore.
Hotel at Inverarnan (breakfast)

Inverarnan to Tyndrum on the West Highland Way

Stage 4: Inverarnan to Tyndrum
Red 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
Having left Loch Lomond behind, the stage winds through Glen Falloch to the village of Crianlarich. This is an important interchange for the West Highland railway. Turning North West, the way ahead is towards Tyndrum along valley tracks both in the woods and out in the open. In Tyndrum you'll find good options to eat and to stock up on provisions before the WHW sets off for wilder ground.
Guesthouse in Tyndrum (breakfast)

Tyndrum to Kingshouse on the West Highland Way

Stage 5: Tyndrum to Kingshouse
Red 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
One of the most notable sights on the route, Beinn Dorain, is a feature this morning as you follow the tracks towards Bridge of Orchy. It's a triangular-looking mountain looming above the road and railway. Past Bridge of Orchy and Victoria Bridge you enter different country again, skirting the huge expanse of Rannoch Moor before dropping down to Kingshouse in its wild setting near the top of Glencoe. This is a long day but the miles fly by on smooth solid tracks.
Hotel at Kingshouse (breakfast)

Kingshouse to Kinlochleven on the West Highland Way

Stage 6: Kingshouse to Kinlochleven
Red 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
Tackle the Devil's Staircase today, the trail's toughest climb. It is a zig-zagging path to a col where you will be rewarded with huge views to the North onto Blackwater Reservoir and more of Rannoch Moor. All the way up, weather dependent, you have views of Buachaille Etive Mor, the bold hill at the entrance to Glencoe. After the climb, you'll drop down onto wide tracks to the friendly village of Kinlochleven in its peaceful setting at the head of Loch Leven.
Hotel in Kinlochleven (breakfast)

Kinlochleven to Fort William on the West Highland Way

Stage 7: Kinlochleven to Fort William
Red 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
Gear up for today's final stage. This is a long but satisfying day, first running through a high valley on the Southern side of the Mamores range. Towards the end of the day, if you're lucky with the weather, you'll be treated to unusual views of the huge slopes of Ben Nevis. A final section of the Way drops into Glen Nevis. Walk through the glen floor to Fort William, pass the leisure centre and railway station and along the high street to the official WHW end post. Congratulations!
Hotel in Fort William (breakfast)

Fort William at the end of the West Highland Way

Departure Day: Depart from Fort William
Take some time to enjoy your full Scottish breakfast and a walk along the lochside before jumping on the bus or train back to Glasgow. If you're looking for further travels in Scotland, we're be happy to share our knowledge so please ask for information!

Make the trip shorter
Make your WHW more challenging by hiking the whole route in 6 or even 5 stages. This is suited to experienced hikers who are willing to hike for more than 30km on consecutive days. Our 6-stage trip combines the stages 3, 4, 5 and 6 into 3 days, with nights in Crianlarich and Inveroran (or Bridge of Orchy). Our 5-stage trip is a feat for the strongest walkers and condenses the first 3 stages into 2 days.

Make the trip longer
The 7-stage West Highland Way suits most trekkers but contains one long day, of km over Rannoch Moor. Our 8-stage schedule breaks this long day with a night in Inveroran or nearby Bridge of Orchy. To make the trip longer still, we suggest splitting the long day beside Loch Lomond with a night in the quaint village of Balmaha. It's harder to recommend longer trips than 9 stages due to the spread of villages; there would be some days still at the usual pace.

Visit Glasgow
Milngavie (the official start of the West Highland Way) is close to the great city of Glasgow which is well worth a day if you have time to visit. It is also possible to walk to Milngavie from Glasgow along a suprisingly scenic route! Please do let us know if you'd like to walk this stage also or would like to stay a night in Glasgow before your hike. We'll be happy to book a hotel for you and recommend things to do!

Hike with a guide
Hike with confidence in the company of our fully qualified International Mountain Leaders (IMLs), with the navigation, accommodation and arrangements taken care of. You're welcome to walk on any date within our season and we can adjust the hike to suit your needs. Please get in touch for more details.
West Highland Way
1 May to 16 Sept
HuttyClassicComfy
Self-guided
6 stages
(7 nights)
Please ask
GBP
Singles
per dog
GBP
Singles
per dog
7 stages
(8 nights)
Please ask
GBP
Singles
per dog
Main Trip
GBP
Singles
per dog
8 stages
(9 nights)
Please ask
GBP
Singles
per dog
GBP
Singles
per dog
Private guided
7 stages
(8 nights)
Group of 4 or more
Please ask
GBP
Singles
per dog
GBP
Singles
per dog
8 stages
(9 nights)
Group of 4 or more
Please ask
GBP
Singles
per dog
GBP
Singles
per dog
7 or 8 stages
(8 or 9 nights)
Group of 1, 2 or 3
Please ask us
Options
Baggage transfer
To all stops
GBP 60 per bag
Baggage transfer
Direct
GBP 30 per bag

Where we stay
This holiday stays in a mix of pleasant guesthouses, hotels, bed & breakfasts or inns along the route. We place most value on a friendly welcome, comfortable standards and a good location within the village or town. We book ensuite accommodation where possible.

At the Kingshouse, our classic option stays a short way off the route at the Clachaig Inn in Glencoe as opposed to a night at the Kingshouse Hotel. We think this is a better option for a number of reasons: the famous walkers' bar at the Clachaig Inn is fantastic with its open fire and its whisky; plus you travel down Glencoe in your taxi with outstanding views not seen from the West Highland Way. We will book (and pay for) a taxi to pick you up from the Kingshouse Hotel at the end of your stage to take you to your accommodation in Glencoe. The following morning, the taxi would take you back at the Kingshouse for you to continue your hike. If you'd perfer to stay at the Kingshouse Hotel, please let us know and we can advise.

Comfy
For a touch of luxury whilst you trek, our ‘Comfy’ option upgrades your accommodation on a few nights. We book a lovely 4* hotel in Glasgow as opposed to our option in Milngavie, and at Drymen you'd stay in the hotel rather than our B&B. We'd also swap your acocmmodation in Tyndrum for a hotel just off-route in Crianlarich and we'd book (and pay for) a taxi to and from Tyndrum for you. At Kingshouse, we'd book for you to stay at the Kingshouse Hotel rather than off-route at Glencoe. We would also upgrade your accommodation in Fort William. If opting for a schedule which includes Bridge of Orchy/Inveroran (typically our 8-stage trip) then we book the Bridge of Orchy Hotel instead of the more basic hotel at Inveroran.

As standard on our Comfy trips, we book for you to stay at Rowardennan Hotel which is on the route. If you'd prefer something a little comfier, we can book for you to stay at Balmaha instead. You'd walk to Rowardennan as normal and then take a taxi back to Balmaha (payable locally) for the night.

Hutty
We don't have any ready-made 'Hutty' options for our West Highland Way. However, it may be possible on some nights to opt to stay in more basic accommodation or hostels. Please ask us for details if you are interested in a more basic option.

Single Supplement
The single supplement covers the difference in cost between a single room and sharing a double/twin room.

Bring your dog
In common with most of our UK trips, we're delighted that you can walk with your dog! Our dog friendly itinerary allows your dog to stay with you in your room each night and walk alongside you each day. We ask for an extra cost of GBP 10 per dog per night. Please just let us know when you book if you'd like to bring a dog.

Views down Glencoe
Our approach to the West Highland Way
We follow the official West Highland Way route from Milngavie to Fort William. You'll set off from a small town at the Northern edge of Glasgow, passing through rolling terrain on the way to Loch Lomond. You'll then climb Conic Hill and descend into Balmaha on the shore. On the next stage you follow the loch for a long stretch, later walking inland to Crianlarich. Once you reach Strath Fillan at Tyndrum, you'll notice that the Highlands really start to show themselves. Trek to Bridge of Orchy and beyond as it crosses the edge of wild Rannoch Moor. Our favourite stage is walking to Kingshouse and over the Devil's Staircase to Kinlochleven. This part reveals some of the best views of the route, as you look out onto a still-distant Ben Nevis over the Mamores. For the final stage, you'll ascend a high valley and drop down through trees to Glen Nevis and Fort William.



The Terrain
The walking is excellent underfoot. Enjoy the mix of old military tracks over the Highland moors, solid narrow paths in forests, and lochside trails. A few short sections are rockier and twistier, most noticeably between Inversnaid and Inverarnan, on the banks of Loch Lomond. The route does not climb any mountains apart from (optionally) Conic Hill at m; instead it meanders amongst the feet of the higher hills (3,ft and over) known as the Scottish Munros. The sharpest and highest climb of the West Highland Way comes on the crossing of the pass between Glencoe and Kinlochleven towards the end of the trip, but there is no great difficulty.

Is it for me?
The West Highland Way is a long-distance trail, suited to most walkers. Being just 20 minutes away from Glasgow the start point is easily accessible to all. The route eases you in gently, as you leave the lowlands behind to enter the wild Highlands.

The route is well marked and maintained throughout. For the first half of the trip, until Tyndrum, the route never strays too far from the road. After Tyndrum the route becomes a little wilder, and over Rannoch Moor the route can feel quite remote. The landscape should be treated as wild terrain in which you will need to be self-reliant. We strongly recommended that you know how to navigate with a map and compass.

Difficulty
The West Highland Way is a great introduction for walkers new to long distance trails. It’s not technically difficult and, taking the standard stopping points, none of the days are exceptionally long. The going is generally flat, especially when compared to Alpine walking, with only a couple of sections which reach over m.

We describe alternatives to vary the level of the walk a little. Some of the hardest sections along Loch Lomond between Rowardennen to Inversnaid can be avoided by an alternative high path. Or for walkers up for a challenge, the West Highland Way lends itself to further exploration of the Highlands and the Munros. (Please ask us to book you extra nights to climb Ben Lomond or Ben Nevis). While your routecards make up the walking for the trip, you are of course free to walk wherever you choose, taking side trips or going by a different route of your own choice. Please note that if you follow your own route you will have left the holiday for the duration.

West Highland Way Walking Guide- for more background

The making of our West Highland Way- our story
Arrive by train or plane into the city of Glasgow


Your holiday starts in Milngavie, a suburb of Glasgow, and ends in the Highland town of Fort William. The most convenient airport to reach the WHW is Glasgow Airport with several transfer options available by bus or train. The train from Fort William back to Glasgow offers fantastic views and for many is a highlight of the week. You'll also find that trains link with London if you are heading down South. Alternatively, you can also reach Milngavie from Edinburgh by a direct train, and it is easy to travel from Fort William to Inverness at the end of your trip. That would make a cross-Highlands route of great contrasts, covering the area of the Great Glen Way.

Travel to and from the trip is not included in the holiday price. We take care to give the most useful notes possible about all the travel options. We supply these both on booking and in your info pack, and we offer personalised tips at any point. The aim is that our trekkers arrange their travel by the simplest and most scenic means as suits their plan.
  • Bespoke accommodation and Itinerary - tailored to your preferences
  • Breakfast every morning
  • Detailed Routecards WHW of the Exploratory system, printed on waterproof paper
  • The 2 UK topographical maps needed
  • Expert advice and local information
  • A comprehensive Season Update following our pre-season recce
  • Full support during your trip from the Alpine Exploratory team (8am until 8pm in the UK)
  • Travel to and from your trip
  • Local transport during the trip unless specified
  • Travel insurance
  • Lunches, snacks, drinks and evening meals
  • Baggage transfer (available as an extra)

Baggage transfer

Our baggage option on the West Highland Way takes your bag to each night's accommodation. Each morning simply leave your bag with your host or at reception and it will arrive at your next accommodation. If your first night is in Glasgow instead of Milngavie (an option, or if due to availability) then we give you details about handing your bag to our baggage partners by 9am at Milngavie station; this requires an early train. Alternatively we offer a direct baggage transfer from Milngavie to Fort William for GBP 30 per bag, for those continuing into the Highlands.

Feel free to ask us any questions you have about any aspects of your planning and preparations! Lucy, Steph, Hannah W, Hannah G, or Nicky will reply with expert advice. We spend a lot of time walking our routes and more broadly exploring ski and hiking trails around the world so do feel free to ask anything at all.

If you prefer, please feel welcome to email or call us. Thanks!

Contact Alpine Exploratory
Email [email protected]
Phone +44 (0)
Our times 9am to 5pm UK time
Monday to Friday
Australia 02
Canada
New Zealand 04
USA

Open to the world
Since Alpine Exploratory started in we have loved getting to know our clients from around the world. Along with the UK, our best-represented countries are the US, Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Please use our national-rate numbers for a cheaper call to contact our office in Edinburgh.

The Alpine Exploratory Team

Keep up with us on Facebook, Instagram, and our Blog for photos and updates from our own travels and clients' trips.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

West Highland Way
Self-guided walking holiday

Start of the West Highland Way in Milngavie

Arrival day: Arrive in Milngavie
Your trip starts on arriving at your hotel in Milngavie. This quiet suburb of Glasgow offers plenty of shops, pubs and restaurants, and is only half an hour from Glasgow Queen Street Station. (Some hikers prefer to stay in Glasgow's West End near restaurants and museums.)
Hotel in Milngavie (breakfast)

Milngave to Drymen on the West Highland Way

Stage 1: Milngavie to Drymen
Blue 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
Wake up to your first breakfast of the trip, then put on your boots for the short walk to the official start of the WHW at Milngavie station. This first stage is an easy introduction to life on the trail. You'll start by passing through rolling pastoral terrain, first in the Mugdock park and then alongside the Campsie Fells. The village of Drymen is a welcoming base at the end of the day, with shops and hotels around the green.
B&B in Drymen (breakfast)

Drymen to Rowardennan on the West Highland Way

Stage 2: Drymen to Rowardennan
Red 3 (grade) 22km with m ascent, m descent
The big feature of today's stage is Loch Lomond. Before reaching the loch, we offer an optional climb up Conic Hill (m) for high views. In any case the WHW meets Loch Lomond at Balmaha, a lively village for lunch, then heads North along the shore to Rowardennan. This path twists in and out of wooded promontories with glimpses of the Highlands ahead.
Hotel at Rowardennan (breakfast)

Rowardennan to Inverarnan on the West Highland Way

Stage 3: Rowardennan to Inverarnan
Red 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
Loch Lomond is the theme for most of today's stage. Later you leave behind the loch's wide Southern end and follow its narrower Northern stretch. The high mountains cluster around the glen, first opposite Ardlui then at Inverarnan. The walking is mostly on wooded paths by the loch shore with some twisty and rocky sections today, just above the shore.
Hotel at Inverarnan (breakfast)

Inverarnan to Tyndrum on the West Highland Way

Stage 4: Inverarnan to Tyndrum
Red 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
Having left Loch Lomond behind, the stage winds through Glen Falloch to the village of Crianlarich. This is an important interchange for the West Highland railway. Turning North West, the way ahead is towards Tyndrum along valley tracks both in the woods and out in the open. In Tyndrum you'll find good options to eat and to stock up on provisions before the WHW sets off for wilder ground.
Guesthouse in Tyndrum (breakfast)

Tyndrum to Kingshouse on the West Highland Way

Stage 5: Tyndrum to Kingshouse
Red 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
One of the most notable sights on the route, Beinn Dorain, is a feature this morning as you follow the tracks towards Bridge of Orchy. It's a triangular-looking mountain looming above the road and railway. Past Bridge of Orchy and Victoria Bridge you enter different country again, skirting the huge expanse of Rannoch Moor before dropping down to Kingshouse in its wild setting near the top of Glencoe. This is a long day but the miles fly by on smooth solid tracks.
Hotel at Kingshouse (breakfast)

Kingshouse to Kinlochleven on the West Highland Way

Stage 6: Kingshouse to Kinlochleven
Red 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
Tackle the Devil's Staircase today, the trail's toughest climb. It is a zig-zagging path to a col where you will be rewarded with huge views to the North onto Blackwater Reservoir and more of Rannoch Moor. All the way up, weather dependent, you have views of Buachaille Etive Mor, the bold hill at the entrance to Glencoe. After the climb, you'll drop down onto wide tracks to the friendly village of Kinlochleven in its peaceful setting at the head of Loch Leven.
Hotel in Kinlochleven (breakfast)

Kinlochleven to Fort William on the West Highland Way

Stage 7: Kinlochleven to Fort William
Red 3 (grade) km with m ascent, m descent
Gear up for today's final stage. This is a long but satisfying day, first running through a high valley on the Southern side of the Mamores range. Towards the end of the day, if you're lucky with the weather, you'll be treated to unusual views of the huge slopes of Ben Nevis. A final section of the Way drops into Glen Nevis. Walk through the glen floor to Fort William, pass the leisure centre and railway station and along the high street to the official WHW end post. Congratulations!
Hotel in Fort William (breakfast)

Fort William at the end of the West <a href=First offender program virginia Way">

Departure Day: Depart from Fort William
Take some time to enjoy your full Scottish breakfast and a walk along the lochside before jumping on the bus or train back to Glasgow. If you're looking for further travels in Scotland, we're be happy to share our knowledge so please ask for information!

Make the trip shorter
Make your WHW more challenging by hiking the whole route in 6 or even 5 stages. This is suited to experienced hikers who are willing to hike for more than 30km on consecutive days. Our 6-stage trip combines the stages 3, 4, 5 and 6 into 3 days, with nights in Crianlarich and Inveroran (or Bridge of Orchy). Our 5-stage trip is a feat for the strongest walkers and condenses the first 3 stages into 2 days.

Make the trip longer
The 7-stage West Highland Way suits most trekkers but contains one long day, of km over Rannoch Moor. Our 8-stage schedule breaks this long day with a night in Inveroran or nearby Bridge of Orchy. To make the trip longer still, we suggest splitting the long day beside Loch Lomond with a night in the quaint village of Balmaha. It's harder to recommend longer trips than 9 stages due to the spread of villages; there would be some days still at the usual pace.

Visit Glasgow
Milngavie (the official start of the West Highland Way) is close to the great city of Glasgow which is well worth a day if you have time to visit. It is also possible to walk to Milngavie from Glasgow along a suprisingly scenic route! Please do let us know if you'd like walking the west highland way in 4 days walk this stage also or would like to stay a night in Glasgow before your hike. We'll be happy to book a hotel for you and recommend things to do!

Hike with a guide
Hike with confidence in the company of our fully qualified International Mountain Leaders (IMLs), with the navigation, accommodation and arrangements taken care of. You're welcome to walk on any date within our season and we can adjust the hike to suit your needs. Please get in touch for more details.
West Highland Way
1 May to 16 Sept
HuttyClassicComfy
Self-guided
6 stages
(7 nights)
Please ask
GBP
Singles
per dog
GBP
Singles
per dog
7 stages
(8 nights)
Please ask
GBP
Singles
per dog
Main Trip
GBP
Singles
per dog
8 stages
(9 nights)
Please ask
GBP
Singles
per dog
GBP
Singles
per dog
Private guided
7 stages
(8 nights)
Group of 4 or more
Please ask
GBP
Singles
per dog
GBP
Singles
per dog
8 stages
(9 nights)
Group of 4 or more
Please ask
GBP
Singles
per dog
GBP
Singles
per dog
7 or 8 stages
(8 or 9 nights)
Group of 1, 2 or 3
Please ask us
Options
Baggage transfer
To all stops
GBP 60 per bag
Baggage transfer
Direct
GBP 30 per bag

Where we stay
This holiday stays in a mix of pleasant guesthouses, hotels, bed & breakfasts or inns along the route. We place most value on a friendly welcome, comfortable standards and a good location within the village or town. We book ensuite accommodation where possible.

At the Kingshouse, our classic option stays a short way off the route at the Clachaig Inn in Glencoe as opposed to a night at the Kingshouse Hotel. We think this is a better option for a number of reasons: the famous walkers' bar at the Clachaig Inn is fantastic with its open fire and its whisky; plus you travel down Glencoe in your taxi with outstanding views not seen from the West Highland Way. We will book (and pay for) a taxi to pick you up from the Kingshouse Hotel at the end of your stage to take you to your accommodation in Glencoe. The following morning, the taxi would take you back at the Kingshouse for you to continue your hike. If you'd perfer to stay at the Kingshouse Hotel, please let us know and we can advise.

Comfy
For a touch of luxury whilst you trek, our ‘Comfy’ option upgrades your accommodation on a few nights. We book a lovely 4* hotel in Glasgow as opposed to our option in Milngavie, and at Drymen you'd stay in the hotel rather than our B&B. We'd also swap your acocmmodation in Tyndrum for a hotel just off-route in Crianlarich and we'd book (and pay for) a taxi to and from Tyndrum for you. At Kingshouse, we'd book for you to stay at walking the west highland way in 4 days Kingshouse Hotel rather than off-route at Glencoe. We would also upgrade your accommodation in Fort William. If opting for a schedule which includes Bridge of Orchy/Inveroran (typically our 8-stage trip) then we book the Bridge of Orchy Hotel instead of the more basic hotel at Inveroran.

As standard on our Comfy trips, we book for you to stay at Rowardennan Hotel which is on the route. If you'd prefer something a little comfier, we can book for you to stay at Balmaha instead. You'd walk to Rowardennan as normal and then take a taxi back to Balmaha (payable locally) for the night.

Hutty
We don't have any ready-made 'Hutty' options for our West Highland Way. However, it may be possible on some nights to opt to stay in more basic accommodation or hostels. Please ask us for details if you are interested in a more basic option.

Single Supplement
The single supplement covers the difference in cost between a single room and sharing a double/twin room.

Bring your dog
In common with most of our UK trips, we're delighted that you can walk with your dog! Our dog friendly itinerary allows your dog to stay with you in your room each night and walk alongside you each day. We ask for an extra cost of GBP 10 per dog per night. Please just let us know when you book if you'd like to bring a dog.

Views down Glencoe
Our approach to the West Highland Way
We follow the official West Highland Way route from Milngavie to Fort William. You'll set off from a small town at the Northern edge of Glasgow, passing through rolling terrain on the way to Loch Lomond. You'll then climb Conic Hill and descend into Balmaha on the shore. On the next stage you follow the loch for a long stretch, later walking inland to Crianlarich. Once you reach Strath Fillan at Tyndrum, you'll notice that the Highlands really start to show themselves. Trek to Bridge of Orchy and beyond as it crosses the edge of wild Rannoch Moor. Our favourite stage is walking to Kingshouse and over the Devil's Staircase to Kinlochleven. This part reveals some of the best views of the route, as you look out onto a still-distant Ben Nevis over the Mamores. For the final stage, you'll ascend a high valley and drop down through trees to Glen Nevis and Fort William.



The Terrain
The walking is excellent underfoot. Enjoy the mix of old military tracks over the Highland moors, solid narrow paths in forests, and lochside trails. A few short sections are rockier and walking the west highland way in 4 days, most noticeably between Inversnaid and Inverarnan, on the banks of Loch Lomond. The route does not climb any mountains apart from (optionally) Conic Hill at m; instead it meanders amongst the feet of the higher hills (3,ft and over) known as the Scottish Munros. The sharpest and highest climb of the West Highland Way comes on the crossing of the pass between Glencoe and Kinlochleven towards the end of the trip, but there is no great difficulty.

Is it for me?
The West Highland Way is a long-distance trail, suited to most walkers. Being just 20 minutes away from Glasgow the start point is easily accessible to all. The route eases you in gently, as you leave the lowlands behind to enter the wild Highlands.

The route is well marked and maintained throughout. For the first half of the trip, until Tyndrum, the route never strays too far from the road. After Tyndrum the route becomes a little wilder, and over Rannoch Moor the route can feel quite remote. The landscape should be treated as wild terrain in which you will need to be self-reliant. We strongly recommended that you know how to navigate with a map and compass.

Difficulty
The West Highland Way is a great introduction for walkers new to long distance trails. It’s not technically difficult and, taking the standard stopping points, none of the days are exceptionally long. The going is generally flat, especially when compared to Alpine walking, with only a couple of sections which reach over m.

We describe alternatives to vary the level of the walk a little. Some of the hardest sections along Loch Lomond between Rowardennen to Inversnaid can be avoided by an alternative high path. Or for walkers up for a challenge, the West Highland Way lends itself to further exploration of the Highlands and the Munros. (Please ask us to book you extra nights to climb Ben Lomond or Ben Nevis). While your routecards make up the walking for the trip, you are of course free to walk wherever you choose, taking side trips or going by a different route of your own choice. Please note that if you follow your own route you will have left the holiday for the duration.

West Highland Way Walking Guide- for more background

The making of our West Highland Way- our story
Arrive by train or plane into the city of Glasgow


Your holiday starts in Milngavie, a suburb of Glasgow, and ends in the Highland town of Fort William. The most convenient airport to reach the WHW is Glasgow Airport with several transfer options available by bus or train. The train from Fort William back to Glasgow offers fantastic views and for many is a highlight of the week. You'll also find that trains link with London if you are heading down South. Alternatively, you can also reach Milngavie from Edinburgh by a direct train, and it is easy to travel from Fort William to Inverness at the end of your trip. That would make a cross-Highlands route of great contrasts, covering the area of the Great Glen Way.

Travel to and from the trip is not included in the holiday price. We take care to give the most useful notes possible about all the travel options. We supply these both on booking and in your info pack, and we offer personalised tips at any point. The aim is that our trekkers arrange their travel by the simplest and most scenic means as suits their plan.
  • Bespoke accommodation and Itinerary - tailored to your preferences
  • Breakfast every morning
  • Detailed Routecards WHW of the Exploratory system, printed on waterproof paper
  • The 2 UK topographical maps needed
  • Expert advice and local information
  • A comprehensive Season Update following our pre-season recce
  • Full support during your trip from the Alpine Exploratory team (8am until 8pm in the UK)
  • Travel to and from your trip
  • Local transport during the trip unless specified
  • Travel insurance
  • Lunches, snacks, drinks and evening meals
  • Baggage transfer (available as an extra)

Baggage transfer

Our baggage option on the West Highland Way takes your bag to each night's accommodation. Each morning simply leave your bag with your host or at reception and it will arrive at your next accommodation. If your first night is in Glasgow instead of Milngavie (an option, or if due to availability) then we give you details about handing your bag to our baggage partners by 9am at Milngavie station; this requires an early train. Alternatively we offer a direct baggage transfer from Milngavie to Fort William for GBP 30 per bag, for those continuing into the Highlands.

Feel free to ask us any questions you have about any aspects of your planning and preparations! Lucy, Steph, Hannah W, Hannah G, or Nicky will reply with expert advice. We spend a lot of time walking our routes and more broadly exploring ski and hiking trails around the world so do feel free to ask anything at all.

If you prefer, please feel welcome to email or call us. Thanks!

Contact Alpine Exploratory
Email [email protected]
Phone +44 (0)
Our times 9am to 5pm UK time
Monday to Friday
Australia 02
Canada
New Zealand 04
USA

Open to the world
Since Alpine Exploratory started in we have loved getting to know our clients from around the world. Along with the UK, our best-represented countries are the US, Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Please use our national-rate numbers for a cheaper call to contact our office in Edinburgh.

The Alpine Exploratory Team

Keep up with us on Facebook, Instagram, and our Blog for photos and updates from our own travels and clients' trips.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

My trip to the West Highland Way was different than any other trip I have been on before. The varying terrain types made it truly unique. We passed through lowland moors, dense woodlands, and high mountainous regions. All these terrain types are perfect for an adventurer’s holiday. The first few days of walking brought us through the Glasgow suburbs via riverside walks and by following the path of the Blane Valley Railway.

Arrival in Milngavie

We arrived in Milgavie by train from Glasgow. Milngavie is located in the valley of the River Allander and marks the beginning of the West Highland Way. The Milngavie Precint is where we spent most of our time on the first day. Right in the town centre, it houses a variety of shops and restaurants that we hopped around. We spent our night resting up for the next few days of walking.

The Start of the Walk of West Highland Way

Our first day of walking, we planned to complete 19 kilometres. The walk began in Milngavie at a spot marked with an obelisk. From there, we followed the Allander Water River, with Mugdock Park at our right. The easiest part of the walk was that the only high grounds of the day were Dumgoyach and Dumgoyne. The first day of walking wrapped up in Drymen, where we had a pint, ate a warm meal, and put our feet up.

From Drymen, we were set to carry on 23 km along the West Highland Way. This route took us up to the top of Conic Hill. This hill offers breath-taking views of Loch Lomond and its islands. The descent brings us to Balmaha, where we had lunch and rested up for the rest of the days walk. The continuation of the day brought us towards Rowardennan, where our accommodation was waiting for us for the night.

Halfway There

Our fourth day of our trip, and third day of walking, was a beautiful day. We began in Rowardennan. The walk offered views of Ben Lomond, a distinctive mountain. The grand mountain is situated on the eastern shore of Loch Lomond, which we had views of during the walk as well. The path walking the west highland way in 4 days more rustic than days prior, but is generally a flat walk. At the halfway mark we walking the west highland way in 4 days and had lunch and a breather before continuing on to our destination, Invernan. Invernan is well-known as the home to the Drover’s Inn, which dates back to It claims to be one of the most haunted pubs in Scotland. Of course, we had to venture over there and check it out. It was definitely well-worth the visit.

Loch Lomond

We were sad to say goodbye to Inverarnan, but excited to carryon to see the rest of the beautiful countryside. We continued on to less rustic, better-preserved roads, compared to that of yesterdays. This made the walk exponentially easier. We were accompanied by excellent views of the mountains with sections of forests, farmland, and riverside paths.

As we approached Tyndrum, we noticed plaques lining the road signaling the historic impacts of the lead mining industry in the local area. This was a great way to keep our interest in the homestretch of the 19km walk. We arrived in Tyndrum and settled into our accommodation before heading out to explore more.

Shorter Distances of the West Highland Way

Day six was set to be an easier day as we were only planned to walk 14 km. This part of the route provided us with some beautiful views of the River Orchy and the Bridge of Orchy Railway station. After we reached these, the trail became a little more difficult to travel as we had to ascend feet but, of course, the views at the top made the rougher part of the walk worth it. The views at the top were beautiful views of Loch Tulla. We continued on our way to end our days walk in Inveroran.

From Inveroran we continued on, set to walk km. We started at Victoria Bridge. This walk was beautiful as we walked along the edge of the forest along with through open spaces. We continued on through one of Britain’s largest moors: Rannoch moor. The mid-point of this part of the walk is Ba Bridge. Not much further along, we stopped and had a picnic-style lunch around some cottages. We went on until our final destination for the night, Kings House.

From King’s House, we were to walk 14 km to reach our destination, this is not long, but there are some difficult aspects to this part of the route. About km in from our hike, we reached the Devil’s Staircase. This is the sharpest climb we experienced throughout the entire walk. It is very attainable as long as you pace yourself and are conscious of your breathing. Once we made our way to where we were staying for the night, Kinlochleven, we were ready for a drink. We settled into our accommodation and scurried out to a local pub and ordered a pint and some food- the perfect ending to a semi-difficult walk.

Concluding the Walking Holiday

Our final day of walking was a bit longer, a little over 24 km. The day began with some climbing, but the path didn’t stay too difficult for too long. The views along the path were incredible but the most stunning landscapes were around the time we reached Lairigmore. The last few kilometres took us through forestry plantations. The path was a bit rough at this point again. After, we found Dun Deardail which is a unique Iron Age Fort. We walked along until reaching Fort William, where we spent the night and concluded our walking tour.

Continuing On

Fort William is the second largest settlement in the Highlands of Scotland, so there is plenty to do. It is a major tourist centre, so we decided to continue on our holiday here at the completion of our walking holiday. From here you can embark on day trips to Loch Ness, or if you are a Harry Potter fan as I am, you can take the famous train seen in the films. The Jacobite Steam Train was a highlight for me as not only did I get to feel as though I was on my way to Hogwarts, but I also was able to see the amazing panoramic views and iconic sites from the films.

The nearest airports to Fort William are Glasgow, Inverness, and Edinburgh, so depending on where your next destination is, there are a few options for you to depart from.

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Originally published on 2nd November

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Источник: mynewextsetup.us

4 to 10 nights

44 to 96 mls (km)

West Scotland

Moderate to Hard

Mar to Oct

£

Dramatic Scenery on Scotland’s Flagship Walking Trail

  • Through remote woodland and farmland between the Kilpatrick Hills
  • Across the beautiful shores of Loch Lomond – Scotland’s largest loch
  • Walk through Trossachs National Park and visit the Rob Roy's Cave
  • Past the dramatic 30ft high Waterfalls of Falloch
  • Through beautiful glens and villages such as Tyndrum, Glencoe, Glen Dochart, Glen Nevis and Strath Fillan
  • Lairig Mor’s ‘great pass' - through the central Cairngorms
  • Scale the summit of ‘Devil’s Staircase’
Loch Lomand from Conic hill

Hiking The West Highland Way

Old cattle droving and 18C military ‘roads’ that once linked the highlands to the lowlands are the make up of a route that can prove challenging in places but also one of the most rewarding in Europe.

An advantage that comes with being Scotland's most popular long-distance trail is that the route is well waymarked. Beginning at the town of Milngavie, just northward of Glasgow, you then trace an outline along the shores of Loch Lomond, where you are met by the striking features of the Western Highlands. The journey ends at Fort William, but the rewards are magnificent; here, you are met with Britain's highest mountain - Ben Nevis.

Walking the West Highland Way, you'll find that many of the hotels along this route originated from old droving inns and have been in operation for centuries. These places have an old and curious lineage, and references to these longstanding lodgings have cropped up in the travel anecdotes of many famous writers including Wordsworth and Dr. Johnson.

Walking holiday map of the the West Highland Way

Path Walkthrough

Setting out from Milngavie, walking The West Highland Way begins life as a pleasant pastoral route through the lowland's county lanes. Once you get to Conic Hill the scenery begins to evolve, and scaling the hill you're greeted with your first sight of Loch Lomond on the descent.

From here the trail becomes more rugged and demanding as you walk lochside into Rowardennan and Crianlarich. From then on, its distinctive highland scenery - glens with striking mountain views.

There are strenuous sections out of Glencoe and on to Rannoch moor before arriving at Kinlochleven. Descending through Nevis forest, Ben Nevis comes into view where the trail ends at Fort William.

"I began walking the West Highland Way regularly in the late s, only it wasn’t the West Highland Way then; it was my route from home to school, 5 miles each way, there and back. Little could I imagine the WHW would be today one of the most walking the west highland way in 4 days walking trails in Europe."

Angus Cunningham, founder of Celtic Trails

Our West Highland Way Itineraries

  • Tyndrum to Fort William

    Distance: 44 miles (km)

    WHW5

    4 Nights, 3 Days

    from £ pp

    WHW5 ~ Tyndrum to Fort William ~ 4 / 3 classic
    DayLocationDistance
    Day 1:Arrive Tyndrum
    Day 2:Tyndrum to Inveroran9 miles/km
    Day 3:Inveroran to Kinlochleven19 miles/km
    Day 4:Kinlochleven to Fort William16 miles/24km
    Day 5:Depart Fort William


    or ask us a question

    What's Included:
    Prices

    Itinerary price: £per person, based on two people sharing.

    Solo walkers supplement: £50 per person per night.

    Single occupancy within group: £50 per person per night, for groups of 2 or more people.

    Extras

    Rest days/additional nights: Prices from £58 per person per night. Recommended location for a rest day is Fort William, ideally located to climb Ben Nevis.

    Upgrade options: Speak to our team to discuss upgrade options for this itinerary.

    Walk Pack postage: Europe - £10 supplement, Rest of World - £20 supplement, (UK is included in price).

    Extra Walk Packs: can be requested, please see here for full details and supplements.

    Bank Holidays and short notice bookings may incur extra charges.

    <~ Go back to all itineraries

    WHW4

    5 Nights, 4 Days

    from £ pp

    WHW4 ~ Tyndrum to Fort William ~ 5 / 4 classic
    DayLocationDistance
    Day 1:Arrive Tyndrum
    Day 2:Tyndrum to Inveroran9 miles/km
    Day 3:Inveroran to Kingshouse10 miles/16km
    Day 4:Kingshouse to Kinlochleven9 miles/km
    Day 5:Kinlochleven to Fort William16 miles/24km
    Day 6:Depart Fort William


    or ask us a question

    What's Included:
    Prices

    Itinerary price: £per person, based on two people sharing.

    Solo walkers supplement: £50 per person per night.

    Single occupancy within group: £40 per person per night, for groups of 2 or more people.

    Extras

    Rest days/additional nights: Prices from £58 per person per night. Recommended location for a rest day is Fort William, ideally located to climb Ben Nevis.

    Upgrade options: Speak to our team to discuss upgrade options for this itinerary.

    Walk Pack postage: Europe - £10 supplement, Rest of World - £20 supplement, (UK is included in price).

    Extra Walk Packs: can be requested, please see here for full details and supplements.

    Bank Holidays and short notice bookings may incur extra charges.

    <~ Go back to all itineraries

    Please book early to secure availability.  Please be aware that West Highland Way accommodation gets booked up very early in the season, particularity for Spring start dates.  Please book early to avoid disappointment.

  • Milngavie to Fort William

    Distance: 96 miles (km)

    WHW1

    8 Nights, 7 Days

    from £ pp

    WHW1 ~ Milngavie to Fort William ~ 8 / 7 classic
    DayLocationDistance
    Day 1:Arrive Milngavie
    Day 2:Milngavie to Drymen12 miles/19km
    Day 3:Drymen to Rowardennan14 miles/km
    Day 4:Rowardennan to Inverarnan14 miles/km
    Day 5:Inverarnan to Tyndrum12 miles/km
    Day 6:Tyndrum to Inveroran9 miles/km
    Day 7:Inveroran to Kinlochleven19 miles/km
    Day 8:Kinlochleven to Fort William16 miles/24km
    Day 9:Depart Fort William


    or ask us a question

    What's Included:
    Prices

    Itinerary price: £per person, based on two people sharing.

    Solo walkers supplement: £50 per person per night.

    Single occupancy within group: £50 per person per night, for groups of 2 or more people.

    Extras

    Rest days/additional nights: Prices from £58 per person per night. Recommended location for a rest day is Fort William, ideally located to climb Ben Nevis.

    Upgrade options: Speak to our team to discuss upgrade options for this itinerary.

    Walk Pack postage: Europe - £10 supplement, Rest of World - £20 supplement, (UK is included in price).

    Extra Walk Walking the west highland way in 4 days can be requested, please see here for full details and supplements.

    Bank Holidays and short notice bookings may incur extra charges.

    <~ Go back to all itineraries

    WHW2

    9 Nights, 8 Days

    from £ pp

    WHW2 ~ Milngavie to Fort William ~ 9 / 8 classic
    DayLocationDistance
    Day 1:Arrive Milngavie
    Day 2:Milngavie to Drymen12 miles/19km
    Day 3:Drymen to Rowardennan14 miles/km
    Day 4:Rowardennan to Inverarnan14 miles/km
    Day 5:Inverarnan to Tyndrum12 miles/km
    Day 6:Tyndrum to Inveroran9 miles/km
    Day 7:Inveroran to Kingshouse10 miles/16km
    Day 8:Kingshouse to Kinlochleven9 miles/km
    Day 9:Kinlochleven to Fort William16 miles/24km
    Day Depart Fort William


    or ask us a question

    What's Included:
    Prices

    Itinerary price: £per person, based on two people sharing.

    Solo walkers supplement: £50 per person per night.

    Single occupancy within group: £50 per person per night, for groups of 2 or more people.

    Extras

    Rest days/additional nights: Prices from £58 per person per night. Recommended location for a rest day is Fort William, ideally located to climb Ben Nevis.

    Upgrade options: Speak to our team to discuss upgrade options for this itinerary.

    Walk Pack postage: Europe - £10 supplement, Rest of World - £20 supplement, (UK is included in price).

    Extra Walk Packs: can be requested, please see here for full details and supplements.

    Bank Holidays and short notice bookings may incur extra charges.

    <~ Go back to all itineraries

    WHW3

    10 Nights, 9 Days

    from £ pp

    WHW3 ~ Milngavie to Fort William ~ 10 / 9 classic
    DayLocationDistance
    Day 1:Arrive Milngavie
    Day 2:Milngavie to Drymen12 miles/km
    Day 3:Drymen to Balmaha7 miles/km
    Day 4:Balmaha to Rowardennan7 miles/km
    Day 5:Rowardennan to Inverarnan14 miles/km
    Day 6:Inverarnan to Tyndrum12 miles/km
    Day 7:Tyndrum to Inveroran9 miles/km
    Day 8:Inveroran to Kingshouse10 miles/16km
    Day 9:Kingshouse to Kinlochleven9 miles/km
    Day Kinlochleven to Fort William16 miles/24km
    Day Depart Fort William


    or ask us a question

    What's Included:
    Prices

    Itinerary price: £per person, based on two people sharing.

    Solo walkers supplement: £50 per person per night.

    Single occupancy within group: £40 per person per night, for groups of 2 or more people.

    Extras

    Rest days/additional nights: Prices from £58 per person per night. Recommended location for a rest day is Fort William, ideally located to climb Ben Nevis.

    Upgrade options: Speak to our team to discuss upgrade options for this itinerary.

    Walk Pack postage: Europe - £10 supplement, Rest of World - £20 supplement, (UK is included in price).

    Extra Walk Packs: can be requested, please see here for full details and supplements.

    Bank Holidays and short notice bookings may incur extra charges.

    <~ Go back to all itineraries

    Please book early to secure availability.  Please be aware that West Highland Way accommodation gets booked up very early in the season, particularity for Spring start dates.  Please book early to avoid disappointment.

    • High standard accommodation at a mixture of Guesthouses, Farmhouses, local Inns and B&Bs with en-suite or private facilities wherever possible
    • Breakfast
    • Luggage transfers (one bag per walker, max 18kg per bag)
    • Personal transfer between accommodation and path where necessary
    • Route planning
    • Walk Pack including Trail Guide, itinerary, accommodation directions, local interest leaflets and holiday plannin

    You choose which day you would like your holiday to start on. We will book your holiday in accordance with your requirements.

    Our West Highland Way holidays are available to walk March to October.

    Walking The West Highland Way in winter conditions is not advised. Late spring is a good time to walk, you should be able to avoid the crowds as well as the midges.

     

    By Rail: Railway stations are located in Milngavie and Fort William.

    Trains to Glasgow operate on a regular basis at both stations, there is also a train to Edinburgh Waverley at Milngavie - twice hourly on weekdays.

    There is also a sleeper service out of Fort William to London Euston at approximately hours each afternoon.

    mynewextsetup.us

    Public transport website

    mynewextsetup.us

    Looking for different mileages or a different number of nights? Please contact us to discuss how our itineraries can be adjusted to meet your specific needs. Call one of our helpful team on +44 (0) or e-mail us here.

    We seek out the best accommodation of its type available

    West Highland Way Client Reviews

    /5 based on 29 reviews


    Gill P - October

    Ceri, Abergavenny - September

    Anon - June

    David & Sarah Blackwood - October

    Anon. - October

    C & B Schueler - October

    Anon. - October

    Anon. - September

    A. Borovac - August

    Anon. - July

    A. Bjerge - July

    M. Smoyer - July

    W. Lefort - July

    S. Ress - July

    Anon - July

    Massey - June

    P. Massey - June

    S. Saunders - April

    Sidloski & Zaluski - September

    S.D. - June

    Mr Cross - May

    M. Lindsay - May

    Mr D Smith - April

    Heys - June

    Mrs Dunn & Mr Prentice - June

    Sears - June

    Mr & Mrs Cowan - June

    Kelly - May

    Mr & Mrs Maund - April

    Leave your own review of your West Highland Way Walking Holiday with us - add review.

    Keen to find out more?

    Our friendly, experienced team will be happy to answer all your questions and help advise you on your ideal itinerary.

    Local Points Of Interest

    Ben Nevis

    The highest mountain in the British Isles will require a separate day toBen Nevis & Highland Cattle complete, where walkers take an old pony track to the summit. It should take the average person 3½ - 4½ hours to scale the mountain, with approx.  2½ - 3½ hours on the way down.

    Although there is a distinct track, due to the altitude navigation as you reach the top can make orientation difficult. If you are planning on climbing Ben Nevis, prior planning and suitable precautions are an absolute must.

    Loch Lomond

    One of the pleasures of walking the way is the significant diversity of landscape featured, from Loch Lomond from Conic Hilltowering munros to the sprawling Loch Lomond. Its the largest body of water (by surface area) in the UK, harbouring a total of thirty small islands in its expanse, one of which, Inchconnachan, is inhabited by a colony of wallabies.

    On day three of both itineraries (Drymen to Rowardennan), you'll find far reaching views over the Loch from Conic Hill.

    Booking Request - West Highland Way
    What Happens Next?

    We will check your details and come back to you within two working days with a personalised estimate based on your requirements. We will then formally request a deposit of £ per person (£ per person for a single centre break) and book all your arrangements - find out about our full booking process here.

    Please note this does not constitute a booking confirmation, we kindly ask you to refrain from booking any travel until we have confirmed all your arrangements.

    Still Have Questions?

    If you are still unsure on any of your requirements, please do enquire with us first and one of our friendly team will be happy to help you with any queries you have.

    Enquire About West Highland Way

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    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    The West Highland Way

    The West Highland Way (WHW) is a very popular walking route in Scotland. At over km in length, and with moderate elevations, it crosses the most western (as its name suggests) and the most southern (dare we say) regions of the Highlands.

    A superb hike, marked by the diversity of landscapes, the omnipresence of water (lochs, rivers, streams, waterfalls and the rain), and the wild beauty of the landscape. Last but not least, you are likely to make a few friends along the way!

    Technical sheet

    No.

    A East Dunbartonshire walk posted on 20/08/19 by Netra. Update : 15/01/20

    Author's timeAuthor's time : 7 days
    DistanceDistance : km
    Vertical gainVertical gain : m
    Vertical dropVertical drop : m
    Highest pointHighest point : m
    Lowest pointLowest point : 5m
    DifficultDifficulty : Difficult
    Back to starting pointBack to starting point : No
    WalkingWalking
    LocationLocation : East Dunbartonshire
    Starting pointStarting point : N ° / W °
    ArrivalArrival : N ° / W °

    Step by step walk

    This walk needs several days, please find the details below.

    Milngavie to Drymen

    Milngavie to Drymen

    The first stage of the WHW which presents no other difficulty than its distance takes us through the Scottish countryside and a taste of the first hills of the Highlands.

    From Drymen to Rowardenann

    From Drymen to Rowardenann

    This second stage of the WHW is superb! It consists of three distinct parts. First of all, we cross a pretty forested area. Then, after a pleasant crossing of meadows, we climb Conic Hill, from where the panorama over the Highlands and Loch Lomond is very extensive. After a steep descent to the port of Balmaha, you alternate between the lakeside passages and climbs and descents in the forest.

    From Rowardennan to Inverarnan

    From Rowardennan to Inverarnan

    The third stage of the WHW consists of going up Loch Lomond. We start by climbing steadily in a very beautiful forest, for superb views of the lake, while crossing waterfalls that descend from Ben Lomond. Once back at the edge of the lake, follow the shore for a long time, more or less closely, on paths that lead you on a rollercoaster ride winding between the rocks. A brief ascent between beautiful landscapes and a descent to Inverarnan rounding off this long stage.

    From Inverarnan to Bridge of Orchy

    From Inverarnan to Bridge of Orchy

    The fourth stage of the WHW takes us first up the Falloch river, then across a beautiful forested area and finally sneaks around the foot of high hills. There is much talk of bridges in this stage, two of them having been damaged during a recent flood, which leads to a detour and a ford that is refreshing.

    This very long stage can be shortened by taking public transport for the last section, from Tyndrum to Bridge of Orchy.

    Bridge of Orchy to Kingshouse Hotel

    Bridge of Orchy to Kingshouse Hotel

    This fifth stage of the WHW brings us to yet more superb landscapes! The ascent of the small hill of Màm Carraigh offers a very beautiful point of view on Loch Tulla. Then, for about ten kilometres, we follow a very comfortable old military road and we climb gently and very regularly towards a pass in the middle of the moor. Ahead during the descent you will see the classic pyramid silhouette of the Buachaille summit.

    From Kingshouse Hotel to Kinlochleven

    From Kingshouse Hotel to Kinlochleven

    The sixth stage of the WHW takes us through the highest point of the entire hike, an unnamed pass at an altitude of m. After a pleasant walk at the foot of Beinn a’ Chrùlaiste, you reach the pass by climbing the Devil's Staircase, an easier climb than the name of this path suggests. We then descend on good paths or wide tracks on the former small industrial town of Kinochleven.

    From Kinlochleven to Fort William

    From Kinlochleven to Fort William

    The seventh and last stage of the WHW makes us evolve in a beautiful setting, at the foot of the Mamore hills. We then cross lightly wooded areas, from which we benefit from a prominent view of Ben Nevis, the highest point in Great Britain. Arrival in the city of Fort William marks the end of this long hike.

    Useful Information

    Equipment:
    Bring the usual equipment for long-distance hikes, while taking care not to overload your backpack. Items which to me seem essential for the WHW:
    - Waterproof hiking shoes.
    Rain protection: rain cape, backpack protection, etc.
    - Clothing to protect against the cold and/or wind.
    - Midge repellent, can be bought locally.
    - An electrical outlet adapter for the United Kingdom (in particular to be able to recharge your phone battery).
    NB There are companies on site that organise luggage transportation from point to point, which allows you to hike with a small bag during the day and keep the rest dry.

    Signage:
    - The route is very well marked on site, mainly at major intersections and changes of direction, by three walking the west highland way in 4 days means: sign posts with thistle flower; posts with a yellow arrow for changes of direction; signposts.
    - Having the route instructions on your phone via the Visorando application is an undeniable plus. Remember to save the basemaps (OSM Hiking) of all stages before departure. This will allow you to precisely follow progress on a map regardless of the quality of your network connection and even in the absence of a network.
    - Physical maps on a British map background (pdf file of each stage) are a back-up.
    - A compass does not weigh very much and can very useful.

    Water:
    It is best to fill your water containers from the tap at your accommodation. There are no real water refilling points along the way. Admittedly, there are countless streams and torrents on the course but the potability of this water is not guaranteed (bring water purification tablets if you plan to use these).
    In some places, especially along the first two stages, locals will provide bottles of water or other drinks at the side of the route which should be paid for by putting the amount indicated in an Honesty Box (the system is based on trust).

    Supplies:
    Details of opportunities to resupply are mentioned in the sheets for each stage.
    - Shops: Glasgow; Milngavie; Drymen; Inverarnan (sundry supplies); Tyndrum; Kinlochleven; Fort William.
    - Cash machines: Glasgow; Milngavie; Kinlochleven; Fort William.
    - Some hotels offer packed lunches to order the day before for the next day’s trek.

    Accommodation:
    Hotel type accommodation (with bar-restaurant) or Bed and Breakfast are recommended, being more or less numerous depending on the stage. These suggestions do not claim to be exhaustive: for more addresses, use your preferred search engine. Remember to book well in advance.

    Camping:
    Many hikers follow the WHW while camping (bring a really waterproof tent). On the route, the camping is highly regulated, with official campsites, places where camping is allowed (for example near a hotel) and several sites where it is strictly prohibited. Inquire beforehand and respect the indications found on site. And remember to take your refuse with you to the next village.

    Recommendations:
    - The WHW crosses sensitive areas, nature reserves and national parks. Do not leave any refuse on site! Take everything with you to the next village.
    - The moors and pastures of the highlands are grazed by (Scottish Blackface) sheep and, to a lesser extent, (Highland Cattle and Aberdeen Angus breeds) of cattle. The route therefore crosses many fields and hikers must open and close countless barriers: these are generally equipped with an automatic closing system, but it is considered responsible to check it has closed properly after passing through.

    Breakdown of stages:

    7-day trek - This is what is offered here and represents an average of 22km and m of elevation gain per day. As this is already a long daily distance, and a non-negligible elevation, that the whole route is classified as Difficult, even though the course itself does not involve any technical difficulty.
    NB The longest stage (km), from Inverarnan to Bridge of Orchy, can be reduced to 20km if you complete your last section by public transport. See the indications in the "Practical information" section of the corresponding hiking guide.

    The 8-day trek - represents an average of km and m of elevation gain per day. Depending on the accommodation available, the route can be broken down as follows: Milngavie - Drymen - Rowardennan - Inverarnan - Tyndrum - Inveroran - Kingshouse Hotel - Kinlochleven - Fort William.

    6-day trek (an average of 26km and m of elevation gain per day) or a 5-day trek (average of 31km and m of elevation gain per day) - Requires excellent physical condition and proven endurance.

    In any event, plan a route in line with your own capabilities.

    Useful links:
    - Official site of West Highland Way.
    - Trains: ScotRail website ScotRail.
    - Bus: Citylink website Citylink.

    '’Hiked by the author in August ''

    Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

    During the walk or to do/see around

    The whole route goes through superb landscapes: hills, tall landscapes, lakesides, rivers and waterfalls, moors and meadows, etc. Wilderness lovers will be delighted!

    For more details, see the different stages of the hike.

    The GPS track and description are the property of the author.

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    10 beginner tips for walking the West Highland Way

    A friend, Hilary, recently walked the West Highland Way with her year-old daughter Holly. The mile walking trail is the most popular walking route in Scotland and some 50, people from across the world set out to complete the trail from Milngavie, near Glasgow, to Fort William, in the Scottish Highlands every year. (The West Highland Way can also be walked in the opposite direction, from north to south.)

    Hilary has written her top tips for walking the West Highland Way from a novice’s point of view. She has kindly allowed me to publish these for the benefit for others who hope to complete this famous Scottish walking trail. It is possible to do the West Highland Way as a guided tour as well.

    obselisk at Start of the West Highland Way in Milngavie.

    Hilary and her daughter Holly at the start of the West Highland Way in Milngavie.

    Top tips for walking the West Highland Way (from an amateur)

    1 Plan your journey well in advance

    There is a West Highland Way website, which is a tremendous source of information. It breaks down the route into different sections depending on how long you want to take to walk it.

    When my husband and son, Paul and Jamie, did it two years ago they did it in six days, which was a bit tough so we decided to do it in seven days.

    The website then lets you decide how to split your journey, which then lets you see where you need to book your accommodation. It also gives you information about all aspects of your journey from what to take, to where to stay.

    Editor’s note: Also see Walk Highlands.

    in drymen on the West Highland Way

    A late finish for Hilary and Holly on the West Highland Way.

    2 Think about your budget

    It’s not that cheap to do the West Highland Way. Even if you camp along the way (although see point four) there is still a lot of equipment to buy. You also need to have accommodation for every night en route, so the longer you take, the more it will cost you.

    There are lots of options for where to stay, from tents, to hikers’ huts, to B&Bs, to youth hostels, to hotels. We did a mixture of all of these.

    Our favourite was our first night in a B&B in Drymen (we felt we could have come home that night but wanted to properly embrace the “journey”). Jane at the Shandon Farmhouse B&B looked after us extremely well and it was our most comfortable night.

    The hikers’ huts on the West Highland Way are warm and much better than camping, but the two we stayed in straddled our longest day and we could really have done with a proper bed on those nights (and en suite toilet!) and you need to bring your own sleeping bags and pillows, which considerably increase your luggage requirements. But they keep your overall costs down.

    It’s definitely worth having some of your nicer accommodation towards the end of the walk because by then everything is sore and having a bath and a close toilet are especially welcome then.

    More superb views on the West Highland Way.

    More superb views on the West Highland Way.

    3 Book your WHW accommodation ahead

    You need to do this early, especially if you are planning to do a walk of the West Highland Way at a busy time, including spring, summer and autumn. In some places, there are lots of options, but depending on your route, other points walking the west highland way in 4 days limited places to stay and you will be a bit stuffed if the only accommodation is full.

    For example, Rowardennan, a common end to day two on the WHW is pretty much in the middle of nowhere. There is a pricey hotel and a youth hostel. We stayed in the youth hostel, which was great and has a very picturesque setting, and we had dinner, cooked breakfast and a packed lunch there, too. Holly and I had our own room but these can book out so it’s worth getting everything booked up well in advance.

    Hobbit Huts at Glencoe on the West Highland Way.

    Hobbit Huts at Glencoe on the West Highland Way.

    4 Don’t camp (IMO)!

    Obviously, you can camp if you want but whatever time of year you choose to do this, remember it’s the west of Scotland and likely to pour with rain at least some of the time. You will have no opportunity to dry things if you camp.

    You will just have really long days of walking, carrying very heavy rucksacks, and then have to pitch a tent on water-logged ground before freezing overnight, and then pack all your wet stuff up again in the morning to set off and do it all again the next day.

    Every time we saw anyone camping on the West Highland Way, we thanked our lucky stars it wasn’t us.

    Editor’s note: Camping is a cheaper option, especially in Scotland where the Scottish Outdoor Access Code allows for wild camping. It’s important to note the Camping Management Byelaws in Loch Lomond & the Trossachs National Park between March and September, because the West Highland Way goes through the national park. You can book to camp in the zones (cheap) or walk at least metres away from the trail to wild camp.

    Carry less by booking luggage transportation on the West Highland Way.

    5 Book your baggage to be carried for you

    We tried to be sparing with what we took but still had tons of luggage for completing the West Highland Way. And we used all of it. There is no way we could have carried it on our backs every day.

    There is a whole host of companies that will take your bags from accommodation to accommodation on the West Highland Way for you for around £35 to £45 per bag.

    But beware if you are thinking of doing this in the October school holiday week because quite a few of the companies stop at the start of October. We eventually found (thanks to marvellous Jane at the Shandon Farmhouse B&B) Go Haggis who keep going a bit longer than most of the others, but after October you’d be hard pushed finding anyone to do this for you.

    A good quality waterproof jacket is one of the musts while walking the WHW.

    A good quality waterproof jacket is one of the musts while walking the WHW.

    6 Bring the right gear

    This is really important for West Highland Way walkers. I’ll break it into sections.

    Clothing: It is worth investing in a few good items of clothing for this. Whatever you wear, your feet will get sore, but it will be much worse if you wear the wrong footwear.

    Much of the terrain is rough, stony ground and almost all of it (for us anyway) was water-logged. Get a good pair of boots and lots of pairs of socks. We had to re-use socks a number of times over but at least we managed to dry them overnight.

    I would suggest proper waterproof trousers and gaiters (if you get soaked first thing in the morning you can stay freezing all day) and a properly waterproof coat (ideally a thin shell that you can wear on top of lots of layers as you can end up hot while walking, and wet, and it’s easier to take off underneath layers and keep the outside waterproof one on to stay dry).

    Food: Stock up on portable, non-perishable snacks before you leave. There is little opportunity to buy these en route, and even if you can, you won’t be inclined to take long (or short) detours to shops after walking for miles during the day.

    I advise lots of chocolate/nuts/energy bars/whatever you fancy to last you the week. Also, before you leave, go through your itinerary and make sure you know where each meal is coming from.

    If you’re staying in a hikers’ hut, is there somewhere you can have breakfast and what are you doing for a packed lunch?

    Most of the sections of walking the west highland way in 4 days don’t have somewhere you can buy food en route so you will need crescom bank routing number north carolina have a packed lunch with you as you leave each morning. Most of the places on the way will provide you with packed lunches if you ask, but it’s worth checking in advance.

    General equipment: You’ll need a wee rucksack each for during the day on the West Highland Way to carry food, extra clothing layers, painkillers, water etc. We bought rain covers for our rucksacks, which came in very handy as we got absolutely soaked on a few of the days and everything inside our rucksacks would have been wet without these. (Editor’s notes: Dry bags inside the rucksack work well, too.)

    Think about the collapsible walking poles. We didn’t have these but for a few of the days we used large sticks, which helped a lot with support. But they did get a wee bit cumbersome at times and it would be useful to be able to fold them up and carry when not required.

    Take as many Compeed blister plasters as you can buy. These are actually magic. And they stay on even if your feet spend the day soaking wet submerged in puddles. Stick them anywhere that feels like it’s remotely rubbing and hopefully you’ll see off many blisters before they come.

    And, finally, take plenty painkillers. You will need them.

    Hilary and Holly enjoyed their mum and daughter walk on the West Highland Way.

    Hilary and Holly enjoyed their mum and daughter walk on the West Highland Way.

    7 Bring the right company

    You are going to spend a lot of time with whoever you choose to do the West Highland Way with. We had a wonderful time but it was tough going. Everyone on the West Highland Way walk needs to be completely invested in getting to the end. I cannot imagine having to cajole a reluctant traveller for the whole journey.

    8 Track your progress

    I took my Garmin watch with me, which I usually use for triathlons/training. But it has a “hike” setting on it, which meant we could see how far we had travelled on the West Highland Way and how quickly we were going each day.

    This was actually really useful to give us an idea of how long we had to go.

    I also downloaded an app (Trekright: West Highland Way) which was really useful as it plotted us directly on the West Highland Way map using GPS so we could see where we were in relation to the route of the day.

    The West Highland Way is well signposted, but every so often you come to an intersection and it’s not entirely clear which way to go and it was a really helpful tool for making sure we were on the right track. It was also the thing that stopped us going too many miles off track on day two when we went in the wrong direction.

    (Editor’s notes:Viewranger is also an excellent app for your smartphone.)

    A welcome stop on the West Highland Way at Tyndrum.

    9 Take lots of photos

    The scenery on the West Highland Way is truly spectacular. Photos don’t really do it justice, and you need to appreciate it as you go along (see point 10!) but there were times when we were tired/sore/wet/grumpy and couldn’t be bothered stopping for a minute to take a picture but I made myself stop.

    Not only did it make us appreciate the view at the time, but we’ll have a lovely chronicle of our journey in years to come.

    Hilary and Holly make it to the end of the West Highland Way at Fort William.

    Hilary and Holly make it to the end of the West Highland Way at Fort William.

    10 Just do it!

    If you are tempted to walk the West Highland Way, or thinking about it, then just do it. I’ll never forget this week I’ve had with Holly and Walking the west highland way in 4 days hope she won’t either.

    The further we got into the countryside, the further our stresses and strains of every day life drifted. I will always treasure the quality time we had together over the week, but also the challenges, laughs and views we shared, as well as the people we met on the way. I cannot recommend the West Highland Way strongly enough.

    Please do send me any tips you have for walking the West Highland Way.

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    WEST HIGHLAND WAY ECONOMY PACKAGE 1 ( 4 DAYS & 4 NIGHTS )


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    If you have any queries about our packages or you would like something different then feel free to contact us through our contact section.

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    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    West Highland Way

    See all Scottish Highlands tours

    West Highland Way

    Stretching for kilometres (96 miles), starting just outside Glasgow in the town of Milngavie and concluding in Fort William, the West Highland Way route is Scotland’s darling. This long-distance route utilizes ancient roads and traverses wildly beautiful land like Rannoch Moor and Glen Coe. Passing through some of the country’s best landmarks like Ben Nevis, the West Highland Way offers its walkers a crash course of Scotland. For this reason, it’s one of the UK’s most popular treks, with a few thousand folks completing it in its entirety.

    Trekking the trail from south to north is typical practice, as the stretch from Milngavie to Inverarnan is easier and gives travellers a chance to warm up before taking on the more challenging stretch from Inverarnan to Fort William. As its many elevation changes (at one point even rising about 1, ft) don't make it a simple undertaking, it’s also usually completed in days with around hours of hiking each day. Don't let that put you off, though: the West Highland Way is easily one of Scotland’s most rewarding hikes.

    The location: 

    The West Highland Way is located in the southwestern section of the Scottish Highlands, starting just north of Glasgow in Milngavie before crossing the Highland Boundary Fault into the Highlands. The journey ends in the foothills of Ben Nevis in Fort William.

    Highest point: 

    The Devil's Staircase near Kingshouse at 1, feet ( metres)

    Duration: 

    6 nights/7 days, kilometres (96 miles) 

    Trail conditions:

    As one of Scotland’s great long-distance trails, the West Highland Way is a well-maintained, waymarked route with its share of rocky and narrow sections. However, it can disappear in the wintertime when the northern stretch is covered in snow. The most challenging part of this trail, really, is its constant ascents and descents.

    West Highland Way difficulty rating & trekking requirements

    Difficulty rating:

    Moderate. You should be in relatively good shape and able to walk for hours at a time. There is no physical preperation required for this journey, but the fitter you are, the more you'll enjoy the experience.

    Trekking requirements:

    No special trekking requirements are needed to hike the length of the West Highland Way. However, make sure you have the typical backpacking gear, like hiking poles, a reliable pair of hiking boots, hiking sandals, a head torch, a First Aid kit, and daily provisions. A 65 to litre backpack is recommended if you’re planning on sleeping under the stars.

    West Highland Way tips

    • Wild camping is legal in Scotland, and the West Highland Way f gallery by a train its share of camping spots. Some of these are permit areas so acquire a camping permit before your trip.
    • If you’re travelling from June to August, make sure to pack proper protection from midges and ticks. A midge head net, midge repellent, fine-tipped tweezers, long-sleeved shirts and long pants are your best bets to ward them off.
    • Be sure to pack a decent raincoat, especially when hiking during the rainy season.
    • Bed and breakfasts are popular in Scotland. Many offer a lunch service and are a great way to meet locals.
    • Make sure to pack plenty of snacks and drinks, as some days you might be a little ways off from civilization.
    • Start training a few months before the trip, and include some hilly terrain in your training.
    • Utilizing a baggage transfer service might be an excellent idea if you don’t want to be burdened with a heavy load during your hike.

    Seasonality and Climbing Requirements

    • How do I prepare for the Scottish Highlands?

      Though many of the Highlands’ great walks and trails are accessible for most skill levels, a strong fitness level is certainly preferable. To prepare, build up your stamina and strength by doing some practice uphill and downhill hikes before your trip, perhaps with your backpack on. Learn more.

    • When should I climb the Scottish Highlands?

      Some trails are manageable in the wintertime, some are best in the summer. Generally, the Scottish Highlands are excellent from May through August, when the days are long and warm. September might be too wet for long-distance treks, but October is drier, and stunning with fall foliage. Learn more.

    • What permits do I need?

      Though wild camping in Scotland is permissible in many unenclosed areas, there are camping bylaw-covered areas in which a permit is necessary for camping. If you plan on camping in such areas, obtain a permit for £3 per tent before your trip. Learn more.

    • Do I need a guide to climb?

      Scotland’s trails are self-guided treks, easily navigable and never too far from civilization, so a guide is not necessary. However, there are guided treks and hikes being offered by tour operators if you prefer to travel with one. Learn more.

    • How do I get to the Scottish Highlands?

      Since the Highlands' network of trails start in different places, where you fly in depends on which route you would like to take on. Travellers from NYC and Sydney have the option to fly into Glasgow, Edinburgh or Inverness, while those from London can hop on a train to those cities. Learn more.

    • What should I pack and what equipment do I need?

      There are some gear and equipment that every hiker will find necessary, and these include mountain gaiters, a raincoat, quick dry pants, water filter and trekking poles. Summers are notorious for midges so a midge head net is also important, as are tweezers for removing ticks. Learn more.

    The Scottish Highlands routes

     

    1. West Highland Way. Distance:  km, average duration:  days
    2. Great Glen Way. Distance:  km, average duration: days
    3. Southern Upland Way. Distance:  km, average duration:  days
    4. Great Trossachs Path. Distance: 48 km, average duration: days
    5. Three Lochs Way. Distance: 55 km, average duration:  days
    6. Cowal Way. Distance: 92 km, average duration:  days 
    7. The Great Glen Canoe Trail. Distance: 96 km, average duration:  days 

    Scottish Highlands tours & reviews

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    Источник: mynewextsetup.us
    walking the west highland way in 4 days

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    1. It doesn’t show on PayPal my direct dippsot or touching I don’t have my bank info on there that’s why

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