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define the word ally

The term ally means that YOU recognize the privilege that settler cultures have and take for granted. It also implies that you challenge and work towards. She said it ensures the movement is long-term and its message reaches all communities. “When it comes to allyship, people [are] more likely to. As well-intentioned as the term is, its use is now fraught, leaving many of us questioning how to show up in social justice movements. “The.
define the word ally
define the word ally

Define the word ally -

Collective defence - Article 5

The principle of collective defence is at the very heart of NATO’s founding treaty. It remains a unique and enduring principle that binds its members together, committing them to protect each other and setting a spirit of solidarity within the Alliance.

 

  • Collective defence means that an attack against one Ally is considered as an attack against all Allies.
  • The principle of collective defence is enshrined in Article 5 of the Washington Treaty.
  • NATO invoked Article 5 for the first time in its history after the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States.
  • NATO has taken collective defence measures on several occasions, for instance in response to the situation in Syria and in the wake of the Russia-Ukraine crisis.
  • NATO has standing forces on active duty that contribute to the Alliance’s collective defence efforts on a permanent basis.

 

  • A cornerstone of the Alliance

    Article 5

    In , the primary aim of the North Atlantic Treaty – NATO’s founding treaty – was to create a pact of mutual assistance to counter the risk that the Soviet Union would seek to extend its control of Eastern Europe to other parts of the continent.

    Every participating country agreed that this form of solidarity was at the heart of the Treaty, effectively making Article 5 on collective defence a key component of the Alliance.

    Article 5 provides that if a NATO Ally is the victim of an armed attack, each and every other member of the Alliance will consider this act of violence as an armed attack against all members and will take the actions it deems necessary to assist the Ally attacked.

    Article 5

    “The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all and consequently they agree that, if such an armed attack occurs, each of them, in exercise of the right of individual or collective self-defence recognized by Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, will assist the Party or Parties so attacked by taking forthwith, individually and in concert with the other Parties, such action as it deems necessary, including the use of armed force, to restore and maintain the security of the North Atlantic area.

    Any such armed attack and all measures taken as a result thereof shall immediately be reported to the Security Council. Such measures shall be terminated when the Security Council has taken the measures necessary to restore and maintain international peace and security.”

    This article is complemented by Article 6, which stipulates:

    Article 61

    “For the purpose of Article 5, an armed attack on one or more of the Parties is deemed to include an armed attack:

    • on the territory of any of the Parties in Europe or North America, on the Algerian Departments of France 2, on the territory of Turkey or on the Islands under the jurisdiction of any of the Parties in the North Atlantic area north of the Tropic of Cancer;
    • on the forces, vessels, or aircraft of any of the Parties, when in or over these territories or any other area in Europe in which occupation forces of any of the Parties were stationed on the date when the Treaty entered into force or the Mediterranean Sea or the North Atlantic area north of the Tropic of Cancer.”

    The principle of providing assistance

    With the invocation of Article 5, Allies can provide any form of assistance they deem necessary to respond to a situation. This is an individual obligation on each Ally and each Ally is responsible for determining what it deems necessary in the particular circumstances.

    This assistance is taken forward in concert with other Allies. It is not necessarily military and depends on the material resources of each country. It is therefore left to the judgment of each individual member country to determine how it will contribute. Each country will consult with the other members, bearing in mind that the ultimate aim is to “to restore and maintain the security of the North Atlantic area”.

    At the drafting of Article 5 in the late s, there was consensus on the principle of mutual assistance, but fundamental disagreement on the modalities of implementing this commitment. The European participants wanted to ensure that the United States would automatically come to their assistance should one of the signatories come under attack; the United States did not want to make such a pledge and obtained that this be reflected in the wording of Article 5.

  • Invocation of Article 5

    The 9/11 terrorist attacks

    The United States was the object of brutal terrorist attacks on 11 September The Alliance's Strategic Concept had already identified terrorism as one of the risks affecting NATO’s security. The Alliance’s response to 9/11, however, saw NATO engage actively in the fight against terrorism, launch its first operations outside the Euro-Atlantic area and begin a far-reaching transformation of its capabilities. Moreover, it led NATO to invoke Article 5 of the Washington Treaty for the very first time in its history.

    An act of solidarity

    On the evening of 12 September , less than 24 hours after the attacks,  the Allies invoked the principle of Article 5. Then NATO Secretary General Lord Robertson subsequently informed the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the Alliance's decision.

    The North Atlantic Council – NATO’s principal political decision-making body – agreed that if it determined that the attack was directed from abroad against the United States, it would be regarded as an action covered by Article 5. On 2 October, once the Council had been briefed on the results of investigations into the 9/11 attacks, it determined that they were regarded as an action covered by Article 5.

    By invoking Article 5, NATO members showed their solidarity toward the United States and condemned, in the strongest possible way, the terrorist attacks against the United States.

    Taking action

    After 9/11, there were consultations among the Allies and collective action was decided by the Council. The United States could also carry out independent actions, consistent with its rights and obligations under the United Nations Charter.

    On 4 October, once it had been determined that the attacks came from abroad, NATO agreed on a package of eight measures to support the United States. On the request of the United States, it launched its first ever anti-terror operation – Eagle Assist – from mid-October to mid-May It consisted in seven NATO AWACS radar aircraft that helped patrol the skies over the United States; in total crew members from 13 NATO countries flew over sorties. This was the first time that NATO military assets were deployed in support of an Article 5 operation.

    On 26 October, the Alliance launched its second counter-terrorism operation in response to the attacks on the United States, Active Endeavour. Elements of NATO's Standing Naval Forces were sent to patrol the Eastern Mediterranean and monitor shipping to detect and deter terrorist activity, including illegal trafficking. In March , the operation was expanded to include the entire Mediterranean.

    The eight measures to support the United States, as agreed by NATO were:

    • to enhance intelligence-sharing and cooperation, both bilaterally and in appropriate NATO bodies, relating to the threats posed by terrorism and the actions to be taken against it;
    • to provide, individually or collectively, as appropriate and according to their capabilities, assistance to Allies and other countries which are or may be subject to increased terrorist threats as a result of their support for the campaign against terrorism;
    • to take necessary measures to provide increased security for facilities of the United States and other Allies on their territory;
    • to backfill selected Allied assets in NATO’s area of responsibility that are required to directly support operations against terrorism;
    • to provide blanket overflight clearances for the United States and other Allies’ aircraft, in accordance with the necessary air traffic arrangements and national procedures, for military flights related to operations against terrorism;
    • to provide access for the United States and other Allies to ports and airfields on the territory of NATO member countries for operations against terrorism, including for refuelling, in accordance with national procedures;
    • that the Alliance is ready to deploy elements of its Standing Naval Forces to the Eastern Mediterranean in order to provide a NATO presence and demonstrate resolve;
    • that the Alliance is similarly ready to deploy elements of its NATO Airborne Early Warning Force to support operations against terrorism.
  • Enhanced collective defence measures

    On the request of Turkey, on three occasions, NATO has put collective defence measures in place: in with the deployment of Patriot missiles during the Gulf War, in with the agreement on a package of defensive measures and conduct of Operation Display Deterrence during the crisis in Iraq, and in in response to the situation in Syria with the deployment of Patriot missiles.

    Since Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea in and the rise of security challenges from the south, including brutal attacks by ISIL and other terrorist groups across several continents, NATO has implemented the biggest increase in collective defence since the Cold War. For instance, it has tripled the size of the NATO Response Force, established a 5,strong Spearhead Force and deployed multinational battlegroups in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland. NATO has also increased its presence in the southeast of the Alliance, centred on a multinational brigade in Romania. The Alliance has further stepped up air policing over the Baltic and Black Sea areas and continues to develop key military capabilities, such as Joint Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance. At the Warsaw Summit in July , Allies recognised cyber defence as a new operational domain, to enable better protection of networks, missions and operations; and at the meeting of foreign ministers in November , Allies agreed to recognise space as a new operational domain to “allow NATO planners to make requests for Allies to provide capabilities and services, such as hours of satellite communications.”

  • Standing forces

    Collective defence measures are not solely event-driven. NATO has a number of standing forces on active duty that contribute to the Alliance’s collective defence efforts on a permanent basis. These include NATO’s standing maritime forces, which are ready to act when called upon. They perform different tasks ranging from exercises to operational missions, in peacetime and in periods of crisis and conflict.

    Additionally, NATO has an integrated air defence system to protect against air attacks, which also comprises the Alliance’s ballistic missile defence system. NATO also conducts several air policing missions, which are collective peacetime missions that enable NATO to detect, track and identify all violations and infringements of its airspace and to take appropriate action. As part of such missions, Allied fighter jets patrol the airspace of Allies who do not have fighter jets of their own. They run on a 24/7 basis, days a year.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Look up a word, learn it forever.

If you have an ally, you have someone who is on your side, like a more experienced teammate who is your ally in convincing the coach to give you more playing time.

Ally comes from the Latin word alligare, meaning "to bind to," like nations who are allies in wartime — they will act together, and protect one another. You can also use ally as a verb, meaning "join forces with." For example, you might ally yourself with influential people to advance your career. As a noun, pronounce ally like this: "AL-eye." As a verb, it's "uh-LIE."

Definitions of ally

  1. noun

    an associate who provides cooperation or assistance

    &#;he's a good ally in fight&#;

    synonyms:friend
  2. verb

    become an ally or associate, as by a treaty or marriage

    &#;He allied himself with the Communists&#;

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Ally is a girl that is so incredible, a description can't be put into words. A person who is so completely selfless it's almost ridiculous. A person who is so beautiful both inside and out. A person with a heart bigger than Texas. A person who is so deep that she can make you contemplate your entire being with just one sentence. A person who has a certain enjoyment of donuts and Milkduds. A person who is extremely thoughtful and kind. A person so loyal and honest. A person you should make your girlfriendin a hurry. Ally's are not basic at all and are one in a million kind of girls. Treat them right and don't take them for granted.

OMG that girl is so beautifulwho is she?
That's Ally.

by Donuts March 29,

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A person named Ally is smart, funny, loyal, caring, and generous. She never gets mad at people and is always smiling. If you know someone named Ally you should consider making her your girlfriend because people like this only come once in a lifetime. Ally is always giving and never asking for things in return. She has beautiful long brown hair and brown eyes. She may have a pale complexion but she will get very tan in the summer. Ally is the most beautiful girl you would ever meet.

Ally is the most generous and caring person you will ever meet.

by >.< bunny June 21,

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An Ally is a girl who is unique, cute, loving and super pretty. She is usually SUPER crazy and fun to be around. She likes to make everyone happy, but secretly is very insecure about herself. Ally is single and all of the guys secretly love her, but they are afraid of rejection from her. Ally has a lot of interests and talents. Some people don't know what Ally is capable of, they think she's dumb; but Ally is very, very smart. Usually has blonde hair and blue eyes and she's very skinny. Ally is the best friend and the best girlfriend you will ever meet

Is that an Ally? I've neverseen one before! She's like the luckiest girl in the world!

by Chocolatee November 23,

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Pure and utter awesomeness. For real, this girl is indescribable, but I will do my best. She has long long long beautiful hair, which goes along with the rest of her beauty. She is kind, but be careful because she is also easily angered and not afraid to stand her ground. She has an absolutely stupendous voice, and a fashion style to match, that no matter how much anyone would like to replicate, they would be unable to pull it off. The same inability to replicate can be said for her music preferences, and her vast knowledge of Youtube stars no one cares about.(okay, a lot of people who don't have lives do, but still) She has an amazing dad and a horrendous mother, the combination of differences what I believe to be the reason she is so incredibly ally like?(that's meant to be a compliment I swear) As in: not spoiled rotten but also not all depressed and 'feel bad for me' acting. At first glance she may seem normal, but just attend one of her small but infamous parties, and the true, crazy fun Ally is revealed. She has a very particular sense in boys, which is good because only the very best truly deserve to have any sort of romantic relationship with her. She is proud of who she, and her refusal to let anything change that is com-memorable. She can be annoying, and often complains, but even though she has faults, the entirety of her makes up for it. No one could ask for a better friend, and if you meet an Ally, I suggest holding onto her with all your might!!!

Boy-Wow that girls beautiful. Who is she? Me-You can date her but only if you can stand me asking you a bazillion questions to ensure that you meet the qualifications for anyone to date someone of her stature Boy-She's definitely worth it Me-In the unlikely case that you hurt her in any unwanted way, how would you like your dead body to be disposed?
*hears an angelic voice in the distance* Person- What what IS that? Me-Sounds like Ally's a singing Person-dies from the pure angelic-ness of her voice
I went to an amazing party It was an Ally party of course(that's why it was amazing)
Friendship is chewing on a well cooked face together

by 1 of your 5 besties(guess!) March 17,

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Источник: mynewextsetup.us?term=Ally

a loyal ally definition, a loyal ally meaning

Definitions of ALLY and ACCOMPLICE

The term ally is defined as someone who advocates for groups or individuals who do not come from the same place of privilege as the ally. Being an ally is considered one of the first steps in race and social justice work.

The term accomplice encompasses allyship but goes beyond to advocacy. An accomplice uses their privilege to challenge existing conditions at the risk of their own comfort and well-being. 

Being an Ally

In social justice and bias trainings, becoming an ally is one of the first actionable items presented. Becoming an ally does not happen overnight. It is a process of self-awareness and work toward unlearning social constructs. An ally is asked to accept that mistakes may be made along the way and commit to continuing their education every day. 

From Amélie Lamont’s Guide to Allyship, allies are a necessary force in race and social justice work. 

“Anyone has the potential to be an ally. Allies recognize that though they’re not a member of the underinvested and oppressed communities they support, they make a concerted effort to better understand the struggle, every single day. Because an ally might have more privilege and recognizes said privilege, they are powerful voices alongside oppressed ones.”

“Alongside” is a key word in allyship. A quote from Aboriginal elder, activist, and educator Dr. Lilla Watson sums it up: “If you have come here to help me, you’re wasting your time. If you have come because your liberation is bound up in mine, then let us work together.” 

Being an ally is about recognizing your privilege, then using it in solidarity with marginalized groups to challenge the status quo. It involves working through discomfort, listening, and learning from mistakes.

Activist, comedian, and YouTube personality Franchesca Ramsey, also known as @chescaleigh, suggests that sometimes people get hung up on the word “privilege.” 

“Privilege does not mean that you are rich, that you’ve had an easy life…all it means is that there are some things in life that you will not experience or ever have to think about simply because of who you are.” 

Ramsey breaks down her top five tips for becoming an ally in this video. 

Moving from Ally to Accomplice 

In a court of law, the word “accomplice” has a negative connotation, as in someone who has assisted someone else in wrongdoing. In the context of race and social justice work, an accomplice is someone who assists others in creating a space of inclusion, equity, and safety for all, often at the risk of their own social and/or professional standing and physical well-being. 

Opportunities for White People in the Fight for Racial Justice provides the following example to better understand the difference between ally and accomplice: An ally will volunteer at a local racial justice-focused organization, while an accomplice will join an organization with an explicit aim of naming and disrupting racial injustice.

Social justice leader Dr. Jon Paul describes the importance of the accomplice in a piece for ColorBloq. He says, “Being an accomplice is more than just listening to others talk about the struggle. It is about solidifying a course of action that helps you commit to undoing it.” This course of action is more often than not uncomfortable, challenging, and fraught with confrontation. It is a commitment to disrupting the status quo.

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion speaker Willie Jackson, who gives workshops across the country on how to be an ally, suggests that, ultimately, being an accomplice is the true goal of allyship, despite the challenges involved: 

“What I’m hoping to impress upon folks is that this work — the work of being an accomplice — might cost you something. Perhaps your comfort or social standing, or maybe even your safety. Real advocacy and comfort rarely go hand in hand.”


Interested in continuing your race and social justice education? Join us for our 10th Annual Seattle Stand Against Racism Town Hall featuring keynote speaker Ijeoma Oluo on April 30. And help us celebrate equity champions in our community at our inaugural Bertha Pitts Campbell Equity Awards on June

Local Resources

Additional Reading

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Straight ally

Heterosexual and cisgender person who supports LGBT rights and movements

An ally, straight ally, or heterosexual ally is a heterosexual and cisgender person who supports equal civil rights, gender equality, and LGBT social movements, challenging homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia.[2][3][4] Not everyone who meets this definition identifies as an "ally", however.

LGBT ally organizations[edit]

Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays march at an Australian Pride paradein

Most LGBT organizations have straight or cisgender members involved; others actively encourage straight and cisgender participation. A gay–straight alliance (also known as a gender-sexuality alliance) is a student-run club that brings together LGBT and straight students to create a platform for activism to fight homophobia and transphobia.[5] There are also some groups that unite the LGBT community to work together with allies. Founded in , PFLAG is the original ally organization, started by Jeanne Manford, mother of the Ally movement. Based in the United States, PFLAG unites LGBT people with parents, families, and allies to gain full civil and legal equality for LGBT people. In , the organization launched a new project, Straight for Equality[6] to help more allies become engaged in the LGBT movement in the workplace, healthcare, and now in faith communities.

Historical background[edit]

The Stonewall Riots of (in New York City) are known to be the starting point of the Gay Liberation Front. Protests, advocacy organizations, HIV/AIDS relief groups, etc., collectively have characterized the movement from the start. In the s, a divide emerged within the community over opposing beliefs on what liberation truly meant: the 'liberationists' and the 'homophiles'.[7] Liberationists presented themselves as being considerably radical; their intent lay in going beyond acceptance and transforming traditional constructs of society (homophobia, sexism, militarism, etc.). In contrast, homophiles aimed only for what was deemed realistic; instead of dismantling an oppressive system, they simply asked for tolerance.[7] Their group maintained an apologist standpoint, where their end goal was living in peaceful coexistence with the oppressor.[7] This assimilationist perspective held particular appeal with members of the community who were able to "blend in" with heterosexual society. Unsurprisingly, the existence of such a group left room for a movement that was more sensitive to the struggles, needs and ultimate goals of more marginalised subcultures. The liberationists, who seemed to be drawing in members of such groups, filled this need. The emergence of the Liberationists allowed for a wider spectrum of sexual-social behaviour & identity to be represented without compromise, and with less risk of infighting. Members of the latter group would not feel forced to conform to the more socially conservatives mores of the Former group, whilst they were able to separate themselves from elements of the gay subculture that they found crass, excessive, decadent or extreme. Despite the evident differences, both groups share similar aims, and would be unlikely to ever see one another as anything but allies.[citation needed][tone]

Stages of allyship[edit]

Sociologist Keith Edwards identifies three stages to the process of becoming an ally in a social movement.[8]

The first stage of allyship is rooted in self-interest. These allies goals focus entirely on those they love. When taking action as an ally, their impact is individualistic – they perceive the issues of their loved one to have stemmed from the influence of a certain group of people rather than believing the issues to be symptomatic of a greater, oppressive system. This exhibition of early allyship is not necessarily harmful, but since it does not address the larger problem its effectiveness is limited. Self-interested behavior is most often associated with parents supporting their children, and although these parents are key supporters in the community, what is not always clear is whether their help would extend beyond their own family and friends.[8]

The second stage in Edward's model is that of the ally aspiring for altruism. This is a more developed stage than the former because the ally's motivations are directed towards combating the oppression of an entire group instead of just one individual. They are also more established in the sense that allies at this level begin to show awareness of their societal privilege, yet they have a tendency to assume a savior role toward those they aim to help.[8]

The third stage of allyship is the ally who fights for social justice. The main driver of this stage above all else is respect for those who are oppressed.[8] In contrast to the prior two approaches, allies in the third stage are aware that the group they support is fully capable of advocating for themselves. [8]

Challenges raised[edit]

Partnership with straight allies has raised challenges as well as benefits for the LGBTQ+ community: there is a perception that such allies evince different levels of 'respect' for the community on whose behalf they advocate, sometimes being patronizing, unaware of their own privilege and power, and crowding out the members.[8] Given that distinguishing the line between speaking on behalf of a group and speaking for a group is not simple, much of the time that line is crossed without even noticing. This grey area can be referred to as 'positive respect'; a sort of force found in an ally's motives that inhibits the 'servile' (as a result of their internalized oppression) group's freedom to act.[8]

Another challenge is that straight allies can be easily discouraged, in the face of close scrutiny of their motives and approaches. Newer straight allies can become overwhelmed by the complication of their position in the movement.&#; Since newer allies derive their identity from their personal relations with queer-identifying people, this limits their allyship.[9] Allies tend to respond very defensively to criticism from members of the queer community about their understanding of queer issues, which in turn feeds a concern that they are motivated by the praise they anticipate as their moral reward. Additionally there is a coming out process for being a straight ally that is not explicitly present in other social movements (concerns about being seen as LGBT); this can hinder the level of advocacy an ally does.[9] In other words, allyship requires a support that is accompanied with a distinct protocol many find challenging to achieve.[citation needed]

Straight allies at protest march
Straight allies protesting at Seattle March for Marriage Equality

Allies may receive criticism for a variety of reasons. For example, some believe that allies are unable to step outside their own heteronormative world to advocate.[10] Allies are also criticized for using LGBT advocacy as a means to gain popularity and status.[11]

Role in policy change[edit]

Studies show that elite allies have a positive effect on the policy goals of a social movement, whatever those goals may be.[12] While allies' main role is to provide wider support for the goals of a social movement, their secondary role of influencing policy is also valuable.[12] The allies' role is to inform policy makers of the struggles endured by a community. Allyship of this kind is often effective, though self-interested; for example, high-ranking, conservative government officials Barry Goldwater and William Weld (former Republican governor of Massachusetts), were motivated by their relations with queer family and friends to provide uncharacteristic support for pro-gay policies.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Pride Flags". The Gender & Sexuality Resource Center. Retrieved
  2. ^Eichler, Matthew A. (). "Joining the Family: Experiences of Being and Becoming Ally Activists of LGBTQ People". Journal of Transformative Education. 8 (2): 89– doi/ ISSN&#; S2CID&#;
  3. ^Fingerhut, Adam W. (). "Straight Allies: What Predicts Heterosexuals' Alliance With the LGBT Community?1". Journal of Applied Social Psychology. 41 (9): – doi/jx. ISSN&#;
  4. ^Levesque, Amie (). ""I've Always Wanted a Gay Family Member!": Straight Ally Girls and Gender Inequality in a High School Gay-Straight Alliance". Qualitative Sociology. 42 (2): – doi/s ISSN&#; S2CID&#;
  5. ^"What We Do: Gay-Straight Alliance". mynewextsetup.us Retrieved
  6. ^"Straight for Equality website". mynewextsetup.us Retrieved
  7. ^ abcShepard, Benjamin H. (). "Monthly Review
    define the word ally

    Ally is a girl that is so incredible, a description can't be put into words. A person who is so completely selfless it's almost ridiculous. A person who is so beautiful both inside and out. A person with a heart bigger than Texas. A person who is so deep that she can make you contemplate your entire being with just one sentence. A person who has a certain enjoyment of donuts and Milkduds. A person who is extremely thoughtful and kind. A person so loyal and honest. A person you should make your girlfriendin a hurry. Ally's are not basic at all and are one in a million kind of girls. Treat them right and don't take them for granted.

    OMG that girl is so beautifulwho is she?
    That's Ally.

    by Donuts March 29,

    Get the mug

    Get a Ally mug for your cat Helena.

    A person named Ally is smart, funny, loyal, caring, and generous. She never gets mad at people and is always smiling. If you know someone named Ally you should consider making her your girlfriend because people like this only come once in a lifetime. Ally is always giving and never asking for things in return. She has beautiful long brown hair and brown eyes. She may have a pale complexion but she will get very tan in the summer. Ally is the most beautiful girl you would ever meet.

    Ally is the most generous and caring person you will ever meet.

    by >.< bunny June 21,

    Get the mug

    Get a Ally mug for your brother James.

    An Ally is a girl who is unique, cute, loving and super pretty. She is usually SUPER crazy and fun to be around. She likes to make everyone happy, but secretly is very insecure about herself. Ally is single and all of the guys secretly love her, but they are afraid of rejection from her. Ally has a lot of interests and talents. Some people don't know what Ally is capable of, they think she's dumb; but Ally is very, very smart. Usually has blonde hair and blue eyes and she's very skinny. Ally is the best friend and the best girlfriend you will ever meet

    Is that an Ally? I've neverseen one before! She's like the luckiest girl in the world!

    by Chocolatee November 23,

    Get the mug

    Get a Ally mug for your mama Riley.

    Pure and utter awesomeness. For real, this girl is indescribable, but I will do my best. She has long long long beautiful hair, which goes along with the rest of her beauty. She is kind, but be careful because she is also easily angered and not afraid to stand bank of america card login ground. She has an absolutely stupendous voice, and a fashion style to match, that no matter how much anyone would like to replicate, they would be unable to pull it off. The same inability to replicate can be said for her music preferences, and her vast knowledge of Youtube stars no one cares about.(okay, a lot of people who don't have lives do, but still) She has an amazing dad and a horrendous mother, the combination of differences what I believe to be the reason she is so incredibly ally like?(that's meant to be a compliment I swear) As in: not spoiled rotten but also not all depressed and 'feel bad for me' acting. At first glance she may seem normal, but just attend one of her small but infamous parties, and the true, crazy fun Ally is revealed. She has a very particular sense in boys, which is good because only the very best truly deserve to have any sort of romantic relationship with her. She is proud of who she, and her refusal to let anything change that is com-memorable. She can be annoying, and often complains, but even though she has faults, the entirety of her makes up for it. No one could ask for a better friend, and if you meet an Ally, I suggest holding onto her with all your might!!!

    Boy-Wow that girls beautiful. Who is she? Me-You can date her but only if you can stand me asking you a bazillion questions to ensure that you meet the qualifications for anyone to date someone of her stature Boy-She's definitely worth it Me-In the unlikely case that you hurt her in any unwanted way, how would you like your dead body to be disposed?
    *hears an angelic voice in the distance* Person- What what IS that? Me-Sounds like Ally's a singing Person-dies from the pure angelic-ness of her voice
    I went to an amazing party It was an Ally party of course(that's why it was amazing)
    Friendship is chewing on a well cooked face together

    by 1 of your 5 besties(guess!) March 17,

    Get the mug

    Get a Ally mug for your dog Larisa.

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    Источник: mynewextsetup.us?term=Ally

    It is no secret that the tech industry has reshaped how society lives – from ordering weekly groceries online, recording fitness goals, revolutionizing healthcare and everything in between. Technology is intrinsic to almost every single thing people do. With this in mind, the industry creating these ground-breaking solutions must represent the society which uses it so readily - currently, it does not.

    Representation in technology

    In a report released by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission init was outlined that white people are represented in industry at a higher rate in the tech sector's executive category than the rest of the private sector, at 83%—more than 15% higher than their representation in the professional category, which includes jobs like computer programming. Other groups are represented at significantly lower rates in the executive category than in the professional category, including African Americans (2% to %), Hispanics (% to %), and Asian Americans (% to %). Additionally, if we focus on gender, less than 7% of tech professionals in Europe are female.

    The representation of those in intersectional communities is even lower. For define the word ally, between and  there has been a 13% decrease in the number of black women professionals. Even though white women are now substantially more successful in reaching the executive level than all minority men or women, white men are still 47% more likely than white women to be executives.

    To have the most successful and well-rounded tech industry, representation of marginalized groups in industry must improve. To invoke this change, the majority must help, support and advocate for the minority. If engaged correctly, allies hold the power and the key to stimulate positive change.

    What is an ally?

    An ally is any person that actively promotes and aspires to advance the culture of inclusion through intentional, positive and conscious efforts that benefit people as a whole.

    Everyone has the ability to be an ally as privilege is intersectional - white women can be actionable allies to people of color, men can be allies 1st niagara bank near me women, cis people can be allies to members of the LGBTQI+ community, able-bodied people can define the word ally allies to those with different abilities, economically privileged people can be allies to those who are not and so on.  

    What is allyship?

    Allyship is:

    • a lifelong process of building relationships based on trust, consistency, and accountability with marginalized individuals and/or groups of people.
    • not self-defined—work and efforts must be recognized by those you are seeking to ally with.
    • an opportunity to grow and learn about ourselves, whilst building confidence in others.

    Becoming actionable allies

    To be allies, words and dr finical charlotte plastic surgery must be in sync. Words without actions are detrimental and work against changing the culture in technology.

    To be a true ally, you should:

    • Lift others up by advocating,
    • Share growth opportunities with others,
    • Not greendot com login page venting as a personal attack,
    • Recognize systematic inequalities and realize impact of micro-aggressions,
    • Believe underrepresented people’s experiences, and
    • Most importantly – listen, support, self-reflect & change.

    Small actions, big impact

    Allyship is a continual investment of time in supporting others, holding ourselves accountable when mistakes are made, apologizing and being prepared to rework the approach towards allyship as needs change.

    Through personal actions, a more inclusive environment can be fostered by:

    • Becoming a sponsor – champion someone from an underrepresented community to support career growth and increase company retention. Being a sponsor is different to being a mentor – sponsoring is being actively involved in aiding someone’s career progression, mentoring is providing advice.
    • Calling out inappropriate behavior – People in privileged positions have the ability to call out unacceptable behavior towards underrepresented people and be heard. Underrepresented people may not be comfortable raising issues due to a fear of backlash or risk of jeopardizing professional relationships.
    • Tasking all employees with getting involved with diversity and inclusion related tasks – embracing diversity & fostering an environment of inclusion is good for business. Everyone should be involved. Do not assign this daunting task to underrepresented people best buy credit card account inclusive language – Be aware of gendered terms, and use language which embraces all walks of people. For example, using “partner” instead of gendered terms such as “girl/boyfriend” or “husband/wife” to be more inclusive of those in the LGBTQI+ community.
    • Rolling out unconscious bias training regularly – Understand that unconscious, unchecked bias cannot and will not be fixed after one unconscious bias training session. This is a growing process and continued challenging of ourselves and peers must happen to aid growth and learning in this space.
    • Trying different recruitment methods – To attract and retain different kinds of people, use different recruitment methods. Partner with organisations which actively push for equality in that space, be present at conferences, and reach out to underrepresented people for their honest feedback on where they would look for roles – listen to the people you are trying to reach.
    • Recognizing privilege and use it to amplify underrepresented voices – Understanding and recognizing privilege can be a daunting and uncomfortable task. Having uncomfortable conversations with yourself, understanding the systematic and societal issues which may have played in your favor is eye opening and allows you to use this privilege to amplify those who do not have it.
    • Following an array of voices – Learning and growth will not happen without being challenged. Follow different people and listen to them. Challenge yourself to cross-examine define the word ally bias after learning from define the word ally voices.

    In conclusion, a true ally must regularly listen to those around them, adapt their thinking, rework what they believe to be correct & become comfortable being uncomfortable.

    It can be a unique and challenging journey becoming and remaining an ally, but certainly one worth taking.

    Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here. 

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    Main meanings of ally in English

    : ally1ally2

    ally1

    See synonyms for ally

    Translate ally into Spanish

    nounplural noun allies

    • 1A state formally cooperating with another for a military or other purpose.

      ‘debate continued among NATO allies’

      • ‘Japan is, for all intents and purposes, our strongest ally in Asia at the moment.’
      • ‘Many Taiwanese see those two countries as the island's most likely allies in any military conflict with China.’
      • ‘The Philippines and Thailand are military allies of the U.S. in Southeast Asia.’
      • ‘As the war continued, Italy's relations with its allies continued to develop.’
      • ‘Offending military allies or major trading partners is an important concern.’
      • ‘The North's disabling of the surveillance system has triggered alarm in the South and among its allies.’
      • ‘He still has allies inside Umno and among Malaysia's numerous royal families.’
      • ‘While the wars remained a contest for empire, Britain was less dependent on allies.’
      • ‘For over 50 years our country, with our allies, has sought to avoid war by deterring potential aggressors.’
      • ‘Slapping the cohorts of a military ally in the face is not very respectable.’
      • ‘It caused jealousies, disagreements, and suspicions among allies, at the expense of the common cause.’
      • ‘He is working in a cooperative way with the United Nations and our allies around the world.’
      • ‘The division among progressive allies is a signal of the genomic politics to come.’
      • ‘The use of military bases is dependant on the good will of their allies, many of which are not as willing as before.’
      • ‘The two countries, ostensibly allies, too often view each other suspiciously and lovelessly.’
      • ‘Force is on the menu, and will of course be necessary from time to time to protect ourselves or our allies.’
      • ‘He stated that First Nations are allies with the Queen, not subjects to her.’
      • ‘We're going to depend on our allies, and others are going to have to belly up the same as we are.’
      • ‘Many of these countries are natural allies of reform and rapid growth, having emerged from behind the iron curtain a decade and a half ago.’
      • ‘The allies had no power to use military force to put pressure of any kind on the regime.’
      1. A person or organization that cooperates with or helps another in a particular activity.

        ‘he was forced to dismiss his closest political ally’

        • ‘Genuine reformers define the word ally look to teachers and teacher organizations as their allies.’
        • ‘Within my global responsibilities, the legal department was a close ally and business partner.’
        • ‘The two organisations have key allies and it s reassuring for economic development.’
        • ‘He was in a particularly bad mood one day after his father had called him to come help him promote a political ally.’
        • ‘The two families never lost sight of the fact they were not only business allies but close friends.’
        • ‘I'd say to people who are immediately under attack from this, get yourselves organised, find allies and fight back.’
        • ‘I've come to see the cactus as an organic metaphor for technology; a thorny ally in the artistic process.’
        • ‘He said he had no idea his political ally was misusing Forum define the word ally to friends, he enjoys making avian analogies between rare birds and his political allies and enemies.’
        • ‘Some of his former political allies had turned their backs on him.’
        • ‘Frankly, a lot of the money seems to be going to the political allies of this president.’
        • ‘Does it bother you in the least that many of your political allies are in favor of anarchy?’
        • ‘As his political allies and opponents will know only too well, he had so much more to offer.’
        • ‘Only a hard core of biotech businesses, researchers and their political allies are bothered.’
        • ‘Maybe he and his genuine allies should forget the religious order and join a political party.’
        • ‘What is out-dated is the belief that it is possible to conduct politics by ignoring your allies and angering your enemies.’
        • ‘You sideline friends and allies, whose cooperation could help preserve your security.’
        • ‘Hostilities will cease and you shall depart college with true allies and four good years.’
        • ‘Moreover, it is a mistake to think that militaries rule without civilian allies.’
        • ‘The idea of calling in the military to shape up students has won some unusual allies.’

        associate, colleague, friend, confederate, partner, supporter, accomplice, helper, accessory, abetter

        View synonyms
      2. A person or organization that actively supports the rights of a minority or marginalized group without being a member of it.
        • ‘Claudia is an activist and an ally, deeply involved with Black Lives Matter and LGBTQ+ rights’
      3. the AlliesThe countries that fought with Britain in the First and Second World Wars.

        ‘they were caught between the German army of occupation and the advancing Allies’

        • ‘Many Jews had fought for the Allies during World War Two and had developed their military skills as a result.’
        • ‘It was the first battle won by the Allies in World War Two and Hitler define the word ally won a battle after that.’
        • ‘Rochdale could be justly proud define the word ally the role it played in helping the Allies to victory in World War Two.’
        • ‘The where is latin america in Africa was to play a key role in the overall success of the Allies in World War Two.’
        • ‘Already decorated with an Iron Cross, Gecas was later decorated for fighting for the Allies.’
        • ‘It was now clear: the Allies were fighting an undeclared war against the Bolsheviks.’
        • ‘Other nations that fought for the Allies offered their support for the declaration.’
        • ‘This skirmish against the Allies was fought just outside Paris, to the east of the city.’
        • ‘For the rest of the war the Allies were to fight under a single overall command.’
        • ‘This left Germany with only sixty divisions with which to repel the Allies on the Western Front.’
        • ‘How did the German experience of World War One trench warfare differ from that of the Allies?’
        • ‘After the Nazi surrender, the Allies and Russia met at Potsdam, a suburb of Berlin.’
        • ‘A renewal of the war was unavoidable, and the Allies promptly formed the Seventh Coalition.’
        • ‘Montgomery wanted the Allies to use the power they had to get to Berlin before the Russians.’
        • ‘The most significant result of the raid was on morale, as the Allies had had few big victories to that date.’
        • ‘Roosevelt and Stalin had not yet best savings interest rates today, but as Allies they could be shown together.’
        • ‘What the Allies had not expected was that while they were preparing to win the long war, France would lose a short one.’
        • ‘The Allies would not negotiate with a country that had plunged Europe into war twice in 30 years.’
        • ‘If the Allies could acquire those machines and their keys, it would be a major help in decrypting Enigma.’
        • ‘If the Allies controlled the rail junction, they could supply their own men.’

    Pronunciation

    ally

    /ˈalʌɪ/

    verbverb allies, verb allying, verb allied

    [with object]ally something to/with
    • 1Combine or unite a resource or commodity with (another) for mutual benefit.

      ‘he allied his racing experience with his father's business acumen’

      • ‘Garry Hay is an integral part of the side as he allies defensive duties with his non-stop attacking forays down the flanks.’
      • ‘I also believe such a shift would be good for the nationalist brand: it would ally the party with the quality of dynamism, while showing commitment to personal as well as national ‘freedom’.’
      • ‘She had proved a good leader, allying her people with the underground, yet keeping the government in power in complete ignorance of her true alliance.’
      • ‘In the war against Spain and Austria, he allied Catholic France with Protestant Holland in ’
      • ‘Four Scots ambassadors, two bishops and two nobles, sailed for France in July, and allied the country to Philip IV in October ’
      • ‘I also choose to continue with the discourse of addiction, in spite of the compelling arguments about its limits and fallibility, because it allies me with people who are living in ways I value.’
      • ‘This bleak outlook on humankind allies him to Beckett, and it's no surprise that the godfather of the absurd should be here in one of the show's most powerful pieces.’
      • ‘I get the feeling that she rather enjoys criticism, likes the way it allies her with the feminists of the past, the Germaine Greers and Mary Wollstonecrafts, who have also been made to suffer for their beliefs.’
      • ‘His speed defied belief and he allied it with a wondrous temperament.’
      • ‘In the first innings Lee had been erratic and expensive, like Warne conceding more than runs, but yesterday he sustained a decent pace and allied it to accuracy.’

      combine, marry, couple, merge, amalgamate, join, pool, fuse, weld, knit

      View synonyms
      1. ally oneself withSide with or support.

        ‘he allied himself with the forces of change’

        • ‘On the other side, advocates of indigenous authors allied themselves with partisans of free trade and international copyright, claiming universal natural rights of authorship.’
        • ‘Since the families you ally yourself with in marriage determine your level of access to credit, education, food, housing, and a host of other goods, loss of reputation is a disaster.’
        • ‘Moderate Conservatives will prefer not to ally themselves with those views and will stay at home.’
        • ‘In Mexico, the Greens are allying themselves with the right-wing Catholic PAN party, enthusiastic supporters of economic deregulation (free trade).’
        • ‘Clint never allies himself with the townsfolk, he's never on their side.’
        • ‘To broaden support for the town, the coalition has allied itself with Jewish groups in Israel and the United States.’
        • ‘Much of how the game plays out depends on new mexico bank and trust louisiana of the four major players you choose to ally yourself with: the English, French, Spanish, or pirates.’
        • ‘Are these the sort define the word ally people you wish to ally yourself with politically?’
        • ‘What if every humans adopted a species and allied themselves with it throughout their lives?’
        • ‘Increasingly, institutions of higher learning are allying themselves with the proponents of social justice, blurring the line between knowledge and belief, education and indoctrination.’

        unite, join, join up, join forces, band together, go into partnership, team up, combine, collaborate, side, align oneself, league, go into league, affiliate, confederate, form an alliance, throw in one's lot, define the word ally common cause

        View synonyms

    Pronunciation

    ally

    /ˈalʌɪ//əˈlʌɪ/

    Origin

    Middle English (as a verb): from Old French alier, from Latin alligare ‘bind together’, from ad- ‘to’ + ligare ‘to bind’; the noun is partly via Old French alie ‘allied’. Compare with alloy.

    Main meanings of ally in English

    : ally1ally2

    ally2

    See synonyms for ally

    Translate ally into Spanish

    nounplural noun allies

    variant spelling of alley

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    Definitions of ALLY and ACCOMPLICE

    The term ally is defined as someone who advocates for groups or individuals who do not come from the same place of privilege as the ally. Being an ally walmart eye center mexico mo considered one of the first steps in race and social justice work.

    The term accomplice encompasses allyship but goes beyond to advocacy. An accomplice uses their privilege to challenge existing conditions at the risk of their own comfort and well-being. 

    Being an Ally

    In social justice and bias trainings, becoming an ally is one of the first actionable items presented. Becoming an ally does not happen overnight. It is a process of self-awareness and work toward unlearning social constructs. An ally is asked to accept that mistakes may be made along the way and commit to continuing their education every day. 

    From Amélie Lamont’s Guide to Allyship, allies are a necessary force in race and social justice work. 

    “Anyone has the potential to be an ally. Allies recognize that though they’re not a member of the underinvested and oppressed communities they support, they make a concerted effort to better understand the struggle, every single day. Because an ally might have more privilege and recognizes said privilege, they are powerful voices alongside oppressed ones.”

    “Alongside” is a key word in allyship. A quote from Aboriginal elder, activist, and educator Dr. Lilla Watson sums it up: “If you have come here to help me, you’re wasting your time. If you have come because your liberation is bound up in mine, then let us work together.” 

    Being an ally is about recognizing your privilege, then using it in solidarity with marginalized groups to challenge the status quo. It involves working through discomfort, listening, and learning from mistakes.

    Activist, comedian, and YouTube personality Franchesca Ramsey, also known as @chescaleigh, suggests that sometimes people get hung up on the word “privilege.” 

    “Privilege does not mean that you are rich, that you’ve had an easy life…all it means is that there are some things in life that you will not experience or ever have to think about simply because of who you are.” 

    Ramsey breaks down her top five tips for becoming an ally in this video. 

    Moving from Ally to Accomplice 

    In a court of law, the word “accomplice” has a negative connotation, as in someone who has assisted someone else in wrongdoing. In the context of race and social justice work, an accomplice is someone who assists others in creating a space of inclusion, equity, and safety for all, often at the risk of their own social and/or professional standing and physical well-being. 

    Opportunities for White People in the Fight for Racial Justice provides the following example to better understand the difference between ally and accomplice: An ally will volunteer at a local top hotels in the keys justice-focused organization, while an accomplice will join an organization with an explicit aim of naming and disrupting racial injustice.

    Social justice leader Dr. Jon Paul describes the importance of the accomplice in a piece for ColorBloq. He says, “Being an accomplice is more than just listening to others talk about the struggle. It is about solidifying a course of action that helps you commit to undoing it.” This course of action is more often than not uncomfortable, challenging, and fraught with confrontation. It is a commitment to disrupting the status quo.

    Diversity, Equity and Inclusion speaker Willie Jackson, who gives workshops across the country on how to be an ally, suggests that, ultimately, being an accomplice is the true goal of allyship, despite the challenges involved: 

    “What I’m hoping to impress upon folks is that this work — the work of being an accomplice — might cost you something. Perhaps your comfort or social standing, or maybe even your safety. Real advocacy and comfort rarely go hand in hand.”


    Interested in continuing your race and social justice education? Join us for our 10th Annual Seattle Stand Against Racism Town Hall featuring keynote speaker Ijeoma Oluo on April 30. And help us celebrate equity champions in look up my fedex account number community at our inaugural Bertha Pitts Campbell Equity Awards on June

    Local Resources

    Additional Reading

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    Collective defence - Article 5

    The principle of collective defence is at the very heart of NATO’s founding treaty. It remains a unique and enduring principle that binds its members together, committing them to protect each other and setting a spirit of solidarity within the Alliance.

     

    • Collective defence means that an attack against one Ally is considered as an attack against all Allies.
    • The principle of collective defence is enshrined in Article 5 of the Washington Treaty.
    • NATO invoked Article 5 for the first time in its history after the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States.
    • NATO has taken collective defence measures on several occasions, for instance in response to the situation in Syria and in the wake of the Russia-Ukraine crisis.
    • NATO has standing forces on active duty that contribute to the Alliance’s collective defence efforts on a permanent basis.

     

    • A cornerstone of the Alliance

      Article 5

      Inthe primary aim of the North Atlantic Treaty – NATO’s founding treaty – was to create a pact of mutual assistance to counter the risk that the Soviet Union would seek to extend its control of Eastern Europe to other parts of the continent.

      Every participating country agreed that this form of solidarity was at the heart of the Treaty, effectively making Article 5 on collective defence a key component of the Alliance.

      Article 5 provides that if a NATO Ally is the victim of an armed attack, each and every other member of the Alliance will consider this act of violence as an armed attack against all members and will take the actions it deems necessary to assist the Ally attacked.

      Article 5

      “The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all and consequently they agree that, if such an armed union savings bank mt washington occurs, each of them, in exercise of the right of individual or collective self-defence recognized by Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, will assist the Party or Parties so attacked by taking forthwith, individually and in concert with the other Parties, such action as it deems necessary, including the use of armed force, to restore and maintain the security of the North Atlantic area.

      Any such armed attack and all measures taken as a result thereof shall immediately be reported to the Security Council. Such measures shall be terminated when the Security Council has taken the measures necessary to restore and maintain international peace and security.”

      This article is complemented by Article 6, which stipulates:

      Article 61

      “For the purpose of Article 5, an armed attack on one or more of the Parties is deemed to include an armed attack:

      • on the territory of any of the Parties in Europe or North America, on the Algerian Departments of France 2, on the territory of Turkey or on the Islands under the jurisdiction of any of the Parties in the North Atlantic area north of the Tropic of Cancer;
      • on the forces, vessels, or aircraft of any of the Parties, when in or over these territories or any other area in Europe in which occupation forces of any of the Parties were stationed on the date when the Treaty entered into force or the Mediterranean Sea or the North Atlantic area north of the Tropic of Cancer.”

      The principle of providing assistance

      With the invocation of Article 5, Allies can provide any form of assistance they deem necessary to respond to a situation. This is an individual obligation on each Ally and each Ally is responsible for determining what it deems necessary in the particular circumstances.

      This assistance is taken forward in concert with other Allies. It is not necessarily military and depends on the material resources of each country. It is therefore left to the judgment of each individual member country to determine how it will contribute. Each country define the word ally consult with vrbo com customer service number other members, bearing in mind that the ultimate aim is to “to restore and maintain the security of the North Atlantic area”.

      At the drafting of Article 5 in the late s, there was consensus on the principle of mutual assistance, but fundamental ally cashiers check on the modalities of implementing this commitment. The European participants wanted to ensure that the United States would automatically come to their assistance should one of the signatories come under attack; the United States did not want to make such a pledge and obtained that this be reflected in the wording of Article 5.

    • Invocation of Article 5

      The 9/11 terrorist attacks

      The United States was the object of brutal terrorist attacks on 11 September The Alliance's Strategic Concept had already identified terrorism as one of the risks affecting NATO’s security. The Alliance’s response to 9/11, however, saw NATO engage actively in the fight against terrorism, launch its first operations outside the Euro-Atlantic area and begin a far-reaching transformation of its capabilities. Moreover, it led NATO to invoke Article 5 of the Washington Treaty for the very first time in its history.

      An act of solidarity

      On the evening of 12 Septemberless than 24 hours after the attacks,  the Allies invoked the principle of Article 5. Then NATO Secretary General Lord Robertson subsequently informed the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the Alliance's decision.

      The North Atlantic Council – NATO’s principal political decision-making body – agreed that if it determined that the attack was directed from abroad against the United States, it would be regarded as an action covered by Article 5. On 2 October, once the Council had been briefed on the results of investigations into the 9/11 attacks, it determined that they were regarded as an action covered by Article 5.

      By invoking Article 5, NATO members showed their solidarity toward the United States and condemned, in the strongest possible way, the terrorist attacks against the United States.

      Taking action

      After 9/11, there were consultations among the Allies and collective action was decided by the Council. The United States could also carry out independent actions, consistent with its rights and obligations under the United Nations Charter.

      On 4 October, once it had been determined that the attacks came from abroad, NATO agreed on a package of eight measures to support the United States. On the request of the United States, it launched its first ever anti-terror operation – Eagle Assist – from mid-October to mid-May It consisted in seven NATO AWACS radar aircraft that helped patrol the skies over the United States; in total crew members from 13 NATO countries flew over sorties. This was the first time that NATO military assets were deployed in support of an Article 5 operation.

      On 26 October, the Alliance launched its second counter-terrorism operation in response to the attacks on the United States, Active Endeavour. Elements of NATO's Standing Naval Forces were sent to patrol the Eastern Mediterranean and monitor shipping to detect and deter terrorist activity, including illegal trafficking. In Marchthe operation was expanded to include the entire Mediterranean.

      The eight measures to support the United States, as agreed by NATO were:

      • to enhance intelligence-sharing and cooperation, both bilaterally and in appropriate NATO bodies, relating to the threats posed by terrorism and the actions to be taken against it;
      • to provide, individually or collectively, as appropriate and according to their capabilities, assistance to Allies and other countries which are or may be subject to increased terrorist threats as a result of their support for the campaign against terrorism;
      • to take necessary measures to provide increased security for facilities of the United States and other Allies on their territory;
      • to backfill selected Allied assets in NATO’s area of responsibility that are required to directly support operations against terrorism;
      • to provide blanket overflight clearances for the United States and other Allies’ aircraft, in accordance with the necessary air traffic arrangements and national procedures, for military flights related to operations against terrorism;
      • to provide access for the United States and other Allies to ports and airfields on the territory of NATO member countries for operations against terrorism, including for refuelling, in accordance with national procedures;
      • that the Alliance is ready to deploy elements of its Standing Naval Forces to the Eastern Mediterranean in order to provide a NATO presence and demonstrate resolve;
      • that the Define the word ally is similarly ready to deploy elements of its NATO Airborne Early Warning Force to support operations against terrorism.
    • Enhanced collective defence measures

      On the request of Turkey, on three occasions, NATO has put collective defence measures in place: in with the deployment of Patriot missiles during the Gulf War, in with the agreement on a package of defensive measures and conduct of Operation Display Deterrence during the crisis in Iraq, and in in response to the situation in Syria with the deployment of Patriot missiles.

      Since Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea in and the rise of security challenges from the south, including brutal attacks by ISIL and other terrorist groups across several continents, NATO has implemented the biggest increase in collective defence since the Cold War. For instance, it has tripled the size of the NATO Response Force, established a 5,strong Spearhead Force and deployed multinational battlegroups in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland. NATO has also increased its presence in the southeast of the Alliance, centred on a multinational brigade in Romania. The Alliance has further stepped up air policing over the Baltic and Black Sea areas and continues to develop key military capabilities, such as Joint Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance. At the Warsaw Summit in JulyAllies recognised cyber defence as a new operational domain, to enable better protection of networks, missions and operations; and at the meeting of foreign ministers in NovemberAllies agreed to recognise space as a new operational domain to “allow NATO planners to make requests for Allies to provide capabilities and services, such as hours of satellite communications.”

    • Standing forces

      Collective defence measures are not solely event-driven. NATO has a number of standing forces on active duty that contribute to the Alliance’s collective defence efforts on a permanent basis. These include NATO’s standing maritime forces, which are ready to act when called upon. They perform different tasks ranging from exercises to operational missions, in peacetime and in periods of crisis and conflict.

      Additionally, NATO has an integrated air defence system to protect against air attacks, which also comprises the Alliance’s ballistic missile defence system. NATO also conducts several air policing missions, which are collective peacetime missions that enable NATO to detect, track and identify all violations and infringements of its airspace and to take appropriate action. As part of such missions, Allied fighter jets patrol the airspace of Allies who do not have fighter jets of their own. They run on a 24/7 basis, days a year.

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    a loyal ally definition, a loyal ally meaning

    Ally or Accomplice? The Language of Activism

    Recently, I attended a Diversity Committee meeting at my daughter’s school. For context, the majority of committee members, including me, are white. This committee actively works to educate our community on issues of racial injustice through events for students and parents. One event is an Ally Week during which students consider the hard work of allyship with marginalized communities. As the clerk of the committee, I strive to make ally work—not “savior work”—a core component of our mission and programming. 

    So when someone mentioned the word accomplice in the context of social justice work, I was taken aback. I joked and said, “It sounds like we would be committing a crime!” But I wanted to know more about how some social justice advocates are using this term. I also wanted to know how I might rethink how those in power can stand with and not for marginalized populations. 

    Thinking about the word accomplice, I remembered my Latin roots from high school—com means “with” or “together.” So while one may hear accomplice and think about crime, the original meaning of the word conveys a sense of cooperation—and not in a criminal sense. In a social justice context, accomplice speaks to a sense of community or “folding together,” from the Latin complicare.

    Here’s something else I learned: For social justice advocates who use the term accomplice, they often see the site of focus as the main difference between the work of an ally and that of an accomplice. An ally will mostly engage in activism by standing with an individual or group in a marginalized community. An accomplice will focus more on dismantling the structures that oppress that individual or group—and such work will be directed by the stakeholders in the marginalized group. Simply, ally work focuses on individuals, and accomplice work focuses on the structures of decision-making agency. 

    An ally will mostly engage in activism by standing with an individual or group in a marginalized community. An accomplice will focus more on dismantling the structures that oppress that individual or group—and such work will be directed by the stakeholders in the marginalized group.

    Of course, these two brands of work blend into each other and are hard to untangle. But for the sake of understanding, we can look at an example: An ally will “volunteer at a local racial justice-focused organization,” while an accomplice will “join an organization with an explicit aim of naming and disrupting racial injustice,” according to the useful guide “Opportunities for White People in the Fight for Racial Justice.” The former is working with individuals toward those individuals’ access to representation, dignity or some kind of protection. The latter is working on dismantling a structure, thereby striving for those same protections, but through a different kind of work.

    While some writing about these terms implies a hierarchy, with accomplice work as the “best” type of social justice work, I would coldwell banker bain seattle rentals that both ally and accomplice work are crucial. Working on the individual level will push us toward the safety and dignity of marginalized populations in the present moment (ally), and working at us bank home mortgage bill pay structural level will take a long view to destroy oppressive social structures and create a more equitable world (accomplice). 

    I don’t see the committee at my daughter’s school changing the name of Ally Week to Accomplice Week in the near future, but I can see the term accomplice as an entry point for those of us having conversations about how to enact social justice from positions of privilege. Continuing to critically investigate our positions in social justice activism allows us to be more thoughtful teachers and practitioners as we all work toward a more just world.

    Clemens is the associate professor of non-Western literatures and director of Women's and Gender Studies at Kutztown University in Pennsylvania.

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    Posted in The

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  1. @Sarthak Gupta Did you try to transfer your balance in paypal? and did you connect your paypal with your fiverr account?

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