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All chords in the key of c piano


all chords in the key of c piano

The key of C contains 7 notes: C, D, E, F, G, A, B; we can mix up these notes to play melodies. If all of the your favorite pop songs were played in the key of. There seemed so many chords, and lead sheets were quite free with chords like. C Maj 7 / G. And all those black keys! 4 is your everyday I–IV–V–I in the key of C. These particular voicings and the arpeggio pattern provide a certain '90s pop sound to the progression. Next, in.
all chords in the key of c piano
Chord Formula List
Chord type FormulaExample in C 

Major 

1 3 5

C E G

Named after the major 3rd interval between root and 3

Minor

1 b3 5

C Eb G

Named after the minor 3rd interval between root and b3

7th 

1 3 5 b7

C E G Bb

Also called DOMINANT 7th

Major 7th

1 3 5 7

C E G B

Named after the major 7th interval between root and 7th major scale note

Minor 7th

1 b3 5 b7

C Eb G Bb

 

6th

1 3 5 6

C E G A

Major chord with 6th major scale note added

Minor 6th

1 b3 5 6

C Eb G A

Minor chord with 6th major scale note added

Diminished

1 b3 b5

C Eb Gb

 

Diminished 7th

1 b3 b5 bb7

C Eb Gb Bbb

 

Half diminished 7th

1 b3 b5 b7

C Eb Gb Bb

Also called minor 7thb5

Augmented

1 3 #5

C E G#

 

7th #5

1 3 #5 b7

C E G# Bb

 

9th

1 3 5 b7 9

C E G Bb D

 

7th #9

1 3 5 b7 #9

C E G Bb D#

The 'Hendrix' chord

Major 9th

1 3 5 7 9

C E G B D

 

Added 9th

1 3 5 9

C E G D

 Chords extended beyond the octave are called 'added' when the 7th is not present.

Minor 9th

1 b3 5 b7 9

C Eb G Bb D

 

Minor add 9th

1 b3 5 9

C Eb G D

 

11th

1 (3) 5 b7 9 11

C E G Bb D F

The 3rd is often omitted to avoid a clash with the 11th

Minor 11th

1 b3 5 b7 9 11

C Eb G Bb D F

 

7th #11

1 3 5 b7 #11

C E G Bb D F#

often used in preference to 11th chords to avoid the dissonant clash between 11 and 3 

Major 7th #11

1 3 5 7 9 #11

C E G B D F#

 

13th

1 3 5 b7 9 (11) 13

C E G Bb D alabama a&m admissions A

The 11th is often omitted to avoid a clash with the 3rd.

Major 13th

1 3 5 7 9 (11) 13

C E G B D (F) A

The 11th is often omitted sync amazon prime avoid a clash with the 3rd.

Minor 13th

1 b3 5 b7 9 11 13

C Eb G B D F A

 

Suspended 4th (sus, sus4)

1 4 5

C F G

 

Suspended 2nd (sus2)

1 2 5

C D G

Sometimes considered as an inverted sus4 (GCD)

5th (power chord)

1 5

C G

 

Chord Formula Focus

MAJOR CHORDS

The formula for major chords is 1 3 5. That means if we want to know how to make the chord of C major, we would take the 1st, 3rd & 5th notes of the C major scale. Similarly, if we wanted to build the chord of G major, we would use the 1st, 3rd & 5th notes of the G major scale.

Let's take a closer look at both the scale and chord of C major.

The scale of C major consists of the notes: C D E F G A B C

So applying our 'major chord' formula (1, 3 & 5) to that scale, we get the notes C, E & G.

Play them all at the same time (or even one after the other) and we all chords in the key of c piano the chord of C major. We can duplicate any of the notes to make the chord fuller sounding. For example, we can have C E G E G C, or any other arrangement that our instrument allows.

We can play the notes in any order, but usually we want the lowest pitched note (the bass bank of commerce chanute ks to be the root. If the root is the lowest note, we say the chord is in ROOT POSITION. If any other note is the lowest sounding note, we say the chord is inverted. Chords in root position tend to sound more stable and balanced than when they are inverted. Inverted chords have a more subtle, less definite harmonic effect. Both types (root and inverted) have their place in music.

It also depends on whether another instrument is playing a bass note that is lower than the bass note of the chord. For example, if a guitarist plays the chord C major with E as the lowest note, the chord is said to be in first inversion. However, if at the same time a bass guitarist is playing the root note (lower than the E played by the guitarist), the chord will again sound stable because the overall sound of the chord (bass plus guitar) to any listener will be in root position.

MINOR CHORDS

The formula for minor chords is 1 b3 (flat 3) 5. It's similar to the major chord except that the middle note has been lowered. In other words the distance (or interval) between the root and the 3rd is smaller than in the major chord. That interval is called a minor 3rd and that's why the chord is called MINOR.

To get that b3rd note in order to make the chord of C minor we take the 3rd note of the C major scale and lower it (keeping the same letter name). So instead of C E & G, that the major chord formula gave us, we get C Eb (E flat) & G.

MAJOR 7th CHORDS

The formula for major 7th chords is 1 3 5 7. In other words, it's a major chord with the 7th note of the scale added. So the chord of C major 7th consists of the notes: C E G & B. Note that the word major in this type of chord isn't referring to the fact that this is a major type chord but is referring to the chord's 7th being a major 7th interval above the root This distinguishes it from the 7th chord below, which uses a flat 7th - the 7th note being a minor 7th above the root.

7th CHORDS

The formula for 7th chords (also called dominant 7ths) is 1 3 5 b7.

Applying this formula to the C major scale, gives us the chord C7, consisting of notes C E G & Bb.

Note* Be careful using the term 'dominant 7th' as it has another, more official, meaning, which is 'the 7th chord built on the 5th (dominant) note of major or minor scales&apos. It's actually referring to a chord function, but in modern times the term has been hijacked to name any chord with the formula b7 regardless of key or scale.

MINOR 7th CHORDS

The formula for minor 7th chords is 1 b3 5 b7. So C minor 7th consists of the notes C Eb G & Bb. It's a minor chord with a flat 7th added.

Extended Chords

You may have noticed that the chords we've dealt with so far have used alternate notes of the major scale. That is, we took the first note, missed the second, took the third, missed the 4th, took the 5th, and so on, all the way up to the 7th. We can describe this by saying that most chords are built in thirds. In other words, the spacing (or interval) between each note and the next covers three letter names.

Here's the C major scale again with the chord C major 7th outlined in bold.

C D E F G A B C

C to E is the interval of a 3rd because it encompasses three letters: C, D & E. Similarly, E to G is a 3rd too, because it spans 3 letters: E, F & G, and G to B is also a 3rd as it spans 3 letters G, A & B. They're not all the same size of 3rds; E to G is a minor 3rd as it's one semitone smaller than the other two, which are major 3rds, but, regardless of size, they're all 3rds because they all span 3 letters.

We can extend the notes even further than the 7th by continuing to add more notes spaced by intervals of a 3rd, but we need to extend the scale beyond an octave to see this. Here is the C major scale written out over two octaves. The notes in bold are all spaced a 3rd apart and the final note is D which is the 9th note of the scale. This gives us the chord C MAJOR 9th with formula 1 3 5 7 9. As mentioned previously in the 'major 7th' example, https www suntrust online banking word major here is referring to the 7th being a major 7th interval above the root. and not being lowered to a flat 7th.

C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C

As you can see, the 9th note (D) is the same as the 2nd, but we prefer to call it a 9th to show that it has been arrived at by first american bank credit card notes spaced by intervals of a 3rd. The same applies to the other notes. The actual pitch (register) of the notes doesn't matter; they could be at opposite ends of a piano. Further extended chords can be formed by continuing this process, giving us 11th and 13th chords. That's as far as we can go. If we add another 3rd to the 13th scale note, we arrive back at C, two octaves above our starting note. So you won't see any number higher than 13 in reference to chords.

It's worth mentioning here that it's possible, and often desirable, to omit certain notes from chords. For example, 13th chords have 7 notes, (with formula 1 3 5 b7 9 11 13). We often omit the 11th because it can clash discordantly with the 3rd. We can also omit the 5th as it doesn't add much to the chord's overall sound. In fact, to convey the essential sound of a 13th chord, all we really need are the notes: 3, b7 & Even the root can be implied just with that 3-note combination.

Augmented and Diminished Chords

So far, all the chords have used note 5 straight from the major scale, but there are two other important chord types that modify note 5, by raising it or lowering it.

AUGMENTED CHORDS:
If we take a major chord (1 3 5) and raise the 5 to #5, we get an augmented chord. As C major consists of C, E & G, then C augmented consists of C E & G#

We can sometimes see other chords that contain that #5 note. For example, C major 7 #5. As we saw earlier, C major 7th consists of C E G & B, so C major7#5 consists of C E G# & B

Augmented chords have the symbol +, e.g., C+ means C augmented

DIMINISHED CHORDS:
If we take a minor chord (1 b3 5) and we lower the 5 to b5, we get a diminished chord. So, as C minor consists of C Eb G, the chord, C diminished consists of C, Eb & Gb.

As with augmented chords, diminished chords can be extended too. There are two important ones, namely: Diminished 7th and half diminished 7th.

The diminished 7th chord has a strange sounding structure because it consists of notes: 1 b3 b5, like the simple diminished chord, but it also includes a 7th note which has been lowered twice!! We call that note a double flatted 7th (bb7). So, the formula for this chord is 1 b3 b5 bb7. The chord, C diminished 7th consists of C Eb Gb and wait for it Bbb. Bbb sounds the same as A of course, but to be correct within our chord naming system, it has to be called Bbb to show that it's a kind of 7th chord.

The half diminished 7th chord is similar to the (fully) diminished 7th, except that the 7th is lowered just once instead of twice. Its formula is 1 b3 b5 b7, and C half diminished 7th consists of the notes: C Eb Gb & Bb. This chord is also called minor 7thb5 because, as you can see, it's similar to a minor 7th chord but with a b5 instead of 5.

Diminished chords have the symbol ° e.g., C°7 means C diminished 7th.

Half diminished chords have the symbol Ø7 (or sometimes just Ø by itself) e.g., CØ7 means C half diminished 7th.

Going Forward

If you can see the logic (such as it is) in the chord naming system, then you can more easily work out any chord construction problems you come across. Memorise the formulas for the important and well-used chords, and you'll find it easy to construct the more obscure ones because they're all just extensions or modifications of the important ones. The clue is almost always in the name.

Questions & Answers

Question: Where is add2? I guess I can play Cadd2 in the key of C. Can you help me?

Answer: Add 2 chords are just another name for add 9 chords because the 2nd note of a scale is the same as the 9th note. C add2 / C add 9 = C E G & D

Question: Isn't the "7th #11" and "7th b5" the same chord? Or are the 7th#11 and 7th b5 different because the 5 is still present in a 7th #11 chord? If you then omit the 5 in a "7th #11" is it called a "7th b5"?

Answer: It's the context of the music that determines the most appropriate name of the chord. Compare C7b5 (C E Gb Bb) with C7#11 with a santander auto finance payoff phone number 5th (C E (G) Bb F#). In the first case, C-Gb is a tritone interval. If it resolves in the music in the standard way by going to Db-F) then the Gb really is a Gb (falling to F) and not an F#, and the chord is best called a 7b5. If in a 7#11 that same note has a rising, leading note quality rising to G in the next chord, then it really is an F#, not a Gb. If the music proceeds to the next chord in a non-standard way, or nonfunctional way then choosing the most logical name requires other factors to be taken into the account such as the key of the music and the neighboring chords, etc.

Question: Can a pianist play 7th chords with both hands on a piano keyboard?

Answer: Yes.

Comments

Casey on July 24,

"Note* Referring to the major scale as a way to find the chord tones is purely a convenience. The chord tones don't actually come from the major scale or any scale; it's just a handy and familiar yardstick for applying the chord formulas. Any 'diatonic' scale would work just as well, but all the formulas would be different. The major scale is by far the best known of all the diatonic scales; that's why it's the only one used for this purpose."

Dude this is EXACTLY what I came here to figure out. Thank you so much for writing this part, it makes so much sense now. I was sitting here wondering if there were like, minor chord formulas or something.

chasmac (author) from UK on June 27,

The fingers you use depends on the instrument - piano, harp, guitar, ukulele, etc.

Constant on June 14,

How to place the fingers by just seeing the formulas,not with the diagram?

As "R"

chasmac (author) from UK on November 21,

@ Dave

Slash chords are normal chords built on top of a bass note, usually as part of a melodic bass run. Am/G is A minor(A-C-E) with the non-chord tone G in the bass. Am7/G is Am7 (A-C-E-G) built on top of the chord tone G. If the G has no melodic function then it's just Am7 in 3rd inversion (G-A-C-E).

chasmac (author) from UK on November 21,

@ Zack

Yes - it's an add 9 () or minor add 9 if the 3rd is a flat 3rd (1-b) The order of notes doesn't change anything so it doesn't matter where the 3rd is - it will cancel any sus effect.

Dave. on November 20,

How are slash chords constructed? and how are they used, thanks.

Zack on September 10,

What if you have a suspended 2 chord but have the third above the octave is it still an add chord?

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Keys, chords and scales

Keys, chords and scales

Sometimes composing a melody with Sonic Pi can be tricky, if you don’t immediately know what or sounds like. To help with that, here’s a browser keyboard for trying out your ideas. If you want, you can select a scale from the drop 1st day of spring 2019 usa to see what keys might sound nice in a certain key.

What chords and notes to play?

Obviously you can play whatever notes and chords you like to. There’s no right or wrong. Music doesn’t have to sound harmonic and some dissonance or noise belongs to a track as much as the artist wants it to belong. However there’s some rules you can try out if you wish.

If your composition is in a certain key, let’s say C major for an example, you have certain chords that probably sound nice on the track. Here’s a table with some jazzy chords that should play along with each other quite nicely. If you want you can look more in to chord progressions here: mynewextsetup.us

Common chord progressions in majorI - IV - VI - VI bank ozk online banking login IV - VII - V - I
Major keyIIIIIIIVVVI
Cchord(:C, :major7)chord(:D, :minor7)chord(:E, :minor7)chord(:F, :major7)chord(:G, "7")chord(:A, :minor7)
Dbchord(:Db, :major7)chord(:Eb, :minor7)chord(:F, :minor7)chord(:Gb, :major7)chord(:Ab, "7")chord(:Bb, :minor7)
Dchord(:D, :major7)chord(:E, :minor7)chord(:Gb, :minor7)chord(:G, :major7)chord(:A, "7")chord(:B, :minor7)
Ebchord(:Eb, :major7)chord(:F, :minor7)chord(:G, :minor7)chord(:Ab, :major7)chord(:Bb, "7")chord(:C, :minor7)
Echord(:E, :major7)chord(:Gb, :minor7)chord(:Ab, :minor7)chord(:A, :major7)chord(:B, "7")chord(:Db, :minor7)
Fchord(:F, :major7)chord(:G, :minor7)chord(:A, :minor7)chord(:Bb, :major7)chord(:C, "7")chord(:D, :minor7)
Gbchord(:Gb, :major7)chord(:Ab, :minor7)chord(:Bb, :minor7)chord(:Cb, :major7)chord(:Db, "7")chord(:Eb, :minor7)
Gchord(:G, :major7)chord(:A, :minor7)chord(:B, :minor7)chord(:C, :major7)chord(:D, "7")chord(:E, :minor7)
Abchord(:Ab, :major7)chord(:Bb, :minor7)chord(:C, :minor7)chord(:Db, :major7)chord(:Eb, "7")chord(:F, :minor7)
Achord(:A, :major7)chord(:B, :minor7)chord(:Db, :minor7)chord(:D, :major7)chord(:E, "7")chord(:Gb, :minor7)
Bbchord(:Bb, :major7)chord(:C, :minor7)chord(:D, :minor7)chord(:Eb, :major7)chord(:F, "7")chord(:G, :minor7)
Bchord(:B, :major7)chord(:Db, :minor7)chord(:Eb, :minor7)chord(:E, :major7)chord(:Gb, "7")chord(:Ab, :minor7)
Common chord progressions in natural minorI - VI - VIII - IV - VIII - IV - VI - VI - III - VIIII - V - I
Minor keyIIIIIIIVVVIVII
Cmchord(:C, :minor7)chord(:D, "m")chord(:Eb, :major7)chord(:F, :minor7)chord(:G, :minor7)chord(:Ab, :major7)chord(:Bb, "7")
Ddmchord(:Dd, :minor7)chord(:Eb, "m")chord(:E, :major7)chord(:Gb, :minor7)chord(:Ab, :minor7)chord(:A, :major7)chord(:B, "7")
Dmchord(:D, :minor7)chord(:E, "m")chord(:F, :major7)chord(:G, :minor7)chord(:A, :minor7)chord(:Bb, :major7)chord(:C, "7")
Ebmchord(:Eb, :minor7)chord(:F, "m")chord(:Gb, :major7)chord(:Ab, :minor7)chord(:Bb, :minor7)chord(:B, :major7)chord(:Db, "7")
Emchord(:E, :minor7)chord(:Gb, "m")chord(:G, :major7)chord(:A, :minor7)chord(:B, :minor7)chord(:C, :major7)chord(:D, "7")
Fmchord(:F, :minor7)chord(:G, "m")chord(:Ab, :major7)chord(:Bb, :minor7)chord(:C, :minor7)chord(:Db, :major7)chord(:Eb, "7")
Gbmchord(:Gb, :minor7)chord(:Ab, "m")chord(:A, :major7)chord(:B, :minor7)chord(:Db, :minor7)chord(:D, :major7)chord(:E, "7")
Gmchord(:G, :minor7)chord(:A, "m")chord(:Bb, :major7)chord(:C, :minor7)chord(:D, :minor7)chord(:Eb, :major7)chord(:F, "7")
Abmchord(:Ab, :minor7)chord(:Bb, "m")chord(:B, :major7)chord(:Db, :minor7)chord(:Eb, :minor7)chord(:E, :major7)chord(:Gb, "7")
Amchord(:A, :minor7)chord(:B, "m")chord(:C, :major7)chord(:D, :minor7)chord(:E, :minor7)chord(:F, :major7)chord(:G, "7")
Bbmchord(:Bb, :minor7)chord(:C, "m")chord(:Db, :major7)chord(:Eb, :minor7)chord(:F, :minor7)chord(:Gb, :major7)chord(:Ab, "7")
Bmchord(:B, :minor7)chord(:Db, "m")chord(:D, :major7)chord(:E, :minor7)chord(:Gb, :minor7)chord(:G, :major7)chord(:A, "7")
Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Chord Construction & Chord Formula List

Although many musicians who play chordal instruments have a good knowledge of chord construction, all chords in the key of c piano more rely purely on memory (or notation) to play them. While it's great to have a decent repertoire of memorised chords, understanding how chords are formed and named extends your chord knowledge considerably.

A knowledge of chord construction gives you the ability to play chords that you've never previously learned just by seeing the chord's name and understanding what the name actually means. It also allows you to modify chords based on 'sound' musical knowledge rather than guesswork. For those who want to improvise over chord progressions, it's an advantage to know which notes belong to the chord being played and which don't, So that they can target those essential chord tones accurately, and treat non-chord tones accordingly.

How Chords are Named

Chords are named in two main parts. The first part is simply the name of the note that the chord is based on (also known as the chord's ROOT). The second part refers to the type (or quality) of the chord. It contains words or numbers or both and describes how the other notes of the chords are chosen to go with the root.

For example, in the chord, C major 7th, the first part of the name (i.e., the root) is C and the second part (the type of chord) is major 7th. Similarly In the chord, F# minor 7th, the root is the note F# (F sharp) and the second part, minor 7th, is the type of chord. In the chord Bb major, the root is the note Bb (B flat) and the chord type or quality is major. As you probably know, when a chord is major, we usually drop the word major and just call it by its root name, (Bb in this case).

Finding the root note is easy enough as it's always given, but in order to know which notes are specified by the second part of the name, we have to do two things:

  1. Refer to the notes of the major scale that corresponds with the root. So for any chord with C as the root, we need to know the scale of C major.
  2. Next, we have to know the formula for that type of chord. That tells us which notes to select (or modify) from the scale.

Note* Referring to the major scale as a way to find the chord tones is purely a convenience. The chord tones don't actually come from the major scale or any scale; it's just a handy and familiar yardstick for applying the chord formulas. Any 'diatonic' scale would work just as well, but all the formulas would be different. The major scale is by far the best known of all the diatonic scales; that's why it's the only one used for this purpose.

The next part of this lesson lists the formula for each of the most common chord types. When you know the formula for any basic chord, it becomes easy to work out the notes of the more obscure chords as the clue is in the name.

Chord Formula List

Here is a list of chord types, each with its formula and example based on the root note C. It's not a complete list - that would be impossible, and it would also defeat the purpose of the all chords in the key of c piano, which is to give you an understanding of how chords are formed, and how the name reflects the structure. More in-depth info for specific chords is given below the list. Hopefully, if you come across a chord type not mentioned below, you'll be able to make an educated attempt at finding the notes.

C major scale (2 octaves) > C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C

Chord Construction

What Is a Diminished Chord and How to Use Them

What is a diminished chord? Learn how to make diminished chords and use them to spice up your chord progressions in this basic music theory guide. Knowing how to use diminished chords will open creative doors and expand your songwriting.

Music Producer Playing Synthesizer

What is a Diminished Chord?

A diminished chord is a triad built from the root note, minor third, and a diminished fifth. It&#;s a chord with two minor thirds above the root. Meaning three semitones separate the third and fifth notes of the chord. 

For example, a C major triad has the notes C (the root), E (the third), and G (the fifth). Therefore, a diminished C triad has the notes C, Eb, and Gb.

Diminished chords inject a sense of drama, tension, and suspense into music. They also have a distinct timbre that sounds dark, dissonant, and eerie. Their oddness makes them unique!

However, the flattened fifth makes diminished chords sound unstable and creates a desire for tonal resolution. They leave the listener hanging, which makes the resolve back to consonant chords more impactful. This sense of tension makes them interesting chords to use in your progressions.

How to Make a Diminished Chord?

D Diminished Chord Piano Keys

Diminished chords are easy to build because the note intervals are equally spaced by a third. Meaning each note in a diminished chord is separated by three half steps. Easy right?

There are three types of diminished chords: diminished triads, the diminished seventh, and the half-diminished seventh

Let&#;s look at how to build these three chords using the key of D minor as an example.

1. The Diminished Triad (dim or °)

The diminished triad chord consists of a:

  • Root Note
  • Minor 3rd
  • Diminished 5th

A diminished triad is a minor union savings bank mt washington with a flat fifth. The chord symbols are &#;dim&#; and &#;°.&#; For example, Ddim or D°.

To build a diminished triad, first find the root note of the chord. The root is always the note that&#;s the basis for the chord. For example, the root note for a Ddim chord is D.

Next, count three semitones to find the third note of the scale. For example, the third note above the root in a Ddim chord is F.

Lastly, count three semitones from the third or six semitones from the root to find the diminished fifth note. For example, the fifth note in a Ddim chord is Ab. The complete Ddim triad chord has the notes D &#; F &#; Ab.

2. The Diminished Seventh Chord (dim7 or °7)

The diminished seventh is a four-note chord that consists of a:

  • Root Note
  • Minor 3rd
  • Diminished 5th
  • Diminished 7th

The diminished seventh (or fully diminished chord) adds a minor-third above a diminished triad. Meaning the seventh note is three semitones above the flattened fifth.

For example, the seventh note in a Ddim7 chord is Cb. Therefore, the complete Ddim7 chord has the notes D &#; F &#; Ab &#; Cb.

3. The Half-Diminished Seventh Chord (m7b5 or ø7)

The half-diminished seventh is a four-note chord consisting of a:

  • Root Note
  • Minor 3rd
  • Diminished 5th
  • Minor 7th

A half-diminished chord adds a major-third above a diminished triad. Meaning the seventh note is four semitones above the flattened fifth.

For example, the seventh note in a Dø7 chord is C. The complete Dø7 chord has the notes D &#; F &#; Ab &#; C.

How to Use Diminished Chords in Your Progressions

Passing Diminished Chord Ableton Live

Diminished chords often function as passing chords in a progression. Passing chords spice up standard progressions and create tension between chords with a stronger relationship to the key.

A passing chord acts as a transition that sits &#;in-between&#; the primary chords of a progression. Typically, a passing chord is not in the same key as the song. As a result, it creates a dissonant sound that needs to resolve to a chord harmonically related to the song&#;s key.

The most common passing chord is the diminished seventh. Try adding a diminished chord in the middle section of your chord sequence. Then resolve it to a major or minor chord one half-step higher. This technique adds tension and intrigue to a chord progression while remaining melodic.

For example, try replacing the V chord in a standard chord progression with a Dim7 or m7b5 chord. If you have a common I &#; V &#; vi- IV chord progression, the diminished chord will play second.

However, diminished chords are not limited to replacing the V chord. You can use them anywhere within a chord progression. But, because diminished chords sound unstable, they rarely play on the first or last bar. You won&#;t find a sequence of diminished chords in a progression, either. They typically occur once for a beat or two within a chord progression. They&#;re passing chords, so they pass by quickly.

Where to Use Diminished Chords

To figure out where to use a passing diminished chord, find two chords a whole step apart. Next, build a diminished chord on the note between them. Lastly, put the passing chord between the two chords a whole step apart.

For example, let&#;s use the progression C &#; Am &#; F &#; G. The F major and G major chords are a whole step apart. The note between them is F#. Build a F#dim chord and put it between the F and G major all chords in the key of c piano. The new progression is C &#; Am &#; F &#; F#dim &#; G.

Diminished Chord Chart 

You can play the diminished chord in all twelve keys. In major scales, a diminished triad occurs only on the 7th scale degree. Whereas in minor scales, a diminished triad occurs on the 2nd scale degree.

Below is a list of all twelve diminished triads for each key:

C dim = C &#; Eb &#; Gb
C# dim = C# &#; E &#; G
Db dim = Db &#; E &#; G
D dim = D &#; F &#; Ab
Eb dim = Eb &#; Gb &#; A
E dim = E &#; G &#; Bb
F dim = F &#; Ab &#; B
F# dim = F# &#; A &#; C
Gb dim = Gb &#; A &#; C
G dim = G &#; Bb &#; Db
Ab dim = Ab &#; B &#; D
A dim = A &#; C &#; Eb
Bb dim = Bb &#; Db &#; E
B dim = B &#; D &#; F

Example of Diminished Chord Progressions

There are several ways to resolve a diminished chord to either a major chord or minor chord. Leading a song into the vi chord is one common use of diminished chords in popular music. The vi chord builds on the 6th scale degree of the key.

The song below uses a diminished triad in a major key following a V &#; vi &#; IV &#; I progression.

&#;Stay With Me&#; by Sam Smith

Sam Smith&#;s hit &#;Stay With Me&#; uses the G#dim chord in all three choruses and the bridge. Here is one of those rare examples where the progression starts on a diminished chord. 

Listen to the chord quality of G#dim and how it leads into the last chorus repetition. It changes the emotional feel and sets up the final &#;stay with me&#; lyric at the end of the chorus. You&#;ll also notice how quickly the chord plays compared to the other chords. Can you hear the subtle differences?

[Chorus]

Won&#;t you stay with me?

Am &#; F &#; C

Cause you&#;re all I need

Am &#; F &#; C

This ain&#;t love it&#;s clear to see

G &#; Am &#; F &#; C

But darling, stay with me

G#dim &#; Am &#; F &#; C

The bridge follows the same chord progression but with different lyrics. It sets up the final chorus.

[Bridge]

Oh oh oh ohhh oh ohhh oh ohhh

Am &#; F &#; C

Oh oh oh ohhh oh ohhh oh ohhh

Am &#; F &#; C

Oh oh oh ohhh oh ohhh oh ohhh

G#dim &#; Am &#; F &#; C

Oh oh oh ohhh oh ohhh oh ohhh

G#dim &#; Am &#; F &#; C

Conclusion

Music theory tools like diminished chords expand the sounds you have available in your chord progressions. Using them in your songwriting will improve your overall sound and make your music more interesting.



About Icon Collective

ICON Collective is a Los Angeles and Online music production school that teaches you core technical skills while unlocking your unique creative process. Mentorships with industry professionals let you access real-world insights and help you personalize your music education. Check out our Music Production Programs.



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Introduction: How to Add Chords to a Melody on the Piano

Adding chords to a melody on the piano just changes everything!

It's like going from being the only person in a room to having a whole team with you that supports you and gives you lots of new tools to work with. Or it's like making a drawing in black ink, and then filling in everything with beautiful and different colors.

Harmony - Chordsare the colors in music.

Chords always contain more than one note. Melody is usually just one note that follows a particular lyrical line in the music.

For this lesson, we're going to be using chords that have 3 notes in them. They are really easy to learn and once you know your chords for a given key signature, you're ready to add them into a melody line that you already know in your right hand.

This lesson will go over 3 different steps to finding the right chords for the melody that you're playing and we'll apply those new ideas to 3 different piano pieces so you can see exactly how this works, and you'll be able to practice with me using the video tutorial in the last step.

Let's get started by looking at the 1st thing you need to do to apply chords to your playing.

Step 1: Figure Out the Key Signature

This 1st step is easy, especially if you are familiar with several different key signatures already.

When you look at a melody that you want to add chords in to, look anthonys edmonds happy hour at what the key signature is for the piece.

You have to know the key signature in order to play the correct notes in each chord, as they will be made up of the specific notes for this specific key signature.

If your piece is in the key of C, then you know that every chord you play will have all natural notes.

If your piece is in the key of G, then you know that every chord you play with an F in it will be a F# as F# is in the key signature of G.

Make sense?

OKnow, practice through the scale of your piece a few times to reinforce your knowledge of that particular key.

Do this with each new key you are playing whenever you want to add in your own chords to a melody.

(In the video, the first 2 pieces that we will go over are in the Key of C, so take a minute to go through the C scale before watching the video just to prepare yourself better)

Now that we know the key signature, let's move on to Step identifying the chords in the key signature that we're playing in.

Step 2: Figure Out the Chords - Specifically the Primary Chords

Now we're about to dive deeper into the area of music theory as we learn how to put notes together to make chords that create breakfast at tiffanys asian that each major scale has 8 notes in it. 7 are unique but the bottom and top note are the same note, just an octave apart.

You can build a chord on every single note (all 8) in each scale!

It's really incredible just how much music can come out of just 8 notes!

If you're playing in the key of Cbuild chords on each note of the scale by simply playing 1, 3 &5 fingers, on notes C, E, & G. Now repeat this starting on the next consecutive note going all the way up through the entire scale.

For the C scale, your chords would be:

  1. C-E-G
  2. D-F-A
  3. E-G-B
  4. F-A-C
  5. G-B-D
  6. A-C-E
  7. B-D-F
  8. C-E-G

Notice how the 1st and last chords are actually the same notes, but again, they are an octave apart.

Also notice the numbers next to each chord. See how the number corresponds to where the first note falls in the scale itself? It's in numerical order, and we actually call these chords by these numbers.

When you add chords to a melody line, you will be able to choose from any of these 8 chords to match with the notes in the melody.

Most often, however, we use specific ones, that are called Primary Chords.

The Primary Chords - there are 3 of them for each Key Signature are:

Chord 1, Chord 4, & Chord 5

This means that in the above example if you take the numbers next to those chords for what your primary chords are in the key of C, they would be:

1) A-C-E

4) F-A-C

5) G-B-D

This is true for any key signature you're playing in.

Why don't you take a few minutes now to play these primary chords on your piano, and then take another simple key signature, like G major, and figure out the primary chords in that key as wellNeed a hint?

G Majorthe Primary Chords are:

1) G-B-D

4) C-E-G

5) D-F#-A

Why do we have a F# in the 3rd Primary Chord? Because ncesc com to des nc gov Key of G major has All chords in the key of c piano in it. Remember that your chords always have to have the same sharps, flats, and naturals that are in the key signature.

Why all this emphasis on Primary Chords?

They will be the ones that you use the most when you start adding chords to your melody lines. So remember this, and focus on these 3 chords in each of your key signatures so you can start bringing them into your playing more.

We know so far that we need to identify the key signatures of our pieces first, and then we need to identify the chords on each numbered note in the scale, and finally, we learn to really focus on the Primary Scales as they are the easiest to match to a melody line and most often used in all kinds of playing styles.

Now, let's look at several examples of how we actually do this with different pieces.

Step 3: First Example - Jingle Bells

This piece is in the key of C Majora great one to start with.

Look at the first note of the pieceit's E, right?

How do you choose out of all those 8 chords in the key of C major, the right one to go with that first E?

First, always try your 1 chordthat's a great place to start and it will usually fit just right with the first note. In this case, play the Chord with the notes C, E, & G.

Play the chord with your left hand while you play the melody in your right hand. Just play the 1st measure.

Now here's an important thing to remember!

When you want to pair a chord with a specific note, always play a chord that has that same note in your melody line as well.

So if your note is E, you would want all chords in the key of c piano play a chord that has an E in it. In this case, the first note is, in fact, E, and lookthe 1st chord which also happens to be a Primary Chord, as E in it as well. Union savings bank mt washington can't go wrong with picking that chord to go with the E note.

Don't try to add in a bunch of different chords in each measure, to begin withthat's too complicated. Just start by using one chord for each measureand it can be the same chord for each measure in the beginning; just make sure you start adding in different ones as you get more comfortable with doing this.

If any of this is confusing, be encouraged! I go over all of these examples in this lesson in the video at the end and I take you through the whole piece with chords, not just the 1st measure like we went over here.

Let's look at our next example. It's in the same key, but it has different notes so we'll use different chords.

Step 4: 2nd Example - Deck the Halls

This great piece is in the key of C major just like our last one was.

Notice how the 1st note in Deck the Halls is a G.

Remember what we have to do to add in the right chords for this melody?

  • Figure out the Key Signature - C Major
  • Figure out the chords in the Key of C Major - see Step 2
  • Identify the Primary Chords in this Key - see Step 2
  • Choose a Chord that contains the same note that is in your melody line to play for that measure.

What chord would you choose to play with the G that air force academy jobs the 1st note of this piece?

hint - The Primary Chords in C are C, F, & G

Do any of these primary chords have a G in it? Yes, in fact, 2 of them do! C does, as well as G. So which one do you choose?

Remember when we said in the last step that you'll usually pick the 1 chord to start the piece out? This is exactly what you do hereeven though you have 2 options, you'll usually come out the best if you pick the 1 chord for the very beginning.

So in this piece, you would how to find my paypal account number the 1 chord with the notes C, E, & All chords in the key of c piano in it while playing the melody of the 1st line in your right hand.

I take you through this whole piece in the video so you'll get a really good understanding of each measure and the changes in chords as the notes themselves change measure to measure. Be sure to watch!

Our last example is in a different key. This will help you apply what we've learned up to this point using different notes now.

Step 5: Example 3 - Mary Had a Little Lamb

Now we're dealing with a new key signature which will require us to identify different chords than we played in the key of C.

Anddon't worryyou won't have to learn how to play the violin to play this version of "Mary Had A Little Lamb"it's just the music sample that I happened to find! :)

This piece is in the Key of D Major sharps: F# & C#.

Although the notes have changedthe principal hasn't. Let's walk through this.

  • Identify the Key Signature: D Major - (F#/C#)
  • Play through the D Major Scale
  • Identify the 8 Chords in the D Major Scaledo it the same way you did for C Major in Step 2
  • Identify the Primary Chords in D Major (1, 4,& 5 chords) - Step 2
  • Make the 1st chord of the piece your 1 Chord and make sure each chord contains the same note that is in the melody line.
  • Just try using 1 chord per measure unless the notes change too much.

That's all you need to do and you do this with any key signature you're playing in. Later on, when you start playing in minor keys and other modes, you'll still do this same method to add in harmony to the melody line.

mynewextsetup.us's a lot of information. Read through this several times slowly before you even try this on the piano. That gives your brain time to process all of the new info without overwhelming yourself with understanding and playing it at the same time. Once you've done thatgrab your keyboard and sit down with me while I take you all the way through each of these pieces - measure by measure while we add in chords and talk about even more ways that you can easily harmonize your playing.

Ready to Come and Practice With Me?

Step 6: Come Practice With Me!

Playing through all of these examples with me in this video will really reinforce what we went through in this lesson here.

It's always better to play with someone who is teaching you a new concept and these videos give you a sort of "teacher on demand"!

Just remember to take this slowly -

Start with the Key of C so you don't have to worry about sharps or flats; know the all chords in the key of c piano well and play through each chord of the scale like we did earlier, and then really dig into each of these pieces with me, because in the video I'll walk you through the changes in notes that come in some of the measures and how you pick the right chords for those notes - especially when we're not using the 1 chord like we predominantly do in the beginning of each piece.

I hope you enjoy this lesson because being able to harmonize melodies on your own will add so much to your piano playing!

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Feel and Key

How to write chord progressions

Pick a progression type that matches what you want to play. Remember that your playing style can also affect the emotion of a chord progression.

Next, pick a key that you feel comfortable playing in. If you're playing guitar, the keys with the easiest chords are G major, E minor, C major and A minor.

Or why not just hit Randomize?

Main Progression

This is your chosen progression, in the key you selected. Sounding too happy? Try changing the key to minor. Too depressing? Change it to major.

Alternatives

This section does some magic with the circle of fifths to find some progressions that will probably sound good with the main progression.

The key might not match exactly in some of these, but you can use these to mix it up to put an interesting chorus or bridge in your song.

All Chords in Key

This section shows you all of the standard chords in the key you've chosen. If you want to put an extra chord in your progression to change it up, pick from one of these.


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Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Let’s take a look at the chords that appear in the keys of C Major Scale. We’ll start by revising the tonic chord, or home chord. Remember, the tonic chord of any key is the chord built on the first note of the scale. For more clarity on chords, read our article on Piano Chords Overview.

We start with the C Major scale. And give each note a scale degree number:

To build the triad, we take the first, third and fifth notes of the scale: C E G. Play them together and you have a C Major triad!  Notice how this creates a pattern on the keyboard of play one note, skip one note, play one note, skip one note, play one note.

When we talk about numbering the chords, roman numerals are followed. The major chords are numbered in capital roman numerals. the minor chords are numbered in small roman numerals, and the diminished chords are numbered with small letters followed by °.

Primary Triads (Chords) of C Major

Now you’ve mastered the tonic chord of C Major, let’s look at the other chords that are used a lot in this key. We call these the primary triads, or primary chords.

Each key has three primary triads— these are the chords built on the first, fourth and fifth degrees of the scale.

So let’s look back at the scale degrees for C Major:

The first note of the scale is C, the fourth note is F and the fifth note is G. We will use these notes to build our chords.

Chord I &#; C Major

You will notice we use Roman numerals when referring to scale numbers. Chord I is the tonic chord, which we have already learned.

Chord IV &#; F Major

To find chord four, we begin on F; the fourth note of the scale. Remember that pattern you used to find the C chord: play a note, skip a note, play a note, skip a note, play a note? Follow the same pattern to build the F chord. You’ll play F A C.

This is the F Major chord.

Chord V &#; G Major

Follow the same pattern to find chord V, although this time we begin on G, the fifth note of the scale. Remember the pattern: play a note, skip a note, play a note, skip a note, play a note. This time you’ll play G B D.

This is the G Major chord.

Secondary Triads (Chords) in C Major

The secondary triads in any are the chords built on scale degrees two, three and six. To find each of these chords we will again use the pattern of playing one note, skipping one note. You’ll notice that while each of the primary triads is major, the secondary triads are minor. This will be the same in each major key.

  • Chord ii &#; D Minor: D F A
  • Chord iii &#; E Minor: E G B
  • Chord vi &#; A Minor: A C E

Notice that chord vi is the tonic chord of C Major’s relative minor— A Minor.

Chord vii°- B diminished

Building a chord on the seventh degree of a major scale will produce the dark sounding diminished triad. In C Major, this chord is B diminished: B D F. Play it carefully, listening to the difference in the sound.

Extended Chords

Because we are playing in the key of C Major, which has no flats or sharps, all the chords within the key use only the white notes on the piano. We can also use the notes of C Major to play the following four-note seventh chords:

  • C Major 7th: C E G B
  • D Minor 7th: D F A C
  • E Minor 7th: E G B D
  • F Major 7th: F A C E
  • G Dominant 7th (G7): G B D F
  • A Minor 7th: A C E G
  • B Minor 7th Flat 5th (Bm7b5): B D F A

More Chords in different Keys:

Rohit Tripathi

I am the founder of mynewextsetup.us I created this website to help people learn popular songs on the piano. I am a self-taught pianist and I am still learning new things every day.

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Источник: mynewextsetup.us

All chords in the key of c piano -

It probably happened when you were trying to learn a new song that you got a bit overwhelmed by the number of chords and possibilities. You probably even tried to create your own chord progression and got lost by the number of places you could go from a single chord. One of the most important things about music theory is chord families.

What are chord families? Chord families are groups of chords based on the principle chords that are found in harmony. Even though ever chord can be followed by another chord, some are more pleasing to our ears and will undoubtedly sound better.

If we follow the family of chords, each of them will sound good because each of them belongs to the same scale. Since there are twelve notes in the chromatic scale, there will be twelve different families for each of the modes.

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If you are new to guitar theory or music theory I suggest you read my post Guitar Music Theory In-Depth Basics

Different Types Of Chords In The Family

One of the most common mistakes is to assume that all the chords in the major scale are major ones. Even though the scale is major, the chords from that family won’t be the same. There are three basic types of chords in each family and they are a major, a minor, and a diminished chord.

If we take a look at the C major scale, we will have C, D, E, F, G, A, B, and C which is one octave higher. The chords from this scale will be major, minor, minor, major, major, minor, and diminished. This can be applied for any other of the twelve notes from the scale.

Let’s take a look at the table of all the chord families for the major scale.

KeyIiiiiiIVVvivii
C majorCDmEmFGAmB⁰
G majorGAmBmCDEmF#⁰
D majorDEmF#mGABmC#⁰
A majorABmC#mDEF#mG#⁰
E majorEF#mG#mABC#mD#⁰
B majorBC#mD#mEF#G#mA#⁰
F# majorF#G#mA#mBC#D#mE#⁰
F majorFGmAmBbCDmC⁰
Bb majorBbCmDmEbFGmA⁰
Eb majorEbFmGmAbBbCmD⁰
Ab majorAbBbmCmDbEbFmG⁰
Db majorDbEbmFmGbAbBbmC⁰
Gb majorGbAbmBbmCbDbEbmF⁰
Cb majorCbDbmEbmFbGbAbmBb⁰

Now, we will continue with the C major scale. The first note of the scale is C, as we already know, and it is the root note. But when we talk about chord families, C major is tonic. If we talk about the F chord family, the tonic would be F major, of course, for the major scale.

The role of the tonic is rather important since it will create a tonal center of the entire song. We already mentioned principle chords when we said that the families are based upon them in harmony. The first one is the root or the tonic chord. The second one is the fourth step or F major, and the last one is the fifth step or G major.

One of the important things you need to know is how to read chord families. We use Roman numerals for marking chords in the scale, and we will use capital letters for major chords, while non-capital letters will be for the minor.

So in the example of the C major scale, the I, IV, V is C, F, G, where all three chords are major. We already mentioned that the first one is tonic, the second one is subdominant, and the third one is dominant. These three are the main harmonic family.

Interestingly, these three chords are all major chords in the scale.

What Is The Role Of Each Chord?

The first one is the tonic. The role it is marked by the Roman numeral I and it is a major chord. Of course, all of this applies only for this scale and this mode, but more on that later. The role of the tonic is to create an atmosphere of the music piece. The whole point of musical creation is to create some kind of tension, and then to resolve it. This is achieved by returning to the tonic after some kind of progression. Usually, the tonic will be used to start and to end a composition or at least part of it.

The second one, or the sub-dominant, is marked by IV and it is also the major chord. The role of the sub-dominant is to transfer you away from the tonic and toward the dominant chord.

Finally, the last important bit of the family is the dominant chord which is the fifth chord in the family marked by V and in the example of C major it is G major chord. The dominant family wants to return you back to the tonic and create a circle. If played in sequence, the dominant will create a rather strong resolution to your chord progression.

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Chord Families Modes

There are seven modes. So let’s start from the beginning.

Ionian Mode

As we already mentioned all of the previous examples can apply only to the major scale and there are twelve chord families. However, the major scale is just one of the modes available to you.

If we take a look at the C major scale, we have seven different notes C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C. Each of the major scales are built the same way. We have the root of C, full step to D, full step to E, half a step to F, full step to G, full step to A, half a step to B, and full step to C again.

So the schematics to create any major scale are F, F, H, F, F, F, H, F. Where F means full step, and H means half a step. This major scale is also known as the Ionian mode or the first mode where we will start everything. We already mentioned that we can build triads out of each of the chords where the first triad is tonic, the second one is called supertonic, the third one is mediant, the fourth one (we mentioned) is subdominant, the fifth one is dominant (also mentioned), the sixth one is submediant, the seventh one is leading tone, and the last one is tonic again.

Dorian Mode

If we take the same schematic, but move everything circular we will get F, H, F, F, F, H, F, F, where we just took the first full step and moved it to the end of the line, we will get the second mode or Dorian mode. So, for our dear C scale, Dorian mode would go like this C, D, bE, F, G, A, bB, C. While Ionian mode is a major one, also known as the major scale, Dorian is minor.

Naturally, we will get another twelve families of chords based on this mode where we would have different sounding chords and a different approach to the topic we already mentioned.

The chords in Dorian mode are like this i, ii, III, IV, v, vi⁰, VII. The first chord is minor, the second one is also minor, the third and fourth are major, the fifth one is minor, the sixth is diminished, and the seventh one is major. As you can see, everything is changed, and the whole scale will be a minor one just because we changed the order of the full steps and half steps. We already know the C major scale and the reason we use it always is that there are no half-steps on the scale. If you would play this on a piano, you would play only white keys starting from C. However, when it comes to the Dorian scale, D Dorian would go like this D, E, F, G, A, B, C, D.

Phrygian Mode

Let’s go a step further and move everything for one more space. We will have now H, F, F, F, H, F, F, F. This is the third mode and it’s called Phrygian Mode. In the example of C major, we will get C, bD, bE, F, G, bA, bB, C. As you might have guessed already, the perfect scale for the Phrygian mode is E Phrygian where the notes are E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E. Phrygian mode is also minor but you can use it for both minor and major scales. But let’s not complicate things further. The chords in the Phrygian family are i, II, III, iv, v⁰, VI, VII. This way you can build the Phrygian family of chords for any of the twelve notes of the chromatic scale.

Lydian Mode

Lydian is the fourth mode and if we continue moving notes from the scale (or starting point) we will get F, F, F, H, F, F, H. Lydian mode is a major mode, and in the example of C, the Lydian scale would go like this C, D, E, F#, G, A, B, C. The best scale for Lydian mode is, of course, F Lydian where notes are F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F.

Finally, the chord family for the Lydian scale is I, II, iii, iv⁰, V, vi, vii. Lydian mode is also major.

Mixolydian Mode

The fifth mode is Mixolydian and it is played from G to G using only white keys on the piano. Similarly to the previous examples, the notes for G Mixolydian are G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G. The schematic used for this mode is F, F, H, F, F, H, F, and if we apply this to C scale, we will get, C, D, E, F, G, A, bB, C. Naturally, like in the previous examples you could build twelve different chord families using the following scheme I, ii, iii⁰, IV, v, vi, VII. Mixolydian mode is a major one.

Aeolian Mode

Now, for this mode, things get a bit easier since this is our standard minor scale. As you might already know the minor scale for A is without any semi notes and it goes like this A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, which is also known as a natural minor scale. If we apply this to C to create Aeolian mode we will get C, D, bE, F, G, H, bA, bB, C which is simply C minor scale. The scale is built with pattern F, H, F, F, H, F, F.

Naturally, you will have twelve more chord families that are built like this i, ii⁰, III, iv, v, VI, VII. And these are the chord families for the natural minor scale. This is one of the most popular modes besides the Ionian one since most of the songs are either in the major or minor key.

Here is a full table for the Aeolian mode or natural minor, that might help your guitar progress.

Keyiii⁰IIIivvVIVII
C minorCmD⁰EbFmGmAbBb
G minorGmA⁰BbCmDmEbF
D minorDmE⁰FGmAmBbC
A minorAmB⁰CDmEmFG
E minorEmF#⁰GAmBmCD
B minorBmC#⁰DEmF#mGA
F# minorF#mG#⁰ABmC#mDE
F minorFmG⁰AbBbmCmDbEb
Bb minorBbmC⁰DbEbmFmGbAb
Eb minorEbmF⁰GbAbmBbmCbDb
Ab minorAbmBb⁰CbDbmEbmFbGb
Db minorDbmEb⁰FbGbmAbmBbbCb
Gb minorGbmAb⁰BbbCbmDbmEbbFb
Cb minorCbmDb⁰EbbFbmGbmAbbBbb

Locrian Mode

Finally, we have the last mode or the seventh mode which is Locrian. The pattern for Locrian mode is H, F, F, H, F, F, F, and in the example of C we will have C, bD, bE, F, bG, bA, bB, C. Of course, we will have a B Locrian scale which will have only full notes and it will go like this B, C, D, E, F, G, H, A.

As in the previous examples, we will get our final twelve chord families for Locrian mode in the form of i⁰, II, iii, iv, V, VI, vii.

The Circle Of Fifths

While it might seem complex a bit, the basics are simple. Each of the modes will give us twelve chord families we could build and use. There are seven modes and twelve chords which gives us eighty-four different chord families, which is why you might sometimes feel confused when trying to remember them.

We can always place these modes in three groups where we will have three major modes Ionian, Lydian, and Mixolydian. And we will have three minor modes which are Dorian, Phrygian, Aeolian. The last mode or Locrian is diminished.

By knowing this, you could create additional six tables similar to the Ionian we created in the first example, this way, you will have all of the chords families for each of the chords in the chromatic scale in each of the seven modes.

Interestingly, what you’ll create by using this is also known as the circle of fifths which originated in the 17th century and explains the relationship between each of the notes in the chromatic scale.

Conclusion

It is worth mentioning that standard chord progressions are built mostly around the major scale or Ionian mode and using the same chords over and over again can get a bit boring, so you could always try experimenting to create something unique and interesting. Furthermore, the rules are meant to be broken and there are so many musicians that stepped out of these rules to create something beautiful and inspiring.

There are a few additional rules that might explain how to use other types of chords since we mentioned here are only minor, major, and diminished ones. As you know, there are so many songs that use suspended chords, augmented, sevenths, thirteenths, ninths, and so much more. But then things would get complicated even more than they are now.

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Simple formulas help you find any keyboard chords


In this free keyboard chords theory lesson you will learn simple formulas to help you find absolutely any chord on the piano keyboard without having to rely on bulky chord charts or written music.

Understanding these keyboard chord formulas will make a big difference in your ability to enjoy making music on piano or electronic keyboard.

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In our previous lesson on finding the 12 major chords we learned a simple formula and learned that by choosing the First, Third, and Fifth note of any major scale we will end up with the major chord named by that scale.

New term: Musical Intervals.

A musical interval is simply a distance between two notes on any major scale.

No matter what scale we use, the major chord associated with that scale will have a Root which names both the chord and the scale from which it was taken. a Third, (in the case of a major chord we call it a major third) and a fifth sometimes called a perfect fifth.

Using a C major scale as an example, the distance from C to E is a major third. The distance from C to G is a perfect fifth.

As we move through this lesson you will encounter more of these interval names 2nds, 4ths, 6ths, and 7ths.. Again these refer to distances from the root note of any scale or chord.

Lowered and raised intervals.

We will use our # (sharp sign) and b (flat sign ) to raise( # )or lower( b ) an interval one half step as we learn more and more different types of chords. All this will become clearer as we move through the formulas and pick out some chords in a few different scales or keys.

Here are the formulas for your most commonly used chords

We have already figured out a C major chord by choosing Notes 1,3,and 5 ( C, E, G, ) from the C major scale.

Using the chart below we see that the C minor chord uses scale notes 1, b3, 5, or (C, Eb, G) the flat sign means lower the third one half step.

A note from yourPersonal Piano Professor It would be great if you could memorize all the formulas below but there is no need to do it all at once.

If you are a beginner I recommend that as you encounter any new chord in your playing, take the time to figure the chord out using the right formula and then commit it to memory by playing the chord with both hands in all its possible inversions up and down the keyboard.

Remember to notice the patterns and similarities you will surely see, and feel, as you practice. Concentrate on the major and minor triads first.

Best Home Study for "Ear Players"

After checking out dozens of home study courses that teach you to play by ear and focus on chord progressions I am convinced that the folks at Hear and Play have the best, most well rounded program available for just about all styles of music from Gospel to Jazz. Read my review or visit Hear and Play for more information.

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If you have any questions, suggestions, or ideas for future lessons feel free to Contact Me.

Diatonic chords and chord progressions

As you continue learning about keyboard chords you will benefit from understanding diatonic chords. Click the link below to begin this valuable lessons as an introduction to basic chord progressions.

Diatonic Chords and Chords Progressions

As always your questions are welcome and help me to better serve you and others. Use the contact form below to ask a question or make a suggestion or register for customized free lessons from your Personal Piano Professor.

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Let’s take a look at the chords that appear in the keys of C Major Scale. We’ll start by revising the tonic chord, or home chord. Remember, the tonic chord of any key is the chord built on the first note of the scale. For more clarity on chords, read our article on Piano Chords Overview.

We start with the C Major scale. And give each note a scale degree number:

To build the triad, we take the first, third and fifth notes of the scale: C E G. Play them together and you have a C Major triad!  Notice how this creates a pattern on the keyboard of play one note, skip one note, play one note, skip one note, play one note.

When we talk about numbering the chords, roman numerals are followed. The major chords are numbered in capital roman numerals. the minor chords are numbered in small roman numerals, and the diminished chords are numbered with small letters followed by °.

Primary Triads (Chords) of C Major

Now you’ve mastered the tonic chord of C Major, let’s look at the other chords that are used a lot in this key. We call these the primary triads, or primary chords.

Each key has three primary triads— these are the chords built on the first, fourth and fifth degrees of the scale.

So let’s look back at the scale degrees for C Major:

The first note of the scale is C, the fourth note is F and the fifth note is G. We will use these notes to build our chords.

Chord I &#; C Major

You will notice we use Roman numerals when referring to scale numbers. Chord I is the tonic chord, which we have already learned.

Chord IV &#; F Major

To find chord four, we begin on F; the fourth note of the scale. Remember that pattern you used to find the C chord: play a note, skip a note, play a note, skip a note, play a note? Follow the same pattern to build the F chord. You’ll play F A C.

This is the F Major chord.

Chord V &#; G Major

Follow the same pattern to find chord V, although this time we begin on G, the fifth note of the scale. Remember the pattern: play a note, skip a note, play a note, skip a note, play a note. This time you’ll play G B D.

This is the G Major chord.

Secondary Triads (Chords) in C Major

The secondary triads in any are the chords built on scale degrees two, three and six. To find each of these chords we will again use the pattern of playing one note, skipping one note. You’ll notice that while each of the primary triads is major, the secondary triads are minor. This will be the same in each major key.

  • Chord ii &#; D Minor: D F A
  • Chord iii &#; E Minor: E G B
  • Chord vi &#; A Minor: A C E

Notice that chord vi is the tonic chord of C Major’s relative minor— A Minor.

Chord vii°- B diminished

Building a chord on the seventh degree of a major scale will produce the dark sounding diminished triad. In C Major, this chord is B diminished: B D F. Play it carefully, listening to the difference in the sound.

Extended Chords

Because we are playing in the key of C Major, which has no flats or sharps, all the chords within the key use only the white notes on the piano. We can also use the notes of C Major to play the following four-note seventh chords:

  • C Major 7th: C E G B
  • D Minor 7th: D F A C
  • E Minor 7th: E G B D
  • F Major 7th: F A C E
  • G Dominant 7th (G7): G B D F
  • A Minor 7th: A C E G
  • B Minor 7th Flat 5th (Bm7b5): B D F A

More Chords in different Keys:

Rohit Tripathi

I am the founder of mynewextsetup.us I created this website to help people learn popular songs on the piano. I am a self-taught pianist and I am still learning new things every day.

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How to Play Basic Piano Chords

How do you play chords on the piano? This blog takes you through the basics! Learn how to convert chord symbols for the piano, keyboard or organ, which is handy when playing music from a songbook. Once you&#;ve got the hang of it, try a piano book, keyboard book or music theory book to really enhance your skills!

How to play basic piano chords?

What is a chord?

A chord consists of three or more different notes that are played at the same time. A standard C chord (C major) consists of the notes C, E and G. Below, you will find a table of commonly-used chords. Do you want to know more about chords? We offer various music theory books that tell you all you need to know!

The piano keyboard

At the top of this blog, there is an image of a keyboard. If you look closely, you will see only twelve different notes. The rest of the keys are a repetition of the same notes but in different octaves, meaning they are either higher or lower in pitch. Think of it like a child and a grown man singing the same song &#; they are both singing the same melody, but the notes that the man sings are in a lower register than what the child is singing.

Take note:

  • The black keys have two names because they are located between two notes on the major scale.
  • If you&#;re overwhelmed by the amount of keys, concentrate for a moment only on the black keys. They are in groups of two and three. The C note is always the white key directly before a group of two black keys. Or&#; you can use key stickers.

Playing a chord

Let&#;s start by playing a C chord. As mentioned before, this chord consists of the notes C, E and G. See the keyboard depicted below &#; all the C, E and G notes in every octave are marked with a dot. Play any three C, E and G notes on your own piano or keyboard. You can try playing multiple Cs, Es and Gs at once, as long as you play at least one of each!

How to play basic piano chords?

Go to YouTube or your favourite music player and look up the song &#;Let it Be&#; by the Beatles. The very first chord played when the vocals begin is the C chord!

It doesn&#;t matter which C, E or G notes you play on the keyboard, but professionals agree that it sounds best to play the C, E and G notes that are in the same octave. You can start playing the chord in the root position by pressing the C note first, then the E, and finally the G. See the example below.

You can also try different variations of the C chord, as long as C, E and G are in the same octave. Here are some examples:

Take note:

  • If you play the chord too low on the keyboard, it has a tendency to sound dark and cluttered.
  • The chord progressions above (CEG, EGC and GCE) are known as inversions, which you can play in any octave on the keyboard.

Bass note

Everything you have learned up to now is to be played with your right hand, which means your left hand is free to play the bass note. By pressing a minimum of three notes with your right hand and one bass note with your left, you can play a solid, complete chord.

How do you play a bass note? It&#;s important to know that the bass note is the lowest (the furthest left) key in the entire chord. In a C chord, the C is the bass note (C is also the root of the C chord). See the example below. You can play any C on the keyboard, as long as it&#;s lower than the rest of the notes in the chord.

Sometimes, a chord will be denoted as C/G. This means that G is the bass note of the C chord. See the example below. This type of variation is always specified in the sheet music because it gives the chord a different &#;colour&#;!

Take note:

  • A chord might also be C/E. If this is the case, then E is the bass note of the chord.
  • If C is the bass note of a C chord, then the chord will sound finished. If you play a different bass note, then the chord can sound open and unfinished.

Fingering

Fingering refers to which fingers are placed on which keys. The goal is to be able to play notes and chords as comfortably as possible.

The fingering for playing the chord progression C, E, G is as follows: thumb, middle finger, pinky. This placement should feel very natural. If you look closely, you&#;ll see that there is a white key under each of your five fingers. Congratulations, you have officially just nailed fundamental piano fingering!

Take note:

  • The fingering for playing the inversion E, G, C is: thumb, index finger, pinky.
  • For the inversion G, C, E, it is: thumb, middle finger, pinky.

Going from one chord to the other

If you want to play a C chord followed by a G chord (like in &#;Let it Be&#;), then begin by placing your right hand on the C chord in the C E G progression (with C as the root) like the image shows:

From here, you can move to the G chord. The G chord consists of the notes G, B and D with G as the bass note. Choose the G, B and D keys that are closest to the C chord you&#;re playing. See the image below.

Keep the pinky of your right hand on the G so you only need to move your other two fingers to the left! This is to ensure 1) you don&#;t move your hand/fingers unnecessarily and 2) that the chord transition sounds as natural and smooth as possible.

Take note:

  • Don&#;t forget your fingering! The following placement is most natural:
    • C E G : thumb, middle finger, pinky
    • B D G: thumb, index finger, pinky
  • In terms of fingering for the bass notes, the following example is recommended:
    • Bass note C: pinky
    • Going to bass note G: thumb

Chord table

Take note:

  • For each chord in this table, the notes/keys in major are indicated as ‘maj’ and minor are indicated as ‘min’. For each chord, there is also a seventh tone so you can play seventh chords.
  • Chords are usually denoted in the following way:
    • major: C
    • minor: Cm
    • major seventh: C7
    • minor seventh: Cm7
  • Here are a few examples:
    • If you want to play a D chord, a.k.a D major, start by looking up &#;D&#; in the left-hand column in the table. Then, go to the right to find the three ‘maj’ notes (D, F#/Gb, A) that belong in that chord.
    • Want to play Dm? Again, start at &#;D&#; in the table, but now select the &#;min&#; notes (D F A).
    • Dm7: select all ‘min’ notes and add a seventh (C D F A).
Источник: mynewextsetup.us
Chord Formula List
Chord type FormulaExample in C 

Major 

1 3 5

C E G

Named after the major 3rd interval between root and 3

Minor

1 b3 5

C Eb G

Named after the minor 3rd interval between root and b3

7th 

1 3 5 b7

C E G Bb

Also called DOMINANT 7th

Major 7th

1 3 5 7

C E G B

Named after the major 7th interval between root and 7th major scale note

Minor 7th

1 b3 5 b7

C Eb G Bb

 

6th

1 3 5 6

C E G A

Major chord with 6th major scale note added

Minor 6th

1 b3 5 6

C Eb G A

Minor chord with 6th major scale note added

Diminished

1 b3 b5

C Eb Gb

 

Diminished 7th

1 b3 b5 bb7

C Eb Gb Bbb

 

Half diminished 7th

1 b3 b5 b7

C Eb Gb Bb

Also called minor 7thb5

Augmented

1 3 #5

C E G#

 

7th #5

1 3 #5 b7

C E G# Bb

 

9th

1 3 5 b7 9

C E G Bb D

 

7th #9

1 3 5 b7 #9

C E G Bb D#

The 'Hendrix' chord

Major 9th

1 3 5 7 9

C E G B D

 

Added 9th

1 3 5 9

C E G D

 Chords extended beyond the octave are called 'added' when the 7th is not present.

Minor 9th

1 b3 5 b7 9

C Eb G Bb D

 

Minor add 9th

1 b3 5 9

C Eb G D

 

11th

1 (3) 5 b7 9 11

C E G Bb D F

The 3rd is often omitted to avoid a clash with the 11th

Minor 11th

1 b3 5 b7 9 11

C Eb G Bb D F

 

7th #11

1 3 5 b7 #11

C E G Bb D F#

often used in preference to 11th chords to avoid the dissonant clash between 11 and 3 

Major 7th #11

1 3 5 7 9 #11

C E G B D F#

 

13th

1 3 5 b7 9 (11) 13

C E G Bb D (F) A

The 11th is often omitted to avoid a clash with the 3rd.

Major 13th

1 3 5 7 9 (11) 13

C E G B D (F) A

The 11th is often omitted to avoid a clash with the 3rd.

Minor 13th

1 b3 5 b7 9 11 13

C Eb G B D F A

 

Suspended 4th (sus, sus4)

1 4 5

C F G

 

Suspended 2nd (sus2)

1 2 5

C D G

Sometimes considered as an inverted sus4 (GCD)

5th (power chord)

1 5

C G

 

Chord Formula Focus

MAJOR CHORDS

The formula for major chords is 1 3 5. That means if we want to know how to make the chord of C major, we would take the 1st, 3rd & 5th notes of the C major scale. Similarly, if we wanted to build the chord of G major, we would use the 1st, 3rd & 5th notes of the G major scale.

Let's take a closer look at both the scale and chord of C major.

The scale of C major consists of the notes: C D E F G A B C

So applying our 'major chord' formula (1, 3 & 5) to that scale, we get the notes C, E & G.

Play them all at the same time (or even one after the other) and we have the chord of C major. We can duplicate any of the notes to make the chord fuller sounding. For example, we can have C E G E G C, or any other arrangement that our instrument allows.

We can play the notes in any order, but usually we want the lowest pitched note (the bass note) to be the root. If the root is the lowest note, we say the chord is in ROOT POSITION. If any other note is the lowest sounding note, we say the chord is inverted. Chords in root position tend to sound more stable and balanced than when they are inverted. Inverted chords have a more subtle, less definite harmonic effect. Both types (root and inverted) have their place in music.

It also depends on whether another instrument is playing a bass note that is lower than the bass note of the chord. For example, if a guitarist plays the chord C major with E as the lowest note, the chord is said to be in first inversion. However, if at the same time a bass guitarist is playing the root note (lower than the E played by the guitarist), the chord will again sound stable because the overall sound of the chord (bass plus guitar) to any listener will be in root position.

MINOR CHORDS

The formula for minor chords is 1 b3 (flat 3) 5. It's similar to the major chord except that the middle note has been lowered. In other words the distance (or interval) between the root and the 3rd is smaller than in the major chord. That interval is called a minor 3rd and that's why the chord is called MINOR.

To get that b3rd note in order to make the chord of C minor we take the 3rd note of the C major scale and lower it (keeping the same letter name). So instead of C E & G, that the major chord formula gave us, we get C Eb (E flat) & G.

MAJOR 7th CHORDS

The formula for major 7th chords is 1 3 5 7. In other words, it's a major chord with the 7th note of the scale added. So the chord of C major 7th consists of the notes: C E G & B. Note that the word major in this type of chord isn't referring to the fact that this is a major type chord but is referring to the chord's 7th being a major 7th interval above the root This distinguishes it from the 7th chord below, which uses a flat 7th - the 7th note being a minor 7th above the root.

7th CHORDS

The formula for 7th chords (also called dominant 7ths) is 1 3 5 b7.

Applying this formula to the C major scale, gives us the chord C7, consisting of notes C E G & Bb.

Note* Be careful using the term 'dominant 7th' as it has another, more official, meaning, which is 'the 7th chord built on the 5th (dominant) note of major or minor scales'. It's actually referring to a chord function, but in modern times the term has been hijacked to name any chord with the formula b7 regardless of key or scale.

MINOR 7th CHORDS

The formula for minor 7th chords is 1 b3 5 b7. So C minor 7th consists of the notes C Eb G & Bb. It's a minor chord with a flat 7th added.

Extended Chords

You may have noticed that the chords we've dealt with so far have used alternate notes of the major scale. That is, we took the first note, missed the second, took the third, missed the 4th, took the 5th, and so on, all the way up to the 7th. We can describe this by saying that most chords are built in thirds. In other words, the spacing (or interval) between each note and the next covers three letter names.

Here's the C major scale again with the chord C major 7th outlined in bold.

C D E F G A B C

C to E is the interval of a 3rd because it encompasses three letters: C, D & E. Similarly, E to G is a 3rd too, because it spans 3 letters: E, F & G, and G to B is also a 3rd as it spans 3 letters G, A & B. They're not all the same size of 3rds; E to G is a minor 3rd as it's one semitone smaller than the other two, which are major 3rds, but, regardless of size, they're all 3rds because they all span 3 letters.

We can extend the notes even further than the 7th by continuing to add more notes spaced by intervals of a 3rd, but we need to extend the scale beyond an octave to see this. Here is the C major scale written out over two octaves. The notes in bold are all spaced a 3rd apart and the final note is D which is the 9th note of the scale. This gives us the chord C MAJOR 9th with formula 1 3 5 7 9. As mentioned previously in the 'major 7th' example, the word major here is referring to the 7th being a major 7th interval above the root. and not being lowered to a flat 7th.

C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C

As you can see, the 9th note (D) is the same as the 2nd, but we prefer to call it a 9th to show that it has been arrived at by stacking notes spaced by intervals of a 3rd. The same applies to the other notes. The actual pitch (register) of the notes doesn't matter; they could be at opposite ends of a piano. Further extended chords can be formed by continuing this process, giving us 11th and 13th chords. That's as far as we can go. If we add another 3rd to the 13th scale note, we arrive back at C, two octaves above our starting note. So you won't see any number higher than 13 in reference to chords.

It's worth mentioning here that it's possible, and often desirable, to omit certain notes from chords. For example, 13th chords have 7 notes, (with formula 1 3 5 b7 9 11 13). We often omit the 11th because it can clash discordantly with the 3rd. We can also omit the 5th as it doesn't add much to the chord's overall sound. In fact, to convey the essential sound of a 13th chord, all we really need are the notes: 3, b7 & Even the root can be implied just with that 3-note combination.

Augmented and Diminished Chords

So far, all the chords have used note 5 straight from the major scale, but there are two other important chord types that modify note 5, by raising it or lowering it.

AUGMENTED CHORDS:
If we take a major chord (1 3 5) and raise the 5 to #5, we get an augmented chord. As C major consists of C, E & G, then C augmented consists of C E & G#

We can sometimes see other chords that contain that #5 note. For example, C major 7 #5. As we saw earlier, C major 7th consists of C E G & B, so C major7#5 consists of C E G# & B

Augmented chords have the symbol +, e.g., C+ means C augmented

DIMINISHED CHORDS:
If we take a minor chord (1 b3 5) and we lower the 5 to b5, we get a diminished chord. So, as C minor consists of C Eb G, the chord, C diminished consists of C, Eb & Gb.

As with augmented chords, diminished chords can be extended too. There are two important ones, namely: Diminished 7th and half diminished 7th.

The diminished 7th chord has a strange sounding structure because it consists of notes: 1 b3 b5, like the simple diminished chord, but it also includes a 7th note which has been lowered twice!! We call that note a double flatted 7th (bb7). So, the formula for this chord is 1 b3 b5 bb7. The chord, C diminished 7th consists of C Eb Gb and wait for it Bbb. Bbb sounds the same as A of course, but to be correct within our chord naming system, it has to be called Bbb to show that it's a kind of 7th chord.

The half diminished 7th chord is similar to the (fully) diminished 7th, except that the 7th is lowered just once instead of twice. Its formula is 1 b3 b5 b7, and C half diminished 7th consists of the notes: C Eb Gb & Bb. This chord is also called minor 7thb5 because, as you can see, it's similar to a minor 7th chord but with a b5 instead of 5.

Diminished chords have the symbol ° e.g., C°7 means C diminished 7th.

Half diminished chords have the symbol Ø7 (or sometimes just Ø by itself) e.g., CØ7 means C half diminished 7th.

Going Forward

If you can see the logic (such as it is) in the chord naming system, then you can more easily work out any chord construction problems you come across. Memorise the formulas for the important and well-used chords, and you'll find it easy to construct the more obscure ones because they're all just extensions or modifications of the important ones. The clue is almost always in the name.

Questions & Answers

Question: Where is add2? I guess I can play Cadd2 in the key of C. Can you help me?

Answer: Add 2 chords are just another name for add 9 chords because the 2nd note of a scale is the same as the 9th note. C add2 / C add 9 = C E G & D

Question: Isn't the "7th #11" and "7th b5" the same chord? Or are the 7th#11 and 7th b5 different because the 5 is still present in a 7th #11 chord? If you then omit the 5 in a "7th #11" is it called a "7th b5"?

Answer: It's the context of the music that determines the most appropriate name of the chord. Compare C7b5 (C E Gb Bb) with C7#11 with a missing 5th (C E (G) Bb F#). In the first case, C-Gb is a tritone interval. If it resolves in the music in the standard way by going to Db-F) then the Gb really is a Gb (falling to F) and not an F#, and the chord is best called a 7b5. If in a 7#11 that same note has a rising, leading note quality rising to G in the next chord, then it really is an F#, not a Gb. If the music proceeds to the next chord in a non-standard way, or nonfunctional way then choosing the most logical name requires other factors to be taken into the account such as the key of the music and the neighboring chords, etc.

Question: Can a pianist play 7th chords with both hands on a piano keyboard?

Answer: Yes.

Comments

Casey on July 24,

"Note* Referring to the major scale as a way to find the chord tones is purely a convenience. The chord tones don't actually come from the major scale or any scale; it's just a handy and familiar yardstick for applying the chord formulas. Any 'diatonic' scale would work just as well, but all the formulas would be different. The major scale is by far the best known of all the diatonic scales; that's why it's the only one used for this purpose."

Dude this is EXACTLY what I came here to figure out. Thank you so much for writing this part, it makes so much sense now. I was sitting here wondering if there were like, minor chord formulas or something.

chasmac (author) from UK on June 27,

The fingers you use depends on the instrument - piano, harp, guitar, ukulele, etc.

Constant on June 14,

How to place the fingers by just seeing the formulas,not with the diagram?

As "R"

chasmac (author) from UK on November 21,

@ Dave

Slash chords are normal chords built on top of a bass note, usually as part of a melodic bass run. Am/G is A minor(A-C-E) with the non-chord tone G in the bass. Am7/G is Am7 (A-C-E-G) built on top of the chord tone G. If the G has no melodic function then it's just Am7 in 3rd inversion (G-A-C-E).

chasmac (author) from UK on November 21,

@ Zack

Yes - it's an add 9 () or minor add 9 if the 3rd is a flat 3rd (1-b) The order of notes doesn't change anything so it doesn't matter where the 3rd is - it will cancel any sus effect.

Dave.. on November 20,

How are slash chords constructed? and how are they used, thanks..

Zack on September 10,

What if you have a suspended 2 chord but have the third above the octave is it still an add chord?

Источник: mynewextsetup.us
all chords in the key of c piano

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Comments

  1. Patulong nmn po about user ID pahinge po ng pattern lng kc kht anong ilagay ko ayaw nya po... Salamat sa tutulong po

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