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south carolina state animal

It is National Animal Shelter Appreciation Week! We are so incredibly thankful to the heroes that work in our animal shelters day in and day out. Our shelters. State and federal agencies protect much of the coastal and mountain areas by way of parks and refuges. The white-tailed deer is the best known of the mammals. SC Animal – White Tailed Deer Deer can be seen bounding through South Carolina's woods year-round. They are plentiful in our state, and in the.
south carolina state animal
south carolina state animal

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South Carolina State Symbols - Bird
south carolina state animal

South carolina state animal -

A trail sign at Fort Macon State Park

Our rules are for the protection of our visitors and natural resources, and to make everyone's visit a safe and enjoyable experience. The information given below is a synopsis of rules, regulations, park policies, and in some cases state and federal laws. Please observe them for your safety and enjoyment as well as the safety and enjoyment of others. It will preserve our parks and make them a valuable resource now and in the future.

In some cases there may be park-specific rules or policies that apply to activities within a particular park. Please check with your park of interest for additional information about its park-specific rules.

Also, the list below represents activities available across the parks system. All activities are not available at every park. You may contact your park of interest to get information about specific activities offered at that park.

Click the links below to view specific rules.

General Rules

Possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages is prohibited, except in designated areas. Visitors shall not be or become intoxicated while within any state park or recreation area.

As a courtesy to other campers, please observe the campground quiet hours. Quiet hours are typically from 10pm until 7am. The production or emission in any park or recreation area of noises, amplified speech, music or other sounds that annoy, disturb or frighten park visitors is prohibited at all times.

Some parks border or are scattered along many miles of rivers, waterways and other areas which may border privately owned land. When traveling waterways and using parklands in any of the parks, please respect the rights of private property owners and avoid trespassing on private land when parking vehicles, hiking, biking, canoeing, etc.

Pets are permitted in parks so long as they are on an attended leash no longer than 6 feet and under the constant control of the owner, and on all pedestrian trails.

Pets are allowed in some campgrounds–contact the specific park. Overnight, pets must be confined to the owner's tent or vehicle during quiet hours. Pets are not allowed in the bathhouses or swimming areas.

Pets are strictly prohibited from entering any building, with the exception of service animals and authorized search and rescue dogs. Owners may be asked to remove dangerous or noisy pets from the park.

Pets are not allowed on the ferry at Hammocks Beach State Park. 

Park visitors are prohibited from ascending or taking-off within or upon any state park area or state park water surface, of any airplane, flying machine (includes drones, UAS, quadcopters), balloon, parachute, glider, hang glider (except with permit at Jockey’s Ridge State Park), or other apparatus for aviation. In some limited circumstances, these machines may be operated after obtaining a Special Activity Permit from the park.

Additionally, State Law prohibits persons from launching or recovering any unmanned aircraft systems from state property without consent.

Firearms and other weapons are prohibited except that those with a proper permit may possess a concealed handgun in permitted areas and under the requirements of North Carolina G.S. All firearms and weapons are prohibited in state park visitor centers and park offices. (EXCEPTION: Federal law (36 C.F.R. § ) prohibits loaded firearms or ammunition on those lands and waters at Falls Lake, Jordan Lake and Kerr Lake state recreation areas managed by the state parks system and owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.)

Fireworks, cap pistols, air guns, bows and arrows, slingshots and lethal projectiles or missiles of any kind are prohibited on all properties managed by the N.C. Division of Parks and Recreation.

The removal, destruction or injury of any tree, flower, artifact, fern, shrub, rock or other plant or mineral in any park is prohibited unless with an approved collection permit for scientific or educational purposes.

Certain areas of the park may be closed to public use for safety or for the management and protection of natural resources.

A permit is required for any project involving the collection, removal or disturbance of any natural or cultural resource of any state park unit and for projects that require placing monitoring equipment in any state park unit.

Activities that occur as part of a typical visit to any state park, such as wildflower photography or wildlife observation, do not require a permit. Requests for personal or commercial collecting, or for projects that do not address specific research needs, will be denied. Manipulative or destructive research is generally not permitted. School trips for purposes of simple observation do not require a permit. However, classes that visit the park to collect specimens or to conduct experiments that are not part of a scheduled park educational program are required to obtain a permit. Teachers should contact the park superintendent in advance of their arrival to determine if a permit is needed.

Activities that require additional permits: Certain research projects may require compliance with other environmental and administrative regulations. It is the applicant's responsibility to determine if additional permits are required, to contact the appropriate agencies and obtain those permits. The Division of Parks and Recreation will not issue a park research permit until all other required permits have been obtained. Regulations that require compliance may include but are not limited to: the Endangered Species Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act and the Coastal Area Management Act. Other agencies that may require permits include the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the NC Department of Agriculture's Plant Conservation Program.

Fill out a permit application online.

Littering is illegal. State law requires aluminum cans and plastic bottles to be placed in recycling containers. To help maintain a clean and safe environment for park visitors and wildlife, place trash in proper containers. Wildlife may mistake plastic bags for food and may become entangled in discarded fishing line or other types of litter.

Burying trash is prohibited. Shifting winds and other types of weather may expose trash and endanger wildlife and the environment.

State law requires aluminum cans to be placed in recycling containers where available.

North Carolina state parks are wildlife preserves. The hunting, trapping, pursuing, shooting, injuring, killing or molesting of any bird or animal is prohibited. Feeding or baiting wildlife is prohibited.

Loggerhead and other sea turtles are protected by law. Anyone who harms the turtles, nests or hatchlings is subject to prosecution. Do not enter marked nesting sites on foot or by vehicle.

Bald eagles are protected by law. It is illegal to kill, harass or possess—dead or alive—any eagle or part of an eagle, including feathers and talons. Convictions related to such violations may result in fines as high as $20, and imprisonment for one year.

Nesting shorebirds are protected by law. Anyone who harms the birds, nests, or chicks is subject to a fine. Do not enter marked nesting areas on foot or by vehicle. Anyone who enters the sites, harms or harasses the birds is subject to a fine.

Rules for Activities

In parks where boating and fishing are allowed during park hours, such activities are regulated by all applicable North Carolina laws and regulations, including those regarding fresh and coastal recreational fishing licenses, boat registration and safety requirements.

Laws and regulations may be enforced by the N.C. Division of Parks and Recreation as well as other regulatory agencies including—but not necessarily limited to—the Wildlife Resources Commission, the Department of Transportation and/or the Division of Marine Fisheries. If unsure, call the specific park office before your visit to learn of boating and/or fishing opportunities.

Boats, rafts and canoes are prohibited within designated swimming areas.

In all parks, bicycles are permitted only on those trails or other park areas specifically designated for their use. Not all parks have bicycle trails. Please check with the individual park for availability.

Bicycle riders under age 16 must wear a helmet.

Bicycle passengers who weigh less than 40 pounds or who are less than 40 inches tall must be seated in a separate restraining seat. All other bicycle riders must be seated on saddle seats. Persons unable to maintain an erect, seated position cannot be bicycle passengers.

E-bikes are allowed on all trails where traditional bikes are allowed. The speed limit on all trails is 25 mph.

Conducting commercial business/activity in any park is prohibited except during special events governed by a Special Activity Permit.

Photography or video production for commercial purposes is prohibited except under a Film Permit.

Camping is allowed in designated areas by permit only. In most cases, campers register with a ranger on site or at an on-site registration box. You must register even if you have reserved a campsite.

Fires are permitted only in designated areas and must be tended at all times. Gathering firewood is generally prohibited, but may be allowed in some parks.

Please don’t transport firewood into our state parks because you could unknowingly spread dangerous insects and diseases—such as the emerald ash borer—which can harm the forest. Buy firewood locally where you intend to burn it, or buy heat-treated firewood. Visit the Don't Move Firewood website for more information on how to have a risk-free campfire experience.

All vehicles left in the park after posted park hours must be registered.

Visitors must be 18 years or older to reserve a campsite, and there must be at least one adult 18 years or older present at the campsite throughout the duration of the stay.

There is a maximum limit of 6 people, 2 tents and 2 vehicles per family campsite. All camping equipment and vehicles (if applicable) must be on the campsite and not spread out in the woods. Group campsites vary depending on the size of the campsite, but typically hold individuals.

See the Reservations page for more information about camping and cabins.

Hammocks Beach State Park operates a ferry service to Bear Island. Carts and wagons are prohibited on passenger ferries unless collapsible. Park staff reserve the right to suspend the use of collapsible carts due to space and weight limitations at any time. Passenger conveyance devices, such as strollers and wheelchairs, are allowed. Pets are not allowed on the ferry or in the swimming area.

Hang gliding is only allowed at Jockey's Ridge State Park. Only visitors with a USHGA Hang 1 or other agency-approved rating may hang glide in the park.

For your safety and protection, please stay on designated trails and hiking areas. Also, many rare plants live on thin soils and wet rocks, and are vulnerable to damage from climbing, trampling and scraping.

In parks where horses are permitted in designated park areas or on bridle trails, horses are allowed only on those trails or other park areas specifically designated for their use. Some parks may require special use permits for bridle trail use where trail maintenance is a concern.

Horses are prohibited from camping areas, swimming areas, cabin areas, picnic areas and other day-use areas.

Loading/unloading horses is permitted in designated park areas only. Owners are required to remove all feces from designated horse trailer parking areas.

No carts, carriages or other horse-drawn apparatus are permitted on park trails.

A negative Coggins test not more than 12 months old for all horses over six months of age is required. Proof of equine testing certification must be carried by the horse owner at all times while the animal is within a park.

Rock climbing is only allowed in five parks, by permit (climbers must register before beginning a climb), in designated areas only, and with proper equipment. Those parks are: Chimney Rock, Crowders Mountain, Hanging Rock, Pilot Mountain and Stone Mountain. Climbing is prohibited at all other parks.

  • All climbers must register with the park staff and must keep in their possession a valid rock climbing and rappelling permit.
  • Organized private, commercial, or non-profit groups must obtain a Special Activity Permit prior to the outing. Contact the park office.
  • NC state parks do not install or maintain any climbing route or fixed anchors.
  • New routes are not permitted.
  • Climbers climb at their own risk and are responsible for obtaining proper equipment and training.
  • Unroped climbing is discouraged.
  • Route selection and the decision to rely on any fixed anchors are the climber's responsibility.
  • Climbing activities are permitted in designated areas only and must coincide with the park's posted hours of operation.
  • All accidents and injuries must be reported to park staff.
  • All climbers and rappellers must schedule their activity in order to leave the park by the posted closing hour.
  • Park only in designated parking areas

At Jockey's Ridge State Park, sandboarding and kiteboarding are allowed without a permit. For kiteboarding, please use the parking area at the Soundside Beach access located off of West Soundside Road.

State parks allow for many special recreational activities such as bicycling events, marathons, photo tours, kite-flying contests, club meetings, etc. However, all such events must be held under a Special Activity Permit.

You can download a Special Activity Permit application or obtain one from the park office.

Swimming is not allowed in all parks. Check with the individual park. Swimming and surfing—where allowed—are only permitted in designated areas.

Public nudity, including public nude bathing is prohibited. Children under age five are exempt.

North Carolina motor vehicle and traffic laws apply in all state parks.

Unlicensed motor vehicles, including golf carts, unregistered motorcycles, snowmobiles, utility vehicles, mini-bikes and all-terrain vehicles, are prohibited. Reasonable accommodations will be made for persons with physical disabilities. Electric wheelchairs are permitted but the operator must be the person with the physical disability.

Unlicensed drivers may not operate motor vehicles on park roads.

Motorized vehicles are permitted only in designated areas and not permitted on park trails.

All vehicles left in the park after posted park hours must be registered.

No carts, carriages or other horse-drawn apparatus are permitted on park trails.

View All State Park Regulations (.pdf)

North Carolina Administrative Code – Subchapter 13A

North Carolina Administrative Code – Subchapter 13B

North Carolina Admnistrative Code – Subchapter 13C

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South Carolina adopts mammoth as state fossil after origin debate

CHARLESTON S.C. (Reuters) - The Columbian mammoth became the official state fossil of South Carolina on Tuesday, fulfilling a third-grader’s dream, after months of delay stemming from efforts by some lawmakers to give God credit for creating the prehistoric animal.

Olivia McConnell, 8, of New Zion, watched with her mother, classmates and teachers as Governor Nikki Haley signed the designation into law.

Olivia had written to her state legislator to point out that the state had no official fossil and suggested the animal because in slaves had dug up a tooth from a Columbian woolly mammoth on a South Carolina plantation.

The woolly mammoth, a huge, shaggy, tusked mammal related to the elephant that roamed North America, Siberia and northern Europe, went extinct about 4, years ago, although the Columbian species died out long before that.

The bill passed the state House in March, but legislators tried to add amendments referring to the book of Genesis and God’s creation of the earth and the beasts.

State residents pleaded for senators to keep religion out of science, and the simple designation bill eventually emerged from the legislature free of amendments.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

South Carolina

State Fair: Columbia South Carolina National ForestsSouth Carolina State Forests South Carolina State Parks South Carolina Historic Sites South Carolina Attractions Fishing in South CarolinaHunting in South CarolinaSouth Carolina Homeschooling Listen to Carolina Wren's Song South Carolina Photo GallerySouth Carolina Butterfly Gallery South Carolina Resorts South Carolina RV ParksSouth Carolina Hotels & Reviews Several Native American groups lived in South Carolina. Largest among these were the Cherokee, Catawba, and Yamasee. The Spanish tried unsuccessfully to establish a colony near present-day Georgetown in , and the French also failed to colonize Parris Island near Fort Royal in The first English settlement was made in at Albemarle Point on the Ashley River, but poor conditions drove the settlers to the site of Charleston.King Charles I of England granted the land on which South Carolina is located to Sir Robert Heath in The region was named Carolina, a word derived from the Latin form of Charles, in reference to King Charles. During the Revolutionary War, the almost legendary figure Francis Marion (the Swamp Fox), contributed to the British retreat. Marion and his men would hide in the swamps and strike out in surprise at British troops, only to vanish again into the unwelcoming swampland. British forces finally withdrew from Charleston in The walls of the American fort on Sullivan Island, in Charleston Harbor, were made of spongy Palmetto logs. This was helpful in protecting the fort because the British cannonballs bounced off the logs. South Carolina was the first state to secede from the Union. The Civil War began in at Fort Sumter as South Carolinan troops fired on Federal troops. The City of Myrtle Beach is in the center of the Grand Strand, a mile crescent of beach on the South Carolina coast. In the last 25 years, Myrtle Beach has developed into the premier resort destination on the East Coast. There are more than public and private golf courses in South Carolina.The Saint Cecilia Society, organized in , sponsored America's first symphony orchestra.South Carolina grows more peaches than any other state except California.Johnston is known as the Peach Capital of the World. The only commercial tea plantation in America is in South Carolina on Wasmalaw Island. The Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame features champion thoroughbred flat racers and steeplechase horses trained in Aiken. A noble Catawba Indian who befriended early Camden settlers, King Haiglar is often called "The Patron Saint of Camden." Sumter has the largest Gingko farm in the world. The Lake City tobacco market was established in , and has grown to become one of the two largest markets in South Carolina today. Sweetgrass basket making has been a part of the Mount Pleasant community for more than years. Basket making is a traditional art form that has been passed on from generation to generation. Each year thousands of Purple Martins return to Bomb island on Lake Murray to roost for the spring and summer. It is quite a sight to watch these birds return to Bomb Island each day around sunset. The Edisto Memorial Gardens in Orangeburg displays past and current award winning roses from the All-American Rose Selections. Summerville is the "The Flower Town in the Pines." Since the early s tourists have flocked to the town during early spring to enjoy millions of spring blossoms, particularly azaleas.The Upper Whitewater Falls is the highest cascade in eastern America; it descends for nearly feet. On Nov 2, Strom Thurmond (R) became the first US senator elected by write-in vote. Thurmond received , write-in votes to win his seat. South Carolina's Ethnic Roots: African American %, American %, German %, English %, Irish %. "Americans" are likely descendents of Scots-Irish settlers.Religion in South Carolina: 92% Christian (84% Protestant, 7% Catholic, 1% Other), 7% No Religion, 1% Other Religions

South Carolina has some towns with funny/unusual names like Coward, Due West, Ninetimes, Ninety Six, Southern Shops, South of the Border, and Welcome.

The palmetto, South Carolina's state tree, grows in coastal areas of North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.
Источник: mynewextsetup.us

South Carolina

Atlas of South Carolina State
Click on map for larger view

South Carolina State Symbols

State Nickname: Palmetto State

State Slogan: Smiling Faces. Beautiful Places. Also on one of its two base license plates.

State Motto: Animis opibusque parati (Prepared in mind and resources) and Dum spiro spero (While I breathe, I hope)

State flower: Yellow Jessamine

State bird: Carolina Wren

State fish: Striped bass

State tree: Palmetto

State mammal: White-tailed deer, Boykin Spaniel

State foods: Peach, Milk, Sweet Tea

Becoming a State

Date admitted: May 23,

Number admitted: 8

Prior Name: Province of South Carolina, then sovereign state in Confederation

Postal Abbreviation: SC

South Carolina State Map


The Geography of South Carolina

Total Size: 30, sq. miles (source: Census)

Geographical Low Point: Atlantic Ocean at Sea Level (source: U.S. Geological Survey)

Geographical High Point: Sassafras Mtn. at 3, feet, located in the county/subdivision of Pickens (source: U.S. Geological Survey)

Central Point: Located in Richland County approx. 13 miles southeast of Columbia (source: U.S. Geological Survey)

Counties: 46 (source: National Association of Counties)

Bodies of Water: Atlantic Ocean, Lake Murray, Lake Marion, Lake Moultrie, Lake Hartwell, Pee Dee River, Saluda River, and Santee River

Famous People

  • James Brown - Singer
  • Joe Frazier - Champion Heavyweight Boxer
  • Kevin Garnett - Professional basketball player
  • Sarah Moore Grimke - Women's rights activist
  • Andrew Jackson - The 7th President of the United States
  • Jesse Jackson - Civil rights activist
  • Jasper Johns - Artist
  • Shoeless Joe Jackson - Professional baseball player
  • Chris Rock - Comedian and actor
  • Vana White - Game show host

Fun Facts

  • The state tree of South Carolina, the Palmetto Tree, was used to build the walls for a fort on Sullivan Island. The rubbery trees were a great defense as cannon balls bounced right off them!
  • The first shots of the Civil War were in South Carolina at Fort Sumter.
  • Johnston, South Carolina is called the Peach Capital of the World. There is a giant water tower in the shape of a peach near Gaffney.
  • Before South Carolina adopted the Palmetto State as its nickname, it was called the Iodine State.
  • The official state dance is the Shag.
  • There are rumors that a water monster lurks in the depths of Lake Murray.
  • The state amphibian is the salamander. The state insect is the Carolina Mantis.
  • South Carolina beaches are popular tourist destinations including the Grand Strand and Myrtle Beach.

Professional Sports Teams

There are no major professional sports teams in South Carolina. The Carolina Panthers play just across the border in Charlotte.

Geography >> US States>> South Carolina History

For state symbols, flag, maps, geography, and fun facts:

Источник: mynewextsetup.us?State=South%20Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina State History

The earliest history of South Carolina is similar to a lot of the Eastern United States; it was populated 13, years ago by archaic communities, which went on to follow the same big changes that affected most cultures in the area. By the time of European contact there were 29 nations of native people in South Carolina. The nations of South Carolina mostly fell under two large culture groups, the Eastern Siouan and Cusaboan peoples, though other groups lived in the area.

Following exploration of the coast in by Francisco de Gordillo, the Spanish tried unsuccessfully to establish a colony near present-day Georgetown in , and the French also failed to colonize Parris Island near Fort Royal in Although there was an older charter from , King Charles II of England chartered the colony in to wealthy aristocrats in exchange for their political support back in England. The colony was named Carolina after King Charles, and it acted as a buffer zone between Spanish territory and the other English mynewextsetup.us first English settlement was made in at Albemarle Point on the Ashley River, but poor conditions drove the settlers to the site of Charleston (originally called Charles Town).

South Carolina, officially separated from North Carolina in Charleston, despite its size and influence in the colonies, wasn't incorporated until after the Revolution. The city was run by a governor representing the Crown, and the state was a bastion of Loyalism to the British government. Itwas the scene of extensive military action during the Revolution and again during the Civil War.

In the s, South Carolina played a leading role in Southern hostility to the federal government, and in the entrenchment of slavery in the Deep South. South Carolina was the largest slave state by percentage of people in slavery, and had the strictest laws toward freeing slaves; the government worked hard to ensure the dominance of the minority white population over the black majority. They viewed this as especially necessary since the plantation owners left their plantations for the city during the summer, as they were afraid of contracting malaria.

In this contributed to the Nullification Crisis. South CarolinianJohn C. Calhoun was the nation's most famous pro-slavery mynewextsetup.us , South Carolina became the first state to secede from the mynewextsetup.us Civil War began in as South Carolina troops fired on federal Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor.

After the Confederate loss in the Civil War, South Carolina became the only state with a black majority congress. This saw a brief period of rapidly expanding rights for Black Americans that was swiftly reversed during the Jim Crow era. However, despite its long history as a bedrock slave state, South Carolina didn't see the levels of violence that plagued Mississippi and Alabama during desegregation. Likewise South Carolina was relatively swift among former Confederate states to remove the Confederate flag from government buildings after incidents of racial violence.

In the time since desegregation, South Carolina has converted itself into a popular tourist destination, moving away from the traditional manufacturing and agriculture sectors.

Historic points of interest include Fort Sumter National Monument, Fort Moultrie, Fort Johnson, and aircraft carrier USS Yorktown in Charleston Harbor; the Middleton, Magnolia, and Cypress Gardens in Charleston; and Cowpens National Battlefield. VIsitors might also be interested inthe Hilton Head resorts, and the Riverbanks Zoo and Botanical Garden in Columbia.

South Carolina Culture and Interesting Facts

Myrtle Beach & the Grand Strand

Myrtle Beach is likely South Carolina's biggest tourist attraction, as the center of the Grand Strand string of beaches. The beaches collectivelydrawover 14 million visitors every year?that's nearly three times the population of South Carolina?and Myrtle Beach specifically hosts a lot of famous attractions. The recently opened boardwalk, the nearby Family Kingdom Amusement Park, and the abundant shopping have led Myrtle Beach to receive regular national acclaim. That's a pretty big achievement, considering the town used to be almost entirely off the map. The idea to develop the beach into a tourist area only started in the early s, and the city of Myrtle Beach was only incorporated in the s.

Charleston, South Carolina

The city of Charleston is one of the most historically important cities in the United States. It was one of the first major cities in the country, founded back in , and was at one point the fifth largest city in the nation. For rather unsavory reasons, the city continued to have an outsize influence on the country even as the rest of the country grew and expanded; Charleston was the largest slave port in the United States, sometimes second to Savannah, Georgia. The slave trade in Charleston led to South Carolina being the state with the largest Black majority population andbeing the only state with a majority of legislators being slaveholders. The Civil War started in Charleston when secessionists attacked Fort Sumter. Today the city is famous for much nicer reasons, including its lovely and well-preserved architecture, its food culture, and its healthy arts scene. The city has received international attention and praise.

South Carolina Plantations

The plantations of South Carolina are another popular tourist destination. The plantations were home to the aristocratic elite, who built large country mansions in which to live comfortably as they profited off the forced labor of mynewextsetup.us former slaveholding mansions embody a lot of important history in the South. They offer a glimpse into the historic culture of the area including the artistic tastes and values of the slaveholding class, the economic realities that shaped American history, and the violent injustices inflicted on America's Black population. Some plantations are just catered to tourists interested in the design, but many of the best plantation museums allow visitors to dive into the deep history of slavery.

Gullah Culture in the Lowcountry

Gullah culture refers to the unique culture of Black people living in the Lowcountry of South Carolina and Georgia. Gullah people are most culturally distinct from other Black Americans due to their use of their own creole language, also called Gullah, which heavily draws on different West and Central African languages. South Carolina was a Black-majority state, and more than anywhere else Gullah culture has heavily influenced the whole of South Carolina. The unique style of Gullah art and cuisine makes up some of South Carolina's most powerful cultural legacy. One particular craft, Sweetgrass basket weaving, was recognized as a state symbol.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Nature Notes: Yes, South Carolina has its own state spider

What is your South Carolina IQ? If you read this column often, you have probably read about our state animal, the white-tailed deer, and our state tree, the Sabal palmetto. Most folks could probably also come up with our state bird, the Carolina wren, and maybe even our state vegetable, the collard green.

Would it surprise you, though, that South Carolina has a state spider? It’s true. Some 20 years ago the state legislature decided that the Carolina wolf spider was worthy of such an honor and made the designation official. I can’t say for certain that we needed a state spider, but if South Carolina was going to have one, Hogna carolinensisis a pretty cool critter. And it differs from most spiders in several interesting ways.

When we think of spiders, webs are some of the first things that come to mind. But wolf spiders don’t spin webs. True to its name, the Carolina wolf spider is fast, furry, and generally chases down its prey instead. They are mostly nocturnal, have great vision, and use their eight eyes arranged in three rows to locate their evening meals.

One person recently asked me, after viewing some rather spooky photos of Carolina wolf spiders, if they were very common. These creatures are everywhere! Their range covers most of North America, and if you are wondering how many are hunting on Daniel Island each night, I have a brief experiment for you to try. Don a headlight, or take a flashlight, and shine it from somewhere close to your eyes. Then step outside into your yard after dark on any summer evening when it isn’t wet from a recent rain or sprinkler activity. Can you see them? Those dozens of twinkling stars in the grass are not diamonds, but spider eyes. They are nearly all wolf spiders, and the size of the twinkle will give some indication of the size of the spider.

I stepped out into the green space adjacent to our house on a recent night and there were dozens, if not hundreds, of light-reflecting eyes staring back at me.

Wolf spiders also treat reproduction differently than most of their eight-legged cousins. The female spider wraps her eggs in a silk sack and will protect them and carry them everywhere she goes until they hatch. In another unusual twist, the newly hatched babies, perhaps a hundred or more, will climb her legs and ride around on her back until they are old enough to fend for themselves.

Carolina wolf spiders are the largest of the wolf spider family, with females growing to nearly an inch in body length, or three to four inches long including the legs. Males are slightly smaller. They are hairy and, honestly, a little spooky looking. That said, these spiders are not aggressive and will actively try to stay away from humans or other animals. Like most wild creatures, however, they can bite if cornered or threatened. While they are mildly venomous, it is very rare for a wolf spider bite to require medical attention.

Most of us don’t spend a lot of time exploring our nocturnal surroundings by flashlight. The next time, you do, however, be on the lookout for the South Carolina state spider. They are out there by the hundreds, and they are watching you!

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

State Symbols and Icons: Animals and Insects

Like every state, South Carolina is south carolina state animal with critters on land and in water. But there are those creatures who, by virtue of cuteness, usefulness or widespread interest, have burrowed their way into our hearts. These are the ones spotlighted through legislation as official symbols and icons of South Carolina.

Establishing state symbols first enjoyed widespread popularity in the late s with the adoption of state agricultural and wildlife symbols. Before that, it south carolina state animal customary to choose a symbol and flag upon achieving statehood. InSouth Carolina was one of the first states to establish the tradition of legislative designations, and other states soon followed.

Today, South Carolina has 44 official state symbols and icons established via legislative acts. Of those, a whopping 14 are dedicated to animals and insects. Take a closer look at them in this lineup of official South Carolina critters.

State Amphibian - Spotted Salamander
It took a spirited campaign undertaken by a class of third-graders to win this brightly spotted salamander the State Amphibian designation. Spartanburg’s Woodlands Heights Elementary School was rightly proud of their students for leading the charge to get the job done. Admired for its double rows of yellow dots, the steely gray spotted salamander has held the title since It is indigenous to South Carolina and found across the state, particularly in forests.

State Animal - White-tailed Deer
They can leap tall fences in a single bound and run faster than a speeding bullet—well, not quite. But at running speeds of up to 40 mph, it seems that way. The white-tailed deer has been the South Carolina State Animal since Graceful and strong, these animals have a tail with a white underside that is flashed as a danger warning. They forage on vegetation and are a favorite prey among the hunting crowd. But many lovers of these deer consider them more of a “spirit animal,” a soulful creature to be appreciated as an integral part of South Carolina’s natural beauty.

State Bird - Carolina Wren
The Carolina wren is a usurper of sorts. While it was named state bird init displaced the mockingbird, which had held the spot for six years. But long before the mockingbird took the title, the Carolina wren was considered the unofficial state bird. Promoting the state symbol adoption of birds was a common practice of the Federated Women’s Clubs. The SC branch began lobbying for the Carolina Wren in and gave it an unofficial designation until That’s when, much to the chagrin of the women’s club, the SC legislature selected the mockingbird as the official designee. It took nine years, but eventually, the women had their way. The mockingbird got a figurative boot and the Carolina wren took its place with approval from legislators. It has ruled the roost as the SC State Bird ever since.

State Butterfly - Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly
The buttery-winged tiger swallowtail makes a pretty representative as the South Carolina State Butterfly. Officially designated init comes in two colors, depending on the gender. Males have dark “tiger” stripes on their wings, while females have bluish wings and no stripes. The butterfly was chosen for its familiar presence in South Carolina, where it is often spotted in woods, along rivers, streams and swamps, and just generally flitting about in backyard flower gardens. English artist Mark Catesby is said to have painted the mobile application development company usa swallowtail in in South Carolina, which gives the insect a place of honor in state history.

State Dog - Boykin Spaniel
South Carolina’s favorite canine friend and hunting companion, the Boykin spaniel, achieved official top dog status in The breed was born of the efforts of South Carolinians who bred the dog specifically for hunters. Named for Lemuel Whitaker Boykin, a Camden hunter and breeder who developed the breed in the early s, Boykin spaniels are especially skilled at hunting waterfowl and other birds. They first demonstrated their impressive prowess in the Wateree River Swamp, but it wasn’t long before hunters everywhere recognized their talents. Now, the SC state dog is appreciated nationwide. InGov. Richard Riley designated September 1—the first day of the state’s dove hunting season—as Boykin Spaniel Day in South Carolina. You can learn more about south carolina state animal state dog through an exhibit, “Little Brown Dog,” at the Camden Museum and Archives. 

State Fish - Striped Bass
Prized by anglers across the state, the striped bass became south carolina state animal official South Carolina fish in Abundant in most all our major reservoirs, “stripers” can weigh up to 40 pounds and are known to put up a good fight—an attractive challenge for game fishermen and fisherwomen. Each year, the Santee Cooper lakes draw crowds of anglers on the hunt for striped bass. Spring on the lakes is heralded by the Striped Bass Festival, a day-long celebration of striper love with fishing tournaments, pageants and other events carried out amongst the glorious beauty of blooming azaleas, wisteria and tulips. 

State Wild Game Bird - Wild Turkey
And you thought it was just a bourbon. The wild turkey is honored in South Carolina as the official State Wild Game Bird, a designation it has held since This bird is indigenous to the United States and was nearly extinct in the early s. Efforts of conservation groups turned that around, though, and the wild bird made a stunning comeback nationwide. The South Carolina chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation helps ensure the state population of the bird remains robust. Wild turkeys reach impressive sizes, growing 4 feet in height and weights in excess of 20 pounds. It is not unusual to see them gathered roadside or find a proud tom preening for the ladies out in rural springtime fields.

State Heritage Horse - Marsh Tacky
The official state heritage horse, so named inholds a special place in South Carolina history. Native to the Palmetto State, the Marsh Tacky is an uncanny breed, a small colonial horse bred from horses brought here by Spanish settlers. Its ability to manage our lowland swamps during the Revolutionary War enabled General Francis “Swamp Fox” Marion to outsmart the British who hounded him and his band of men. Thought to be extinct as recently as the s, the critically endangered Marsh Tacky is receiving special treatment from conservation groups like the South Carolina Marsh Tacky Association, which, in addition to advocating for the breed, hosts races and other events. You can visit the headquarters of the Daufuskie Marsh Tacky Society on Daufuskie Island, where the horses are bred and protected. For an unforgettable experience, arrange to take a guided trail ride on a Marsh Tacky or learn more about this beautiful creature with a Marsh Tacky History Tour. 

State Heritage Work Animal – Mule
Call it stubborn, but South Carolina’s undying love for this hard-working, delightful animal meant it was no contest when selecting the state’s heritage work animal in The sterile offspring of mares and male donkeys, mules are special for many reasons. Sincethe South Carolina Donkey and Mule Association was formed just for the purpose of showcasing the amazing tenacity, patience and friendliness of these long-eared animals. Check out their website for sponsored events and opportunities to go for a ride. 

State Insect - Carolina Mantis
The Carolina mantis, or praying mantis, is a hard-working insect that earned its title in The official state insect plays an important part in controlling insects that threaten our agriculture. Found across South Carolina, the graceful mantis is a little more than 2 inches in length and ranges in color from earthy browns and grays to a brighter yellow and green. Larger mantises are likely an invasive Chinese species and not to be confused with our highly useful official insect.

State Marine Mammal - Bottlenose Dolphin
The intelligent, playful bottlenose dolphin has been the official state marine mammal since They are commonly seen frolicking in the waters just off South Carolina beaches. These fascinating animals are distinguished from most bottlenose dolphins in other areas because they “strand feed,” a strategy by which the mammals (sometimes in groups) rush the mudflats for stranded fish during low tide in marshes and tidal creeks. See them up close by taking a dolphin tour. You can do so just about anywhere along the SC coast, including Hilton Head Island, Myrtle Beach and Charleston. 

State Migratory Marine Mammal - Northern Right Whale
The majestic Northern Right Whale is the official migratory marine mammal of South Carolina. Designated inthis magnificent mammal breeds and calves off the state’s coastline. They can grow to 50 feet in length and weigh aboutpounds. The rare whales, of which only a few hundred remain, are protected under the Endangered Species Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Their 1,mile migration typically happens in early December and takes the mammals from Nova Scotia and New England to South Carolina, Georgia and Florida where they calve. Conservation groups hope that protections and increased awareness will result in more births south carolina state animal eventual restoration of the Northern Right Whale population.

State Reptile - Loggerhead Sea Turtle
South Carolina’s love mills v board of education of the district of columbia with the loggerhead sea turtle is reflected in its designation as the state reptile. These ancient creatures, which can exceed pounds, undertake a lengthy migration. Home to some of the nation’s most environmentally pleasing sea turtle nesting grounds, South Carolina is somewhat of a paradise for the loggerhead. Though threatened with extinction because of habitat destruction, the loggerhead sea turtle is seeing a resurgence thanks to a network of South Carolina environmental agencies like S.C.U.T.E. (South Carolina United Turtle Enthusiasts), which recruits volunteers to help educate the public and protect turtle nesting zones, and the South Carolina Aquarium, with its sea turtle hospital for the treatment of injured or sick sea turtles. The SC Department of Natural Resources also has a marine turtle rescue conservation program with more than 20 teams of concerned individuals working to protect the turtles and their nesting habitat. To assist with the effort, contact any of those groups. 

State Spider - Carolina Wolf Spider
Arachnophobes, skip on by this one. Otherwise, say “hello” to South Carolina’s official eight-legged friend: the Carolina wolf spider. Sincethis hairy little bugger (named the state spider thanks to efforts of third-graders at Sheridan Tarrant county juvenile probation officer jobs School in Orangeburg) is the walking the west highland way in 4 days wolf spider in North America, growing to about 3 to 4 inches in size. (Isn’t that cute?) They tend to flee from humans and are not inclined to bite, though they sometimes do if they feel threatened. Their venom is not dangerous to humans, however. (What a relief, right?) They hunt their prey, usually at night, rather than spinning webs to capture them. You can identify them by their grayish-brown body with a dark stripe centered on the abdomen, or by shining a flashlight at them. Seems their eyes (all eight of them) are highly efficient reflectors of light. (Okay. Go ahead and scream …)

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South Carolina

South Carolina State History

The earliest history of South Carolina is similar to a lot of the Eastern United States; it was populated 13, years ago by archaic communities, which went on to follow the same big changes that affected most cultures in the area. By the time of European contact there were 29 nations of native people in South Carolina. The nations of South Carolina mostly fell under two large culture groups, the Eastern Siouan and Cusaboan peoples, though other groups lived in the area.

Following exploration of the coast in by Francisco de Gordillo, the Spanish tried unsuccessfully to establish a colony near present-day Georgetown inand the French also failed to colonize Parris Island near Fort Royal in Although there was an older charter fromKing Charles II of England chartered the colony in to wealthy aristocrats in exchange for their political support back in England. The colony was named Carolina after King Charles, and it acted as a buffer zone between Spanish territory and the other English mynewextsetup.us first English settlement was made in at Albemarle Point on the Ashley River, but poor conditions drove the settlers to the site of Charleston (originally called Charles Town).

South Carolina, officially separated from North Carolina in Charleston, despite its size and influence in the colonies, wasn't incorporated until after the Revolution. The city was run by a governor representing the Crown, and the state was a bastion of Loyalism to the British government. Itwas the scene of extensive military action during the Revolution and again during the Civil War.

In the s, South Carolina played a leading role in Southern hostility to the federal government, and in the entrenchment of slavery in the Deep South. South Carolina was the largest slave state by percentage of people in slavery, and had the strictest laws toward freeing slaves; the government worked hard to ensure the dominance of the minority white population over the black majority. They viewed this as especially necessary since the plantation owners left their plantations for the city during the summer, as they were afraid of contracting malaria.

In this contributed to the Nullification Crisis. South CarolinianJohn C. Calhoun was the nation's most famous pro-slavery mynewextsetup.usSouth Carolina became the first state to secede from the mynewextsetup.us Civil War began in as South Carolina troops fired on federal Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor.

After the Confederate loss in the Civil War, South Carolina became the only state with a black majority congress. This saw a brief period of rapidly expanding rights for Black Americans that was swiftly reversed during the Jim Crow era. However, despite its long history as a bedrock slave state, South Carolina didn't see the levels of violence that plagued Mississippi and Alabama during desegregation. Likewise South Carolina was relatively swift among former Confederate states to remove the Confederate flag from government buildings after incidents of racial violence.

In the time since desegregation, South Carolina has converted itself into a popular tourist destination, moving away from the traditional manufacturing and agriculture sectors.

Historic points of interest include Fort Sumter National Monument, Fort Moultrie, Fort Johnson, and aircraft carrier USS Yorktown in Charleston Harbor; the Middleton, Magnolia, and Cypress Gardens in Charleston; and Cowpens National Battlefield. VIsitors might also be interested inthe Hilton Head resorts, and the Riverbanks Zoo and Botanical Garden in Columbia.

South Carolina Culture and Interesting Facts

Myrtle Beach & the Grand Strand

Myrtle Beach is likely South Carolina's biggest tourist attraction, as the center of the Grand Strand string of beaches. The beaches collectivelydrawover 14 million visitors every year?that's nearly three times the population of South Carolina?and Myrtle Beach specifically hosts a lot of famous attractions. The recently opened boardwalk, the nearby Family Kingdom Amusement Park, and the abundant shopping have led Myrtle Beach metro bank login receive regular national acclaim. That's a pretty big achievement, considering the town used to be almost entirely off the map. The idea to develop the beach into a tourist area only started in the early s, and the city of Myrtle Beach was only incorporated in the s.

Charleston, South Carolina

The city of Charleston is one of the most historically important cities in the United States. It was one of the first major cities in the country, founded back inand was at one point the fifth largest city in the nation. For rather unsavory reasons, the city continued to have an outsize influence on the country even as the rest of the country grew and expanded; Charleston was the largest slave port in the United States, sometimes second to Savannah, Georgia. The slave trade in Charleston led to South Carolina being the state with the largest Black majority population andbeing the only state with a majority of legislators being slaveholders. The Civil War started in Charleston when secessionists attacked Fort Sumter. Today the city is famous for much nicer reasons, including its lovely and well-preserved architecture, its food culture, and its healthy arts scene. The city has received international attention and praise.

South Carolina Plantations

The plantations of South Carolina are another popular tourist destination. The plantations were home to the aristocratic elite, who built large country mansions in which to live comfortably as they profited off the forced labor of mynewextsetup.us former slaveholding mansions embody a lot of important history in the South. They offer a glimpse into the historic culture of the area including the artistic tastes and values of the slaveholding class, the economic realities that shaped American history, and the violent injustices inflicted on America's Black population. Some plantations are just catered to tourists interested in the design, but many of the best plantation museums allow visitors to dive into the deep history of slavery.

Gullah Culture in the Lowcountry

Gullah culture refers to the unique culture of Black people living in the Lowcountry of South Carolina and Georgia. Gullah people are most culturally distinct from other Black Americans due to their use of their own creole language, also called Gullah, which heavily draws on different West and Central African languages. South Carolina south carolina state animal a Black-majority state, and more than anywhere else Gullah culture has heavily influenced the whole of South Carolina. The unique style of Gullah art and cuisine makes up some of South Carolina's most powerful cultural legacy. One particular craft, Sweetgrass basket weaving, was recognized as a state symbol.

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A trail sign at Fort Macon State Park

Our rules are for the protection of our visitors and natural resources, and to make everyone's visit a safe and enjoyable experience. The information given below is a synopsis of rules, regulations, park policies, and in some cases state and federal laws. Please observe them for your safety and enjoyment as well as the safety and enjoyment of others. It will preserve our parks and make them a valuable resource now and in the future.

In some cases there may be park-specific rules or policies that apply to activities within a particular park. Please check with your park of interest for additional information about its park-specific rules.

Also, the list below represents activities available across the parks system. All activities are not available at every park. You may contact your park of interest to get information about specific activities offered at that park.

Click the links below to view specific rules.

General Rules

Possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages is prohibited, except in designated areas. Visitors shall not be or become intoxicated while within any state park or recreation area.

As a courtesy to other campers, please observe the campground quiet hours. Quiet hours are typically from 10pm until 7am. The production or emission in any park or recreation area of noises, amplified speech, music or other sounds that annoy, disturb or frighten park visitors is prohibited at all times.

Some parks border or are scattered along many miles of rivers, waterways and other areas which may border privately owned land. When traveling waterways and using parklands in any of the parks, please respect the rights of private property owners and avoid trespassing on private land when parking vehicles, hiking, biking, canoeing, etc.

Pets are permitted in parks so long as they are on an attended leash no longer than 6 feet and under the constant control of the owner, and on all pedestrian trails.

Pets are allowed in some campgrounds–contact the specific park. Overnight, pets must be confined to the owner's tent or vehicle during quiet hours. Pets are not allowed in the bathhouses or swimming areas.

Pets are strictly prohibited from entering any building, with the exception of service animals and authorized search and rescue dogs. Owners may be asked to remove dangerous or noisy pets from the park.

Pets are not allowed on the ferry at Hammocks Beach State Park. 

Park visitors are prohibited from ascending or taking-off within or upon any state park area or state park water surface, of any airplane, flying machine (includes drones, UAS, quadcopters), balloon, parachute, glider, hang glider (except with permit at Jockey’s Ridge State Park), or other apparatus for aviation. In some limited circumstances, these machines may be operated after obtaining a Special Activity Permit from the park.

Additionally, State Law prohibits persons from launching or recovering any unmanned aircraft systems from state property without consent.

Firearms and other weapons are prohibited except that those with a proper permit may possess a concealed handgun in permitted areas and under the requirements of North Carolina G.S. All firearms and weapons are prohibited in state park visitor centers and park offices. (EXCEPTION: Federal law (36 C.F.R. § ) prohibits loaded firearms or ammunition on those lands and waters at Falls Lake, Jordan Lake and Kerr Lake state recreation areas managed by the state parks system and owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.)

Fireworks, cap pistols, air guns, bows and arrows, slingshots and lethal projectiles or missiles of any kind are prohibited on all properties managed by the N.C. Division of Parks and Recreation.

The removal, destruction or injury of any tree, flower, artifact, fern, shrub, rock or other plant or mineral in any park is prohibited unless with an approved collection permit for scientific or educational purposes.

Certain areas of the park may be closed to public use for safety or for the management and protection of natural resources.

A permit is required for any project involving the collection, removal or disturbance of any natural or cultural resource of any state park unit and for projects that require placing monitoring equipment in any state park unit.

Activities that occur as part of a typical visit to any state park, such as wildflower photography or wildlife observation, do not require a permit. Requests for personal or commercial collecting, or for projects that do not address specific research needs, will be denied. Manipulative or destructive research is generally not permitted. School trips for purposes of simple observation do not require a permit. However, classes that visit the park to collect specimens or to conduct south carolina state animal that are not part of a scheduled park educational program are required to obtain a permit. Teachers should contact the park superintendent in advance of their arrival to determine if a permit is needed.

Activities that require additional permits: Certain research projects may require compliance with other environmental and administrative regulations. It is the applicant's responsibility to determine if additional permits are required, to contact the appropriate agencies and obtain those permits. The Division of Parks and Recreation will not issue a park research permit until all other required permits have been obtained. Regulations that require compliance may include but are not limited to: the Endangered Species Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act and the Coastal Area Management Act. Other agencies that may require permits include the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the NC Department of Agriculture's Plant Conservation Program.

Fill out a permit application online.

Littering is illegal. State law requires aluminum cans and plastic bottles to be placed in recycling containers. To help maintain a clean and safe environment for park visitors and wildlife, place trash in proper containers. Wildlife may mistake plastic bags for food and may become entangled in discarded fishing line or other types of litter.

Burying trash is prohibited. Shifting winds and other types of weather may expose trash and endanger wildlife and the environment.

State law requires aluminum cans to be placed in recycling containers where available.

North Carolina state parks are wildlife preserves. The hunting, trapping, pursuing, shooting, injuring, killing or molesting of any bird or animal is prohibited. Feeding or baiting wildlife is prohibited.

Loggerhead and other sea turtles are protected by law. Anyone who harms the turtles, nests or hatchlings is subject to prosecution. Do not enter marked nesting sites on foot or by vehicle.

Bald eagles are protected by law. It is illegal to kill, harass or possess—dead or alive—any eagle or part of an eagle, including feathers and talons. Convictions related to such violations may result in fines as high as $20, and imprisonment for one year.

Nesting shorebirds are protected by law. Anyone who harms the birds, nests, or chicks is subject to a fine. Do not enter marked nesting areas on foot or by vehicle. Anyone who enters the sites, harms or harasses the birds is subject to a fine.

Rules for Activities

In parks where boating and fishing are allowed during park hours, such activities are regulated by all applicable North Carolina laws and regulations, including those regarding fresh and coastal recreational fishing licenses, boat registration and safety requirements.

Laws and regulations may be enforced by the N.C. Division of Parks and Recreation as well as other regulatory agencies including—but not necessarily limited to—the Wildlife Resources Commission, the Department of Transportation and/or the Division of Marine Fisheries. If unsure, call the specific park office before your visit to learn of boating and/or fishing opportunities.

Boats, rafts and canoes are prohibited within designated swimming areas.

In all parks, bicycles are permitted only on those trails or other park areas specifically designated for their use. Not all parks have bicycle trails. Please check with the individual park for availability.

Bicycle riders under age 16 must wear a helmet.

Bicycle passengers who weigh less than 40 pounds or who are less than 40 inches tall must be seated in a separate restraining seat. All other bicycle riders must be seated on saddle seats. Persons unable to maintain an erect, seated position cannot be bicycle passengers.

E-bikes are allowed on all trails where traditional bikes are allowed. The speed limit on all trails is 25 mph.

Conducting commercial business/activity in any park is prohibited except during special events governed by a Special Activity Permit.

Photography or video production for commercial purposes is prohibited except under a Film Permit.

Camping is allowed in designated areas by permit only. In most cases, campers register with a ranger on site or at an on-site registration box. You must register even if you have reserved a campsite.

Fires are permitted only in designated areas and must be tended at all times. Gathering firewood is generally prohibited, but may be allowed in some parks.

Please don’t transport firewood into our state parks because you could unknowingly spread dangerous insects and diseases—such as the emerald ash borer—which can harm the forest. Buy firewood locally where you intend to burn it, or buy heat-treated firewood. Visit the Don't Move Firewood website for more information on how to have a risk-free campfire experience.

All vehicles left in the park after posted park hours must be registered.

Visitors must be 18 years or older to reserve a campsite, and there must be at least one adult 18 years or older present at the campsite throughout the duration of the stay.

There is a maximum limit of 6 people, 2 tents and 2 vehicles per family campsite. All camping equipment and vehicles (if applicable) must be on the campsite and not spread out in the woods. Group campsites vary depending on the size of the campsite, but typically hold individuals.

See the Reservations page for more information about camping and cabins.

Hammocks Beach State Park operates a ferry service to Bear Island. Carts and wagons are prohibited on passenger ferries unless collapsible. Park staff reserve the right to suspend the use of collapsible carts due to space and weight limitations at any time. Passenger conveyance devices, such as strollers and wheelchairs, are allowed. Pets are not allowed on the ferry or in the swimming area.

Hang gliding is only allowed at Jockey's Ridge State Park. Only visitors with a USHGA Hang 1 or other agency-approved rating may hang glide in the park.

For your safety and protection, please stay on designated trails and hiking areas. Also, many rare plants live on thin soils and wet rocks, and are vulnerable to damage from climbing, trampling and scraping.

In parks where horses are permitted in designated park areas or on bridle trails, horses are allowed only on those trails or other park areas specifically designated for their use. Some parks may require special use permits for bridle trail use where trail maintenance is a concern.

Horses are prohibited from camping areas, swimming areas, cabin areas, picnic areas and other day-use areas.

Loading/unloading horses is permitted in designated park areas only. Owners are required to remove all feces from designated horse trailer parking areas.

No carts, carriages or other horse-drawn apparatus are permitted on park trails.

A south carolina state animal Coggins test not more than 12 months old for all horses over six months of age is required. Proof of equine testing certification must be carried by the horse owner at all times while the animal is within a park.

Rock climbing is only allowed in five parks, by permit (climbers must register before beginning a climb), in designated areas only, and with proper equipment. Those parks are: Chimney Rock, Crowders Mountain, Hanging Rock, Pilot Mountain and Stone Mountain. Climbing is prohibited at all other parks.

  • All climbers must register with the park staff and must keep in their possession a valid rock climbing and rappelling permit.
  • Organized private, commercial, or non-profit groups must obtain a Special Activity Permit prior to the outing. Contact the park office.
  • NC state parks do not install or maintain any climbing route or fixed anchors.
  • New routes are not permitted.
  • Climbers climb at their own risk and are responsible for obtaining proper equipment and training.
  • Unroped climbing is discouraged.
  • Route selection and the decision to rely on any fixed anchors are the climber's responsibility.
  • Climbing activities are permitted in designated areas only and must coincide with the park's posted hours of operation.
  • All accidents and injuries must be reported to park staff.
  • All climbers and rappellers must schedule their activity in order to leave the park by the posted closing hour.
  • Park only in designated parking areas

At Jockey's Ridge State Park, sandboarding and kiteboarding are allowed without a permit. For kiteboarding, please use the parking area at the Soundside Beach access located off of West Soundside Road.

State parks allow for many special recreational activities such as bicycling events, marathons, photo tours, kite-flying contests, club meetings, etc. However, all such events must be held under a Special Activity Permit.

You can download a Special Activity Permit application or obtain one from the park office.

Swimming is not allowed in all parks. Check with the individual park. Swimming and surfing—where allowed—are only permitted in designated areas.

Public nudity, including public nude bathing is prohibited. Children under age five are exempt.

North Carolina motor vehicle and traffic laws apply in all state parks.

Unlicensed motor vehicles, including golf carts, unregistered motorcycles, snowmobiles, utility vehicles, mini-bikes and all-terrain vehicles, are prohibited. Reasonable accommodations will be made for persons with physical disabilities. Electric wheelchairs are permitted but the operator must be the person with the physical disability.

Unlicensed drivers may not operate motor vehicles on park roads.

Motorized vehicles are permitted only in designated areas and not permitted on park trails.

All vehicles left in the park after posted park hours must be registered.

No carts, carriages or other horse-drawn apparatus are permitted on park trails.

View All State Park Regulations (.pdf)

North Carolina Administrative Code – Subchapter 13A

North Carolina Administrative Code – Subchapter 13B

North Carolina Admnistrative Code – Subchapter 13C

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

South Carolina

Atlas of South Carolina State
Click on map for larger view

South Carolina State Symbols

State Nickname: Palmetto State

State Slogan: Smiling Faces. Beautiful Places. Also on one of its two base license plates.

State Motto: Animis opibusque parati (Prepared in mind and resources) and Dum spiro spero (While I breathe, I hope)

State flower: Yellow Jessamine

State bird: Carolina Wren

State fish: Striped bass

State tree: Palmetto

State mammal: White-tailed deer, Boykin Spaniel

State foods: Peach, Milk, Sweet Tea

Becoming a State

Date admitted: May 23, south carolina state animal admitted: 8

Prior Name: Province of South Carolina, then sovereign state in Confederation

Postal Abbreviation: SC

South Carolina State Map


The Geography of South Carolina

Total Size: 30, sq. miles (source: South carolina state animal

Geographical Low Point: Atlantic Ocean at Sea Level (source: U.S. Geological Survey)

Geographical High Point: Sassafras Mtn. at 3, feet, located in the county/subdivision of Pickens (source: U.S. Geological Survey)

Central Point: Located in Richland County approx. 13 miles southeast of Columbia (source: U.S. Geological Survey)

Counties: 46 (source: National Association of Counties)

Bodies of Water: Atlantic Ocean, Lake Murray, Lake Marion, Lake Moultrie, Lake Hartwell, Pee Dee River, Saluda River, and Santee River

Famous People

  • James Brown - Singer
  • Joe Frazier - Champion Heavyweight Boxer
  • Kevin Garnett - Professional basketball player
  • Sarah Moore Grimke - Women's rights activist
  • Andrew Jackson - The 7th President of the United States
  • Jesse Jackson - Civil rights activist
  • Jasper Johns - Artist
  • Shoeless Joe Jackson - Professional baseball player
  • Chris Rock - Comedian and actor
  • Vana White - Game show host

Fun Facts

  • The state tree of South Carolina, the Palmetto Tree, was used to build the walls for a fort on Sullivan Island. The rubbery trees were a great defense as cannon balls bounced right off them!
  • The first shots of the Civil War were in South Carolina at Fort Sumter.
  • Johnston, South Carolina is called the Peach Capital of the World. There is a giant water tower in the shape of a peach near Gaffney.
  • Before South Carolina adopted the Palmetto State as its nickname, it was called the Iodine State.
  • The official state dance is the Shag.
  • There are rumors that a water monster lurks in the depths of Lake Murray.
  • The state amphibian is the salamander. The state insect is the Carolina Mantis.
  • South Carolina beaches are popular tourist destinations including the Grand Strand and Myrtle Beach.

Professional Sports Teams

There are no major professional sports teams in South Carolina. The Carolina Panthers play just across the border in Charlotte.

Geography >> US States>> South Carolina History

For state symbols, flag, maps, geography, and fun facts:

Источник: mynewextsetup.us?State=South%20Carolina

South Carolina adopts mammoth as state fossil after origin debate

CHARLESTON S.C. (Reuters) - The Columbian mammoth became the official state fossil of South Carolina on Tuesday, fulfilling a third-grader’s dream, after months of delay stemming from efforts by some lawmakers to give God credit for creating the prehistoric animal.

Olivia McConnell, 8, of New Zion, watched with her mother, classmates and teachers as Governor Nikki Haley signed the designation into law.

Olivia had written to her state legislator to point out that the state had no official fossil and suggested the animal because in slaves had dug up a tooth from a Columbian woolly mammoth on a South Carolina plantation.

The woolly mammoth, a huge, shaggy, tusked mammal related to the elephant that roamed North America, Siberia and northern Europe, went extinct about 4, years ago, although the Columbian species died out long before that.

The bill passed the state House in March, but legislators tried to add amendments referring to the book of Genesis and God’s creation of the earth and the beasts.

State residents pleaded for senators to keep religion out of science, and the simple designation bill eventually emerged from the legislature free of amendments.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

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