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Signal corps keyer tg 34 a


signal corps keyer tg 34 a

United States Army history of the Signal Corps during World War II, part 1 of 3. 34 flags. Tactically, there was little need for, By the close of World. This Army Signal Corps Morse Code Keyer TGA Morse Code Trainer WW II is in very good shape. Vibroplex Morse Code Keyer - I Rt States Army Signal Corps before and during the war which ended in was 34 By the close of World War I, U.S. production of.

: Signal corps keyer tg 34 a

Signal corps keyer tg 34 a
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United States Army Technical Manuals: A Resource Guide and Inventory

Radio Sets SCR-AF, SCR-AG, SCR-AH, SCR-AJ, SCR-AK, SCR-AL, SCR-AN, SCR-AL, and SCR-ANWar DepartmentOct. Test Set AN/FSM-3 Tool Equipment TK/FSM-3 and Maintenance Kit MK/FSM-3War DepartmentJun. Directory of German Radar EquipmentWar DepartmentApr. Signal Equipment Directory, Power UnitsWar DepartmentApr. Signal Communication Directory German Radio Communication EquipmentWar DepartmentJun. Signal Communication Directory German Radio Communication EquipmentWar DepartmentApr. CRadio Set SCRCWar DepartmentAug. Radio Sets SCR and SCRWar DepartmentDec. Radio Set SCRBWar DepartmentAug. Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentMar. Radio Set SCRCWar DepartmentMar. Radio Sets SCRA, SCRB, and SCRCWar DepartmentMay Radio Sets SCRA,-B,-C,-D,-E, and -FWar DepartmentMay Radio Sets SCR and SCRWar DepartmentMar. Radio Sets SCR and SCR and Auxiliary EquipmentWar DepartmentApr. Radio Set SCRWar DepartmentApr. DRadio Set SCRDWar DepartmentJun. FRadio Set SCRFWar DepartmentOct. Poste Radio SCRAMinistere de la GuerreAug. Radio Sets SCRB, SCRC, SCRD, SCRE, and SCRFWar DepartmentMay Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentApr. Radio Set SCRADept of the ArmySep. Radio Set SCRA (Direction Finding)War DepartmentMar. Radio Set SCRDWar DepartmentAug. Radio Sets SCRA, -B, and -DWar DepartmentApr. Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentNov. Supp. 1Postes Radio SCRA, SCRB et SCR (*) (Et Boite d’Alimentation PE(*)). Ministere de la GuerreMar. ARadiogoniometre SCRAMinistere de la GuerreJul. ARadio Set SCRAWar DepartmentMar. BRadio Set SCRB (Direction Finding)War DepartmentMar. Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentMar. Radio Set SCRA and Radio Set SCRBWar DepartmentAug. Radio Set SCRWar DepartmentOct. Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentSep. Radio Set SCR (Direction Finding)War DepartmentAug. Radio Set SCR (Direction Finding)War DepartmentAug. Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentSep. Radio Set SCRWar DepartmentJan. Radio Set AN/PRT-1War DepartmentJun. Radio Set AN/GRC-9Dept of the ArmyMar. Radio Sets AN/TRT-1 and AN/TRR-2Dept of the ArmyOct. Radio Sets SCRA, -B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, -H, and -J; and Radio Sets SCRA, -B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, -H, and -J, -K, -L, -M, -N, and -PWar DepartmentFeb. Radio Sets SCRA, SCRB, SCRC, SCRD, and SCREWar DepartmentApr. Radio Set SCRWar DepartmentAug. Radio Set SCRWar DepartmentJan. set 1Radio Set SCRWar DepartmentJan. set 2Radio Set AN/VRC-1War DepartmentJun. Direction Finder Set AN/SRDDept of the ArmyJun. BRadio Set SCRA and Radio Set SCRBWar DepartmentOct. Radio Set SCRA Radio Set SCRB Radio Set SCRC Radio Set SCRDWar DepartmentJun. Radio Sets SCRA and SCRAWar DepartmentMar. Radio Sets SCRA and SCRAWar DepartmentSep. Radio Set AN/FRCDept of the Army and the Air ForceJun. Radio Sets AN/VRC AN/VCR/ and AN/VRCCRDept of the ArmyMar. AGFrequency Meter Sets SCRAG and SCRAKWar DepartmentJan. AFFrequency Meter Set SCRAFWar DepartmentNov. AFFrequencemetre SCRAFMinistere de la GuerreFeb. QFrequency Meter Set SCRQWar DepartmentMar. TFrequency Meter Set  SCRTWar DepartmentMay Charging Set SCRWar DepartmentDec. Charging Set SCRWar DepartmentMay HCharging Set SCR (Power Unit PE-HH)War DepartmentJul. KCharging Set SCR (Power Unit PEHK)War DepartmentAug. Test Sets IC, -D, -H, -J.War DepartmentMar. Frequency Meter Sets IA, IB Absorption TypeDept of the ArmyJul. Charging Set SCRAWar DepartmentAug. Maintenance Equipments MEA, B, C, and DWar DepartmentAug. CMaintenance Equipment MECWar DepartmentFeb. DMaintenance Equipment MEDWar DepartmentJun. Signal Generators IG and IHWar DepartmentMar. Emetteur d’Essai IG et  IHMinistere de la GuerreOct. Signal Generators IG, H, J, and K.War DepartmentJan. Remote Control Unit RM(*).  War DepartmentJan. ARemote Control Unit RMAWar DepartmentJan. BRemote Control Unit RMBWar DepartmentNov. Test Equipment IEE.War DepartmentMay Remote Control Equipment RCDWar DepartmentJan. set 1Remote Control Equipment RCDWar DepartmentJan. set 2Remote Control Equipment RCA, B, C, D, & GWar DepartmentOct. Allen Model E-2 Unitron RectifierWar DepartmentMar. Antennas and Antenna SystemsWar DepartmentNov. Maintenance Equipment Me(*) and Maintenance Kit (ME(*)War DepartmentOct. Material d’Entretien Me(*) et Trousse d’Entretien ME(*)Ministere de la GuerreSep. Signal Generator IWar DepartmentAug. Alignment Equipment MEWar DepartmentJul. Test Set IEWar DepartmentJul. Signal Generator Triplett Model War DepartmentOct. Switchboards BD, BD, BDA, and BDBWar DepartmentOct. Cuardros de Distribucion BD BD BDA Y BIDBMinisterio de GuerraMar. Switchboard BDWar DepartmentJun. Telephone Central Office Set TC-4War DepartmentJun. Telephone Central Office Set TC-4War DepartmentMar. Telephone EE-8, EEA and EEBWar DepartmentMar. Timing and Telephone Sets ML(*) and ML(*)War DepartmentAug. Telephone Central Office Set TC-1War DepartmentApr. Telephone Central Office Set TCWar DepartmentJan. Telephone Central Office Set TCWar DepartmentFeb. Telephone Central Office Set TCWar DepartmentJul. Telephone Central Office Set TC-2War DepartmentOct. Telephone Terminal CFA (Carrier) and Repeater CFA (CarrierWar DepartmentApr. Ringing Equipment EET1 EEA (Voice Frequency), and EEA (Voice Frequency)War DepartmentJun. Relay Unit BEA (Teletype Trunk)War DepartmentApr. Converter MWar DepartmentJan. Converter MWar DepartmentApr. Cabinet BE (  ) (Wire Chief's Testing)War DepartmentApr. Test Sets A, B, and CWar DepartmentApr. Telephone Repeater Set TCAWar DepartmentApr. Maintenance Equipment MEWar DepartmentMay Telegraph Sets TG-5 and TGAWar DepartmentSep. Telegraph Sets TG-5, TGA, and TGBWar DepartmentJul. Telegraph Sets TG-5, TGA, and TGBWar DepartmentJun. Printers TGA, TGB & TGB Chests ChA & CHB Chests  ChA & CHBWar DepartmentDec. Printer TGA and Teletypewriters TGB and TGBWar DepartmentFeb. Installation and Maintenance of Telegraph Printer EquipmentWar DepartmentJul. Telegraph Printer Sets EE and EEWar DepartmentDec. Teletypes EE, EE, EEA, EEA, et EEMinistere de la GuerreOct. Telegraph Terminal CFA (Carrier)War DepartmentApr. Preliminary Instructions for Telegraph Terminal CFA (Carrier)War DepartmentApr. BTelegraph Terminal CFB (Carrier)War DepartmentNov. Radio Teletype Terminal Equipment AN/FGCI or AN/FCC-IXWar DepartmentNov. Radio Teletype Terminal Equipment AN/FGCI or AN/FCC-IXWar DepartmentNov. Telegraph Central Office Set TC-3War DepartmentJul. Equipement de Central Telegraphique TC-3Ministere de la GuerreFeb. Telegraph Central Office Set TC-3 and Switchboard BDWar DepartmentSep. Technical Manual Line Unit BEA and Line Unit BEWar DepartmentSep. Line Units BE, BEA and BEBWar DepartmentMar. Reel Units RL and RLAWar DepartmentAug. Reel units Rl and RA, -B and -CWar DepartmentOct. Tests Sets EE and EEAWar DepartmentAug. Test Set EE and EEA Through -EWar DepartmentFeb. FTest Set EEFWar DepartmentApr. Reel Unit RlWar DepartmentJul. Reel Unit Rl, RLB and RLCWar DepartmentNov. Devidoirs RL, RLB et RLWar DepartmentJul. Pole Line ConstructionWar DepartmentJan. Truck KB and Earth Borer Equipment HDWar DepartmentSep. Vulcanizing Equipment TEA and TEAWar DepartmentJan. Vulcanizing Equipment TEA and TEA, TEB and TEBWar DepartmentDec. Tactical Open Wire Pole Line ConstructionWar DepartmentMay Spiral-Four CableWar DepartmentAug. Spiral-Four CableWar DepartmentAug. Plow LC (Cable)War DepartmentJun. Cable Assemblies CC (5 Pair), CCA (10 Pair) and Associated EquipmentWar DepartmentJun. Cables WC (5-Pair), and WC (10 pair), and Cable Assemblies CC and CCAWar DepartmentOct. Telephone Cable SplicingWar DepartmentMay Telephone Cable Splicing: Cable TestingDept of the ArmySept. Telephone Cable Splicing: Cable Terminations and Cable RepairsDept of the ArmyOct. set 1Telephone Cable Splicing: Cable Terminations and Cable RepairsDept of the ArmyOct. set 2Tape Facsimile Equipment RCBWar DepartmentFeb. BFacsimile Equipment RC, RCA and RCB and Facsimile Set AN/TXC-1War DepartmentApr. Boehme Automatic Keying and Recording EquipmentWar DepartmentJul. set 1Boehme Automatic Keying and Recording EquipmentWar DepartmentJul. set 2Test Set I (Cable Repairman)War DepartmentSep. Converter MWar DepartmentApr. Converter M, MA, MB (cipher)War DepartmentMar. Recorder RD-2/ GXRWar DepartmentJan. Signal Lamp Equipment EEAWar DepartmentFeb. Signal Lamp Equipment EE and EEAWar DepartmentSep. Signal Lamp Equipment EEWar DepartmentOct. Signal Lamp Equipment SeWar DepartmentJun. Visual Identification Equipments AN/VVX-1 and AN/VVX-1XWar DepartmentApr. Spotlight Set AN/PVQ-1War DepartmentMar. Instructions Pour L'emploi du Necessaire Photographique PH du Services des Transmissions (Signal Corps) de L'Armee AmericaineMinistere de la GuerreMar. Instructions for Signal Corps, U.S. Army Photographic Set PHWar Department Photographic Set PHWar DepartmentJan. APhotographic Set ES (1)Dept of the ArmyJan. Training Film and Film Strip ProjectionWar DepartmentMar. Reproducing Equipments MCA, MCB, and MCCWar DepartmentJun. Identification Equipment PHWar DepartmentMay set 1Identification Equipment PHWar DepartmentMay set 2Photographic Darkroom Equipment Processing Equipment PHWar DepartmentMay Photographic Darkroom Equipment Processing Equipment PHWar DepartmentMay Projector Equipment PHWar DepartmentApr. AProjector Equipment PHAWar DepartmentFeb. Projector Equipment PHWar DepartmentJul. Projectors PH and PHAWar DepartmentOct. Photographic Laboratories Organization and Operation in Service Commands, Departments and PostsWar DepartmentJun. Photographic Laboratories Organization and Operation in Class I and II InstallationsWar DepartmentJan. The Homing PigeonWar DepartmentJan. Military Standardization Handbook Glossary of Photographic Terms Including Document ReproductionDept of the ArmyFeb. set 1Military Standardization Handbook Glossary of Photographic Terms Including Document ReproductionDept of the ArmyFeb. set 2Dry BatteriesDept of the ArmyFeb. Tables of Vertical and Horizontal Components of Distances of Pilot BalloonsWar DepartmentAug. Ceiling Light Projectors ML, A, B, C, E, F and GWar DepartmentJun. Theodolite ML(*) Telescrope ML Tripod ML(*) Compass MLWar DepartmentJun. Theodolites MLC Through MLR Tripods MLC Through MLR Compass ML Telescope ML Theodolite MLWar DepartmentOct. Supports MLB, MLD, MLE; Anemometers ML, MLA, MLB; Indicators ML, MLA, MLBWar DepartmentSep. Barographs MLA, MLB MLC, MLDWar DepartmentJul. Thermographs ML and MlWar DepartmentJul. Barometers MLB, MLD, MLE, MLFWar DepartmentNov. Barometers ML-2 Through MLF Cases ML Through MLEWar DepartmentOct. Barometers ML-2 Through MLH Cases ML Through MLEDept of the Army and the Air ForceFeb. Wind Equipment SCMA and Wind Equipment AN/GMQ-1War DepartmentMar. Storage Batteries For Signal Communication Except Those Pertaining to AircraftWar DepartmentJan. Target Range Communication SystemsWar DepartmentJan. Code Practice EquipmentWar DepartmentFeb. Time Interval Apparatus EE, EE, EEA Line Connector Unit EE Time Interval Signal BE and Bell MCWar DepartmentAug. Spotting Set PHBWar DepartmentMay Spotting Sets PHB, PHC, PHD, and PHF and Spotting Set AN/TVQ-1War DepartmentDec. DSpotting Set PHD (Theodolite PH-BG)War DepartmentJun. Public Address Equipment PACWar DepartmentJan. Code Training Set AN/GSC-T1War DepartmentNov. Flash Ranging Set GRAWar DepartmentNov. Recorder BCWar DepartmentMay Enregistreur Trelegraphique BCMinistere de la GuerreNov. Keyer TGAWar DepartmentOct. Sound Ranging Set GRCWar DepartmentJun. Materiel de Reperage par le Son, GRCMinistere de la GuerreAug. Panoramic Adaptions BCA, BCB, BCA, and BCBWar DepartmentDec. Keyer TGJ (Automatic, 60 Cycles) and Keyers TGA, TGB, TGC, TGD, TGFWar DepartmentMay Keyers TGA, TGB, TGC, TGD, TGF, TGG, TGH, and TGJ.War DepartmentMar. Public Address Set PABWar DepartmentOct. Training of Signal Communication PersonnelWar DepartmentMar. Signal SupplyWar DepartmentJan. Signal SupplyWar DepartmentMar. Shop WorkWar DepartmentJan. Shop WorkWar DepartmentMar. The Radio OperatorWar DepartmentApr. The Radio OperatorWar DepartmentMay Radio FundamentalsWar DepartmentJul. Radio FundamentalsWar DepartmentMay Principles de Radio-CommunicationMinistere de la GuerreFeb. Wire TelegraphyWar DepartmentJul. Local-Battery Telephone EquipmentWar DepartmentSep. Common-Battery Telephone EquipmentWar DepartmentSep. Instruction for Learning International Morse CharactersWar DepartmentJun. Instructions pour l'Enseignement des Caracteres Morse InternationauxMinistere de la GuerreJun. International Morse Code (Instructions)War DepartmentAug. Division Field Code Training Edition No. 2 (DFCT2)War DepartmentMay Reference DataWar DepartmentFeb. The Typewriter OperatorWar DepartmentJun. Radar Electronic FundamentalsWar DepartmentDec. Radar Electronic FundamentalsWar DepartmentJun. Substation MaintenanceWar DepartmentDec. Communication SecurityWar DepartmentDec. Telephone Central Office InstallationWar DepartmentAug. Repair and Calibration of Electrical Measuring InstrumentsWar DepartmentDec. Central Office MaintenanceWar DepartmentJun. Substation InstallationWar DepartmentJun. Principles of Long Distance Telephone and Telegraph TransmissionWar DepartmentOct. Suppression of Radio NoisesWar DepartmentNov. Electrical Communication Systems EngineeringWar DepartmentApr. Electrical Communications Systems Engineering Transmission and Circuit LayoutDept of the ArmyDec. Electrical Communications Systems Engineering HandbookWar DepartmentSep. Electrical Communication Systems EquipmentWar DepartmentOct. Military Standardization Handbook Electronic  Sound and Light and Miscellaneous  EquipmentDept of the ArmyApr. AElectronic Communication HandbookDept of the ArmyJun. AElectronic Communication HandbookDept of the ArmyJun. BDirectory of Signal Corps Equipment’s Wire Communication EquipmentDept of the ArmyMar. CDirectory of Signal Corps Equipment’s Ground Radar and Recognition EquipmentDept of the ArmyJan. DDirectory of Signal Corps Equipment’s Radio Direction EquipmentDept of the ArmyJan. EDirectory of Signal Corps Equipment’s Power EquipmentDept of the ArmyMar. GDirectory of Signal Corps Equipment’s Meteorological EquipmentDept of the ArmyApr. HDirectory of Signal Corps Equipment’s Test EquipmentDept of the ArmyMar. HMilitary Standardization Handbook Electronic  Test EquipmentDept of the ArmyMar. Remote Control Equipment’s For Ground Radio Set and Interconnections With Wire SystemsWar DepartmentJan. Radio Propagation HandbookWar DepartmentNov. Radio Sets SCRA, -T2, SCRA, and -T2War DepartmentMay Radio Set AN/CRD-3War DepartmentJul. Radio Set AN/CRD-2Dept of the ArmyFeb. Radio Sets SCR (*), SCR(*) and SCR(*).  War DepartmentMar. Radio Sets SCR (*), SCR(*) and SCR(*).  Ministere de la GuerreNov. Radio Sets SCRA and SCRAWar DepartmentJun. Radio Set AN/MRC-1War DepartmentDec. Radio Sets SCR(*) and SCR(*)War DepartmentNov. Radio Set AN/TRC-7War DepartmentFeb. Radio Set SCRA and Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentMay Radio Sets SCRA and -B and Radio Sets SCRA and -BWar DepartmentApr. Radio Set AN/TRC-8 (XC-3) Radio Terminal Set AN/TCR (XC-3) Radio Relay Set AN/TCR (XC-3)War DepartmentMar. Radio Set AN/TRC-8 (XC-3) Radio Terminal Set AN/TCR (XC-3) Radio Relay Set AN/TCR (XC-3)War DepartmentMar. ARadio Set AN/TCR-8 -8A and Radio Terminal Set AN/TCR, A, and B Radio Relay Set AN/TRC, A and B and Amplifier-Power Supply Group AN/TRADept of the Army and the Air ForceJun. Radio Set SCRWar DepartmentApr. Radio Sets SCRA and SCRAWar DepartmentApr. Radio Sets SCRA and SCRAWar DepartmentJan. Radio Set SCRA Radio Set SCRB Radio Set SCRCWar DepartmentJan. Radio Set AN/TRC-5 (XC-3)War DepartmentJul. Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentFeb. Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentNov. Poste Radio SCRAWar DepartmentFeb. Radio Set AN/TRC-6(XC-2) Description and InstallationWar DepartmentJan. Radio Set AN/TRC-6(XC-2) Preventive Maintenance and Auxiliary EquipmentWar DepartmentJan. Radio Set AN/TRC-6(XC-2) Preventive Maintenance and Auxiliary EquipmentWar DepartmentJan. Radio Set AN/TRCWar DepartmentMar. Radio Set AN/VRC-3War DepartmentOct. Radio Set AN/MRQ-2War DepartmentFeb. Radio Receiving Set AN/FRRDept of the ArmyNov. Radio Receiving Set AN/FRR and AN/FRR Dept of the Army and the Air ForceSep. Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentSep. Introduction to ElectronicsDept of the ArmyJul. C-W and A-M Radio Transmitters and ReceiversDept of the ArmySep. Higher Frequency Techniques (Excluding Microwaves)Dept of the ArmyOct. Special Purpose Oscillators and AmplifiersDept of the ArmyJul. Cathoder-Ray Tubes and Their Associated CircuitsDept of the Army and the Air ForceSep. Generation and Transmission of Microwave EnergyDept of the ArmyJun. Servo Systems and Data TransmissionDept of the Army and the Air ForceAug. Grounding Procedure and Protective DevicesDept of the Army and the Air ForceAug. Fundamentals of TelephonyDept of the ArmyMar. Fundamentals of Carrier and RepeaterDept of the ArmyDec. Principles and Applications of Mathematics for Communications-ElectronicsDept of the ArmyOct. Basic Theory and Application of TransistorsDept of the ArmyMar. A-1Radio Set AN/ARC-3 Maintenance ManualDept of the ArmyAug. Interphone Equipment RC and RCAWar DepartmentFeb. Interphone Equipment RCWar DepartmentMay Interphone Extension Kit RCWar DepartmentOct. Interphone Equipment RCWar DepartmentFeb. Interphone Equipment RC and RCWar DepartmentApr. Interphone Equipment RCWar DepartmentApr. Grounds, Grounding Procedure & Protective Devices for Wire Communication EquipmentWar DepartmentApr. Theory and Measurement of Pulse Radar System PerformanceDept of the Army and the Air ForceNov. Radio Transmitters BCA, BCB, BCC, BCD, BCE, and BC-AAWar DepartmentNov. NRadio Transmitter BCNWar DepartmentMar. Amplifier Group AN/FRA-2Dept of the ArmyNov. Power Amplifier BCG and Water Cooling Unit RUAWar DepartmentJan. Radio Transmitters (Wilcox Electric Types A, B, and C)War DepartmentMar. Transmitting Components of Radio Set SCRC,  Radio Set SCRD, and  Radio Set SCRFWar DepartmentJun. Radio Transmitter BCJ and Remote Control Unit RMAWar DepartmentJan. Radio Transmitting Equipment RCWar DepartmentApr. AWatt Airport Control Transmitter Equipment: Radio Transmitter BCL, Remote Control Unit RM-J-6 and Microphone TPWar DepartmentJan. Radio Transmitters 33A and 34AWar DepartmentJan. Radio Transmitter T-4/FRC Radio Transmitter T-5/FRC Power Rectifier PP-1/FRC Modulator MD-1/FRC Switch Panel SA-2/FRC Oscillator O-2/FRC Amplifier AM-2/FRCWar DepartmentNov. Radiotelegraph Transmitter Press Wireless Type PWAWar DepartmentSep. Radio Transmitter AWar DepartmentFeb. Radio Transmitter-Receiver Type ( Watts) and Associated EquipmentWar DepartmentSep. Instruction Book Radio Transmitter-Receiver Type ( Watts) and Associated EquipmentWar DepartmentMay Poste Emetteur Recepteur de Radio Type ( Watts) Et Materiel AccessoireMinistere de la GuerreJan. SST Radio TransmitterWar DepartmentJan. Portable Radio Broadcast Transmitter TWT PBAWar DepartmentMar. Radio Transmitter BCFWar DepartmentMar. Radio Transmitter BCF and Remote Control Unit RMFWar DepartmentAug. Radio Set AN/VRC and Transmitter Type TS and Receiver Types RS and RSWar DepartmentJan. Model ET Lifeboat Radio Transmitter PortableWar DepartmentAug. Radio Transmitting Equipment, Single Sideband (Western Electric Type D)War DepartmentMay Radiotelegraph Transmitter (Press Wireless Type PWA)War DepartmentFeb. Radio Telegraph Transmitter (Press Wireless Types PWB and PWBA)War DepartmentMay Radio Transmitters BC, BCA, -B, -C, -E, -F, -G, -H, -J, -K, -L and -MWar DepartmentJan. Radio Transmitter T/SRWar DepartmentMay Radiotelegraph Transmitter TMWar DepartmentMay Radio Transmitter BCADept of the ArmyMar. Radio Receivers BC( ), BC( ), BC( ), and BC( )War DepartmentJun. Radio Receivers BC(*), BC(*), BC(*), and BC(*) and BC(*)War DepartmentMar. NRadio Receiver BCN Radio Receiver BCNX Radio Receiver BCN Radio Receiver BCG Radio Receiver BCDWar DepartmentFeb. NRadio Receiver BCN Radio Receiver BCNX Radio Receiver BCNWar Department Radio Receivers (Wilcox Electric Types CW3 and F3) and Receiver Bay (Wilcox Electric Type A)War DepartmentNov. Radio Receiver R/ URRDept of the Army and the Air ForceJan. TM Figures , 39, 45, 47, 52, 54, 56, , , Dept of the Army and the Air ForceJan. Radio Set SCRAWar DepartmentMar. CRadio Set SCRCWar DepartmentJun. Radio Set SCR_ (Direction Finding)War DepartmentAug. Radio Set SCARA (Direction Finding)War DepartmentOct. Radio Set SCARA (Direction Finding)War DepartmentOct. Poste Radio SCRA (Reperage En Direction)Ministere de la GuerreOct. Radio Receiving Set AN/FRRDept of the ArmyMay Radio Receivers BCB, BCB and BCC and Power Supply Units RAC, RAB and RaAWar DepartmentAug. Radio Receiver BCBWar DepartmentJul. Radio Receiver AYWar DepartmentNov. Radio Set SCRA Radio Receiver BCA Power Supply Unit RAAWar DepartmentNov. Radio Receiver AN/GRR-2 (Hallicrafters Model SXA)War DepartmentNov. Model ARB Intermediate and High Frequency ReceiverWar DepartmentAug. Radio Receiver R( )/PRWar DepartmentMay Radio Receiver R/SRWar DepartmentMay Receiver Transmitter BCWar DepartmentApr. Receiver Transmitter BCWar DepartmentApr. Radio Receiver (Hallicrafters)War DepartmentFeb. Radio Receiving Equipment, Single Sideband  (Western Electric Type D)War DepartmentMay Radio Receiver R/FSM-1  National HRO Series of ReceiversWar DepartmentAug. Diversity of Receiving Equipment (RCA Model DR)War DepartmentDec. Instruction Book for Navy Model RBZ Radio Receiving Equipment Frequency Range 2 to McsWar DepartmentMar. Radio Receiving Set AN/FRRDept of the ArmyOct. Power Units PEA and PEBWar DepartmentJun. Power Units PEC Through PETWar DepartmentNov. JPower Unit PEJWar DepartmentAug. KPower Unit PEKWar DepartmentJan. SPower Unit PESWar DepartmentFeb. TPower Unit PETWar DepartmentJan. +C1Groupes Electrogenes PEC ? PeUMinistere de la GuerreNov. Power Unit PE(*)War DepartmentOct. Power Units PEA, PEB, and PECWar DepartmentJan. Power Units PEA, -B, -C, -F, -G and -HWar DepartmentJul. HPower Units PEG and PEHWar DepartmentSep. HGroupes Electrogenes PEG et  PeHMinstere de la GuerreFeb. Power Unit PEBWar DepartmentJul. Power Units PE, PEB, PE ( )War DepartmentJan. Power Units PEG and HWar DepartmentJan. FPower Unit PEFWar DepartmentOct. Power Unit PEAWar DepartmentJun. Groupe Electrogene PEAMinistere de la GuerreNov. Power Unit PEAWar DepartmentFeb. CPower Unit PEC1War DepartmentNov. Power Units PE, PEA, PEC, and PEDWar DepartmentJun. LPower Unit PELWar DepartmentJun. MPower Unit PEMWar DepartmentMar. Power Unit PEFWar DepartmentJun. Power Units PEC, -D, -F and -G and Motor Generator MGAWar DepartmentMay GPower Unit PEGWar DepartmentJul. Power Unit PEAWar DepartmentSep. BPower Unit PEBWar DepartmentDec. EPower Unit PEEWar DepartmentDec. FPower Unit PEFWar DepartmentDec. GPower Unit PEGWar DepartmentDec. Power Unit PEAWar DepartmentApr. BPower Unit PEBWar DepartmentAug.
Источник: mynewextsetup.us
TMxx     Signal Corps Manuals

Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets, SCR-AF, SCR-AG, SCR-AH, SCR-AJ, ACR-AK, SCR-AL, SCR-AN, SCR-AL, and SCR-AN, pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM E,

Directory of German Radar Equipment, 73 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Signal Equipment Directory, Power Units, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/10/

Signal Communication Equipment Directory, Radio Communication Equipment, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM E,

Signal Communication Equipment Director, German Radio Communication Equipment, 61 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM EA,

Signal Communications Equipment Directory, Japanese Radio Communication Equipment, 87 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):8; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM C, 08/15/

Radio Set SCRC, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM , 12/15/

Radio Sets SCR and SCR, 41 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRB, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/31/

Radio Set SCRA, 76 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA, -B, -C, -D, -E, AND -F, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/14/

Radio Sets SCR and SCR, 21 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/17/

Radio Set SCR and SCR and Auxiliary Equipment, 65 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , Amendment,

Radio Sets SCR and SCR and Auxiliary Equipment, 2 pages.
PB A - BSIR 8(4); 01/23/48
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCR, 85 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRB, SCRC, SCRD, SCRE, and SCRF, 60 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA (Direction Finding), pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRA, -B, and -D, 98 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/30/

Radio Sets SCRA, SCRB, and SCR(*) (and Power Supply Unit PE(*), pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Note: Includes three supplements the last dated 25 October
Technical Manual, TM A,

Radio Set SCRA, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Technical Manual, TM B, 04/04/

Radio Set SCRB (Direction Finding), pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Note: With Addenda Sheet, 28 March
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA and Radio Set SCRB, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/27/

Preliminary Instructions for Radio Intercept Central TC-9, 84 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 10/28/

Radio Set SCR, 62 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCR (Direction Finding), 54 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(11); 12/13/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA, 49 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Note: Superceded TM (Tentative), 10 February
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCR, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/21/

Radio Set SCR, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Note: With an addenda dated 12 July
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRA, -B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, -H, and -J; and SCRA, -B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, -H, -J, -K, -L, -M, -N, and -P, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRD, -G, -H, -J, -K, -KB, -KW, -L, -M, -P, -Q, -R, -S, -T, and -U, 69 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(8); 11/22/46
Note: With Supplements 1 and 2, and Change 1, 19 June
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/VRC-1, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/19/

Radio Teletype Equipment AN/TRA-7, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Note: With Addenda dated 10 August
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA, Radio Set SCRB, Radio Set SCRC, Radio Set SCRD (Published by Hallicrafters Co.), pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Note: With Change 1, 8 September
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRA and SCRA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/20/

Frequency Meter Sets, SCRA, B, C, D,.., pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Charging Set SCR, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Sets C, -D, -H, -J, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Charging Set SCRA, 40 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Technical Manual, TM D,

Maintenance Equipment MED, 22 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Note: With Change 1, 2 April
Technical Manual, TM ,

Signal Generators IG, H, J, and K, 57 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Note: Superseded TM , 16 March 43 and TB , 45
Technical Manual, TM ,

Remote Control Unit RM(*), 32 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Technical Manual, TM ,

Schematic Diagrams for Maintenance of Ground Radio Communication Sets, 71 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Equipment IEE (Manufactured by Triumph Mfg. Co.), 48 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM , Amendment,

Test Equipment IEE, 7 pages.
PB A - BSIR 8(5); 01/30/48
Technical Manual, TM ,

Remote Control Equipment RCA, B, C, D, & G (Control Unit RM (*) and Control Unit RM(*) and Associated Equipment), pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Note: With Supplement 18 March
Technical Manual, TM ,

Allen Model E-2 Unitron Rectifier, 10 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Maintenance Equipment ME(*) and Maintenance Kit ME(*), 64 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Signal Generator I, 66 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Alignment Equipment ME, 33 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set E (Manufactured by Weston Electrical Instruments Co., Newark, N.J.), 47 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Triplett Model , 16 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(9); 05/30/47
Technical Manual, TM , 10/19/

Switchboards BD, BD, BDA, and BDB, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/30/

Switchboard BD, 16 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telephone Central Office Set TC-4, 40 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telephones, EE-8, EEA, and EEB, 71 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/20/

Timing and Telephone Sets ML(*) and ML(*), 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(9); 02/21/47
Note: The manual number is not given in the entry in BSIR.
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telephone Central Office Set TC-1, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telephone Central Office Set TC, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telephone Central Office Set TC, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM , 10/19/

Telephone Central Office Set TC-2, 90 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Note: With Change 2, 15 April
Technical Manual, TM , 04/08/

Telephone Terminal CFA (Carrier) and Repeater CFA (Carrier), pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telephone Terminal Sets TCA and TCB (Carrier) and Repeater Set TCA (Carrier), pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Relay Unit BEA (Teletype Trunk), 24 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Converter M, 17 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Cabinet BEA, -B, -C, -D, -C, -E, -F, -G, -H, -J, -K, -L, -M, -N, -P, -Q, -R, -S, -U, -AA, and -AB, Wire Chief's Testing, 75 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Sets A, B, and C, 75 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM , 04/20/

Telephone Repeater Set TCA, 37 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telegraph Sets TG-5, TGA, and TGB, 63 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Printers TGA,CHB, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telegraph Printer Sets (Teletypewriter) EE and EE, Teletypewriter Sets EEA, EEA, and EE, 37 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telegraph Terminal CFA (Carrier), pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Teletype Terminal Equipment AN/FGC-1 or AN/FGC-1X, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/02/

Telegraph Central Office Set TC-3, 58 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Line Unit BEA and Line Unit BE, 55 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Note: With Change 1, 18 January
Technical Manual, TM ,

Real Units RL, RLA, -B, and -C, 75 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Sets EE and EEA through E, 41 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Reel Units RL, RLB, and RLC, 31 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Truck KB and Earth Bore Equipment HD, 54 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Vulcanizing Equipment TEA and TEA, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(3); 04/18/47
Technical Manual, TM , 12/04/

Vulcanizing Equipments TEA, TEA, and TEB, 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/24/

Spiral-Four Cable, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Note: With Change 1, 12 March
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Bridging Access Plug U/G, 8 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM , 10/12/

Cables WC (5-Pair), and WC (Pair), and Cable Assemblies CC and CCA, 44 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Tape Facsimile Equipment RCB, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/05/

Facsimile Equipment RC, RCA, and RCB and Facsimile Set AN/TXC-1, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Boehme Automatic Keying and Recording Equipment, 99 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/17/

Converter M, MA, MB, Cipher, 66 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Recorder RD-2/GXR, 42 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Signal Lamp Equipments EE and EEA, 34 pages.
PB - BSIR 8(5); 01/30/48
Technical Manual, TM ,

Signal Lamp Equipment EE, 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Signal Lamp Equipment SE, 20 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Note: Superseded TM , 17 April 43
Technical Manual, TM ,

Visual Identification Equipments AN/VVX-1 and AN/VVX-1X, 53 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/15/

Spotlight Set AN/PVQ-1, 36 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Photographic Set PH, 41 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Training Film and Film Strip Projection, 79 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Reproducing Equipments MCA, MCB, and MCC, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 8(4); 01/23/48
Technical Manual, TM , 05/12/

Identification Equipment PH, 47 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Photographic Darkroom Equipment (Processing Equipment PH), 20 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(1); 10/04/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Photographic Darkroom Equipment (Processing Equipment PH), 21 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Projector Equipment PH, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM A, 02/14/

Projector Equipment PHA, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Projectors PH and PHA, 69 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Photographic Laboratories, Organization and Operation in Service Commands, Departments and Posts, 32 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/46
Note: With Changes 1, 12 September
Technical Manual, TM ,

Ceiling Light Projectors MLA, MLB, MLC, MLD, MLE, MLE, MLF, and MLG, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Theodolites MLC through MLR, Tripods MLC through MLT, Compass ML, Telescope ML, Theodolite ML, 81 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/12/

Supports MLB, MLD, MLE; Anemometers ML, MLA, MLB; Indicators ML, MLA, MLB, 54 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Barographs MLA, MLB, MLC, MLD, 21 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(4); 04/25/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Thermographs ML and ML, 22 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(6); 05/09/47
Note: With Change 1, 14 November
Technical Manual, TM ,

Barometers MLB, MLD, MLE, MLF, and ML/TM, 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 10/17/

Barometers ML-2 through MLF; Cases ML through MLE, 71 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Wind Equipment SCMA and Wind Equipments AN/GMQ-1 and AN/GMQA, pages.
PB - BSIR 8(8); 02/20/48
Technical Manual, TM , 01/16/

Target Range Communication Systems, 7 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 02/02/

Code Practice Equipment, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Time Control Equipment RC, 86 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Spotting Sets PHB, PHC, P_HD, and PHF and Spotting SET AN/TVQ-1, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(20); 05/24/45
Technical Manual, TM , 11/30/

Code Training Set AN/GSC-T1, 37 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM , 11/01/

Flash Ranging Set GRA, 65 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 10/25/

Recorder BC, 96 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Public Address Set PAF, 51 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(13); 06/27/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Keyer TGA, 57 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Sound Ranging Set GRC, 75 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 12/28/

Panoramic Adaptors BCA, BCB, BCA, and BCB, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Keyers TGA, TGB, TGC, TGD, TGF, TGG, TRH, and TGJ, 51 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Public Address Set PAB, 79 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Training of Signal Communication Personnel, 74 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Note: With Change 1, 1 March
Technical Manual, TM , 03/11/

Shop Work, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Wire Telegraphy, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Common-Battery Telephone Equipment, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

International Morse Code, Instructions, 74 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Truck Line Messenger Service, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radar Electronic Fundamentals, pages.
PB - BSIR 8(12); 03/19/48
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radar System Fundamentals, pages.
PB - BSIR 8(12); 03/19/48
Technical Manual, TM ,

Repair and Calibration of Electrical Measuring Instruments, 77 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Substation Installation, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Suppression of Radio Noises, 46 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Electrical Communication Systems Engineering, pages.
PB - BSIR 7(3); 10/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Electronic Communication Systems Equipment, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Training Text and Applicatory Exercises for Amplitude-Modulated Radio Sets, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRA, -T2, SCRA, and -T2, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/CRD-3, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCR(*), SCR(*), and SCR(*), pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/10/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRA and SCRA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM , 12/15/

Radio Set AN/MRC-1, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 11/15/

Radio Sets SCR(*) and SCR(*), pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Note: With Change 1, 4 Dec
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRA and -B and SCRA and -B, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM , 02/22/

Radio Set AN/TRC-7, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Note: With Addenda, 18 May
Technical Manual, TM , 04/23/

Radio Set SCR, 85 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 01/01/

Radio Sets SCRA and SCRA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM , 01/12/

Radio Set SCRA, Radio Set SCRB, Radio Set SCRC, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/TRC-5 (XC-3), pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM , 11/1/44 .

Radio Set SCRA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/TRC-6 (XC-2), Description and Installation, 70 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(8); 02/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/TRC-6 (XC-2), 57 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/14/

Radio Set AN/TRC, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM , 11/16/

Radio Set AN/VRC-3, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/MRQ-2, 71 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM , 09/23/

Radio Set SCRA, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Interphone Equipment RC and RCA, 30 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Interphone Equipment RC, 30 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Interphone Equipment RC, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Interphone Equipment RC and RC, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/13/

Interphone Equipment RC, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Grounds, Grounding Procedures, and Protective Devices for Wire Communication Equipment, 70 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 11/12/

Radio Transmitters BCA, BCB, BCC, BCD, BCE, and BC-AA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Note: With Change 1, 25 January
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitters BCA, BCB, BCC, BCD, BCE, and BC-AA, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Note: With Change 1, 25 January
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitters (Wilcox Electric Types A, B, and C), pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Technical Manual for Transmitting Components of Radio Set SCRC, Radio Set SCRD, and Radio Set SCRF, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM , 05/23/

Radio Transmitting Equipment RC, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

25 watt Airport Control Transmitter Equipment, Radio Transmitter BCJ, Remote Control RMJ, Microphone TL (Published by Wilcox-Gay Corp., Charlotte, Michigan), 42 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM A,

watt Airport Control Transmitter Equipment, Radio Transmitter BCL, Remote Control Unit RM-6J, and Microphone TP, 56 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitter T-4/FRC, Radio Transmitter T-5/FRC, Power Rectifier PP-1/FRC, Modulator MD-1/FRC, Switch Panel SA-2/FRC, Oscillator O-2/FRC, Amplifier AM-2/FRC, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radiotelegraph Transmitter, Press Wireless Type PWA, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitter A, 41 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitter-Receiver Type ( watts) and Associated Equipment (Manufactured by Link Radio Corp., New York), 86 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Transmitter Telegraph-Telephone SST, 83 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Instruction Book for Radio Transmitter BCF, 73 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/24/

Radio Transmitter BCF and Remote Control Unit RMF, 72 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 01/26/

Radio Set AN/VRC-4 and Transmitter Type TS and Receiver Types RS and RS, 76 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Note: With Addenda 7 April
Technical Manual, TM ,

Instruction Book, Model ET Lifeboat Radio Transmitter, Portable, 37 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Telegraph Transmitter, Radio Marine Model ET , 96 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radiotelegraph Transmitter, Press Wireless Type PWA, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Telegraph Transmitters (Press Wireless Types PWB and PWBA), pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitters BC, BCA, -B, -C, -E, -F, -G, -H, -J, -K, -L, and -M, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitter T/SR, 79 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radiotelegraph Transmitter T M, 76 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/15/

Radio Receivers BD(*), BC(*)X, BC(*), and BC(*), pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receivers (Wilcox Electric Types CW3 and F3) and Receiver Bay (Wilcox Electric Type A), 90 pages.
PB - BSIR 8(4); 01/23/48
Technical Manual, TM , 03/02/

Radio Set SCRA, 85 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM C, 06/01/

Radio Set SCRC, 84 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/28/

Radio Set SCR (Direction Finding), pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA (Direction Finding), pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receivers BCB, BCB, And BCC, and Power Supply Units RAC, RAB, and RAA, 98 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/21/

Radio Receiver BC B, 58 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver AY, 45 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Diversity Receiving Equipment AN/FRR-3 and AN/FRR-3A, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 11/12/

Radio Set SCRA. Radio Receiver BCA. Power Supply Unit RAA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver AN/GRR-2 (Hallicrafters Model SXA), 70 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Technical Manual, TM , 08/22/

Intermediate and High Frequency Receiver, Model ABB, 45 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver R()/PR (Hallicrafters Sky Ranger Model S), 45 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Note: With Supplement dated 9 November
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver R/SR, 59 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/23/

Receiver-Transmitter BC, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver (Hallicrafters S), 59 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Units PEC, -D, -J, -K, -P, -S, -T, -U, -W, -AA, -AB, -AC, -AD, and AE, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM , 10/14/

Power Unit PE(*), 73 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PEA, -B, -C, -F, -G, and -H, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Units PE, PEB, PE(), pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Units PEG and H, 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(11); 12/13/46
Technical Manual, TM F,

Power Units PEF, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/22/4 .

Power Unit PEA, 60 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 02/25/

Power Unit PEA, 41 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM C, 11/26/

Power Unit PEC, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Units PEA, -C, -D, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM L,

Power Unit PEL, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM M,

Power Unit PEM, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(7); 11/15/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Units PEC, -D, -E, -F, and -G, and Motor Generator MGA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PEA, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Preventive Maintenance for Magneto of Power Unit PE, 2 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM B, 12/15/

Power Unit PEB, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM F,

Power Unit PEF, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/12/

Power Unit PEA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM B, 08/05/

Power Unit PBB, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PE (A, B, C, D, & E), 91 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(7); 11/15/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PEA (Manufactured by Le Roi Co.), pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/06/

Power Unit PEA, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Moistureproofing and Fungiproofing Power Unit PU-8/TTQ-1, 5 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PU-6/TSP-1, 57 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Dynamotor Unit BDC, 34 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(9); 05/30/47
Note: With Supplement 2, 21 February
Technical Manual, TM , 03/31/

1½-KVA Kohler Power Unit Model 1MA, 91 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PEC, 45 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM , 12/15/

Power Unit PEA, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM , 09/28/

Motor-Generator MGA, 67 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 10/01/

Power Unit PE, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PE, 90 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PEB, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Note: With Addenda dated May
Technical Manual, TM C, 01/06/

Power Unit PEC, 84 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM D, 01/15/

Power Unit PED, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PU/F, 91 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 05/15/

Power Unit PEB, 67 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM , 10/21/

Power Unit PEA, 46 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/29/

Power Unit PE, 77 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifiers RAJ, -K, -L, -N, and -Q, and Rectifier 6RB6B17, 61 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/07/

Rectifier RA, 39 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifier RAB, 52 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifier RA, 23 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifier RA, 17 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PU/C, 62 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Adjustment of Governor for Power Unit PU/C, 3 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifier RAH, 81 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifier RAB, 19 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifier RAA, 12 pages.
PB - BSIR 8(8); 02/20/48
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifier RA, 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Note: With Change 1, 5 May
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifier Power Unit PP/MSM, 18 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Trojan Rectifier Battery Eliminator, Model , 22 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Transfer Panel CN/F, 65 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 01/10/

Rectifier Power Unit PP/TG, 39 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Motor Generator PU/C, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PEB, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/02/

Power Unit PEB, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PEA, 80 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PU/FRC, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PU/U, pages.
PB - BSIR 8(5); 01/30/48
Technical Manual, TM , 11/17/

Power Unit PU/U, 59 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PU26/U, 73 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rotary Converters (Pioneer Gen-E-Motor Models Nos. 3K50, 1K50, 2K50, 2K30X, 2K50X, 2DL60, and 2R), 56 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM , 11/21/

Motor Generator PU/C, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifier Power Unit PP/FSM-1, 39 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 01/19/

Power Unit PU/G, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Moistureproofing and Fungirpoofing Power Unit PU/G, 7 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM , 04/23/

Battery Charger PE, 59 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Vibrator Power Supply, PP/VRC-3, 60 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Note: With Supplement 19 June
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Unit PU/FRC, pages.
PB - BSIR 8(5); 01/30/48
Technical Manual, TM , 04/21/

Signal Generator IA, 24 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Equipment RC() (Manufactured by Allen B. DuMont Laboratories, Passanic, N.J.), pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Calibrator BCA, 60 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Range Calibrator I and IA, 51 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Computer MCA for Radio Sets SCRA, SCR and SCR, for Instructions NXSS and (SK-IM and SP-IM), 16 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(6); 11/08/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Equipment RC and RCA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/28/

6-kw R-F Amplifier PA-1A, Rectifier RA-1A, and Antenna Tuning Unit AT-1A, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 12/01/

Trailer KD, 52 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Aided-Azimuth-Tracking Kit No. AP1, 21 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Position Controls MCA and MCB, Conversion Kits for Radio Sets SCR() and SCR(), pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitter BC and Associated Equipment Kit No. X2, 79 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/10/

Trainer BCA, 86 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Signal Generator I(), 43 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Sweep Generator MIB, 31 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/15/

Antenna AN, 56 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Adcock Radio Range Station, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/03/

Radio Transmitting Set AN/CRN, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 10/31/

Test Set AN/GPM-1, 31 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set AN/MPM-1, 67 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/15/

Signal Generator IA, 42 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Echo Box TS/TPS-3, 19 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Trailers KA and KA, 76 pages.
PB - BSIR 8(8); 02/20/48
Technical Manual, TM , 04/06/

Detector Sets SCRA, SCRB, SCRC, SCRD, and SCRE (Anti-tank Mine, Portable) and Detector, Anti-tank mine, Portable, M-1, 68 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Adjustment of Detector Set SCR() for Operation over Metallic Soil, 2 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Detector Set AN/VRS-1, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Responder-Beacon AN/PPN-1 (Manufactured by Hazeltine Electronics Corp., New York City), 44 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Beacon Transmitter-Receiver AN/PPN-2, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Range Calibrator I, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Detector Set AN/PRS-1, 52 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM A,

Radio Set SCR, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radar Set AN/TPX-3, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set IA; Tube and Set Tester, Precision Model P, 47 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set AN/MPM-2, 91 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Echo Box TS/UP, 37 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Power Meter TS/AP, 44 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set AN/MPM-5, 33 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set AN/MPM-4, 17 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 05/17/

Calibrator IA, 40 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set AN/MPM-3, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 02/24/

Signal Generator TS/U, 46 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/17/

Voltmeter TS/U, 41 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/08/

Test Set AN/MPM-7, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/07/

Crystal Rectifier Test Set TS/U, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set TS/TPX, 56 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Technical Manual, TM , 03/22/

Voltmeter IS, 34 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Technical Operation Radio Equipments RCA and RCA, General Description, Operating Instructions and Equipment Performance Log, pages.
PB - BSIR 8(8); 02/20/48
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Equipment RCB, RCC, RCD, RC, RCA, RCD, General Description, Operating Instructions, and Equipment Performance Log, pages.
PB - BSIR 5(13); 06/27/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRA and SCRB, Technical Operational Manual, General Description, and Equipment Performance Log, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Technical Manual, TM ,

Technical Operation, Radio Equipment RCA, General Description, Operating Instructions, and Equipment Performance Log, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Technical Operation Manual, Radio Equipment RC, 96 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(11); 12/13/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Technical Operation Manual for Radio Set AN/TPS-3; General Description, Operating Instructions, and Equipment Performance Log, 77 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA, General Description, Operating Instructions, and Equipment Performance Log, Technical Operation, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/MPN-1, Technical Operation: General Description, Operating Instructions, and Equipment Performance Log, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(9); 08/30/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Technical Operation, Radio Set SCRA, General Description, Operating Instructions and Equipment Performance Log, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Equipment RC, Technical Operation Manual, General Description, and Equipment Performance Log, 90 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Note: With Addenda 4 April and Change 1, 18 August
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radar Set AN/MPG-1 and Radar Set AN/FPG-1, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Note: With Addenda and Change 1, 31 January
Technical Manual, TM ,

Preventive Maintenance, Radio Equipments RCA and RCA, 64 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRA and SCRT6, 86 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Note: With Change 1, 13 June
Technical Manual, TM , 08/01/

Radio Equipments RCB, RCC, RCD, RC, RCA, RCD, 65 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets SCRA and SCRB: Preventative Maintenance Manual, 93 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(8); 08/23/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/02/

Preventive Maintenance, Radio Equipment RCA, 63 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Preventive Maintenance, Radio Equipment RC, 59 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(11); 12/13/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/TPS-3, Preventive Maintenance, 60 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set SCRA, Preventive Maintenance Manual, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/MPN-1, Preventative Maintenance Manual, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(7); 08/16/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/24/

Preventive Maintenance, Radio Set SCRA, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Equipment RC, Preventive Maintenance Manual, 44 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Note: Addenda 4 April 45 and Change 1, 11 October
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radar Set AN/MPG-1 and Radar Set AN/FPG-1, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Note: With Addenda 15 March 45; and C1, 8 Feb 46 and C2, 16 May 46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Service Manual for Radio Equipments RCA and RCA, pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM , 08/19/

Service Manual for Radio Equipment RCB, RCC, RCD, RC, RCA, RCD, Theory, Trouble Shooting and Repair, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Sets, SCRA and SCRB, Service Manual, Theory, Trouble Shooting, and Repair, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM , 08/21/

Service Manual for Radio Equipment RCA, Theory, Trouble Shooting, and Repair, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Service Manual, Radio Equipment RC, Theory, Trouble Shooting, and Repair, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/TSP-3, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Service, Radio Set SCRA, Theory, Trouble Shooting, and Repair, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Service Radio Set SCRA, Theory, Trouble Shooting, and Repair, pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/MPN-1, Service Manual, Theory, Trouble Shooting, and Repair, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(8); 08/23/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/31/

Service Manual for Radio Set SCRA, Theory, Trouble Shooting, and Repair, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Equipment RC, Service Manual, Theory, Trouble Shooting, and Repair, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM , 03/15/

Radar Set AN/MPG-1 and Radar Set AN/FPG-1, Service Manual, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Note: With Addenda March 28 and June 26,
Technical Manual, TM ,

Sound Locators, M1A1 to M1A8, Inclusive, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(11); 12/13/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/22/

Complete mile Spiral Carrier System, 86 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM , 11/02/

Carrier Hybrid CF-7, 81 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Note: With Change 1, 31 January
Technical Manual, TM ,

Repeater Set TC, Terminal, Telegraph, 76 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 10/30/

Repeater Set TC (Intermediate), 63 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Note: Revisions in this manual as of 26 April are included
Technical Manual, TM , 07/14/

Telephone Repeater EEA, 36 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Note: With Change 1, 29 September
Technical Manual, TM , 02/19/

Telephone Repeater TP, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Converter Set TC (carrier, 2-wirewire) and Repeater Set TC (carrier, 2-wire), pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Ringer Equipment B (Voice-Frequency Rack Mounted), 71 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Switchboard SB-5/PT, 19 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/26/

Test Set TS/TSM, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Note: Change 1, 15 November
Technical Manual, TM , 08/12/

Test Set I, 47 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Ringers,TA/FC and TA/FC, Voice-Frequency Ringer Packaged Equipment, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation Instructions for Carrier Terminals OA/FC and OA/FC and Carrier Repeater OA-9/FC (Type C Carrier Telephone Packaged Equipment), 72 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Type C Carrier Telephone, Packaged Equipment (Moisture Resistant), Preliminary Instructions, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Voice-Frequency Carrier Telegraph Packaged Equipment, 60 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Line Terminating and Composite Panel and Type C Transfer Panel (Manufactured by Western Electric Co., Chicago), 60 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telegraph Repeater, Packaged Equipment, 67 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Telegraph Switchboard SB-6/GG, 19 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set I, 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Interconnection of Packaged Equipment, 80 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Preliminary Instructions for 19C (SPL) Oscillator PER D (Moisture Resistant), 33 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Oscillator TS/U (51A (SLP) Oscillator), 33 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Preliminary Instructions, Volt-Ohm-Milliammeter per D, Moisture-Resistant, 26 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM , 08/30/

Telephone TP-3, 39 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Decibel Meter TS/U, 32A SPL Transmission Measuring Set, 32 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set IB, 18 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/05/

Switchboards BD and BD, 94 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Unit I, 37 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 05/05/

Test Set, TX/TSM, 59 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM , 12/09/

Telephone, TP-9, 80 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Electron Tube Rectifier, Trojan Model , 56 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM , 43 .

Bias Meter IA, 16 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/03/

Reperforator Teletypewriter Sets TG16 and TG17, 38 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Teletypewriter Set AN/TGC-1, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Dual Diversity Receiving Equipment (Wilcox Type CW3-D), 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM , 09/25/

Exciter Unit O-5/FR, 45 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM , 10/18/

Telegraph Terminal Set AN/TCC-1, Telegraph Terminal TH-1/TCC-1, and Filter F-2/GG, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set TS-2/TG, 30 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM , 01/25/

Electronic Ocean Cable Terminal Set, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(8); 08/23/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/19/

Reel Assembly RL/VI, 17 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 01/18/

Reel Equipment CE, 17 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/25/

Converter CV-2/TX, 38 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Open Wire Construction for Fixed Plant Application, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM , 11/22/

Limiter Amplifier, Type 3BLH, Speaker, Type 6AL, 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 02/10/

Rectifier Power Units No. and No. , 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Enlarger PH/UF (V-Mail), 32 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Densitometer PH, 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Paper Cutter PH/GF (V-Mail), 14 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Splicer PH/UF; V-Mail, 22 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Projector PH/UF (V-Mail), 36 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Developing Machine PH/GF, V-Mail, 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Enlarger Ph/GF (V-Mail), 68 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Enlarger PH, V-Mail, 77 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Reader PH (V-Mail), 55 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Recorders PHY (V-Mail), 37 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera Equipment PH/PF (V-Mail), 71 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Light Meter (V-Mail), 24 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Developing Machine PHA (V-Mail), pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Theodolites PH-BC, PH-BD, PH-BE, and Theodolite MX/TVQ-1, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Screens PH/GF and HP/GF, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(4); 04/25/47
Technical Manual, TM , 05/30/

Identification Set AN/TFQ-1, 50 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Transformer PH, 15 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Reader, Recordak, Model C, 34 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(9); 05/30/47
Note: With Change 1, 3 May
Technical Manual, TM ,

Projector AN/TFQ-4, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Projector Equipments PH and PHB, 56 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Recording Equipment PHA, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Exposure Meter PH, 8 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera Equipment PH, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera PH and Recorder PH, 96 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Drier PH, 40 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Drier PH, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Projector Equipments PHA and PHG, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera Equipment Mounting PH/MF, 22 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera PH, 39 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Exposure Meters PH, PHA, PHC, and PHA, 74 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(1); 10/04/46
Note: The manual number shown in BSIR is "TM "
Technical Manual, TM ,

Printer PH/PF, 30 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Darkroom PH, 55 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera PH/PF, 91 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera PHA and Camera Equipment PH, 42 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Photographic Equipment PH, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Identification Set AN/TFQ-3, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Enlargers PH and PHA, 19 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Laminating Equipment, PH/GF, 52 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera PH/PF, 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/09/

Printer PH, 26 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Printer PHA, 42 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Press PH, 19 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Developing Machine PH, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera PH/PF (Manufactured by Folmer Grafler Corp.), 31 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(1); 10/04/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Timer PHA, 20 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/09/

Dryer PH, 20 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Print Straightener PH, 24 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM , 05/08/

Camera PH, 70 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Projector Equipment PH, 43 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM , 05/15/

Printer PH, 26 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera PH, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(13); 09/27/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Camera PH/PF, 84 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Printer PHB, 18 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Splicer PH, 36 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Developing Equipment PHC, 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Electric Timer (Photrix Model ), 34 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Cameras, PHA through PHJ, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Washer PHA, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Generators MLA and MLB, Hydrogen, 61 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation and Maintenance of Radiosonde Receptor AN/FMQ-1, 74 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Field Construction of Radiosonde Test Switch to Switch to Supersede Test Equipment TS/FMQ-1, 8 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Operating Instructions for Radiosondes AN/AMQ-1, AN/AMQ-1A, AN/AMQ-1C, and Radiosonde Receptor AN/FMQ-1, 58 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Meteorological Station AM/TMQ-1, 38 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Aerograph Equipment AN/AMQ-3, 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Aerograph Equipment AN/AMQ-2, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Mobile Meteorological Station SCM-1, 51 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Pilot Balloon Tables (gram), pages.
PB - BSIR 5(4); 04/25/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Pilot Balloon Tables (gram), pages.
PB - BSIR 5(4); 04/25/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Hydrogen Generator ML/TM and Hydrogen Generator Set AN/TMQ-3, 34 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Instruction Book for Weather Panel MLA, MLB, MLC, MLD, Wind Recorder MLA, MLB, MLC, MLD, Wind Intensity Meter MLA, MLB, MLC, MLD, 71 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/05/

Psychrometer Equipment ML/AM, 58 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Ceiling Light Set AN/TMQ-2, 53 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/17/

Thermometers ML-4 and ML-5, Psychrometers MLand ML , Shelters ML, MLA, and MLB, 44 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 11/27/

Plotting Set AN/GMQ-3, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/24/

Psychrometric Calculator ML/UM, 32 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Clinometers MLC, MLD, MLE, and MLF, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Instructions for Modulated Audio Frequency Radiosonde Observations (WBANRAOB Manual), pages.
PB - BSIR 6(6); 08/08/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Aerograph Calibration Set TS/AMQ-6, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Graphing Board ML/TM, 30 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(2); 10/10/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set IA, 13 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/01/

Trailer KE, 47 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Public Address Sets PA-5 and PAA, 93 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Public Address Set AN/RQ-1, 44 pages.
PB - BSIR 6(6); 08/08/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Sets IA, -B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, -H, -J, and -K, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Training Generator AN/URA-TI, 63 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Master Power Meter Panel, 16 pages.
PB - BSIR 6(6); 08/08/47
Technical Manual, TM , 04/06/

Portable Recorder, 52 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Transcriber, Double Toneband, 31 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Tape Puller TT-2/TG, 34 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(6); 05/09/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Diversity Receiving and Combining Equipment, 37 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Tube Tester Espey Model , 44 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM Tentative,

Model A, Tube, Battery and Set Tester: Electrical Specifications (Manufactured by Supreme Instruments Corp., Greenwood, Miss.), 13 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rotary Converters, volt D.C. - volt D.C. - volt A.C., 8 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(4); 01/24/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Vibrator Type Inverter, volt DC to volt AC, 15 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Dual Channel Amplifier AM/FRC, 30 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Note: With Change 1, 18 July
Technical Manual, TM ,

Sound Recording Set AN/UNQ-1, 93 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set TSA/UR (Manufactured by Triumph Mfg. Co.), 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Oscillator IA, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Miller Utility Heater, Model OGA, 39 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(9); 11/29/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Oscilloscope BCA, 50 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Battery Charger PP/MRQ-2, 16 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Range Calibrator IA, 45 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifier PP/VT, 19 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Frequency Standard TS/U, 41 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Public Address Set AN/TIQ-3, 96 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set IA; Analyzer, Precision Model P, 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Meter Test Equipment AN/GSM-1, 80 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/02/

Cable Testing Unit, Defiance Alloyed Products Models , Portable Dry Air Compressor, 62 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Maintenance and Operation of Crystal Grinding Equipment and Crystal Finishing Techniques, pages.
PB - BSIR 8(5); 02/06/48
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Dimensioning Quartz Blanks for Crystal Unit CR-8 B/U, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(5); 02/08/46
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Dimensioning Quartz Blanks for Crystal Unit CR-8 B/U, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Speak-O-Phone Sound Detector, Model SCB, 22 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Speech Recorder MC, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Note: With Addenda, 1 January
Technical Manual, TM , 11/02/

Speech Reproducer MC and MCA, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Magnetic Wire Recorder (G-E Model 20 N-1), 21 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Note: With supplement, 2 April
Technical Manual, TM , 01/22/

Automatic Transmitter for Perforated Tape, Wheatstone, McElroy Type TXRC, 55 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Connecting and Switching Kit MX/GT, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Recorder-Reproducer AN/GNQ-5, 71 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Technical Manual, TM ,

Magnetic Wire Recorder (G-E Models 50A and 51), 26 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Battery Charger PE, 42 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Amplifier, Wilcox Type M57D1, 16 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Control Console, Wicox Type CS, Keying Oscillator, Wilcox Type 95A, Ultra-High Frequency Antenna, Wilcox Type A, 18 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Electricord Recording Machine, Model K, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):9; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Wavemeter, Lavoie Model SM, Frequency Meter TSU, 22 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(3); 10/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Fluxmeters TS/AP, TSA/AP, and TSB/AP, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Reproducer, Sound, Portable, 50 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Oscilloscope TS/U (DuMont Type ), 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 6(7); 08/15/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Shelter S-1/FM, 39 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/04/

Intercommunication Set PA-8, 73 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Note: With addenda dated 25 June
Technical Manual, TM ,

Public Address Set AN/PIQ-1, 61 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(4); 10/25/25
Technical Manual, TM ,

Recorder-Reproducer AN/GNQ-4, 73 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Sound Ranging Set GR-8, pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Recording Equipment RC, 88 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Battery Tester TS/U, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Amplifiers AM/TI and AM/TI and Associated Equipment, 52 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1):8; 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

A.F. and R.F. Signal Generator, Supreme Models and M, 70 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Magnetic Wire Recorder (G-E Model 20B-2), 18 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(8); 02/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Public Address Set AN/SIQ-1, 47 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Reproducer AN/GNQ, 43 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Plotting Equipment AN/TSA-1, 34 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(23); 06/14/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Plotting Equipment AN/TSA-2, 24 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Amplifier (Lewyt Type ED-1), 39 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Amplifier (General Radio Model AM), 14 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set I, 42 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/TRC-1, -1A, -1B, -1C, -1D, and -1E; Radio Terminal Set AN/TRC-3, -3A, -3B, -3C, -3D, and -3E; Radio Relay Set AN/TRC-4, -4A, -4B, -4C, -4D, and -4E; Amplifier Equipment AN/TRA-1, -1A, etc, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM A,

Frequency Standard TSA/FMQ-1, 44 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Set AN/TRC-2, pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set I, 36 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(6); 05/09/47
Note: With Change 1, 14 March
Technical Manual, TM ,

Modulators (Wilcox Electric Types 50A and 50A3), pages.
PB - BSIR 6(6); 08/08/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna System AS/GR, 49 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Beacon Equipment RC, pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Kit for Rhombic Receiving Antenna, Drawing ES-EE, 63 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Note: With Supplement, 1 June
Technical Manual, TM ,

Voltohmmeter I, 40 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Note: With Change 1, 9 July
Technical Manual, TM ,

Assembling and Erecting foot Gin-Pole-Pole-Type Trylon Ladder Towers, 14 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Foundation Steel Pedestal base for 73" 7' Guyed Radio Tower, 7 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM , 10/17/

Antenna Equipment RC, 30 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Kit for Rhombic Transmitting Antenna, Drawing ES-ED, 46 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Instruction Book for Antenna Equipment RC, 21 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Note: This is a "Tentative Technical Manual."
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Control Central AN/TRQ-1, 44 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Support AB/CR, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Remote Control Equipment AN/TRA-2, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(9); 03/08/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Remote Control Console (Wilcox Electric Type CS) and Control Equipment (Wilcox Electric Type CS), 83 pages.
PB - BSIR 6(9); 08/29/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Frequency Meter BCE, 26 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Electronic Volt-Ohmmeter, Radio City Products Model , 21 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM B, 04/30/

Voltohmmeters TS/U and TSB/U, 45 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 03/17/

Frequency Standard TS/FRC, Millen No. , 62 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Unit I, 46 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM , 08/03/

Tube Tester I, 62 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Kit for Double-Doublet Receiving Antenna, Drawing E8-E, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Equipment RCA and Antenna ANA, 24 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Equipment RCA, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Technical Manual, TM , 10/28/

Remote Control Equipment RC, 37 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(8); 03/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Frequency Bridge Type A, 21 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Impedance Bridge (Brown Engineering Model A), 56 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM A,

Impedance Bridge (General Radio Model A), 52 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(10); 12/06/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Instructions and Manual of Radio Frequency Measurement for Q-Meters, Type A, Type A, Type A (Manufactured by Boonton Radio Corp., Boonton, N.J.), 43 pages.
PB - BSIR 93(3); 10/18/46
Technical Manual, TM , 11/08/

Radio Modulator BCB, 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set (Espey Model ), 87 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Mast AB/FR, 23 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Signal Generator TS/U (Signal Generator, Federal Model CS-1), 46 pages.
PB - BSIR 6(7); 08/15/47
Technical Bulletin, TB ,

Signal Generator TS/U, Moistureproofing and Fungiproofing, 4 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Signal Generator IB, W.I.T. Model , 48 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Vibrator Pack PP/U, 38 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Vacuum Tube Voltmeter, Precision Model EVMCP, 83 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Kit for Doublet Transmitting Antenna, Drawing ES-EF, 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM , 02/08/

Signal Generators TS/UP and TSA/UP, 72 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM B, 04/19/

Signal Generator TSB/UP, 70 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM C,

Signal Generator TSC/UP, 70 pages.
PB - BSIR 11(1):8; 49
Note: The manual number was taken from FM , 10 January
Technical Manual, TM ,

Capacitor Analyzer, Solar Model CB, 26 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Test Set TSA/G; RCA Chanalyst No. C, 66 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Supports AB/CR and AB/CR, and Erection Kits MX/CR and MX/CR, 26 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Rectifiers (Wilcox Electric Types 3A and 36A4), 89 pages.
PB - BSIR 6(6); 08/08/47
Technical Manual, TM , 01/25/

Remote Control Equipment RC, 55 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(7); 02/22/46
Note: With Change 1, 2 October
Technical Manual, TM ,

Keyer KY-7/FRT, 63 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Oscillator O/FSM-1, 65 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(5); 11/01/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitters (Wilcox Electric Types 96A, 96C, and 96C3), pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM , 04/05/

Multimeter TS/U, Hickok Models and NX, 98 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Crystal Test Set TS/FSM-1 (Ray Jefferson Model AF), 92 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Standard Oscillator TS/TSM, Galvin Model CES-1, 45 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/13/

Crystal Test Set TS/FSM-1, 60 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Crystal Test Set TS/FSM-1, 59 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM Supp.,

Audio Oscillator TS/FSM-1, Hewlett-Packard Model CR, 9 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(24); 06/21/46
Technical Manual, TM , 06/22/

Lapping Machine TL/FSM-1, 50 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Lapping Machine TL/FSM-1, 49 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Antenna Support AB/CR, 31 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Oscilloscope IB, 61 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Static Direction Finder AN/GRD-1A, pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Static Direction Finder AN/GRD-1, 48 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(25); 06/28/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Balloon Assembly MX ()/GR, 35 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(1); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Light Tank M3A3, 22 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM , 05/17/

Installation of Radio Equipment in Car, Half-Track, M2, 66 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 04/13/

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Light Armored Car M8, 30 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Tank Recovery Vehicle T2, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 6(6); 08/08/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Medium Tank M4 Series, 26 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Light Tank T9E1, 14 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio Equipment in Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M15, 13 pages.
PB - BSIR 6(7); 08/15/47
Technical Manual, TM , 06/26/

Installation of Radio Equipment in Truck, 2 1/2-ton, 6x6, Cargo, 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM , 07/22/

Installation of Radio Equipment in Truck, 3/4-ton, 4x4, Carryall, 58 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/12/46
Technical Manual, TM , 09/15/

Installation of Radio Equipment in Carrier, Personnel, Half-Track, M5 or M5A1, 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio Equipment in Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M13, M14, M16, or M17, 11 pages.
PB - BSIR 6(7); 08/15/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio Equipment in Carrier, Personnel, Half-Track, M3, 40 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(2); 07/05/46
Technical Manual, TM , 09/30/

Installation of Radio Equipment in Truck, 1/4-ton, 4x4, 78 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio Equipment in Armored Utility Car M20, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Car, Scout, M3A1, 68 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Facsimile Equipment in Car, Half-Track M2A1, 54 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Light Tanks M5 and M5A1, 58 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Facsimile Equipment in Carrier, Personnel, Half-Track, M3A1, 49 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Carriage, Motor, 3-inch Gun, M10 and M10A1, 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Carriage, Motor, mm Gun, M18, 18 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio Equipment in Truck, 3/4-ton, 4x4, Weapon Carrier, 68 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Facsimile Equipment in Truck, 3/4-ton, 4x4, Command Reconnaissance, 58 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Carriage, Motor, mm Howitzer, M8, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Tank, Medium, T23, 40 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Note: With Change 1, 6 March
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Carriage, Motor, mm Gun, M36, M36B1, and M36B2, 58 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio Equipment in Carrier mm Mortar, Half-Track M21, 13 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio Equipment in Carrier, Cargo, Light, M29 and M29C (Amphibian), 63 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio Facsimile Equipment in Shelter HO(), 18 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio Equipment in Carriage, Motor, Combination Gun, M15A1, 17 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio Equipment in Truck, 1½-ton, 6x6, Personnel and Cargo, 27 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Medium Tank M4A3 or M4A3E2, mm Gun, Wet Stowage; Medium Tank M4A1, M4A2, and M4A3, mm Howitzer, 40 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Vehicle, Landing, Tracked, (Armored), Mark I, LVT-(A)-1, 25 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Vehicle, Landing, Tracked, (Armored), Mark IV, LVT-(A)-4, 24 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Tank, Light, M24, 45 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Vehicle, Landing, Tracked, (Unarmored), Mark III, LTV-3, 21 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Installation of Radio and Interphone Equipment in Vehicle, Landing, Tracked, LVT-2, LVT-(A)-2, and LVT-4, 23 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Trouble Shooting and Repair of Radio Equipment, 60 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Repair Instructions for Radio Receivers BCA, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, -J, -L, -M, -N, -HX, and -NX, and BC, -A, -C, -D, -F, -J, -L, -M, and -N, 76 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receivers BC, -C, -D, -E, and -G; BC and BCD,,Repair Instructions, 65 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver and Transmitter BVA, Repair Instructions, 44 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitter BCA, Repair Instructions, 50 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver BCA, Repair Instructions, 57 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver and Transmitter BC, Repair Instructions, 72 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Alignment Indicators IA, -B, -C, Repair Instructions, 15 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Oscillators VOA and -B, Repair Instructions, 18 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Oscillators VOA and -B, Repair Instructions, 17 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Signal generators I and IA, Repair Instructions, 97 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver BCA and -B, Repair Instructions, 83 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver and Loop Rotators BCD and -F, Repair Instructions, 59 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver-Transmitter RT/TRC-2, Repair Instructions, 74 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Detector Sets, SCRA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F, Repair Instructions, 29 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(4); 01/24/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Detector Sets SCRA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F, 28 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitters BCA, -B, -C, -E, -F, and -N, Repair Instructions, 84 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitters BCA, -B, -C, -E, -F and -N, Repair Instructions, 80 pages.
PB - BSIR 7(1); 10/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver and Transmitters BCA, -B, -C, -D, and -E, Repair Instructions, 57 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver and Transmitters BCA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F; Repair Instructions, 68 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Control Units RMA, -B, -C, -D, and -G, Repair Instructions, 30 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Converter CV-2/TX, Repair Instructions, 57 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver and Transmitters BCA, -B, -F, -G, -H, and -J; Repair Instructions, 59 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(4); 07/26/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver and Transmitters BCA, -B, -H, and -J, Repair Instructions, 61 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitter BCA (Target): Repair Instructions, 47 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(13); 06/27/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receivers BCA and B, Repair Instructions, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receivers R/TRC-1, RA/TRC-1, RB/TRC-1, RD/TRC-1, and RE/TRC-1, Repair Instructions, 96 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver BCA, Repair Instructions, 78 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitters T/TRC-1, TA/TRC-1, TB/TRC-1, TC/TRC-1, TD/TRC-1, and TE/TRC-1, Repair Instructions, 78 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receivers BCA, -C, -D, -AM, -CM, and -DM, Repair Instructions, 74 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitters BCA, -C, -D, -AM, -CM, and -DM, Repair Instructions, 58 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Interphone Amplifiers BCA, -C, -D, -AM, -CM, and -DM, 33 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receivers BCA, -B, and -BM, Repair Instructions, pages.
PB - BSIR 4(1):3; 01/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitters BCA, -B, and -BM, Repair Instructions, 79 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(1):3; 01/03/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Facsimile Transceiver FXB, Facsimile Set AN/TXC-1, Rectifier Power Supplies PEB and PP/TXC-1, Repair Instructions, 99 pages.
PB - BSIR 3(2); 10/11/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Amplifiers AM-8/TRA-1, AM-8A/TRA-1, AM-8B/TRA-1, and AM-8C/TRA-1, Repair Instructions, 21 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Receiver BCA, Repair Instructions, 76 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(3); 01/17/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Panoramic Adaptor BCA, Repair Instructions, 59 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Panoramic Adaptor BCA, Repair Instructions, 54 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(2); 01/10/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Radio Transmitter, BCA (Target), Repair Instructions, 47 pages.
PB - BSIR 5(13); 06/27/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Recorder BC, Repair Instructions, 60 pages.
PB - BSIR 2(3); 07/19/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Tactical Switchboards and Long Lines Equipment, Repair Instructions, General Requirements, 53 pages.
PB - BSIR 1(22); 06/07/46
Technical Manual, TM ,

Switchboard BD, Repair Instructions, Operational Requirements, 33 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Ringing Equipments EET1, EEA (Voice Frequency), and EEA (Voice Frequency), Repair Instructions, Operational Requirements, 40 pages.
PB - BSIR 4(12); 03/21/47
Technical Manual, TM ,

Repair Instructions, Rectifier RAA, -B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, -H, and -J, pages.
PB - BSIR 8(12); 03/19/48


Источник: mynewextsetup.us

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    Signal Corps Keyers

    ja key

    1

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    j key 2

    2

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    3

    j key

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    4

    j key

    j keys for an-gsc-t1 traing set

    5

    j keys for an-gsc-t1 traing set

    j key

    6

    j key

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    7

    j key

    j leg key

    8

    j leg key

    tg-5 key 1

    9

    tg-5 key 1

    tg-5 key 2

    10

    tg-5 key 2

    tg-5 key 3

    11

    tg-5 key 3

    tg keyer 2

    12

    tg keyer 2

    tha keyer

    13

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    ww1 telegraph key 1

    14

    ww1 telegraph key 1

    ww1 telegraph key2

    15

    ww1 telegraph key2
    Источник: mynewextsetup.us%20corps%20albums/Keyers/Keyers/mynewextsetup.us

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    Signal Corps The Emergency

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    Description:

    United States Army history of the Signal Corps during World War II, part 1 of 3

    Original Title

    Signal Corps the Emergency

    Copyright

    © Attribution Non-Commercial (BY-NC)

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    Description:

    United States Army history of the Signal Corps during World War II, part 1 of 3

    Copyright:

    Attribution Non-Commercial (BY-NC)

    Available Formats

    Download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
    %(1)% found this document useful (1 vote)
    views pages

    Original Title:

    Signal Corps the Emergency

    Description:

    United States Army history of the Signal Corps during World War II, part 1 of 3

    Copyright:

    Attribution Non-Commercial (BY-NC)

    Available Formats

    Download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd

    The more mobile an armed force becomes, the more rugged the terrain it
    encounters, or the more widely the force is deployed, the greater becomes the
    difficulty of securing and maintaining rapid, completely linked communications.
    In the U.S. Army the Signal Corps is the agency charged with developing,
    procuring, and furnishing signal equipment to overcome the difficulties men-
    tioned above. In an age of swift and startling progress in electronics, this phase
    of its mission demands that it keep abreast of scientific advances at home and
    abroad and maintain close ties with civilian laboratories and industry in order
    to take advantage of their capabilities.
    This volume traces the course which the Signal Corps followed between the
    first and second world wars, a period of planning and preparation. Others to
    follow will recount the testing of the Corps' organization and equipment, and
    the results achieved at home and overseas. The author has dealt with the sub-
    ject on a chronological basis, instead of following the topical treatment used in
    other technical service volumes. This broad-front approach has enabled him to
    weave into one pattern the many activities in which the Signal Corps was simul-
    taneously engaged. The reader can here follow from birth the history of Army
    radar and mobile radio, the first steps taken in the conversion of the civilian
    communications industry to war production, the expansion of training facilities,
    and the beginnings of the far-flung communications network that eventually
    encircled the globe. He will see the uncertainties of planning and the difficulties
    of organization incident to rapidly changing conditions, meager appropriations,
    and the clash of interest within the military household. These and many other
    matters showing human beings and institutions under pressure are replete with
    significance to us who must live in a turbulent world where revolution tends to
    have the upper hand over evolution.

    ORLANDO WARD
    Washington, D. C. Maj. Gen., U.S.A.
    30 January Chief of Military History

    vii
    The Author
    Dr. Dulany Terrett was born and reared in Montana and at present lives in
    Washington, D. C. He holds a Ph.B. in English from the University of Chicago
    and a Ph.D. in English from Northwestern University, where he served on the
    faculty from to
    During World War II he was an Air Corps officer with the Flying Training
    Command and the Air Transport Command. In the latter capacity, he wrote
    the history of the Air Transport Command in Brazil and Ascension Island.
    Upon his discharge in , he became the Signal Corps chief historian,
    first in the Office of the Chief Signal Officer and then in the Office of the Chief
    of Military History. In he resigned in order to become a consultant.

    viii
    Preface
    The prefacing of his book long after he has written it does not ordinarily
    come a writer's way. If the present volume be a case in point, history is one
    form which permits it. At least to the extent that it has happened, history is
    unchangeable; and to the extent that it is unchangeable it will stand and wait
    for the attention of those who sooner or later come to it, or of those who, like the
    present author, return to it after having drawn apart from its details.
    This view seems justified in retrospect as well, it appears to me. The history
    of the realizations, disappointments, mistakes, and successes of the United
    States Army Signal Corps before and during the war which ended in was
    itself undertaken entirely after that period had passed into history, and was
    planned and written with an eye to chronological and panoramic structure. It
    was in an effort to capture perspective and proportion, those qualities of neces-
    sary removal from the subject which every writer closely attached to his subject
    will despair of along with me, that I decided to devote the first volume of a
    history of the Signal Corps in World War II to a period beginning a number of
    years earlier. The massive gift which the Infantry makes to the national interest
    is made mostly in the battle itself, wherefore infantry history is combat history
    above all else. Technical arms and services like the Signal Corps, which must
    enter a war with technical gear ready to go, exert a large share of their produc-
    tive effort before it begins. For this reason, this volume surveys The Emergency
    and the years, half lassitude and half desperation, just before the Emperor
    Hirohito's bombers came in over Kahuku Point.
    Opening with the panorama of Signal Corps interests and distinguishing
    each of the characteristic landmarks of the scene, it develops by moving closer
    for repeated and prolonged views at most of these dominant features and by
    returning to the whole view often enough to keep it in mind. As the Signal
    Corps is an agent of communications, the main theme is the snaillike, lightning-
    like race toward radar, frequency modulation, and a multitude of electronic
    devices. Other parts of the narrative illustrate the lesson of the extravagant and
    enervating results of interservice strife. One can draw it primarily from the long
    story of unequal rivalry between the Air Corps and the Signal Corps. Yet the
    alarums and excursions of this melodrama never drowned out the quieter
    actions. Of these, the quietest was the development of radar, second only to
    nuclear fission as the greatest scientific advance of the war. The Emergency makes
    modest but firm claims for the Signal Corps' part in this development, at the
    same time producing evidence against a common notion that radar was the

    ix
    invention of a single scientist or of a single country; as was true of the atomic
    bomb, its origins were so wide as to be nearly universal. Next to radar and pos-
    sibly of even greater significance to the average man was the emergence of FM,
    the frequency modulation system of radio, which all but revolutionized the use
    of tanks in the war, not to speak of its record afterward. The advance of crystal
    control, along with the ticklish triumph over the presumed insufficiency of the
    crystal supply, makes an episode interlinked with the FM story. The influence
    of the communications industry in the Signal Corps is an important element,
    showing the close relationship between the two in the selection and manufac-
    turing of equipment and in the selection and training of officers and signalmen.
    A wider but very much weaker relationship described is that between ourselves
    and our allies, especially the British. One of the sections in this field recalls the
    mutually fruitful mission of Sir Henry Tizard and other electronic scientists and
    physicists to the United States in Finally, I trust that The Emergency
    demonstrates a discrepancy which later years closed: the gap between the
    pygmy Army and the jumbo. I hope, in sum, that the Signal Corps history adds
    its part to the defining and emphasizing of the two broad characteristics which
    have come to be so dominant in modern war that they will increasingly make
    up the bulk of military histories: first, the long preparations incident to a war
    or to any single day of it; and second, the technological aspect which has so
    transformed conflict that either wars or the men who fight them may
    consequently disappear.

    The writing of this book produced many pleasures, of which the most
    frequent and most happily remembered were the acts of interest and assistance
    very gratefully acknowledged here. My colleagues in the writing of this series,
    all of whom have shared with me the repeated profit of these acts, have for their
    own part bulwarked me with them to a point I cannot begin to acknowledge in
    full. Suffice it to say that upon Miss Pauline M. Oakes, Mrs. Dixie R. Harris,
    and Dr. George Raynor Thompson I urge my devoted thanks for all their intel-
    ligent appraisals, unflagging perseverance, and liberal contributions. Miss
    Helen Kasenchak's expert typing deserves full recognition, as does the research
    and writing, at an earlier stage, of Miss Ruth E. McKee. I should like to thank
    individually the hundreds of persons who have found files for me between
    Washington and Alaska, smoothed my way to interviews, notified me of oppor-
    tunities I had overlooked, and in general shown an abundance of cares and
    courtesies which one has no right to expect but welcomes. Since I must content
    myself with a mass acknowledgment, I want it to be known that in my grateful
    mind the mass is made up of individuals. Miss Ruth Stout, Mr. Joseph R.
    Friedman, and Mr. Arthur Henne have shepherded the book editorially. May
    its appearance in print be at least a token tribute to them.

    Washington, D. C. DULANY TERRETT


    May
    Contents
    PART ONE

    Before World War II


    Chapter Page
    I . MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
    The Place of the Signal Corps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
    T h e Early Signal C o r p s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
    The Signal Corps in World War I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

    I I . T H E ARMY I N LIMBO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
    Postwar Curtailment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
    T h e Continuing Technical Tradition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
    Defense-Strategy S i g n a l i n g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
    Administrative Signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
    Peacetime Procurement Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

    III. THE SCOPE OF THE SIGNAL CORPS . . . . . . . . . . . 70


    T h e Chief i n Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
    Pictorial Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
    Communications Contradictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
    Communications Spheres o f Interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

    I V . T H E ARMY I N ABEYANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
    V . EQUIPMENT SEARCH A N D RESEARCH . . . . . . . . . .
    Wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Radar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    PART TWO

    The Limited and Unlimited Emergencies

    V I . T H E PACE O F EMERGENCY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


    Testing Tactical Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    F M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 4 1
    Moves During t h e Winter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    T h e Weight o f Field Demands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    xi
    Chapter Page
    VII. T H E PROPULSION FROM LIMBO . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Accumulating Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    T h e Mirrors o f Defense Effort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    F M Confirmed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    First Answers i n A i r Radar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    T h e Tizard Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    VIII. SELECTIVE SERVICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


    Signal Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Signal Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    IX.. WORKING F O R T H E GROUND FORCES. . . . . . . . . .


    T h e Pigeon Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    T h e Photographic Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Tactical a n d Administrative Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Supply Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    X . WORKING F O R T H E A I R FORCES . . . . . . . . . . . .

    X I . SIGNALING T H E HEMISPHERE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


    To the Northwest and the Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    T o t h e Southeast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    From N e w Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    From the Office of the Chief Signal Officer . . . . . . . . . . . .
    T o t h e West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    APPENDIX: SIGNAL CORPS EQUIPMENT, WORLD WAR II


    BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    LIST O F ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    INDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Charts
    1 . Radiation Spectrum, World W a r I I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
    2. Contrast Between Typical Signal Corps Organizations in Wartime and
    Peacetime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

    xii
    Illustrations
    Page
    O n e Early Means o f Signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
    Civil W a r Signal Tower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
    T h e Wright Brothers' Airplane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
    Early Experiments With Radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
    Signal Corps Installations in France in 1 9 1 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
    T h e SCR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
    A Flying Radio Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
    Experimental Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
    Early Sound Detection Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
    T h e W a r Department Message Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
    Transmitters a t Station W A R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
    ROTC Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
    Motion Picture Camera Crew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
    Mobile Pigeon L o f t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
    A n Aircraft Warning Service Filter Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
    A Training Film Field Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Laying Field Wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    A Battery-Powered Telephone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    A Twelve-Drop Switchboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    T h e SCR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Radar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    T h e SCR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    D r . Edwin H . Armstrong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Locator Equipment a t t h e Louisiana Maneuvers . . . . . . . . . . . .
    T h e SCR, Walkie-Talkie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Training i n Teletypewriter Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Enlisted M e n Learning Open Wire Construction . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Enlisted M e n Learning Pole Climbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Pigeon Lofts a t Fort Monmouth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Training Film Under Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Portable Radios Developed b y t h e Signal Corps . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Camouflaged I F F Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Maj. Gen. Joseph O . Mauborgne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Maj. Gen. Dawson Olmstead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Remote Receiver Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    T h e Cable Ship Restorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    SCR Radar Station i n Panama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    All illustrations are from Department of Defense Files.

    xiii
    PART ONE

    BEFORE WORLD WAR II


    CHAPTER I

    Military Communications
    Shortly before World War II was over, would have occurred sooner or later or
    the General Assembly of the United Na- not at all, if there had been no war, is a
    tions met in an auditorium which pro- point apart from history. They did take
    vided the delegates with five almost simul- place and, with many others in other
    taneous versions of an address. With a fields, dispassionately demonstrated that
    selecting device, they might choose the practical advances had been made in re-
    language they wished to listen to. This sponse to the destructive demands of
    gear was welcomed with a casualness battle.
    which only emphasized the distance an In the advances of this particular realm,
    important utilitarian science had come the realm of mechanical aids to human
    during the half-dozen years when its ad- communication, the Signal Corps of the
    vances had been obscured by war. In the U.S. Army had taken some part; for the
    first postwar years, also, cities commenced military services were the greatest users of
    to equip their airports with radar systems such devices during that period, and the
    which regulated an incoming airplane Signal Corps was the communications
    from the ground. Telephones began to be corps of the Army. If the Army were one
    installed in automobiles, and home tele- of its own soldiers, the Signal Corps would
    vision sets and frequency-modulated be his hand in the act of writing, his
    radios to be promised to the general com- larynx, palate, and tongue in the act of
    mercial market of the United States, Great speaking, the ears hearing, and the sur-
    Britain, and a few of their allies. In many face of the skin registering impressions
    treason and war-crimes trials of the era, from external invisible energy. It would
    wire and tape recordings formed an im- signal that he was about to communicate,
    portant part of the evidence. International it would provide the mechanics for him to
    allotment of radio frequencies meant as do so, and it would enable him to receive
    much, in a renewed contest for spheres of the messages of others. Thus in communi-
    influence, as control of mountain passes cations the Signal Corps had a notably
    had in earlier history. Telephotography single mission. Yet almost infinite possibil-
    and a special lens for long-range detail ity for variety made it also as complex as
    appeared in the news and picture indus- the processes of hearing and speaking are.
    tries. The coaxial cable, radio relay, page Moreover, like those processes, it was
    teletype, facsimile processes, and a hun- vital. To be able to communicate—to
    dred other contrivances stood ready to signal—is to be alive.
    forward the revival of general communi- Applied through a period when earlier
    cation. Whether these developments scientific development had seemed to
    THE SIGNAL CORPS

    make it quaint, the name Signal Corps had tances; it had to arrive on time; it had to
    reattained exactness as World War II ap- be so precisely transmitted that it left no
    proached. At one time associated with the room for doubt, or so deliberately garbled
    torch and the square flags, a signal had and obscured that only those intended to
    come to designate a whole scale of ways in understand it could do so. Army com-
    which the electromagnetic spectrum could munications were often less than the
    give notice that it was carrying a message. ideal—even the most fabulous aid to
    Signals were generated by the human aerial navigation, artillery spotting, tank
    hand and voice, and by electronic im- command, or long-range detection aroused
    pulses as well. Once as rudimentary as a the abuse of harried operators from time
    shaking of spears in the sunlight, military to time; but ideally they were supposed to
    signaling now suggested a multitude of de- be swift, rugged, adaptable, simple, and
    vices. Even the basic information which secure beyond any average standard.
    the savage required—"I am a friend" or The military means of communication
    "I am a foe"—could appear in a dozen used in World War II were often not dif-
    forms. Over the wire paths of the tele- ferent from the nonmilitary means: a com-
    graph, the cable, and the telephone, over mand teletype paralleled a news or stock
    the wireless ones of radio, signal com- exchange ticker; a messenger on a motor-
    munication filled the ground, water, and cycle was the "hand-carrying" equivalent
    air. Photographs conveyed messages in a of a bicycling Western Union boy. Their
    way everyone was likely to grasp; crypto- use was distinctive, however, and attained
    graphic appliances obscured them in the an importance hard to overstate. Warfare
    hope that almost nobody could grasp intensified the use of the office telephone,
    them. Radar was opening a new avenue of the newspaper teletype, radio broadcast-
    communications, the quivering patterns ing, control towers, railway semaphores,
    of the oscilloscope being a form as special- and the other apparatus of communica-
    ized as wigwag had briefly been. tion in the nonbelligerent pursuits.
    Message sending, which had altered Military communications had devel-
    scarcely at all between Pheidippides at oped in three main aspects. These were
    Marathon and the Emperor's courier at general sensory signaling, likely to be non-
    Ratisbon, had acquired a myriad of de- electrical, electrical signaling over wires,
    vices between the mid-nineteenth and and electrical signaling without wires.
    mid-twentieth centuries, and war had Although in the growth of modern means
    altered them in being altered by them. of communication these aspects formed
    Most of this change had come about in early, middle, and recent stages, they did
    less than a hundred years of supplement- not form a line of succession. Samuel F. B.
    ing communication, a message, with com- Morse's telegraph was already in consid-
    munications, apparatus for carrying a mes- erable use when Albert J. Myer intro-
    sage. It had reached such an extent that duced systematic wigwag, but flag signal-
    every margin of efficiency had become ing quickly reached its limits, whereas
    a vital prize among armies. Not only did Morse's invention started a development
    the message have to be spoken, heard, which still had no boundaries a hundred
    written, or read, but also it had to be re- years later. Rather, the three aspects rep-
    ceived without interference from others; it resented degrees in the extension of signal-
    had to be sent and received over long dis- ing techniques. Within the Signal Corps
    MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS 5

    of World War II they existed concurrently. graph, radiotelephone, radioteletype, tele-


    First, there were the primary means of vision, radar; in this field, the most
    signaling, which are usually visual: the thorough and significant change became
    torch and flags, as elemental as pillars of evident. The accomplishments of radio in
    fire by night, cloud by day; the sema- attaining teletypewriter transmission at a
    phore, which Napoleon developed into a hundred words a minute, in reporting the
    system of 1, stations between Paris and weather locally by radiosonde, in radio
    Moscow; wigwag; the heliograph, mirrors control of airways, or in the handie-
    flashing in the sunlight; Very pistols and talkie which pleased Winston Churchill
    other pyrotechnics; panels (signaling to during a visit to Fort Jackson, South
    airplanes with arrangements of colored Carolina,1 and with which he pleased the
    cloth upon the ground); and blinker. newsreel audience—all of these were part
    Pigeons were also primary means of sig- of a story of startling change. Television
    naling, and so were sirens, gongs, and had not yet come into its own sufficiently
    whistles. As a class, the primary means of to contend for wide interest. Radar was
    signaling were historically earliest, and, by the crown of communications efforts dur-
    contrast with World War II's complicated ing the war. Radar learned to guide an
    reaches of invisible communication, they airplane at a distance, to return it safely
    seemed primitive; yet they were not out- and to land it; radar mapped landfalls or
    dated. Wigwag could still be useful in the storms; matching itself to searchlights and
    business of sorting out supplies on a beach- antiaircraft artillery, it gave them un-
    head, and blinker was as much a stand-by heard-of precision; it twice enabled the
    for the Navy as the automatic semaphore British Isles to ward off a nearly supreme
    was for rail transportation. The chief dif- German aerial assault, once from the
    ference was a matter not of date but of Luftwaffe, once from the V-1; and it
    limitation. The best means of communica- looked toward postwar successes which
    tion was that which could carry the most were as gentle as leading the blind and as
    messages fastest with the fewest mistakes. ungentle as marshaling long-range mis-
    In this sense, the simple devices for signal- siles. GCI, GCA, loran, shoran, racon,
    ing directly to the eye and ear lacked IFF, MEW, ASV, BTO, rawin became the
    capacity, speed, and precision. new black magic.2 Resulting from inter-
    When the art of communications had service, international, interacting achieve-
    become electrified, it had suddenly ad- ment of many minds fully as much as the
    vanced in all of these qualities, and the
    technical aspects of military communica- 1
    Winston S. Churchill, The Second World War: The
    tions commanded the field to such an ex- Hinge of Fate (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., ), p.
    tent that virtually the whole history of
    2
    GCI ground-controlled interception
    World War II communications is theirs. GCA ground-controlled approach
    The second form of signaling involved loran long-range navigation
    electrical communication over wires: shoran short-range navigation
    racon radar beacons
    cable, telegraph, telephone, teletype. IFF identification, friend or foe
    Throughout World War II, this was the MEW microwave early warning equipment
    principal form of Signal Corps communi- ASV air-to-surface-vessel radar detection
    BTO bombing through overcast
    cations. The third advanced electrical sig- rawin radio or radar determination of wind
    naling to wireless devices: radio, radiotele- velocity
    6 THE SIGNAL CORPS
    atomic bomb,3 in no sense was radar and field experiments of the 's, the
    thought of as U.S. Army equipment Signal Corps was long established as a
    strictly. Nor did it diminish for the Signal partner in the development of the com-
    Corps the importance of the routine job of munications science. Even in the days of
    signal communications which was on equipping Union armies with telegraph
    hand at the beginning of the war and still wagons, military communications had
    on hand at the close; but as an instrument penetrated, although unknowingly and in
    to open the imagination it took first place. a matter-of-fact way, the splendid scale
    The span from visual signals to radar which joins sound, light, and energy.
    was enormous; yet they shared a basic (Chart 1) When electronics emerged
    function: passage of information. In the eighty years later at the forefront of this
    course of the Signal Corps' emergence into scientific research, Signal Corps experi-
    the form it possessed in the 's, two de- mentation contributed to the general
    partures from this essential function made advance.
    themselves felt. One of these was pic-
    The Place of the Signal Corps
    tures—still pictures, training films, com-
    bat newsreels—undeniably a form of com- The major mission, however, was pur-
    munication but a form at least once re- sued not through science but through prac-
    moved from the commonly accepted tical mechanics. For the most part, dur-
    meaning of it. The other stood not for ing World War II, the Signal Corps was
    communication, but for countercommuni- described as one of seven technical serv-
    cation. It was an interruption, obscuring, ices. The adjective was significant, because
    or obstruction of communication. "Chaff," several of these services were essentially
    "cigar," "carpet," and such devices for applied sciences. Before the war the Signal
    jamming enemy radar; speech scrambling Corps had been classified as an arm, but
    and other endeavors to hinder intercep- during the war it was bracketed with the
    tion of telephone conversations; monitor- six other technical services as an agency of
    ing and interception of both friendly and the Services of Supply, or Army Service
    enemy radio; and all modes of cryptog- Forces.4 As a part of the Army Service
    raphy came under this classification. Forces, it thus took its place in one of three
    With these two exceptions, however, all major groupings of resources of men and
    of the devices within the field of responsi- matériel, the other two being the Army
    bility of military signaling, whether they Ground Forces and the Army Air Forces.5
    used simple or complex, natural or artifi-
    cial means, had the single function of pass- 3
    The fact of radar's international parentage "will
    ing information. In executing it, the Sig- surprise only those who cling to a Hero Theory of
    scientific progress and demand for each discovery a
    nal Corps had become, at one time or single putative inventor. . . ." Henry Guerlac, "The
    another, either permanently or tempo- Radio Background of Radar," Journal of the Franklin
    rarily, the Army's center of activity for Institute, CCL, No. 4 (October, ),
    4
    WD Cirs 59, 2 Mar 42, and , 14 May 46, sub:
    captive balloons, weather observation, WD Reorganization. The Corps of Engineers also oc-
    codes and ciphers, ocean cables, carrier cupied a prewar category as an arm.
    5
    pigeons, aviation, goniometrics, field tele- The Army Ground Forces drew in the Infantry,
    Cavalry, Field Artillery, Coast Artillery Corps,
    phoning, thermal detection, and many Armored Force, Antiaircraft Command, and Tank
    other efforts. By the time of the laboratory Destroyer Command.
    CHART 1—RADIATION SPECTRUM, WORLD WAR II
    8 THE SIGNAL CORPS

    Army Air, Ground, and Service Forces works. Tactically, all forward communica-
    were designed to be interdependent; tion was the province of the using arm: for
    although administratively the Signal example, of the Infantry, the Cavalry, the
    Corps served as a component of the Army Armored Force. The crew of a BE or
    Service Forces, Signal Corps equipment, -F, during the first year of the war, used
    functions, and trained men appeared an interphone set, RC; a tank or
    throughout the Ground and Air Forces armored car would employ a frequency-
    and in theaters and defense and base com- modulated radio, SCR this is the
    mands as well. The same relationships way in which the using arms required a
    characterized the other technical services6 fundamental Signal Corps contribution.
    and the administrative services 7 which, Each division had a signal company, each
    with the service commands (erstwhile army corps a signal battalion, and each
    corps areas, zone of interior administra- field army a signal construction and a sig-
    tive divisions), made up the Army Service nal operations battalion, as well as depot,
    Forces. repair, radio intelligence, photographic,
    The way to see the Signal Corps of headquarters signal service, and other
    World War II, therefore, is to plot it on a companies, depending upon the field
    world-wide chart. Such a chart begins army table of organization and the tacti-
    with the President, the Secretary of War, cal situation which was applicable. In the
    and the Chief of Staff, continues with the Army Air Forces, a similar pattern was
    General and Special Staffs, with theaters, drawn, signal units being assigned at
    task forces, defense and base commands, wing, division, command, and air force
    and with the Army Ground, Air, and levels.8
    Service Forces, and subdivides again into The conception of the Signal Corps
    the big ground and air arms and services. function both as arm and as service
    Most of its space must still be devoted to changed, however. During the war, all of
    an extraordinary complexity of army the arms and services underwent a meta-
    groups, armies, corps, divisions, regiments, 6
    The Chemical, Engineer, Quartermaster, and
    battalions, companies, and platoons, of air Transportation Corps and the Medical and Ordnance
    forces and commands, wings, groups, Departments. For the purposes of this history this is a
    squadrons, and flights, of administrative standard list, although Department of the Army Cir-
    cular 64, 10 March , added to it the Finance De-
    divisions, branches, sections, subsections, partment, and although Circular 59, 2 March ,
    and units. Within this vast wartime frame- also subordinated to Army Service Forces the supply
    work, the Signal Corps was to be thought and procurement functions of the Coast Artillery
    Corps.
    of chiefly as a technical service, as the 7
    The Adjutant General's, Judge Advocate Gen-
    principal communications agency for the eral's, and Provost Marshal General's Departments
    whole organization. and the Offices of the Chiefs of Chaplains, Special
    Services, and Finance.
    It was to be thought of also as an arm. 8
    FM , Army Air Forces Field Manual: Signal
    Signaling was indisputably operational, Communication, 4 Dec 42, par 2b. See also the basic
    and the signalmen were attendant upon manual on signal communication, FM , 19 Oct
    42, and all of the pertinent manuals in the FM, or
    the air force and the infantry closely Signal Corps, series. Sometimes official usage links the
    enough to qualify as combat-zone soldiers. terms signals and communication, as it does in the titles
    The duality is clearly marked in the com- to these field manuals; sometimes it separates them, as
    in referring to army, corps, and divisional signal offi-
    mon Signal Corps distinction between cers, but to regimental, and lower, communication
    tactical networks and administrative net- officers.
    MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS 9

    morphosis, the Cavalry most of all, the where Dr. Albert J. Myer, recently com-
    Signal Corps not least. Quiet and small in missioned an assistant surgeon and de-
    peacetime, characterized by such familiar tailed to Fort Duncan, Texas, was carefully
    objects as the telephone,9 it became a altering a system of hand signals which he
    world-wide, strategic service, wielding had developed for deaf mutes into a system
    prodigies like radar. Even some time after of flag signals for use at distances out of
    the war had begun, the Signal Corps earshot altogether From this start, Myer
    could still be thought of as an organiza- was to become the first Chief Signal Offi-
    tion which devoted itself primarily to cer of the Army. He had realized that the
    message-center work and which, in its same sort of alternation and spacing by
    tactical duties, rated visual communica- which a telegrapher controlled his key
    tions high alongside telephone and tele-
    graph But at the end of the war, the
    Signal Corps described its mission as "not 9
    "The principal weapon of the Signal Corps man
    only [the provision of] communication is the telephone with its associated material just as the
    facilities for the War Department in the rifle with its ammunition is the principal weapon of
    zone of the interior and all overseas thea- the infantryman." Memo, Lt Col Alvin C. Voris for
    Maj Gen Charles McK. Saltzman, CSigO, 9 Oct
    ters, but [also] the design, procurement, SigC Equip.
    10
    construction, installation and major main- WD, Introduction to Employment in the War Depart-
    tenance for radar, radio, telephone and ment—A Reference Manual for Employees, Aug 42, p.
    The Annual Report of the Chief Signal Officer, ,
    telegraph communications for the opera- 'listed the following agencies of communication em-
    tions of the U.S. Army throughout the ployed in signal systems within Army divisions:
    world."11 1. Message centers
    2. Messenger communication
    5. Visual communication
    a. Lamps
    a. Airplane messenger b. Flags
    b. Motor messenger c. Panels
    The Early Signal Corps c. Motorcycle messenger d. Pyrotechnics
    d. Mounted (horse) messenger e. Airplanes
    Among the technical services, the Signal e. Dismounted messenger (runner) 6. Sound communication
    3. Pigeon communication 7. Wire communication
    Corps was neither the biggest nor the old- 4. Radio communication a. Telephone
    12 a. Telegraph b. Telegraph
    est. Its work was concentrated, and its b. Telephone c. Teletypewriter
    history covered only eighty years. Histori- 11
    Info Br OCSigO, The Signal Corps, U.S. Army,
    cal hindsight, in fact, would suggest that 16 Dec SigC Hist Sec File. (See Bibliographical
    modern military signaling was a condi- Note.) Formal statement of Signal Corps functions ap-
    pears in Army regulations. The versions which were
    tioned response to Morse's improvement in force at various stages from the end of World War I
    in message sending; that in former days through World War II were: AR , 14 Jan 22,
    the Army had had no need for a Signal 15 Dec 26, 15 Mar 33, 10 May 39, and 1 Dec 42; AR
    , 12 Nov 21, 1 Aug 25, 17 Apr 40, 1 Aug
    Corps because quick means of communi- 12
    The quartermaster, medical, and engineer func-
    cation were unknown, but that a revolu- tions, which were part of the Army during the Revo-
    tionary invention had had to be met with lution, were the oldest, and by most measurements the
    largest. The Ordnance Department, which dates from
    an arm capable of exercising it. Hindsight the War of , remained small but always had large
    falters a little, for under this sort of cause appropriations. For the sources on the historical ori-
    and effect the Army would have produced gins of the services, as well as those on the beginnings
    and development of the Signal Corps, see the Biblio-
    a Transportation Corps soon after Fulton graphical Note.
    and certainly after Stephenson. Moreover, 13
    (1) Hq of the Army, New York City, SO's
    the Signal Corps had its recognizable and , 4 and 6 Oct National Archives. (2) Al-
    bert J. Myer, A New Sign Language for Deaf Mutes,
    beginnings in a region far from the electric Being a Thesis for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine,
    telegraph, along the Rio Grande in Texas, , University of Buffalo.
    10 THE SIGNAL CORPS

    could be applied to flags or torches for Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, sent
    visual signaling. He patented his system, him into eclipse, and helped to allow the
    got the Army to adopt it, experimented Signal Service to expire unredeemed at
    with it just before the Civil War, and then the end of the war. Within a year and a
    in frustration saw it work for the Confed- half, his point of view was sufficiently vin-
    erate forces at the First Battle of Bull Run, dicated to restore the organization, with
    while he himself was too late for the battle. himself at its head. From then on, although
    Afterward, it proved itself for the Union with vicissitudes, it survived. In the
    Army at Gettysburg, for the Union Navy Signal Service was given bureau status in
    at Mobile Bay, and in a hundred other the War Department, and on 24 February
    engagements. Sometimes the armies put it became the Signal Corps, with
    up chains of elevated platforms in order to Myer its general and his Manual of Signals
    facilitate the flag signaling its guide
    Myer also was attempting to construct For a time within its first quarter cen-
    the new Signal Service upon long-distance, tury, part of the emphasis of its mission
    mechanical signaling as well as upon short- shifted from signaling to meteorology. In
    distance, manual methods; but the regular it took on responsibility for scientific
    telegraph, which ordinarily followed the weather observation, especially in the
    tracks of the railroad, was in the hands of shipping areas of the Great Lakes and the
    the U.S. Military Telegraph. Ostensibly Atlantic coast. Until this work was trans-
    military, but actually a private concession, ferred in to the Weather Bureau of
    it controlled the Morse equipment and the Department of Agriculture,17 Signal
    the teen-aged boys who were skilled at Corpsmen pursued meteorology, especially
    using it. Civilian aeronauts organized a in two notable expeditions to the north.
    balloon corps for observation and signal- Famous at the time, these arctic projects
    ing. Myer wanted no part of that, and made magnetic, pendular, and tidal obser-
    ultimately deflated it in when he vations and collected weather and natural
    rejected an opportunity to take it over.
    Instead, he assembled wagon trains and 14
    At the beginning of the Civil War the Union had
    equipped them with alphabet dials and few secrets from the Confederacy. J. E. B. Stuart had
    been a signal officer; and Jefferson Davis and John B.
    magnetized pointers which, responding to Floyd, both former Secretaries of War, as well as Rob-
    the electric impulses being transmitted ert E. Lee, had been acquainted with Myer's work.
    from another part of the train, indicated a Lt. E. P. Alexander, who knew about this method of
    signaling because he had been assigned to work on it
    message letter by letter. Without effec- with Myer, was present at the First Battle of Bull Run
    tively challenging the civilian telegraph and warned Beauregard of the approach of Mc-
    monopoly, he developed thirty such trains Dowell's column. In turn, poetic justice thwarted him
    at Gettysburg, when signal flags on Little Round Top
    for the Union troops, each extending the led him to believe it was better defended than it was.
    tactical situation by wire for six or eight 15
    PL 58, Secs , 37th Cong. The official birth
    miles. On 3 March Myer had the date of the Signal Corps is 21 June , the date of
    Myer's appointment as Army Signal Officer. Com-
    satisfaction of seeing Congress create the ment 3, OCMH to OCSigO, 11 Feb 54, sub: Birthday
    signals arm,15 but his continued attempt to of SigC. SigC Hist Sec File General
    16
    draw administrative as well as tactical This work was published in various editions from
    the Civil War to the close of the nineteenth century.
    wire communication into his new organi- 17
    Except for gathering marine meteorological data,
    zation brought him into conflict with which the Hydrographic Office took over in
    MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS 11

    history information at points then the far- had a range of as much as sixty miles in
    thest north reached by white men. The clear atmosphere
    Point Barrow party, led by 1st Lt. P. Only visual signaling counted for much
    Henry Ray, left San Francisco in midsum- in the field. Telegraph trains, increased in
    mer, , and came safely back two years size to nine wagons, were still rear-echelon
    later. The Ellesmere Island party, leaving communications, and the telephone gave
    from St. John's, Newfoundland, at the no promise of sturdy military usefulness. A
    same time, was not seen in the United Signal Corps sergeant combined it in a
    States again until , when the six sur- field kit with a Morse key and battery in
    vivors told bitter tales of hardship and , but the device was too expensive to
    death, including the execution of one man be practical. Military ballooning came in
    for rifling food supplies. again in , and experiments in air-to-
    The commander of this group, Adolphus ground telephoning a few years later re-
    W. Greely, became Chief Signal Officer in
    18
    and remained so into the era of radio For an excellent sketch of Greely's life and works,
    see W. Elmer Ekblaw's account in the Dictionary of
    and the airplane, twenty years afterward American Biography, XXI (Supplement One),
    The fame he won as head of this meteor- After General Myer, who died in , the succes-
    ological expedition led to his appointment sion of Chief Signal Officers through World War II
    was as follows:
    as Chief Signal Officer, yet he reflected Brig. Gen. William B. Hazen . . . . . . . . .
    almost every interest of the Signal Corps, Maj. Gen. Adolphus W. Greely. . . . . . .
    Brig. Gen. James Allen . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    and his career spanned the maturity of the Brig. Gen. George P. Scriven . . . . . . . .
    earlier forms of communication and the Maj. Gen. George O. Squier . . . . . . . .
    Maj. Gen. Charles McK. S a l t z m a n . . . .
    origins of the later ones. Before his arctic Maj. Gen. George S. Gibbs . . . . . . . . .
    assignment, he had been putting in tele- Maj. Gen. Irving J. Carr . . . . . . . . . . .
    graph lines in the territorial west. More Maj. Gen. James B. Allison . . . . . . . . .
    Maj. Gen. Joseph O. Mauborgne. . . . .
    than two thousand miles of such construc- Maj. Gen. Dawson Olmstead. . . . . . . . .
    tion took place between and , Maj. Gen. Harry C. I n g l e s . . . . . . . . . . .
    The list of Chief Signal Officers might also contain
    and commercial communications and the the names of two officers who held the place briefly
    Signal Corps then began the close relation during the period when Myer was in disfavor. These
    which continued thereafter. As the rail- were Lt. Col. William J. L. Nicodemus, who occupied
    it from 10 November to 26 December , and
    roads consolidated the west and as the Col. Benjamin F. Fisher, whose tenure, beginning
    number of Army outposts diminished, pri- with Nicodemus' departure, ended indeterminately
    vate interests took over the telegraph lines. between 28 July , when Myer's administration
    retroactively recommenced, and 15 November of the
    Outside Washington, D. C., Fort Whipple, same year, when Fisher was formally relieved.
    then a Signal Corps post and later named 19
    1st Lt. George I. Back, "The Telephone; Com-
    Fort Myer in honor of the general, had mercial v. Military History and Development," Signal
    Corps Bulletin, No. 42 (March, ), p.
    installed a practice telephone line in 20
    Unsuccessfully, because the hawks of the region
    Also in that year, the Corps had preyed upon them. The experiments took place in
    begun its first experiments with pigeons Dakota Territory with Col. Nelson A. Miles's 5th In-
    fantry. Capt. Evan D. Cameron, "The Development
    The last years of Indian fighting advanced and Use of Homing Pigeons for Military Purposes,"
    the heliograph as a means of military sig- Signal Corps Bulletin, No. 24 (February, ), p.
    21
    naling. In the Corps brought out a Possibly the greatest range achieved by this de-
    vice (in ) was miles. Historical Sketch of the Sig-
    new type of heliograph which weighed nal Corps (), Eastern SigC Schools Pamphlet
    only fourteen pounds packed and which 32 (Ft. Monmouth, N.J., ), p.
    12 THE SIGNAL CORPS

    the Ray-Greely expeditions, the experi-


    ence gained in building frontier commu-
    nications systems, the scientific back-
    ground derived from meteorological duties,
    and the exercise provided in establishing
    relatively long lines during the war with
    Spain all contributed to the formation of a
    chain which employed telegraph, cable,
    telephone, and even the newest wonder,
    wireless communication.
    In the Signal Corps had radioed
    experimentally between Fire Island and
    the lightship twelve miles away and a year
    later installed two stations for New York
    23
    Harbor traffic. In a pair of stations
    provided space telegraph—in those days
    an excellent description of radio—across
    Norton Sound, to and from Nome. By
    there were eight stations in Alaska,
    six in the United States, five upon Army
    transports, three in the Philippines, and
    one in Cuba. Their spark-gap sets ranged
    ONE EARLY MEANS OF SIGNAL- in power from watts to 10 kilowatts.
    ING employed flags hoisted by balloon. Field tests improving upon Boer War
    models meanwhile developed the Army's
    called the air-to-ground telegraph demon- first vehicular sets, loaded into wagons or
    strations of the Civil War. Most Army on pack mules Cumbersome as these
    posts had a few telephones, some owned were, they illustrated the fact that the re-
    by the Signal Corps, some rented from the searches of Maxwell and Hertz 25 were
    Bell Company. Even so short a conflict as giving birth to the era of Marconi and
    the Spanish-American War, however, in- 22
    First Draft, Alaska Communication System His-
    creased the advance of new sciences. The tory, SigC Hist Sec File. When the predominant
    Army gave its first contract for a powered use of radio made the early title inappropriate, the
    airplane in the year of that war, , Washington-Alaska Military Cable and Telegraph
    System became the Alaska Communication System.
    allotting the money to Samuel R Langley. 23
    Capt. Edwin R. Petzing, "Development of Radio
    The laying of submarine cable in the in the United States," Signal Corps Bulletin, No. 42
    waters of Cuba and the Philippines ex- (March, ), p. Mention of this work should
    not slight Capt. Leonard H. Wildman, who contrib-
    tended the scope of signal communica- uted to the installation of wireless at both Long Island
    tions, and in the expansive aftermath of Sound and Norton Sound.
    24
    the war the Signal Corps undertook the S. I. Neiman, "Vehicular Radio," Signals, I, No.
    6 (July-August, ),
    Washington-Alaska Military Cable and 25
    James Clerk Maxwell (), British physi-
    Telegraph System. This became the most cist, and Heinrich R. Hertz (), German
    important continuous field operation. 22 physicist. The principles of electromagnetic radiation
    which Maxwell forecast in were confirmed in the
    The knowledge of the north obtained in experiments of Hertz in the '90's.
    MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS 13

    De Forest. Military communication was


    assuming its twentieth-century character.
    The emergence of a science of elec-
    tronics was paralleled by the appearance,
    after long waiting and frustration, of a
    science of heavier-than-air flight. On
    1 August the current Chief Signal
    Officer, Brig. Gen. James Allen, estab-
    lished an Aeronautical Division, to "have
    charge of all matters pertaining to military
    ballooning, air machines, and all kindred
    26
    subjects." A captain, a corporal, and a
    private staffed the division. Specifications
    for the Army's first airplane required that
    it be able to carry the pilot, a passenger,
    and enough fuel for miles, that its
    speed average forty miles an hour in a ten-
    mile test, that it stay aloft for an hour, and
    that it be capable of being dismounted and
    loaded into Army wagons The Wright
    brothers produced such a plane in
    and tested it successfully (despite the fatal
    CIVIL WAR SIGNAL TOWER on
    accident to 1st Lt. Thomas E. Selfridge), Cobb's Hill, Appomattox, Virginia.
    with a series of passengers including Maj.
    George O. Squier, later the World War I
    Chief Signal Officer. was beginning to achieve recognition as a
    For a period, there was a possibility contributor both to airborne transmitting,
    that airplanes and radio, the two inven- in and , at Fort Riley, Kansas,
    tions which had suddenly opened the ele- and to airborne receiving, over Corregidor
    29
    ment of air as a space for the hitherto in December These demonstra-
    grounded army to move within, would tions, however crude, had opened aerial
    develop inside the same organization. 26
    OCSigO Office Memo 6, 1 Aug AAF
    Squier, the man who had drawn up the A SigC Org.
    27
    WDSS, Information and Education Div, "The
    specifications for the military airplane, Army Air Forces — Organization," Army Talk, No.
    represents the transition which was then , 25 January
    28
    altering the Signal Corps. In he de- George O. Squier, "Multiplex Telephony and
    Telegraphy by Means of Electric Waves Guided by
    scribed experiments covering the use of Wires," Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical
    wires to guide high-frequency oscilla- Engineers, Originally called wire wireless, wired
    tions,28 a process fundamental to the wireless, or line radio, the process came to be called
    wire radio (possibly the most descriptive term), carrier
    multiplex telegraphy and telephony which frequency, or the carrier-frequency, carrier-current,
    made up the largest part of World War II or guided-wave method.
    29
    military communications. Joseph O. Mau- (1) The Signal Corps, United States Army: A
    Popular History, MS, p. 75; (2) Maj Gen Joseph O.
    borgne, a lieutenant who was to be Chief Mauborgne, My Early Work in Airplane Radio De-
    Signal Officer twenty years after Squier, velopment. SigC Gen.
    14 THE SIGNAL CORPS

    THE WRIGHT BROTHERS' AIRPLANE during tests at Fort Myer, Virginia.

    communications as a major field of Signal in spite of the roar and static. It is signifi-
    Corps work. Congress recognized military cant that Signal Corps activity of this era,
    aviation by converting a small office divi- at a time while it was still attached to a
    sion into an Aviation Section of a top rudimentary tactical mission, produced
    strength of The range of air-to- names associated with both of the world
    ground Morse increased to miles, and wars, when scientific research tended to
    Signal Corps pilots experimented with become as important in the mission as
    air-to-air Morse exchange. The most per- utilitarian skill. An older Signal Corps and
    plexing problem was noise. Airplane design a newer one, soon to be old itself, coexisted.
    had substituted tractor for pusher engines, 30
    PL , 63d Cong, 18 Jul The testimony of
    with the result that all the disturbance lay Signal Corps officers at the preliminary hearings on
    directly in front of the pilot. By the this bill a year before had made clear the fact that in
    early military aviation the most important function
    Aviation Section felt that a different gen- was reconnaissance and communication, not bom-
    erator and headset had solved the prob- bardment. Capt. William Mitchell, 1st Lt. Benjamin
    lem; and Michael Pupin and Edwin H. D. Foulois, and 1st Lt. Henry H. Arnold, future Air
    Corps generals, agreed with Brig. Gen. George P.
    Armstrong, whom Brig. Gen. George O. Scriven, the Chief Signal Officer, that the time was
    Squier asked to convert the radio signal not then ripe for separation from the Signal Corps,
    into a visual signal which would show up "where all aeronautic work has been done for the last
    20 years." Hearings before the Committee on Military
    on the instrument panel, agreed that radio Affairs, HR, 63d Cong, 1st Sess, On HR , 16 May
    reception was preferable and possible even 13, p. 51 and passim.
    EARLY EXPERIMENTS WITH RADIO included installation of sets in aircraft
    (above) and automobiles (below).
    16 THE SIGNAL CORPS

    The Signal Corps in World War I ment which the Signal Corps brought over
    to Europe in was wholly unsuitable
    32
    The older was dominant. The United for the character of warfare then existing.
    States began and completed its role in the In the early stages, the American Expedi-
    war without reaching a devel- tionary Forces was obliged to rely solely
    opment in either combat communications upon French telephone and telegraph
    or combat aviation comparable to that of facilities; large purchases, as of poles and
    France or Great Britain. In both fields the crossarms, dry batteries, buzzerphones,
    nation's war experience was shorter, its switchboards, and radio and earth telegra-
    appropriations smaller, and to a consider- phy sets, were necessary before the com-
    able degree its industry slow to start and munications mission for the American
    its research too late to be felt. The only Expeditionary Forces could be fulfilled.
    battle testing of the Aviation Section had Titles in the procurement list were grouped
    consisted of mail and reconnaissance into but fourteen categories
    flights during the Punitive Expedition into In France, wire quickly became the
    Mexico in None of its fifty-five air- almost exclusive instrument of army com-
    planes carried any kind of weapon; nor munications. It was the best means
    had the experiments with aerial wireless whether within the regiment or from the
    communication introduced radio into any division back to corps and army head-
    cockpit. When, in March , the Signal quarters. Heliographs appeared only far
    Corps was faced for the first time with the back of the lines, if at all; panels were
    need to install radio apparatus aboard reserved to signaling to aircraft; the pigeon
    Spads which the Air Service was flying in service, attempted at General Pershing's
    France, the French supplied it, having order, had a limited success, although a
    supplied the airplanes also American bird named Cher Ami proved to be a help
    air-to-ground radiotelephone, shown the to the "Lost Battalion." But wire was
    summer before to the Secretary of War, paramount; the Meuse-Argonne offensive
    Newton D. Baker, was not ready. used it at the rate of 2, miles a week
    Correspondingly, in ground signaling, 31
    the old methods had sufficed before the "Report of the Chief Signal Officer," War De-
    partment Annual Reports, , p. Also separately
    war for an Army engaged in small-scale published, the Annual Report of the Chief Signal Officer,
    maneuvers or patrolling the borders of , is by far the most comprehensive source of infor-
    Mexico. Quenched-spark sets carried by mation on the World War I Signal Corps.
    32
    (1) Petzing article cited n. 23, p. (2) Col C. F.
    pack or wagon had introduced radio into Martin, Hist Sec Army War College, Signal Com-
    both the Punitive Expedition and maneu- munications in World War I, Aug 42, p. 8. SigC Hist
    vers, but, in general, buzzers, messengers, Sec File.
    33
    Telephones, telegraphs, radios, line construction
    and visual signaling answered the need for materials, batteries, wire and cable, field glasses,
    command communications within infantry chests, kits and tools, mechanical and electrical sig-
    brigades; and although the field artillery nals, wire carts, pigeon supplies, meteorological equip-
    ment, and watches. James V. Clarke, Contract Ad-
    had telephones for fire control, provided justment in the Signal Corps, 1 July August
    by the Signal Corps since , it also used , Nov 45, p. 3. SigC Hist Sec File.
    34
    flags. Tactically, there was little need for, By the close of World War I, U.S. production of
    field wire had reached 8, miles a month. After a
    or opportunity to employ, electrical com- similar time interval in World War II, the production
    munications. Thus, much of the equip- rate of WB wire was , miles a month.
    SIGNAL CORPS INSTALLATIONS IN FRANCE IN included a telephone
    and telegraph station at Château-Thierry (above) and a goniometric station at Royaumeix (below).
    18 THE SIGNAL CORPS

    Multiplex printing telegraph equipment telephone, aircraft, and artillery signals;


    connected Tours, Chaumont, Paris, and and, in a foreshadowing of the succeeding
    London. Transatlantic cable was called war's signal intelligence and monitoring
    into use, at reduced rates, for EFM's (ex- companies, it policed communications on
    peditionary force messages) from the the Allied side.
    troops to their friends and relatives in the The most interesting aspect of Signal
    35
    United States. Both forward and rear Corps radio in World War I was the con-
    zones depended upon the telephone net- solidation of the hitherto scattered efforts
    work, after construction crews had fanned in scientific research. The Signal Corps
    it out from Chaumont and Tours This Laboratories had their beginnings in a
    was an achievement for the period, admi- World War I radio research division which
    rable for trench warfare. In the mobile functioned in company with the electric
    situation of World War II it would have communications industry and with a spe-
    been, first of all, nearly impossible to build cial wartime Signal Corps laboratory in
    and, second, not relatively worth building. Paris. This division worked upon aircraft
    Although a transatlantic radio station radiotelegraph and radiotelephone sets,
    was built near Bordeaux, the War Depart- aircraft interphone equipment, aircraft
    ment in Washington had no radio contact direction-finding systems (given first pri-
    with its commanders in the field, and ority), 37 three types of continuous-wave
    these commanders had no very depend- radiotelegraph sets, wavemeters, battery-
    able wireless systems among themselves. charging radios, four improved TRS.
    Radio carried little of the war's communi- (earth telegraphy) items, radio operating
    cations load. In the first place, the tactical and repair trucks, and a radiotelegraph
    situation again and again brought the set for tanks. The prewar invention of
    Western Front into small areas and mired vacuum tubes enabled Signal Corps re-
    it there. For another reason, although searchers to try them for electric wave
    nearly 10, radio sets, chiefly airborne detection, amplification of radiofrequency
    radiotelegraph, were produced for the and audiofrequency, continuous wave
    Signal Corps and Air Service, the conflict transmission, voice modulation, regulation
    was over too soon for the combat signal- 35
    Col Edgar Russel, CSigO AEF, AEF Memo, 17
    man or aviator to use them much. Finally, Jun SigC Wired Wireless and Tree Tel & Tel.
    radio was too new to have passed the awk- 36
    History of the Signal Corps, American Expedi-
    ward age. Spark-type equipment did have tionary Forces. SigC Hist Sec File.
    The Signal Corps wire networks for the American
    the advantage of not requiring a skilled Expeditionary Forces, including those leased from
    man to tune it or mend it, but was so heavy France, comprised approximately 50, miles of ad-
    it could scarcely be moved, was often un- ministrative lines and 40, of tactical lines. The
    exact figures are difficult to determine, because the
    intelligible, and was frequently out of standards for calculation vary. (1) "Signal Corps
    commission. Tube equipment generally Work in the A.E.F.," Signal Corps Bulletin, No. 1
    replaced it. Radio's chief use was for intel- (April, ), p. (2) Maj. Alfred E. Larabee, "The
    Signal Corps and Signal Communication," Signal
    ligence work. At goniometric stations it Corps Bulletin, No. 31 (September, ), pp.
    took what were later called "fixes" upon (3) Lt. Col. Frank H. Fay, "A.E.F. Telephone and
    enemy transmitters and identified their Telegraph System," Signal Corps Bulletin, No. 56
    (September-October, ), pp.
    location by the intersection of the angles. 37
    History of Camp Alfred Vail, New Jersey,
    It intercepted German ground telegraph, SigC Hq Ft. Monmouth File
    MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS 19

    of current and voltage in generators, and oscillator principle which the signalmen
    other special purposes without which the installed after the Armistice to make a
    multiple applications of World War II radiotelegraph network connecting the
    radio would never have been possible. But Paris headquarters with the Army of
    despite the fact that an American, Lee Occupation. Of considerable extent and
    De Forest, was the inventor, the United surely one of the earliest successes of the
    States was behind in the use of vacuum sort, the network engaged stations at Ant-
    tubes. Industrial production of them werp, Spa, Koblenz, Trier, Toul, and
    started from almost nothing when the Chaumont at various stages between No-
    nation went into the war. vember and September The
    For the most part, none of the laboratory control was twenty miles outside Paris, at
    improvements got into production before a site in the British zone far enough away
    the Armistice. Had any been developed to escape the radiodiffusion from the EifFel
    before the war, radio history would have Tower spark transmitter. The purpose of
    been made, for the critical inadequacy of the net was to take the place of the tele-
    equipment necessitated remarkable ad- phone and telegraph lines in case they
    vances in the field. For example, a two-way were sabotaged; and on one occasion,
    radio loop set was contrived because the when the wire transmission was inter-
    enemy shot away the antennas of ordinary rupted for forty-five minutes, it did convey
    radio. The new device laid the receiving to Paris an address which President Wood-
    antenna on the ground, and for the trans- row Wilson was making in Germany. Dur-
    mitting antenna substituted a small loop ing the time of its operation, the network
    connected with the spark gap. This set carried thousands of messages, as only wire
    39
    had a range of six miles, transmitted on networks had done up to that point.
    two wavelengths, and could be transported Historically the most interesting of all
    in three sections each weighing less than the experiments was an initial attempt at
    thirty pounds. Developments in electric radar. The only means of being warned of
    communications of the American Expedi- the approach of an airplane was to catch
    tionary Forces were in part the contribu- sight of it, which was usually too late, or to
    tions of Edwin H. Armstrong, then a hear it, which, even with the aid of sound
    Signal Corps captain and a noted radio
    38
    scientist since He applied Lang- Armstrong's contributions to radio science, al-
    muir's master oscillator-power amplifier though generally acknowledged, were persistently
    challenged in court, and the decisions often went
    circuit to improve tank communication, against him. "Revolution in Radio," Fortune, XX
    and he invented the amplifier to facilitate (October, ), 86 ff. De Forest was the principal
    reception of high-frequency signals. The figure to press counterclaims. So far as the super-
    heterodyne discovery is concerned, adjudication
    master oscillator-power amplifier became assigned the credit to Lucien Levy, who like Arm-
    basic in radio design, although the war strong was a World War I officer. Henry W. Roberts,
    was over before it could be tried in battle, Aviation Radio, introduction by Lee De Forest (New
    York: W. Morrow & Company, ), p. Never-
    and high-frequency amplification made theless, and taking account of the fact that the deci-
    possible the superheterodyne receiver and sions were essentially commercial rather than tech-
    38 nical, Armstrong's place in the development of radio
    revolutionized wireless communications.
    is secure.
    Signal Corps and Tank Corps men 39
    Ltr, Edwin H. Armstrong to author, 21 May 52,
    together devised equipment on the master- with incls. SigC Hist Sec File.
    20 THE SIGNAL CORPS

    locators, gave advance notice only as fast thousands of men came in from the
    as sound travels. During the work which commercial communications companies.
    led to his contribution to the superhetero- Among the regular Signal Corps troops at
    dyne receiving circuit, Armstrong consid- the outset of the war, there had been
    ered the possibility of a receiver sensitive organized two telegraph and two field
    enough to pick up the electromagnetic dis- battalions. The National Guard had ten
    turbances given off by an airplane's igni- field signal battalions, no telegraph com-
    tion system Another attempt made in panies, but sixteen separate companies—
    the same period was thermal detection. all together officers, 3, enlisted
    This, too, was an effort to intercept the men. The strength deficiency, then, was in
    electromagnetic radiations from an air- telegraph units, and it was to make up this
    plane engine, but to measure its heat as it difference that the Signal Corps had per-
    drew near or receded from range. Ther- suaded American Telephone and Tele-
    mal detection was a tantalizing field of graph, Postal Telegraph, Western Union,
    research. Even with the later successful and Western Electric to organize battal-
    development of pulse detection, scientists, ions of skilled technicians and to permit
    including those in the Signal Corps Labo- many of their engineers to become Signal
    43
    ratories, never wholly gave it up; but it Corps Reserve officers in
    seemed always to promise better results Training started at Fort Leavenworth,
    than it produced, and until the outset of 40
    E. H. Armstrong, "Vagaries and Elusiveness of
    World War II, aural detectors (sound loca- Invention," Electrical Engineering, LXII, No. 4 (April,
    tors), in association with searchlights, ),
    41
    marked American aircraft warning sites. The field signal company authorized in
    consisted of 4 officers and enlisted men. From
    In order to meet its World War I mis- , regulations provided for one field signal battal-
    sion, the Signal Corps had to multiply ion to each infantry and cavalry division. The field
    itself by thirty-five. At the time of the battalion comprised an outpost, a wire and a radio
    company. (Memo, CSigO for CofS [1 Jan 36], sub:
    National Defense Act, the Corps was Study of the reorganization of sig coms of div and
    smaller even than when it had taken part higher units. SigC OT Gen.) The telegraph com-
    in the Spanish-American War. It com- pany, unlike a field company, did not serve at the
    prised 42 officers and 1, enlisted men, front; it had been created by War Department Gen-
    eral Order 55 in Two of them made up a bat-
    scattered over half the world. The Aviation talion from on. Until just before the United
    Section alone had grown as large. At the States entered the war, the signal field and telegraph
    declaration of war Signal strength was battalions existed only on paper. The first reference
    to them in the Army List and Directory appeared on 20
    only more. Half were in the Washing- December The issue for that date lists four bat-
    ton-Alaska Military Cable and Telegraph talions of each type.
    42
    System, half were organized into a pattern Kenneth B. Warner, "Radio Amateurs in War
    and Peace," Signals, I, No. 2 (November-December,
    of field and telegraph companies To sup- ),
    43
    plement them, there were 6, licensed For narratives of this expedient, see: (1) Ruth F.
    amateur radio operators. More than 4, Sadler, History of the Signal Corps Affiliated Plan,
    Aug 44, pp. SigC Hist Sec File. (2) Peter L.
    of these responded to a spirited recruiting Schauble, The First Battalion, the Story of the th Tele-
    campaign which even promised "assign- graph Battalion, Signal Corps, U.S. Army (Philadelphia,
    ment in a battle plane flying over the front ). (3) th Field Signal Battalion History (Des
    Moines, Iowa, ). (4) A. Lincoln Lavine, Circuits
    lines," 42 and, under a World War I pre- of Victory (New York: Doubleday Page & Company,
    cursor of World War II's Affiliated Plan, ).
    MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS 21

    Kansas, at Camp Meade, Maryland, most name from Camp Alfred Vail to Fort
    particularly at Camp Alfred Vail, New Monmouth; but almost from the end of
    Jersey, and at several other locations; the war it was the recognized center for
    forty-five universities and colleges organ- two principal functions, communications
    ized special courses of instruction in tele- training and communications research; it
    phone and radio engineering, meteorology, was the site of the Signal School and the
    and photography;44 at Vail a camp of Signal Corps Laboratories. With this post,
    buildings arose equipped with every as possibly nowhere else in its range of
    known device used in field signal work, interest, the Signal Corps assumed the
    including a divisional wire net with under- aspect which it held at the outset of the
    ground stations. In Washington the Office next war twenty years later.
    of the Chief Signal Officer moved from
    44
    building to building as it outgrew itself. (1) Memo, CSigO for CofS, cited n. (2) Court-
    Well over 50 percent of the total force of ney R. Hall, The Development of the Office of the
    Chief Signal Officer, Pt. I: , Sep 44, pp.
    the Signal Corps went into the American SigC Hist Sec File.
    45
    Expeditionary Forces, there to become 46
    Exec Order , 20 May
    At the end of World War I, the Signal Corps had
    about 4 percent of a much greater total become the repository for almost 7,, feet of his-
    This is not to count the Aviation Section. torical motion picture film and for about 85, still
    In the American Expeditionary Forces at negatives, most of them purchased from outside
    the time of the Armistice, there were 50 sources. This material joined the collection of military
    pictures taken since the days of Mathew B. Brady in
    field signal battalions, 28 telegraph battal- the Civil War.
    ions, 11 depot battalions, and 19 service Although the photographic activities of the Signal
    companies: a sum of 1, officers and Corps began in , the primary photographic duty
    was assigned officially in July Memo, Brig Gen
    33, enlisted men. Joseph E. Kuhn, Chief War College Div WDGS, for
    After demobilization had drained off the CofS, 17 Jul 17, sub: Photography of military oper-
    wartime strength, after the years interven- ations. PMWCD Record Div National
    Archives. Training films came to be a part of this
    ing between the two world wars had dis- duty; the Army's first one, Close Order Drill, was
    pelled the full recollection of the earlier, a photographed at the Military Academy in Pic-
    residue of accomplishment was still to be tures for surveying and ground photomapping were a
    responsibility reserved to the Corps of Engineers.
    observed. There was, for one thing, a pic- Memo, CofS for TAG, 19 Jul PMWCD
    torial record of conflict compiled by the Record Div National Archives. The Air Service, after
    cameras of thirty-eight Signal Corps pho- its divorce from the Signal Corps on 20 May ,
    took over aerial photography, along with 2, of the
    tographic teams There had been a prac- 3, men engaged in the military pictorial work. M.
    tical demonstration of the Affiliated Plan. E. Boswell, Signal Corps Photography in World War
    At General Pershing's demand for weather I, Apr SigC Hist Sec File.
    WPD, Hist Br, Catalogue of Official A. E. F. Photo-
    service in France, military meteorology graphs Taken by the Signal Corps, U.S.A., WD Doc
    47
    had come back to the Signal Corps. (Washington, ), is an excellent guide to the still
    Electronic knowledge had noticeably wid- pictures of World War I. The motion picture film can
    be referred to from a title list in the National Archives.
    ened. And the principal Signal Corps post 47
    In Signal Corps weather stations com-
    had come into being in northern New menced in the United States itself in , and the
    Jersey, with its character permanently Meteorological Service was formalized in AR
    , 12 November At its peak, it comprised
    established. Not until did it become thirty-nine stations. AG file , passim, especially
    a permanent installation and change its Memo, OCSigO for WP&T Div, 30 Oct
    CHAPTER II

    The Army in Limbo


    Postwar Curtailment the only one authorized for the post-World
    War I Army. In every way, the dwarfing
    The sudden evaporation of a large of the Military Establishment left little
    army, the change from crowded training opportunity for studying and applying the
    camps and busy offices to a backwater gigantic lessons of the war. Planning for
    organization, put a drain on military effi- mobilization of industry in a future war
    ciency and sense of identity. In the confi- began with a marked lack of encourage-
    dence bursting forth from a victory and ment.3 Many laboratory projects came to
    with a natural reluctance to think of wars a halt. From time to time, enlisted men,
    in the future tense, the nation was glad to confronting frozen promotion lists and
    revert to its normal civilian status and to meager pay, secured their release by pay-
    put the Army back in perspective. The ing to the finance officer a sum propor-
    Army saw its recent strength vanishing, tionate to their unexpired term of service.
    and its brief influence wiped away as it The Signal Corps continued, proud in its
    resumed the pleasant life of peacetime own household but feeling, with the rest of
    service. The abrupt ebbing, followed by the Army, that at the national dinner table
    gradual stagnation and ultimately a re- it was sitting below the salt.
    commencing rise, formed the soil of the Raids and forays from other branches
    next twenty years. of the service filled the place of the recent
    Ten days after the Armistice the remain- war. The Field Artillery, the Air Service,
    ing allowances for the current fiscal year and the Tank Corps asked the Signal
    were almost erased.1 For industry's sake, Corps to concur in a change in Army reg-
    Congress continued most of the 1, con- ulations which would let them install,
    tracts outstanding; they were fulfilled in maintain, and operate their own signal
    spite of the fact that the war was over, and communications systems. The Adjutant
    Signal Corps war-ordered equipment piled General's Office endeavored, without suc-
    up in the sudden peace with nobody to cess, to take over the War Department
    use it. Civilian employees, drafted soldiers, Message Center. The Coast Artillery
    National Guardsmen, Reservists—all went Corps expressed a preference for having
    out along with most of the money. The the Corps of Engineers install its fire-
    National Defense Act of provided a control systems. The Air Corps wanted
    strength of 5, men for the Signal Corps. 1
    Memo, SW for Chiefs of Bureaus, 21 Nov
    In the figure was down to 3, and 2

    3
    CSigO, Annual Reports, , ,
    in had fallen to 2, The 51st Sig- H. D. Hausmann, Signal Corps Activity in Indus-
    trial Mobilization and Procurement Planning,
    nal Battalion, stationed at Camp Vail, was , Pt. I. SigC Hist Sec File.
    THE ARMY IN LIMBO 23
    photography, military meteorology, and all be Signal Corps troops. But he had
    development, procurement, installation, made it clear that the units should be indi-
    and maintenance of air navigation equip- visible parts of the combat organizations
    4
    ment. which they served, not, as had often been
    The hardest blow of all came first. In its the case in the American Expeditionary
    capacity as a prominent arm of the Army, Forces, to be broken in upon and deprived
    the Signal Corps had controlled combat of this man or that by the signal officer of
    communications, except for the Field Ar- a higher level. They must "train and serve
    tillery, well down to all but the smallest habitually with the organization to which
    7
    echelons, or, to put it in another direction, attached."
    from the rear all the way to the front. Nevertheless, and although there were
    During the war just past, some signal units doubts as to the legality of the shift, the
    within the infantry brigade had been change took place. It had much to recom-
    made up in part of Infantrymen, in part of mend it for other arms and services. In
    Signal Corpsmen from the outpost com- many ways, it marked the beginning of an
    panies of the field signal battalions; but essential Army-wide interest in communi-
    the general fact was that the communica- cations matters.8 The new arrangement
    tions of the great combat organizations specified that the commander of each unit
    had been in sole charge of the Signal would establish the unit's communications
    Corps. The Army reorganization system, his signal officer being responsible
    carried this responsibility through the divi- for its efficiency. For the Infantry and
    sional level, stopped it there, and from that
    4
    point on assigned communications to the (1) Memo, CSigO for CofS, 22 Jan 20, sub: Sig
    Infantry, Field Artillery, or Cavalry. In5 com sv. SigC Gen, (2) Pauline M.
    Oakes, The Army Command and Administrative
    effect, given the postwar Army, in which Communications System, Pt. I: War Department
    units greater than a division scarcely ex- Radio Net, , Oct 45, pp. SigC Hist
    isted, the order wiped out most of the Sec File. (3) Memo, Lt Col Consuelo A. Seoane for
    Col Charles McK. Saltzman, 8 Mar SigC Gen
    tactical interest of the Signal Corps and (4) Summary Report on Photographic
    permanently moved its center of gravity Activities of the Signal Corps Since August 4, , in
    away from classification as an arm and the Fields of Motion Pictures and Visual Aid, 26 Feb
    43, pp. SigC APS Div File. (5) Courtney R.
    toward classification as a service. Hall, The Development of the Office of the Chief
    Every Chief Signal Officer protested, Signal Officer, Pt. I: , Sep 44, p. SigC
    beginning with Maj. Gen. George O. Hist Sec File. (6) M. P. Claussen, The Development
    of Radio and Radar Equipment for Air Operations,
    Squier, who pointed out the confusion he , p. Photostat copy in same file. (7) Ltr,
    felt sure would result if several independ- TAG to CSigO, 18 Jul 34, sub: Radio direction com-
    ent radio or wire systems operated in one pass, and 6th Ind, Chief of AC to TAG, 11 Mar
    SigC Compasses 1,
    area, and who declared that signal com- 5
    WD GO 9, 18 May
    munication "MUST BE one complete and 6

    7
    Memo, CSigO for CofS, cited n. 4(1).
    coordinated system from battalion head- Memo, CSigO for CofS [1 Jan 36], sub: Study of
    reorgn of sig coms of div and higher units. SigC OT
    quarters of the combat units to the Com- Gen.
    6
    mander in Chief of the Army." Col. 8
    (1) Memo, Maj Gen William G. Haan, WPD, for
    George C. Marshall expressed himself in [TAG?], 4 May SigC Gen, (2) AR
    , 12 Nov 21 and 1 Aug (3) Brig Gen Paul
    much the same way, saying that he be- M. Robinett, Ret., Chief Special Studies Div OCMH,
    lieved that communication troops should comment on MS, 25 Oct Copy in OCMH.
    24 THE SIGNAL CORPS

    Cavalry, it solved the problem of having of communication were becoming more


    signalmen arbitrarily transferred without complex every day—the greater the ap-
    reference to the tactical problems of the parent urgency for having one agency
    commander. Yet other difficulties arose. alone develop the signal plans, produce
    Men not trained in communications work the signal equipment, train the signalmen.
    contended that the Signal Corps equip- Maj. Harry C. Ingles, for instance, said
    ment was too delicate or was improperly that the principle applied in the Air Corps,
    made. Signal platoons and detachments too. Ingles became a World War II Chief
    became indistinct and undependable. The Signal Officer, and his words therefore
    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    Permalink

    For Sale: Miscellaneous Electronics Magazines. For some of these, I included a mention of one article in that issue that might be interesting.



    Electronics Illustrated: $1 each

    January, mc 4-tube RX

    March, Golden Anniversary of ham Radio

    May, CB Special Issue. Articles by 1W and 12Q (both names you would recognize)

    September, How to Tune SSB With Your BFO! Who knew?

    July Frye?s Vacuum Tube Course; Kit report on Heathkit HW

    November, 80M 40W TRCX In An Attache Case--uses 6GJ5

    January, 1 Tube All-Bander RX Uses 2AT7 Tube & Plug-In Coils

    September, ?The Ham Shack? column written by Wayne Green?

    January, Wayne predicts more transistors and then ICs in future ham gear.

    November, Sideband Adapteor Using 2 Transistors



    Radio-TV Experimenter: $1 each

    Fall,

    Fall,



    QST: 50 cents each unless noted.

    March (cover torn and taped), October ($1)

    May ($1), July (cover spots--$1)

    Poor covers: August, Sept, Oct, Nov

    Feb, May ($1 each), June (no covers--free), July ($1), August (poor--free)

    August, November (no covers--free)

    January, October

    June (no covers--free)

    June (no covers--free)

    May

    June

    February

    December

    January

    November

    January

    January, May



    Elementary Electronics: 50 cents each

    Fall, Thermoelectric Beer Cooler project

    Sept-Oct, Radio Shack DX review

    July-Aug, Build a wrist radio for receiving the aircraft band

    Sept-Oct, Roll your own capacitors

    Nov-Dec, The Vacuum Tubes Of Early Radio



    Popular Electronics: $1 each unless noted.

    November, Heathkit Ar-2 review

    December, Build a simple coil-winding jig--uses hand drill

    February, Collins 32V/Hallicrafters S station on the cover

    February, HQ on cover. 2-tube VHF RX project

    March, Bill Orr 70 Watt Novice TX for 15/10MAG7 driving

    June, Superregen BCB ?Pocket? RX using CKAX wire lead tube

    July, Double Your Heathkit At1 Output

    August, Cover Heathkit DX-?? TX/AR-2 RX/QF Article: Modulating

    your Hetahkit station.

    September,

    October, Convert Heathkit CR-1 to loudspeaker operation

    November, Hallicrafters S or similar on cover

    December, Printed circuits come of age

    January, Adding a Communications Switch--to your Scott Philharmonic!

    March, Play Games With Nixie Tubes

    November, Computer Plays Tic Tac Toe

    October, Mobile SWL Converter

    April, New Life for Obsolete Converters (Gonset )

    May, Nuvistor RF Amplifier

    June,

    July, 6M Mobile TX

    August, Cover shows woman in love with handheld EV mic.

    January, Fire and Police RX converter (3 copies available)

    February, Miliwatt Tunnel Diode TX on 6M

    April, Eye-tube mod for Heathkit CB-1

    May, Must We Have UHF TV?

    September,

    October, 2-Tube 2M Super-regen RX

    November, mw BCB Short Range TX built into a rural mailbox!

    (2 copies available)

    January, One Tube 6AF11 All-Band Plug-In Coil RX

    February, Satillites On The Air (2 copies)

    December, VHF Adventurer Moidular RX

    January, 2-Tube Superhet for 80M 6UAT7 (2 copies available)

    Bonus: The Girl Detector (A Carl & Jerry Adventure)

    ISSUES BELOW ARE 50 CENTS

    April, Convert The Knight C for 15, 10 or 6M

    January, 2 Halos Stacked for 2M

    February, Compactron Regulated Power Supply

    March, Oscilloscopes and Broad Phone Signals

    June, The Night Ben Franklin Called It A Day

    1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12

    3, 5, 6, 10, 11, 12

    1, 2, 4, 7

    4, 5, 9, 11, 12

    1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12

    2, 3, 5, 6, 7

    1

    6



    Thanks for looking.

    73, Don Merz, N3RHT

    The information contained in this e-mail may be confidential and is intended solely for the use of the named addressee.
    Access, copying or re-use of the e-mail or any information contained therein by any other person is not authorized.
    If you are not the intended recipient please notify us immediately by returning the e-mail to the originator.(16b)
    Источник: mynewextsetup.us
    signal corps keyer tg 34 a
    signal corps keyer tg 34 a

    Comments

    1. Does it mean I still need to get us payment service approved in order to receive money this way?

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