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F scott fitzgerald letter


f scott fitzgerald letter

Scope and Content The Papers F. Scott Fitzgerald consist of literary Included in his letters to Ruth are poems, sketches, and elaborate stories. While she was a patient at Les Rives de Prangins, Zelda Fitzgerald wrote letters to F. Scott Fitzgerald detailing the nonevents of her days. A Life in Letters is an outstanding book. It provides an up-close and personal look into the life and relationships of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Truly reveals the.
f scott fitzgerald letter

F scott fitzgerald letter -

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A LETTER FROM F. SCOTT FITZGERALD,
QUARANTINED IN 1920 IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE
DURING THE SPANISH INFLUENZA OUTBREAK

Dearest Rosemary,

It was a limpid dreary day, hung as in a basket from a single
dull star.  I thank you for your letter.  Outside, I perceive what may be a
collection of fallen leaves tussling against a trash can.  It rings like
jazz to my ears.  The streets are that empty.  It seems as though the bulk of the
city has retreated to their quarters, rightfully so.  At this time, it seems
very poignant to avoid all public spaces.  Even the bars, as I told
Hemingway, but to that he punched me in the stomach, to which I asked if he
had washed his hands.  He hadn’t.  He is much the denier, that one.  Why, he
considers the virus to be just influenza.  I’m curious of his sources.

The officials have alerted us to ensure we have a month’s
worth of necessities.  Zelda and I have stocked up on red wine, whiskey, rum,
vermouth, absinthe, white wine, sherry, gin, and lord, if we need it,
brandy.

Please pray for us.

F. Scott Fitzgerald 🙂

(The letter comes via one of my dad’s students from his 2017 seminar “The Literature of Fact.”)

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And while we’re sipping our absinthe let’s watch a garden grow! 

Источник: https://jennymcphee.com/2020/03/19/silver-linings-6-a-letter-from-f-scott-fitzgerald/

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Between June 1930 and August 1931, after a series of mental health episodes had whittled away at her career, her marriage, and her overall well-being, Zelda Fitzgerald was a patient at Les Rives de Prangins, a clinic in Nyon, Switzerland, where she wasn’t allowed visitors until her treatment had been established. The experience, as one could imagine, was tremendously isolating: once at the center of a lively and glamorous scene, she now found herself utterly alone with her thoughts. Her husband, F. Scott Fitzgerald, sent short notes and flowers every other day. She wrote long letters in reply, tracing the contours of her mind, expressing both love for and frustration with Scott, and detailing, in luscious, iridescent prose, the nonevents of her days.Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda collects more than three hundred of the couple’s letters to each other. Three of Zelda’s letters from Les Rives de Prangins—carefully transcribed with an eye for accuracy, misspellings and all—appear below.

Zelda Fitzgerald. Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.

[Fall 1930]

Dearest, my Darling—

Living is cold and technical without you, a death mask of itself.

At seven o:clock I had a bath but you were not in the next room to make it a baptisme of all I was thinking.

At eight o:clock I went to gymnastics but you were not there to turn moving into a harvesting of breezes.

At nine o:clock I went to the tissage and an old man in a white stock [smock?] chanted incantations but you were not there to make his imploring voice seem religious.

At noon I played bridge and watched Dr. Forels profile dissecting the sky, contre jour—

All afternoon I’ve been writing soggy words in the rain and feeling dank inside, and thinking of you—When a person crosses your high forehead and slides down into the pleasant valleys about your dear mouth its like Hannibal crossing the Alps—I love you, dear. You do not walk like a person plowing a storm but like a person very surprised at their means of locomotion, hardly touching the earth, as if each step were experimental—

And you are a darling and it must be awful to have a person always trying to creep inside you the way I do—

Good-night, my Sweet Love

Zelda

*

[Fall 1930]

Goofy, my darling, hasn’t it been a lovely day? I woke up this morning and the sun was lying like a birth-day parcel on my table so I opened it up and so many happy things went fluttering into the air: love to Doo-do and the remembered feel of our skins cool against each other in other mornings like a school-mistress. And you ’phoned and said I had written something that pleased you and so I don’t believe I’ve ever been so heavy with happiness. The moon slips into the mountains like a lost penny and the fields are black and punguent and I want you near so that I could touch you in the autumn stillness even a little bit like the last echo of summer. The horizon lies over the road to Lausanne and the succulent fields like a guillotine and the moon bleeds over the water and you are not so far away that I can’t smell your hair in the drying breeze. Darling—I love these velvet nights. I’ve never been able to decide whether the night was a bitter enemie or a “grand patron”—or whether I love you most in the eternal classic half-lights where it blends with day or in the full religious fan-fare of mid-night or perhaps in the lux of noon. Anyway, I love you most and you ’phoned me just because you ’phoned me tonight—I walked on those telephone wires for two hours after holding your love like a parasol to balance me. My dear—

I’m so glad you finished your story—Please let me read it Friday. And I will be very sad if we have to have two rooms. Please.

Dear. Are you sort of feeling aimless, surprised, and looking rather reproachful that no melo-drama comes to pass when your work is over—as if you [had] ridden very hard with a message to save your army and found the enemy had decided not to attack—the way you sometimes feel—or are you just a darling little boy with a holiday on his hands in the middle of the week—the way you sometimes are—or are you organizing and dynamic and mending things—the way you sometimes are—

I love you—the way you always are.

Dear—

Good-night—

Dear-dear dear dear dear dear dear

Dear dear dear dear dear dear dear

Dear dear dear dear dear dear

Dear dear dear dear dear dear

Dear dear dear dear dear dear

Dear dear dear dear dear dear

dear dear dear dear dear dear

dear dear dear dear dear dear

dear dear dear dear dear dear

dear dear dear dear dear dear

*

[Spring 1931]

Dear heart, my darling love,

This is no good—but nothing matters because after to-morrow I’m going to see you again—

What a dreary rain—I rowed on the lake. It was like being on a slate roof. When the boat is not pointed into the waves it goes up with them and you keep waiting for the bump of coming down but it doesn’t come so you just slide from one to another and have no sense of direction like being on one of those oily tin platforms at Luna
Parc—

I can’t write. I tried all afternoon—and I just twisted the pencil round and round churning between my teeth, and I love you. You are a darling. When you can’t write you sit on the bed and look so woebegone like a person who’s got to a store and can’t remember what they wanted to buy—

Good-night, dear. If you were in my bed it might be the back of your head I was touching where the hair is short and mossy or it might be up in the front where it make[s] little caves above your forehead, but wherever it was it would be the sweetest place, the sweetest place

Darling

 

Zelda Fitzgerald was born in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1900. She and Scott Fitzgerald married in 1920, and the following year she gave birth to their daughter, Frances “Scottie” Fitzgerald. The couple became a fixture of the Jazz Age and quickly became known for their wild behavior. Throughout their marriage, Zelda and her diaries were inspiration for Scott’s novels and their characters. Zelda is the author of several short stories and novels, including Save the Waltz. She died at age forty-seven.

Excerpted from Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda: The Love Letters of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald. Copyright © 2002 by Jackson R. Bryer and Cathy W. Barks. Excerpted with permission by Scribner, a Division of Simon and Schuster, Inc.

Источник: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2019/08/15/three-letters-from-switzerland/
Photo credit: Bettmann - Getty Images

From Esquire

In and amongst the videos of lyrics to wash your hands to, Amy Adams singing 'Imagine' and pictures of the aisle where loo roll used to live, a letter from F. Scott Fitzgerald, written while he was under quarantine during the Spanish Influenza outbreak in 1920, is being shared on Instagram and Twitter.

Fitzgerald's words, now often featuring a GIF of a beating heart or a ray of sunshine over them, feel like a letter of hope sent a hundred years into the future. His dark humour as bars close and he stocks up on, "red wine, whiskey, rum, vermouth, absinthe, white wine, sherry, gin, and lord, if we need it, brandy", is the amusement we all need.

The problem is that it isn't written by Fitzgerald, nor was it penned in 1920. The parody letter in fact first appeared a week ago on the humour website McSweeney's, written by Nick Farriella.

Photo credit: =

Taken out of context, it's easy to see how this letter could be believed as the real thing, with its writerly flourishes like the noise of "fallen leaves tussling against a trash can" ringing "like jazz to my ears". Between friends, the article began life as a sincere praising of how modern technology can connect us with those in the past who have already lived through strange times.

Photo credit: Bettmann - Getty Images

Historical inaccuracies aside, the fake letter going viral poses an interesting question about what makes fake news or misinformation harmful. Forwarded notes with untruths about borders closing or home remedy cures to the virus are obviously unhelpful in keeping people informed, but despite not being written by Fitzgerald, the letter can offer hope to people who want to believe there is something on the other side of the darkness.

"I think it speaks to the strangeness of the times," Farriella told Esquire. "Where many can't leave their homes, there's no sports going on, barely any distraction. So, for this parody to get some attention shows people's yearning for some answer from someone from the past, someone who's made it through something like this before. But even though it wasn't an actual letter from F. Scott Fitzgerald, I think the sentiment is still true, and we could all benefit from the way he lived his life, a relentless optimist."

The last week has seen the building of a kind of collective optimism as people place their faith in the idea that we will come out of this situation more compassionate and more aware of our commonalities. Perhaps just that we will come out of it at all.

A similar sentiment to Fitzgerald's supposed correspondence from 1920 is shared in a piece of writing by Kitty O'Meara titled 'In the time of the Pandemic'. It begins: "And the people stayed home. And they read books, and listened, and rested, and exercised, and made art, and played games, and learned new ways of being, and were still. And they listened more deeply. Some meditated, some prayed, some danced. Some met their shadows. And the people began to think differently."

The words from the blog post on The Daily Round have been widely shared on social media; mocked up in front of calming stock images of the ocean or decorated with a line about how we will get through this. It captured the kind of optimism people need right now, and after seeing it many people were asking Reddit or Twitter who the writer was. Some believed it was deceased Irish writer Kathleen O'Meara, perhaps hoping that the wisdom imparted in the writing comes from the past rather than being written in hope for the future.

Like with the fake Fitzgerald note it has also sparked a debate about authenticity, as Italian journalist Irene Vella has claimed it is a translation of her longer version of the same poem. Whatever its origin, these words are spreading like a global daisy chain of hope, promising things will be okay. Whether they are real or not feels almost besides the point.

Farriella's Fitzgerald letter is a fable people need to believe, and his "strain of light" a mantra that, like the real Fitzgerald's "green light at the end of Daisy's dock", provides hope for the future. Perhaps it doesn't matter if it comes from 2020 rather than 1920, as author Deepak Chopkra wrote when sharing O'Meara's words: 'Source unknown... but worth sharing.'

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Источник: https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/problem-f-scott-fitzgeralds-letter-133600029.html

F. Scott Fitzgerald - Letters and Essays

Fitzgerald lived in an age when, despite the existence of the telephone system, hand-writing letters was still commonplace, so that he left behind an abundance of exchanges between himself and his wife, his editor, his literary agent and his friends that were published in a number of different collections after his death in 1940.


The Thoughtbook of F. Scott Fitzgerald

In case you are 14 years old, keeping a diary and harboring ambitions to literary fame, you do not need to worry if your journal entries lack style or substance. F. Scott Fitzgerald did not fare much better during this stage of his life as the recently published The Thoughtbook of F. Scott Fitzgerald shows. However, reading the text will also remind you that, if you do manage to become a famous author, then scholars are going to be interested in anything you ever scribbled down, including your teenage thoughts on girls and gossip. That's why we can now pry into Fitzgerald's private musings on the waxing and waning of his affections, even though they were never meant to be read by anyone but himself. After all, he kept his diary locked in a box under his bed. Perhaps that's where it should have remained, both to spare Fitzgerald any posthumous embarrassment and today's reader an hour of solid boredom.


A Short Autobiography, edited by James L. W. West III

Fitzgerald never worked on an autobiography, but throughout his life - from the start of his career in 1920 until shortly before his death in 1940 - he published several magazine articles and essays that reflected upon his personal life. The collection 'A Short Autobiography' arranges those texts in chronological order so that they trace the arc from the infectious self-assuredness of the successful young author (who never fails to regard himself with a sense of irony, though) to the somber reflections of a man who has outlived his prime - with the eponymous short piece 'A Short Autobiography' as the tipping point: it's nothing more than a list of different drinks consumed in different locations over the years. That literary prank aside, all of Fitzgerald's different attempts at self-portrayal are as enjoyable to read today as they presumably were to the magazine audiences of the 1920s and 1930s. While his exploration of the process of writing in 'One Hundred False Starts' may be the most elegant, most insightful text in the collection, the early accounts of Scott's marriage to Zelda in essays such as 'How to Live on $36,000 a Year' are probably the most enjoyable. It's inspiring how he presents the interaction between his wife and himself, how he showcases them as a good team that enjoys strong camaraderie rather than as the epitome of romantic love. Perhaps he had already guessed that ultimately it would be loyalty and respect that, in its own strange way, would make their relationship last.


Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda, edited by Jackson R. Bryer and Cathy W. Barks

The letters that Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald exchanged span more than two decades, from the first love letter she wrote in 1918 to his final note from December 19, 1940. Nevertheless, their correspondence does not tell a continuous story, but one that is broken into two distinct parts, simply because Scott and Zelda only communicated in writing when they were apart, i.e. during their courtship and later when Zelda was hospitalized. There may be nothing special about these letters, except that they were written by two gifted writers. Yet, reading them in chronologial order makes the exuberance of their early days as well as the hardships they had to face during their final years come to life more vividly than the best biography could. Besides, since more of Zelda's than of Scott's letters have survived, her voice comes through loud and clear, so that readers who have turned to the collection because of their interest in Scott (and that is likely to be the majority) cannot help but acknowledge that Zelda was not just the wife of a famous author, but an equal part in their marriage and that their love survived life because they both felt more at home with each other than with anyone else.


The Crack-Up, edited by Edmund Wilson

The Crack-Up is a collection of essays that Fitzgerald published as he reached his nadir: His latest novel Tender is the Night had been a critical and financial failure, his wife had been institutionalized and the magazine short story market had dried up: "...until you realize with finality that in some regard you will never be as good a man again."


Wir waren furchtbar gute Schauspieler

On May 28, 1933, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald met in the presence of her doctor Thomas Rennie and a stenographer: Scott had asked for a typescript of the conversation to document the state of affairs between his wife and himself. Based on this protocol, their conversation has now been reenacted as an 109 minute audiobook (which is only available in German at this point) that will make anyone who is reasonably happily married grateful for not having sunk to the level of distrust and antipathy that seems to have ruled the relationship between Scott and Zelda during this period. Yet, at the same time, one cannot help but identfy with both of them, especially with how Zelda fights to maintain her own separate identity, but also with Scott's anger at what he perceives as her ungratefulness. In general, he comes across as a broken man at age 36, who is clinging to the emblem's of his worldly success, as he seems to have lost everything else he could have held on to. Listening to Scott and Zelda fighting is a painful reminder how completely lives can unravel, not by a single tragic twist of fate, but gradually, as a matter of course, abetted by too many wrong decisions, each of them insignificant in isolation, but devastating in their cumulative effect.


A Life in Letters: A New Collection, edited and annotated by Matthew J. Bruccoli

This correspondence - edited by eminent Fitzgerald scholar Bruccoli - offers an accessible self-portrait of the writer. Early letters to his editor, Maxwell Perkins, and friends, Edmund Wilson and Ernest Hemingway, document Fitzgerald's devotion to craft, exemplified by The Great Gatsby, as well as the novelist's ever-present financial problems.


Dear Scott/Dear Max: The Fitzgerald-Perkins Correspondence, edited by Jackson R. Bryer

Maxwell Perkins was a well-known editor at literary institution Scribner's. He was Fitzgerald's editor, mentor and creditor. Their correspondence offers not only a lot of literary gossip, but also rare insights into Fitzgerald's devotion to his craft.


As Ever, Scott Fitz-, edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli

A collection of letters between Fitzgerald and his literary agent Harold Ober. Their correspondence ranges from 1919 to 1940.




F. Scott Fitzgerald - An Annotated Bibliography

Источник: https://scott-fitzgerald.com/html/fitzgerald_essays.html

'Nothing Any Good Isn't Hard': F. Scott Fitzgerald's Secret to Great Writing

Culture

By Maria Popova

The Great Gatsby author's surprisingly blunt advice to would-be writers

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F. Scott Fitzgerald


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What is the secret of great writing? For David Foster Wallace, it was about fun. For Henry Miller, about discovery. Susan Sontag saw it as self-exploration. Many literary greats anchored it to their daily routines. And yet, the answer remains elusive and ever-changing.

In the fall of 1938, Radcliffe College sophomore Frances Turnbull sent her latest short story to family friend F. Scott Fitzgerald. His response, found in F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Life in Letters (UK; public library)—the same volume that gave us Fitzgerald's heartwarming fatherly advice and his brilliantly acerbic response to hate mail—echoes Anaïs Nin's insistence upon the importance of emotional investment in writing and offers some uncompromisingly honest advice on essence of great writing:

November 9, 1938

Dear Frances:

I've read the story carefully and, Frances, I'm afraid the price for doing professional work is a good deal higher than you are prepared to pay at present. You've got to sell your heart, your strongest reactions, not the little minor things that only touch you lightly, the little experiences that you might tell at dinner. This is especially true when you begin to write, when you have not yet developed the tricks of interesting people on paper, when you have none of the technique which it takes time to learn. When, in short, you have only your emotions to sell.

This is the experience of all writers. It was necessary for Dickens to put into Oliver Twist the child's passionate resentment at being abused and starved that had haunted his whole childhood. Ernest Hemingway's first stories 'In Our Time' went right down to the bottom of all that he had ever felt and known. In 'This Side of Paradise' I wrote about a love affair that was still bleeding as fresh as the skin wound on a haemophile.

The amateur, seeing how the professional having learned all that he'll ever learn about writing can take a trivial thing such as the most superficial reactions of three uncharacterized girls and make it witty and charming—the amateur thinks he or she can do the same. But the amateur can only realize his ability to transfer his emotions to another person by some such desperate and radical expedient as tearing your first tragic love story out of your heart and putting it on pages for people to see.

That, anyhow, is the price of admission. Whether you are prepared to pay it or, whether it coincides or conflicts with your attitude on what is 'nice' is something for you to decide. But literature, even light literature, will accept nothing less from the neophyte. It is one of those professions that wants the 'works.' You wouldn't be interested in a soldier who was only a little brave.

In the light of this, it doesn't seem worth while to analyze why this story isn't saleable but I am too fond of you to kid you along about it, as one tends to do at my age. If you ever decide to tell your stories, no one would be more interested than,

Your old friend,

F. Scott Fitzgerald

P.S. I might say that the writing is smooth and agreeable and some of the pages very apt and charming. You have talent—which is the equivalent of a soldier having the right physical qualifications for entering West Point.

Two years prior, in another letter to his 15-year-old daughter Scottie upon her enrollment in high school, Fitzgerald offered more wisdom on the promise and perils of writing:

Grove Park Inn
Asheville, N.C.
October 20, 1936

Dearest Scottina:

[...]

Don't be a bit discouraged about your story not being tops. At the same time, I am not going to encourage you about it, because, after all, if you want to get into the big time, you have to have your own fences to jump and learn from experience. Nobody ever became a writer just by wanting to be one. If you have anything to say, anything you feel nobody has ever said before, you have got to feel it so desperately that you will find some way to say it that nobody has ever found before, so that the thing you have to say and the way of saying it blend as one matter—as indissolubly as if they were conceived together.

Let me preach again for one moment: I mean that what you have felt and thought will by itself invent a new style so that when people talk about style they are always a little astonished at the newness of it, because they think that is only style that they are talking about, when what they are talking about is the attempt to express a new idea with such force that it will have the originality of the thought. It is an awfully lonesome business, and as you know, I never wanted you to go into it, but if you are going into it at all I want you to go into it knowing the sort of things that took me years to learn.

[...]

Nothing any good isn't hard, and you know you have never been brought up soft, or are you quitting on me suddenly? Darling, you know I love you, and I expect you to live up absolutely to what I laid out for you in the beginning.

Scott

For more wisdom on the writing life, see Zadie Smith's 10 rules of writing, Kurt Vonnegut's 8 guidelines for a great story, David Ogilvy's 10 no-bullshit tips, Henry Miller's 11 commandments, Jack Kerouac's 30 beliefs and techniques, John Steinbeck's 6 pointers, Neil Gaiman's 8 rules, Margaret Atwood's 10 practical tips, and Susan Sontag's synthesized learnings.


This post also appears on Brain Pickings, an Atlantic partner site.

Источник: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2013/01/nothing-any-good-isnt-hard-f-scott-fitzgeralds-secret-to-great-writing/266935/

FITZGERALD, F. SCOTT.

Autograph Letter Signed

"I’m afraid my own career, which has been erratic and disordered, if seldom dull, would not be a very inspiring one to dilate on..."

A REMARKABLE LETTER: F. SCOTT FITZGERALD EVALUATES HIS CAREER AND OFFERS LIFE ADVICE WHILE AWAITING THE PUBLICATION OF THE GREAT GATSBY.

The letter, responding to a request by an American teacher S.D. Green to offer advice to his students, is written in ink and signed by F. Scott Fitzgerald. It reads in full:

Hotel Tiberio,
Capri, Italy

Dear Mr. Green:

Your letter followed me around Europe and reached me here. Tell them please how I regret this delay, and that I appreciate their interest and the fact that they have chosen me. I’m afraid my own career, which has been erratic and disordered, if seldom dull, would not be a very inspiring one to dilate on -- in fact my hope is that my own children will be better equipped for life and less trustful as to what their elders (including me) tell them.  If I were to say anything it would be that each man’s truth is peculiar to himself and that nothing is worth believing as to conduct in life except that which you find out for yourself or at least confirm for yourself.

With best wishes to them and to you
Sincerely,
[signed] F. Scott Fitzgerald


Although not dated, the letter was written between February and April 1925, while Fitzgerald was staying at the Hotel Tiberio in Capri awaiting the publication of his masterpiece, The Great Gatsby, published on April 10, 1925.

Fitzgerald during this time was in a state of high anxiety. As late as March 19, he was still wrestling with the title, sending a cable to Max Perkins that he was “crazy about [the] title Under the Red White and Blue” (instead of “The Great Gatsby”), but Perkins replied that it was too late to change. In his letter of March 31 to Perkins (from the Hotel Tiberio), he worries, “As the day approaches, my nervousness increases. Tomorrow is the 1st [of April] and your wire says the 10th. I’ll be here until the 25th, probably later, so if the book prospers I’ll expect some sort of cable before I leave for Paris.... Yours in a Tremble, Scott.”

The turbulent nature of Fitzgerald’s career and life is legendary, and in this letter - written at one of the most critical moments of his life - Fitzgerald reveals a high level of self-awareness (and prescience) in realizing that his path may not be a model for others to follow. In the actual advice he does offer, he displays his own insecurities over the discovery of truth and a distrust for authority that would become an essential characteristic for members of his “Lost Generation”.

The recipient, S.D. Green, wrote letters soliciting the advice of various noteworthy people during the years 1922-25.

Hotel Tiberio, Capri, Italy. Feb-April 1925. One 8x12 inch sheet, written on one side; custom decorative box by noted book designer Sjoerd Hofstra. Usual folds, evidence of paper clip at top margin; generally fine.

FITZGERALD LETTERS WITH SUCH REVEALING CONTENT ARE EXTRAORDINARILY RARE ON THE MARKET.

Check Availability:
P: 212.326.8907
E: [email protected]

Источник: https://www.manhattanrarebooks.com/pages/books/1976/f-scott-fitzgerald/autograph-letter-signed?soldItem=true
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Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on September 24, 1896, the namesake and second cousin three times removed of the author of the National Anthem. Fitzgerald’s given names indicate his parents’ pride in his father’s ancestry. His father, Edward, was from Maryland, with an allegiance to the Old South and its values. Fitzgerald’s mother, Mary (Mollie) McQuillan, was the daughter of an Irish immigrant who became wealthy as a wholesale grocer in St. Paul. Both were Catholics.

Edward Fitzgerald failed as a manufacturer of wicker furniture in St. Paul, and he became a salesman for Procter & Gamble in upstate New York. After he was dismissed in 1908, when his son was twelve, the family returned to St. Paul and lived comfortably on Mollie Fitzgerald’s inheritance. Fitzgerald attended the St. Paul Academy; his first writing to appear in print was a detective story in the school newspaper when he was thirteen.

During 1911-1913 he attended the Newman School, a Catholic prep school in New Jersey, f scott fitzgerald letter where he met Father Sigourney Fay, who encouraged his ambitions for personal distinction f scott fitzgerald letter and achievement. As a member of the Princeton Class of 1917, Fitzgerald neglected his studies for his literary apprenticeship. He wrote the scripts and lyrics for the Princeton Triangle Club musicals and was a contributor to the Princeton Tiger humor health insurance plan usa magazine and the Nassau Literary Magazine. His college friends included Edmund Wilson and John Peale Bishop. On academic probation and unlikely to graduate, Fitzgerald joined the army in 1917 and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the infantry. Convinced that he would die in the war, he rapidly wrote a farmers state bank cedar rapids Romantic Egotist”; the letter of rejection from Charles Scribner’s Sons praised the novel’s originality and asked that it be resubmitted when revised.

In June 1918 Fitzgerald was assigned to Camp Sheridan, near Montgomery, Alabama. There he fell in love with a celebrated belle, eighteen-year-old Zelda Sayre, the youngest daughter of an Alabama Supreme Court judge. The romance intensified Fitzgerald’s hopes for the success of his novel, but after revision it was rejected by Scribners for a second time. The war ended just before he was to be sent overseas; after his discharge in 1919 he went to New York City to seek his fortune in order to marry. Unwilling to wait while Fitzgerald succeeded in the advertisement business and unwilling to live on his small salary, Zelda Sayre broke their engagement.

Fitzgerald quit his job in July 1919 and returned to St. Paul to rewrite his novel as This Side of Paradise. It was accepted by editor Maxwell Perkins of Scribners in September. Set mainly at Princeton and described by its author as “a quest novel,” This Side of Paradise traces the career aspirations and love disappointments of Amory Blaine.

In the fall-winter of 1919 Fitzgerald commenced his career as a writer of stories for the mass-circulation magazines. Working through agent Harold Ober, Fitzgerald interrupted work on his novels to write moneymaking popular fiction for the rest of his life. The Saturday Evening Post became Fitzgerald’s best story market, and he was regarded as a “Post writer.” His early commercial stories about young love introduced a fresh character: the independent, determined young American woman who appeared in “The Offshore Pirate” and “Bernice Bobs Her Hair.” Fitzgerald’s more ambitious stories, such as “May Day” and “The Diamond as Big as the The bank of greene county login published in The Smart Set, which had a small circulation.

The publication of This Side of Paradise on March 26, 1920 made the 24-year-old Fitzgerald famous almost overnight, and a week later he married Zelda Sayre in New York. They embarked on an extravagant life as young celebrities. Fitzgerald endeavored to earn a solid literary reputation, but his playboy image impeded the proper assessment of his work. walmart eye center mexico mo

After a riotous summer in Westport, Connecticut, the Fitzgeralds took an apartment in New York City; there he wrote his second novel, The Beautiful and Damned, a naturalistic chronicle of the dissipation of Anthony and Gloria Patch. When Zelda Fitzgerald became pregnant they took their first trip to Europe in 1921 and then settled in St. Paul for the birth of their only child, Frances Scott (Scottie) Fitzgerald, who was born in October 1921.

The Fitzgeralds expected to become affluent from his play, The Vegetable. In the fall of 1922 they moved to Great Neck, Long Island, in order to be near Broadway. The political satire subtitled “From President to Postman” failed at its tryout in November 1923, and Fitzgerald wrote his way out of debt with short stories. The distractions of Great Neck and New York prevented Fitzgerald from making progress on his third novel. During this time his drinking increased. He was an alcoholic, but he wrote sober. Zelda Fitzgerald regularly got “tight,” but she was not an alcoholic. There were frequent domestic rows, usually triggered by drinking bouts.

Literary opinion makers were reluctant to accord Fitzgerald full marks as a serious craftsman. His reputation as a drinker inspired the myth that he was an irresponsible writer; yet he was a painstaking reviser whose fiction went through layers of drafts. Fitzgerald’s clear, lyrical, colorful, witty style evoked the emotions associated with time and place. When critics objected to Fitzgerald’s concern with love and success, his response was: “But, my God! it was my material, and it was all I had to deal with.” The chief theme of Fitzgerald’s work is aspiration, the idealism he regarded as defining chase amazon prime rewards card American character. Another major theme was mutability or loss. As a social historian, Fitzgerald became identified with the Jazz Age: “It was an age of miracles, it was an age of art, it was an age of excess, and it was an age of satire,” he wrote in “Echoes of the Jazz Age.”

Seeking tranquility for his work, the Fitzgeralds went to France in the spring of 1924. He wrote The Great Gatsby during the summer and fall in Valescure near St. Raphael, but the marriage was damaged by Zelda’s involvement with a French naval aviator. The extent of the affair, if f scott fitzgerald letter was in fact consummated, is not known. On the Riviera the Fitzgeralds formed a close friendship with  affluent and cultured American expatriates Gerald and Sara Murphy.

The Fitzgeralds spent the winter of 1924-1925 in Rome, where he revised The Great Gatsby; they were en route to Paris when the novel was published in April. The Great Gatsby marked a striking advance in Fitzgerald’s technique, utilizing a complex structure and a controlled narrative point of view. Fitzgerald’s achievement received critical praise, but sales of Gatsby were disappointing, though the stage and movie rights brought additional income.

In Paris Fitzgerald met Ernest Hemingway, then unknown outside the expatriate literary circle, with whom he formed a friendship based largely on his admiration for Hemingway’s personality and genius. The Fitzgeralds remained in France until the end of 1926, alternating between Paris and the Riviera. Fitzgerald made little progress on his fourth novel, a study of American expatriates in France provisionally titled “The Boy Who Killed His Mother,” “Our Type,” and “The World’s Fair.” During these years Zelda Fitzgerald’s unconventional behavior became increasingly eccentric.

The Fitzgeralds returned to America to escape the distractions of France. After a short, unsuccessful stint of screenwriting in Hollywood, Fitzgerald rented “Ellerslie,” f scott fitzgerald letter a mansion near Wilmington, Delaware, in the spring of 1927. The family remained at “Ellerslie” for two years interrupted by a visit to Paris in the summer of 1928, but Fitzgerald was still unable to make significant progress on his novel. At this time Zelda Fitzgerald commenced ballet training, intending to become a professional dancer. The Fitzgeralds returned to France in the spring of 1929, where Zelda’s intense ballet work damaged her health and contributed to the couple’s estrangement. In April 1930 she suffered her first breakdown. She was treated at Prangins clinic in Switzerland until September 1931, while Fitzgerald lived in Swiss hotels. Work on the novel was again suspended as he wrote short stories to pay for psychiatric treatment.

Fitzgerald’s peak story fee of $4,000 from The Saturday Evening Post may have had in 1929 the purchasing power of $40,000 in present-day dollars. Nonetheless, the general view of his affluence is distorted. Fitzgerald was not among the highest-paid writers of his time; his novels earned comparatively little, and most of his income came from 160 magazine stories. During the 1920s his income from all sources averaged under $25,000 a year, good money at a time when a schoolteacher’s average annual salary was $1,299, but not a fortune. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald did spend money faster than he earned it; the author who wrote so eloquently about the effects of money on character f scott fitzgerald letter was unable to manage his own finances.

The Fitzgeralds returned to America in the fall of 1931 and rented a house in Montgomery. Fitzgerald made a second unsuccessful trip to Hollywood in 1931. Zelda Fitzgerald suffered a relapse in February 1932 and entered Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. She spent the rest of her life as a resident or outpatient of sanitariums.

In 1932, while a patient at Johns Hopkins, Zelda Fitzgerald rapidly wrote Save Me the Waltz. Her autobiographical novel generated considerable bitterness between the Fitzgeralds, for he regarded it as pre-empting the material that he was using in his novel-in-progress. Fitzgerald rented “La Paix,” a house outside Baltimore, where he completed his fourth novel, Tender Is the Night. Published in 1934, his most ambitious novel was a commercial failure, and its merits were matters of critical dispute. Set in France during the 1920s, Tender Is the Night examines the deterioration of Dick Diver, a brilliant American psychiatrist, during the course of his marriage to a wealthy mental patient.

The 1936-1937 period is known as “the crack-up” from the title of an essay Fitzgerald wrote in 1936. Ill, drunk, in debt, and unable to write commercial stories, he lived in hotels in the region near Asheville, North Carolina, where in 1936 Zelda Fitzgerald entered Highland Hospital. After Baltimore, Fitzgerald did not maintain a home for Scottie. When she was fourteen she went to boarding school, and the Obers became her surrogate family. Nonetheless, Fitzgerald functioned as a concerned father by mail, attempting to supervise Scottie’s education and to shape her social values.

Fitzgerald went to Hollywood alone in the summer of 1937 with a six-month Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer screenwriting contract at $1,000 a week. He received his only screen credit for adapting Three Comrades (1938), and his contract was renewed for a year at $1,250 a week. The $91,000 he earned from MGM was a great deal of money during the late Depression years when a new Chevrolet coupe cost $619; but although Fitzgerald paid off most of his debts, he was unable to save. His trips East to visit his wife were disastrous. In California Fitzgerald fell in love with movie columnist Sheilah Graham. Their relationship endured despite his benders. After MGM dropped his option at the end of 1938, Fitzgerald navy federal business account app worked as a freelance script writer and wrote short-short stories for Esquire. He began his Hollywood novel, The Love of the Last Tycoon, in 1939 and had written more m zionsbank com than half of a working draft when he died of a heart attack in Graham’s apartment on December 21, 1940. Zelda Fitzgerald perished at a fire in Highland Hospital in 1948.

F. Scott Fitzgerald died believing himself a failure. The obituaries were condescending, and he seemed destined for literary obscurity. The first phase of the Fitzgerald resurrection “revival” does not properly describe the process that occurred between 1945 and 1950. By 1960 he had achieved a secure place among America’s enduring writers. The Great Gatsby, a work that seriously examines the theme of aspiration in an American setting, defines the classic American novel.

Источник: https://sc.edu/about/offices_and_divisions/university_libraries/browse/irvin_dept_special_collections/collections/matthew_arlyn_bruccoli_collection_of_f_scott_fitzgerald/life_of_fitzgerald/index.php

FITZGERALD, F. SCOTT.

Autograph Letter Signed

"I’m afraid my own career, which has been erratic and disordered, if seldom dull, would not be a very inspiring one to dilate on."

A REMARKABLE LETTER: F. SCOTT FITZGERALD EVALUATES HIS CAREER AND OFFERS LIFE ADVICE WHILE AWAITING THE PUBLICATION OF THE GREAT GATSBY.

The letter, responding to a request by an American teacher S.D. Green to offer advice to his students, is written in ink and signed by F. Scott Fitzgerald. It reads in full:

Hotel Tiberio,
Capri, Italy

Dear Mr. Green:

Your letter followed me around Europe and reached me here. Tell them please how I regret this delay, and that I appreciate their interest and the fact that they have chosen me. I’m afraid my own career, which has been erratic and disordered, if seldom dull, would not be a very inspiring one to dilate on -- in fact my hope is that my own children will be better equipped for life and less trustful as to what their elders (including me) tell them.  If I were to say anything it would be that each man’s truth is peculiar to himself and that nothing is worth believing as to conduct in life except that which you find out for yourself or at least confirm for yourself.

With best wishes to them and to you
Sincerely,
[signed] F. Scott Fitzgerald


Although not dated, the letter was written between February and April 1925, while Fitzgerald was staying at the Hotel Tiberio in Capri awaiting the publication of his masterpiece, The Great Gatsby, published on April 10, 1925.

Fitzgerald during this time was in a state of high anxiety. As late as March 19, he was still wrestling with the title, sending a cable to Max Perkins that he was “crazy about [the] title Under the Red White and Blue” (instead of “The Great Gatsby”), but Perkins replied that it was too late to change. In his letter of March 31 to Perkins (from the Hotel Tiberio), he worries, “As the day approaches, my nervousness increases. Tomorrow is the 1st [of April] and your wire says the 10th. I’ll be here until the 25th, probably later, so if the book prospers I’ll expect some sort of cable before I leave for Paris. Yours in a Tremble, Scott.”

The turbulent nature of Fitzgerald’s career and life is legendary, and in this letter - written at one of the most critical moments of his life - Fitzgerald reveals a high level of self-awareness (and prescience) in realizing that his path may not be a model for others to follow. In the actual advice he does offer, he displays his own insecurities over the discovery of truth and a distrust for authority that would become an essential characteristic for members of his “Lost Generation&rdquo.

The recipient, S.D. Green, wrote letters soliciting the advice of various noteworthy people during the years 1922-25.

Hotel Tiberio, Capri, Italy. Feb-April 1925. One 8x12 inch sheet, written on one side; custom decorative box by noted book designer Sjoerd Hofstra. Usual folds, evidence of paper clip at top margin; generally fine.

FITZGERALD LETTERS WITH SUCH REVEALING CONTENT ARE EXTRAORDINARILY RARE ON THE MARKET.

Check Availability:
P: 212.326.8907
E: [email protected]

Источник: https://www.manhattanrarebooks.com/pages/books/1976/f-scott-fitzgerald/autograph-letter-signed?soldItem=true
Photo credit: Bettmann - Getty Images

From Esquire

In and amongst the videos of lyrics to wash your hands to, Amy Adams singing 'Imagine' and pictures of the aisle where loo roll used to live, a letter from F. Scott Fitzgerald, written while he was under quarantine during the Spanish Influenza outbreak in 1920, is being shared on Instagram and Twitter.

Fitzgerald's words, now often featuring a GIF of a beating heart or a ray of sunshine over them, feel like a letter of hope sent a hundred years into the future. His dark humour as bars close and he stocks up on, "red wine, whiskey, rum, vermouth, absinthe, white wine, sherry, gin, and lord, if we need it, brandy", is the amusement we all need.

The problem is that it isn't written by Fitzgerald, nor was it penned in 1920. The parody letter in fact first appeared a week ago on the humour website McSweeney's, written by Nick Farriella.

Photo credit: =

Taken out of context, it's easy to see how this letter could be believed as the real thing, with its writerly flourishes like the noise of "fallen leaves tussling against a trash can" ringing "like jazz to my ears". Between friends, the article began life as a sincere praising of how modern technology can connect us with those in the past who have already lived through strange times.

Photo credit: Bettmann - Getty Images

Historical inaccuracies aside, the fake letter going viral poses an interesting question about what makes fake news or misinformation harmful. Forwarded notes with untruths about borders closing or home remedy cures to the virus are obviously unhelpful in keeping people informed, but despite not being written by Fitzgerald, the letter can offer hope to people who want to believe there is something on the other side of the darkness.

"I think it speaks to the strangeness of the times," Farriella told Esquire. "Where many can't leave their homes, there's no sports going on, barely any distraction. So, for this parody to get some attention shows people's yearning for some answer from someone from the past, someone who's made it through something like this before. But even though it wasn't an actual letter from F. Scott Fitzgerald, I think the sentiment is still true, and we could all benefit from the way he lived his life, a relentless optimist."

The last week has seen the building of a kind of collective optimism as people place their faith in the idea that we will come out of this situation more compassionate and more aware of our commonalities. Perhaps just that we will come out of it at all.

A similar sentiment to Fitzgerald's supposed correspondence from 1920 is shared in a f scott fitzgerald letter of writing by Kitty O'Meara titled 'In the time of the Pandemic'. It begins: "And the people stayed home. And they read books, and listened, and rested, and exercised, and made art, and played games, and learned new ways of being, and were still. And they listened more deeply. Some meditated, some prayed, some danced. Some met their shadows. And the people began to think differently."

The words from the blog post on The Daily Round have been widely shared on social media; mocked up in front of calming stock images of the ocean or decorated with a line about how we will get through this. It captured the kind of optimism people need right now, and after seeing it many people were asking Reddit or Twitter who the writer was. Some believed it was deceased Irish writer Kathleen O'Meara, perhaps hoping that the wisdom imparted in the writing comes from the past rather than being written in hope for the future.

Like with the fake Fitzgerald note it has also sparked a debate about authenticity, as Italian journalist Irene Vella has claimed it is a translation of her longer version of the same poem. Whatever its origin, these words are spreading like a global daisy chain of hope, promising things will be okay. Whether they are real or not feels almost besides the point.

Farriella's Fitzgerald letter is a fable people need to believe, and his "strain of light" a mantra that, like the real Fitzgerald's "green light at the end of Daisy's dock", provides hope for the future. Perhaps it doesn't matter if it comes from 2020 rather than 1920, as author Deepak Chopkra wrote when sharing O'Meara's words: 'Source unknown. but worth sharing.'

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Источник: https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/problem-f-scott-fitzgeralds-letter-133600029.html

'Nothing Any Good Isn't Hard': F. Scott Fitzgerald's Secret to Great Writing

Culture

By Maria Popova

The Great Gatsby author's surprisingly blunt advice to would-be writers

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F. Scott Fitzgerald


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What is the secret of great writing? For David Foster Wallace, it was about fun. For Henry Miller, about discovery. Susan Sontag saw it as self-exploration. Many literary greats anchored it to their daily routines. And yet, the answer remains elusive and ever-changing.

In the fall of 1938, Radcliffe College sophomore Frances Turnbull sent her latest short story to family friend F. Scott Fitzgerald. His response, found in F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Life in Letters (UK; public library)—the same volume that gave us Fitzgerald's heartwarming fatherly advice and his brilliantly acerbic response to hate mail—echoes Anaïs Nin's insistence upon the importance of emotional investment in writing and offers some uncompromisingly honest advice on essence of great writing:

November 9, 1938

Dear Frances:

I've read the story carefully and, Frances, I'm afraid the price for doing professional work is a good deal higher than you are prepared to pay at present. You've got to sell your heart, your strongest reactions, not the little minor things that only touch you lightly, f scott fitzgerald letter little experiences that you might tell at dinner. This is especially true when you begin to write, when you have not yet developed the tricks of interesting people on paper, when you have none of the technique which it takes time to learn. When, in short, you have only your emotions to sell.

This is the experience of all writers. It was necessary for Dickens to put into Oliver Twist the child's passionate resentment at being abused and starved that had haunted his whole childhood. Ernest Hemingway's first stories 'In Our Time' went right down to the bottom of all that he had ever felt and known. In 'This Side of Paradise' I wrote about a love affair that was still bleeding as fresh as the skin wound on a haemophile.

The amateur, seeing how the professional having learned all that he'll ever learn about writing can take a trivial thing such as the most superficial reactions of three uncharacterized girls and make it witty and charming—the amateur thinks he or she can do the same. But the amateur can only realize his ability to transfer his emotions to another person by some such desperate and radical expedient as tearing your first tragic love story out of your heart and putting it on pages for people to see.

That, anyhow, is the price of admission. Whether you are prepared to pay it or, whether it coincides or conflicts with your attitude on what is 'nice' is something for you to decide. But literature, even light literature, will accept nothing less from the neophyte. It is one of those professions that wants the 'works.' You wouldn't be interested in a soldier who was only a little brave.

In the light of this, it doesn't seem worth while to analyze why this story isn't saleable but I am too fond of you to kid you along about it, as one tends to do at my age. If you ever decide to tell your stories, no one would be more interested than,

Your old friend,

F. Scott Fitzgerald

P.S. I might say that the writing is smooth and agreeable and some of the pages very apt and charming. You have talent—which is the equivalent of a soldier having the right physical qualifications for entering West Point.

Two years google news san jose, in another letter to his 15-year-old daughter Scottie upon her enrollment in high school, Fitzgerald offered more wisdom on the promise and perils of writing:

Grove Park Inn
Asheville, N.C.
October 20, 1936

Dearest Scottina:

[.]

Don't be a bit discouraged about your story not being tops. At the same time, I am not going to encourage you about it, because, after all, if you want to get into the big time, you have to have your own fences to jump and learn from experience. Nobody ever became a writer just by wanting to be one. If you have anything to say, anything you feel nobody has ever said before, you have got to feel it so desperately that you will find some way to say it that nobody has ever found before, so that the thing you have to say and the way of saying it blend as one matter—as indissolubly as if they were conceived together.

Let me preach again for one moment: I mean that what you have felt and thought will by itself invent a new style so that when people talk about style they are always a little astonished at the newness of it, because they think that is only style that they are talking about, when what they are talking about is the attempt to express a new idea with such force that it will have the originality of the thought. It is an awfully lonesome business, and as you know, I never wanted you to go into it, but if you are going into it at all I want you to go into it knowing the sort of things that took me years to learn.

[.]

Nothing any good isn't hard, and you know you have never been brought up soft, or are you quitting on me suddenly? Darling, you know I love you, and I expect you to live up absolutely to what I laid out for you in the beginning.

Scott

For more wisdom on the writing life, see Zadie Smith's 10 rules of writing, Kurt Vonnegut's 8 guidelines for a great story, David Ogilvy's 10 no-bullshit tips, Henry Miller's 11 commandments, Jack Kerouac's 30 beliefs and techniques, John Steinbeck's 6 pointers, Neil Gaiman's 8 rules, Margaret Atwood's 10 practical tips, and Susan Sontag's synthesized learnings.


This post also appears on Brain Pickings, an Atlantic partner site.

Источник: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2013/01/nothing-any-good-isnt-hard-f-scott-fitzgeralds-secret-to-great-writing/266935/

F. Scott Fitzgerald - Letters and Essays

Fitzgerald lived in an age when, despite the existence of the telephone system, hand-writing letters was still commonplace, so that he left behind an abundance of exchanges between himself and his wife, his editor, his literary agent and his friends that were published in a number of different collections after his death in 1940.


The Thoughtbook of F. Scott Fitzgerald

In case you are 14 years old, keeping a diary and harboring ambitions to literary fame, you do not need to worry if your journal entries lack f scott fitzgerald letter or substance. F. Scott Fitzgerald did not fare much better during this stage of his life as the recently published The Thoughtbook of F. Scott Fitzgerald shows. However, reading the text will also remind you that, if you do manage to become a famous author, then scholars are going to be interested in anything you ever scribbled down, including your teenage thoughts on girls and gossip. That's why we can now pry into Fitzgerald's private musings on the waxing and waning of his affections, even though they were never meant to be read by anyone but himself. After all, he kept his diary locked in a box under his bed. Perhaps that's where it should have remained, both to spare Fitzgerald any posthumous embarrassment and today's reader an hour of solid boredom.


A Short Autobiography, edited by James L. W. West III

Fitzgerald never worked on an autobiography, but throughout capital one 360 checking promo code 2020 life - from the start of his career in 1920 until shortly before his death in 1940 - he published several magazine articles and essays that reflected upon his personal life. The collection 'A Short Autobiography' arranges those texts in chronological order so that they trace the arc from the infectious self-assuredness of the successful young author (who never fails to regard himself with a sense of irony, though) to the somber reflections of a man who has outlived his prime - with the eponymous short piece 'A Short Autobiography' as the tipping point: it's nothing more than a list of different drinks consumed in different locations over the years. That literary prank aside, all of Fitzgerald's different attempts at self-portrayal are as enjoyable to read today as they presumably were to the magazine audiences of the 1920s and 1930s. While his exploration of the process of writing in 'One Hundred False Starts' may be the most elegant, most insightful text in the collection, the early accounts of Scott's marriage to Zelda in essays such as 'How to Live on $36,000 a Year' are probably the most enjoyable. It's inspiring how he presents the interaction between his wife and himself, how he showcases them as a good team that enjoys strong camaraderie rather than as the epitome of romantic love. Perhaps he had already guessed that ultimately it would be loyalty and respect that, in its own strange way, would make their relationship last.


Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda, edited by Jackson R. Bryer and Cathy W. Barks

The letters that Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald exchanged span more than two decades, from the first love letter she wrote in 1918 to his final note from December 19, 1940. Nevertheless, their correspondence does not tell a continuous story, but one that is broken into two distinct parts, simply because Scott and Zelda only communicated in writing when they were apart, i.e. during their courtship and later when Zelda was hospitalized. There may be nothing special about these letters, except that they were f scott fitzgerald letter by two gifted writers. Yet, reading them in chronologial order makes the exuberance of their early days as well as the hardships they had to face during their final years come to life more vividly than the best biography could. Besides, since more of Zelda's than of Scott's letters have survived, her voice comes through loud and clear, so that readers who have turned to the collection because of their interest in Scott (and that is likely to be the majority) cannot help but acknowledge that Zelda was not just the wife of a famous author, but an equal part in their marriage and that their love survived life because they both felt more at home with each other than with anyone else.


The Crack-Up, edited by Edmund Wilson

The Crack-Up is a collection of essays that Fitzgerald published as he reached his nadir: His latest novel Tender is the Night had been a critical and financial failure, his wife had been institutionalized and the magazine short story market had dried up: ".until you realize with finality that in some regard you will never be as good a man again."


Wir waren furchtbar gute Schauspieler

On May 28, 1933, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald met in the presence of her doctor Thomas Rennie and a stenographer: Scott had asked for a typescript of the conversation to document the state of affairs between his wife and himself. Based on this f scott fitzgerald letter, their conversation has now been reenacted as an 109 minute audiobook (which is only available in German at this point) that will make anyone who is reasonably happily married grateful for not having sunk to the level of distrust and antipathy that seems to have ruled the relationship between Scott and Zelda during this period. Yet, at the same time, one cannot help but identfy with both of them, especially with how Zelda fights to maintain her own separate identity, but also with Scott's anger at what he perceives as her ungratefulness. In general, he comes across as a broken man at age 36, who is clinging to the emblem's of his worldly success, as he seems to have lost everything else he could have held on to. Listening to Scott and Zelda fighting is a painful reminder how completely lives can unravel, not by a single tragic twist of fate, but gradually, as a matter of course, abetted by too many wrong decisions, each of them insignificant in isolation, but devastating in their cumulative effect.


A Life in Letters: A New Collection, edited and annotated by Matthew J. Bruccoli

This correspondence - edited by eminent Fitzgerald scholar Bruccoli - offers an accessible self-portrait of the writer. Early letters to his editor, Maxwell Perkins, and friends, Edmund Wilson and Ernest Hemingway, document Fitzgerald's devotion to craft, exemplified by The Great Gatsby, as well as the novelist's ever-present financial problems.


Dear Scott/Dear Max: The Fitzgerald-Perkins Correspondence, edited by Jackson R. Bryer

Maxwell Perkins was a well-known editor at literary institution Scribner's. He was Fitzgerald's editor, mentor and creditor. Their correspondence offers not only a lot of literary gossip, but also rare insights into Fitzgerald's devotion to his craft.


As Ever, Scott Fitz-, edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli

A collection of letters between Fitzgerald and his literary agent Harold Ober. Their correspondence ranges from 1919 to 1940.




F. Scott Fitzgerald - An Annotated Bibliography

Источник: https://scott-fitzgerald.com/html/fitzgerald_essays.html
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Day 156 - A Letter From F Scott Fitzgerald from the 1920s

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