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merchants national bank building mobile al

The story former Merchants National Bank building was the first skyscraper built on the Gulf Coast, according to Stephen McNair of. Until its closing in , the bank remained one of the most solvent in the country and time and again survived national panics and banking. The Mobile County Commission met in regular session in the Government Plaza Auditorium, in the City of Mobile, Alabama, on Monday, June 11,

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October 9, 1987 - Merchants National Bank

After the end of World War II, Battleship USS ALABAMA and hundreds of warships used to win the war were deemed essentially useless in the newly-created peace of the mid to late s. In a cost-cutting move, the United States Government decommissioned ALABAMA on January 9, and left her at her berth in Bremerton, Washington, where she and other vessels would await their call back to defend their nation. But, for the highly decorated battleship and most of those with her, that call never came. Other vessels were scrapped, dismantled for their steel and other parts, since they were no longer of use to the peace-keeping efforts of the United States.

On the early morning of May 1, over coffee at breakfast, Jimmie Morris, then an employee of the Tourist & Visitors Department of the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce, noticed a small story in the Mobile Register newspaper. The Associated Press was reporting that the South Dakota class of battleships would be scrapped. This meant SOUTH DAKOTA (BB), INDIANA (BB), MASSACHUSETTS (BB), and ALABAMA (BB) would be destroyed.

When Morris got to work, he found Stephens Croom, then chairman of the Chamber’s Committee for Preservation of Historic Landmarks, already eager to join the fight to save Battleship ALABAMA. They knew BB could be preserved “as is” and presented as a memorial to all those Alabama citizens, men and women alike, who served and fought here and abroad in World War II. He enlisted Henri Aldridge, an International Paper Company attorney, and sought the opinions of others located statewide. Quickly, the hastily gathered group contacted the Governor.

Alabama Governor John Patterson, upon learning that the World War II era South Dakota Class Battleship USS ALABAMA was a candidate for scrapping by the Navy, was in complete agreement. An immediate petition was sent to the Alabama State Legislature, which, fortunately, was in session at the time, and a joint resolution was quickly passed. Governor Patterson appointed a small fact-finding committee, chaired by Aldridge, to assess the feasibility of saving the ship from the scrapper’s torches, bringing her to Alabama’s deep water port of Mobile, and establishing her as the centerpiece of a memorial park. Similar ventures had been successfully undertaken involving the Battleships NORTH CAROLINA (BB) and USS TEXAS (BB), both relocated to their home states, and both groups were eager to assist the fledgling ALABAMA effort.

The group reported to newly-elected Governor George C. Wallace that the venture was feasible, and recommended enthusiastically that the Governor undertake the project. Later to be acclaimed for notoriety of a different sort, Wallace was himself no stranger to America’s efforts in World War II. After overseas combat service in the Army Air Corps, he was keenly aware of the memorial value of ALABAMA for his fellow veterans. The Governor met with representatives from regions bank blountstown fl phone number Alabama counties in Montgomery in summerand charged them to “bring the ALABAMA home!”

Negotiations with the Department of the Navy revealed the enthusiasm of the national government to transfer title of ALABAMA to the State. Therefore, Governor Wallace signed passed legislation into law, and under original Senate Bill (now found in the ALABAMA Code, Section through ) on September 12,the USS ALABAMA Battleship Commission was established as a state agency to acquire, transport, berth, renovate, maintain, and establish the Battleship USS ALABAMA as a memorial to all those Alabamians who had served so valiantly in WWII and Korea. The law was subsequently modified to make USS ALABAMA Battleship Memorial Park a memorial honoring those who served in all armed conflicts of the United States.

Even though Act #, crafted by then State Representative Robert Edington of Mobile, created the Battleship Commission, one fact did not escape the attention of the original Commissioners. The legislation gave the group zero money to bring the battleship to Alabama, and no money to fund any construction and/or operating expenses once the WWII hero arrived key bank canastota ny hours Mobile. Public fundraising was the only answer, and over one million little heroes and heroines raised their hands to save the aging warship. Alabama’s school children heard the call, and donated sprint billing account number  $, to aid the cause, receiving a pass good for free admission as long as Governor Wallace was in office.

The Commission proceeded to organize a statewide campaign, chaired by Frank Samford of Birmingham. Samford, as Chairman of Liberty National Life Insurance Company, rallied the state’s life insurance agents and underwriters, and, as they went throughout the state on their insurance debit routes collecting monthly policy premiums, they also collected thousands of dollars from Alabama’s citizens for the statewide grassroots fundraising effort.

A professional fundraising company assisted in the corporate efforts, and, in the spring ofin a relatively short span of less than six months, approximately $was raised, enough to get the ship underway from the State of Washington. The Under-Secretary of the Navy then executed a transfer document with the State of Alabama, represented by the Commission. It authorized transfer of Battleship USS ALABAMA to the state “as is, were is”, with no additional cost to the Federal Government. The document also allowed the Navy to annually inspect the vessel as ALABAMA must be kept in shipshape fighting trim, since a provision was that should the Navy ever need her, they reserved the right to come take BB, and press her back into active duty status. That call never came, but ALABAMA has still served her country well, in addition to serving as a memorial, since that time.

In the early s, the Navy decided to renovate the IOWA class of battleships, the only four ships newer than ALABAMA. Since the IOWA class and three of the four memorial battleships then on display then were all built within months of each other, Battleships NORTH CAROLINA (BB), MASSACHUSETTS (BB), and ALABAMA (BB) supplied over  $ million worth of irreplaceable and no longer available parts, primarily engine room parts, to “modernize” IOWA (BB), NEW JERSEY (BB), MISSOURI (BB), and WISCONSIN (BB).

Although $, in was a lot of money, it fell short of the intended one million dollar goal needed for the project, so three Mobile banks, Merchants National Bank, First National Bank of Mobile, and American National Bank, loaned the Commission the balance on faith, since the Commission had no collateral the banks could use. Of those banks, Merchants National merged with American National, became First Alabama Bank, and is now Regions Bank. First National became AmSouth, which later merged with Regions, continued to assist the Commission over the years and helped see the Park over lean times until sufficient https www suntrust online banking could be built up by the Commission to carry daily operating expenses year-round.

After ALABAMA reached Mobile on 14 Septemberand the channel for her berth was completed in late September, the battleship was finally pulled into position. A hand-picked crew, consisting of mainly retired Navy men, began work on the weary lady almost right away, working seven days a week. She looked rough in those days, and literally acres of steel had to be sandblasted, primed, and painted. Below decks spaces had to be cleaned and made safe for visitors unaccustomed to moving around ships. Changes in the ship were evident daily, and in less than 4 months, BB, longer than two football fields, was ready to be opened for visitors.

Over two thousand people were on hand Saturday, January 9, to see Governor Wallace officially open USS ALABAMA Battleship Memorial Park. The date was significant since it was eighteen years to the day since ALABAMA had been “put into mothballs” at her decommissioning. The park didn’t look like its present appearance, since over 75 acres of bright white sand south of the U.S. Highways 90/98 Causeway, which had been dredged out of Mobile Bay to make the Park, lay to the west of the battleship, with the Mobile skyline only a few miles away.

In the sun of that cold Mobile winter day, Battleship USS ALABAMA began a new life as a perpetual memorial to all Alabamians, and all Americans, who risked and gave all for their beloved United States of America.

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Pictures and Illustrations.

ills

Old Fort in As seen from the foot of Walnut Street, between Fourth and Broadway. The south half is where site of the Southern Hotel now stands.

St. Louis as Seen from the Illinois Side,

Map of St. Louis as Laid Out in This Map is copied from the original map drawn by Colonel AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU, who was at the founding of the city, inand first surveyed the land. The map was drawn in conformity to an order from the Department, at Washington.

This old map represents the town of St. Louis, nearly as it was laid out in Its breadth from the Mississippi, to the West, was to the line of the Rue de Grange (now Third street), and its length was some few blocks shorter than the map represents. The wall of fortifications was completed in The letters have the following significations:
A THE TOWER
B HALF MOONS
C BASTIONS
D GATES
E GOVERNMENT HOUSE
F THE CHURCH
G THE MARKET
H THE LITTLE RIVER
I PRIVATE TRACTS OF LAND.

The names of the streets that were given at the laying out the town were MAIN STREET, CHURCH STREET, BARN STREET, NO MAIN STREET, SECOND STREET, THIRD STREET, RUNNING NORTH AND SOUTH.

TOWER STREET, MARKET STREET, MISSOURI STREET, KICKAPOO STREET, NOW ARE WALNUT STREET, MARKET STREET, CHESNUT STREET, PINE STREET, RUNNING EAST AND WEST.

The roads leading from the gates were what are now known as Carondelet Avenue (then the well known Vide Poche Road); the Manchester Road, the St. Charles Road, with its branches; and a road which led towards were Bremen now is. What looks like blocks of wood represents fields in cultivation, and the dots show timber. The mark of the compass is only given for the purpose of guiding the reader as to the cardinal points. It must be borne in mind that in some of the localities the direction of the streets has been slightly altered, which may account for some apparent discrepancies which may appear to subsist between the map and the main narrative as the locality of the old fortifications.

Plat of the Town, With location of all the houses (March 10, ) as shown by black dots.

Map of St. Louis, The circles are a mile apart. The great bulk of the population now lies within the three mile circle, but the growth is towards the region of Forest Park. Nearly all the streets shown are Boulevards. City embraces square miles or 39, acres. Seventeen miles from north to south, and from river to western limits, and has river frontage.

1 CARONDELET PARK
2 LACLEDE PARK
3 GRAVOIS PARK
4 BENTON PARK
5 LYON PARK
6 COMPTON HILL RESERVOIR
7 LAFAYETTE PARK
8 NEW UNION DEPOT
9 NEW CITY HALL
10 GAMBLE PARK
11 CARR SQUARE
12 JACKSON PLACE
13 HYDE PARK
14 ST. LOUIS PLACE
15 SOUTH ST. LOUIS SQUARE
16 WATER WORKS

Early Settlers. 1. Aug. Chouteau. 2. P. Chouteau, Jr. 3. Chas. P. Chouteau. 4. Peter B. Lindell. 5. John G. Lindell. 6. Anton Chenie. 7. John O'Fallon. 8. Edgar Ames. 9. Wm. Christy. Robt. Campbell. Old Chouteau Mansion.

Autographs of Distinguished Men in the Early History of St. Louis.

Chouteau Pond. Now occupied by the Samuel Cupples' Real Estate premises, on Seventh, between Spruce and Poplar Streets.

Chouteau Mansion after the Renovation in

Old Market House, (Stone). Built on the Public Square (Block 7.) It was completed Sept. 1st., Sixty-four feet long by merchants national bank building mobile al feet wide, with 12 stalls, which rented from $10 to $30 per annum. Clerk of the market received $ per year.

Old Jail.

Stone Tower,

Old Green Tree House.

Fire Dep.

R. R. Church

Old Post Office.

Old Market and Levee,

Gov. Alexander McNair and His Residence. First Governor of Missouri, inaugurated Sept. 18,

Missouri Republican Only Paper Published Merchants national bank building mobile al of Mississippi River.

Old Olympic Theatre.

Log Cabin,

Old Gratiot St. Prison.

Palace Excursion Steamer, Grand Republic. Licensed to carry 3, persons.

Eads Bridge. Cost $10, Capt. James B. Eads, Chief Engineer. It was five years in building, and is 6, feet long and 54 feet wide. The central arch is feet, the other two feet. The center span is 55 feet above water. Completed July 4,

Merchant's Bridge. Foot of Ferry Street, North St. Louis, opened March 18,and cost $3,

Grand Avenue Bridge.

New Depot. Market, Eighteenth, Twentieth and Clark avenue; cost $1, Will be the finest in the country.

New City Hall. Architect, Geo. R. Mann. Cost $1, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Market and Clark Avenue. (Formerly Washington Square.) Covers six acres of ground, merchants national bank building mobile al stories, rooms; council chamber will cover 4, square feet. At the main entrance a statue of Gen. Sherman, costing $50,

Four Courts and Jail. Clark Avenue, Eleventh, Twelfth and Spruce Streets. Costs of building and site was about $1,

Interior of Jail.

Armory Hall.

Union Market.

Ruins of Old Court House. First Court House in St. Louis, northwest corner Third and Plum Streets. Erected in Torn down

Court House. Fourth, Broadway, Chestnut and Market.

Government House, Southeast corner Main and Walnut, was opened as a public house in by Maj. Wm. Christy, and was patronized by the best class of society. Size of the house 25 by 40 feet, containing four rooms.

Custom House and Post Office. Olive, Locust, Eighth and Ninth Streets. Cost $8, Eleven years in building, and is one of the finest in the country. J. B. Harlow, Postmaster, appointed Feb. 3,

Old Merchants' Exchange. On the Levee During Flood of

Old Merchants' Exchange. On Main between Walnut and Market. — Still standing.

Merchants' Exchange. Pine and Chestnut Streets. Cost $2, Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary. members Jan.,

Grand Hall, Merchants' Exchange.

Presidents of the Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis. Copyright Securedby A. C. Shewey. Scholten, Photographer. 1. One main financial greensboro nc J. Moore. 2. Geo. Partridge. 3. Thos. Richeson. 4. Barton Able. 5. E. O. Stanton. 6. C. L. Tucker. 7. John T. Roe. 8. Geo. P. Plant. 9. Wm. J. Lewis. Gerard B. Allen. R. P. Tansey. Wm. H. Scudder. Web. M. Sumuel. D. P. Rowland. Nathan Cole.

Presidents of the Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis. Copyright Securedby A. C. Shewey. Scholten, Photographer. John A. Schuder. Geo. Bain. John Wahl. Alex W. Smith Michael McEnnis. Chas. E. Slayback. J. C. Ewald. D. R. Francis Henry C. Haarstick. S. W. Cobb. Frank Gaiennie. Chas. F. Orthwein. Chas. A. Cox. John W. Kauffman. Marcus Bernheimer.

St. Louis Cotton Exchange. Walmart eye center mexico mo and Walnut Streets. James H. Allen, President. Henry W. Young, Secretary and Treasurer.

St. Louis Exposition and Music Hall. Olive, St. Charles, Thirteenth and Fourteenth Streets. Cost $,; length, feet; width, feet; height, feet; containssquare feet; opened inand has three grand entrances. Seating capacity of Music Hall 4,; standing room for 2, Frank Gaienne, Secretary. J. B. Legg, Architect.

Music Hall. — Seating Capacity 4,

Bennett's Mansion House Hotel, (Brick.) Built by Gen'l Wm. Rector, U. S. Surveyor General for Merchants national bank building mobile al and Missouri, for his office and residence, at the northeast corner of Third and Vine. Opened as Bennett's Hotel in

Missouri Hotel, (Stone). Southwest corner of Main and Oak, (now Morgan.) Built by Thos. Brady, ; opened by David Massey, First Legistlature sat in it Sept. 18,at which Alexander McNair was inaugurated first Governor of Missouri.

1. Barnum's Old City Hotel.

2. Old Jewish Synagogue, Benaiel, Southeast cor. Sixth and Cerre Streets.

3. Old Centenary Methodist Episcopal Church, South cor. Pine and Fifth Streets.

4. Old Planter's House.

5. Old St. Nicholas.

New Hotel. Copyright securedby A. C. Shewey. Henry G. Isaacs, Architect. Cost $1, Fourth, Chestnut and Pine Streets. Allied savings bank contact number stories; Terra Cotta and Brick, by feet; balcony over grand entrance, feet long; grand entrance 46 feet wide, 76 feet long; rotunda 46 by 76 feet; grand dining-room 45 by 76 feet; apartments.

Southern Hotel. Fourth, Broadway, Walnut and Elm Streets; rooms. Burned April 11, ; rebuilt and opened May 11,and is now one of the most thoroughly fireproof hotels in the world. Henry C. Lewis, Manager.

Southern Hotel, Walnut St. Entrance.

Southern Hotel Rotunda. The length from Walnut to Elm Streets is feet and 60 feet wide; the cross hall is feet long and 26 feet wide. One of the finest hotel rotunda's in the country.

Lindell Hotel. Washington Avenue, Sixth and Seventh Streets. Organized ; destroyed by fire March, ; rebuilt Sept. 28, ; apartments. The Rotunda is feet long by 41 feet wide.

Hotel Beers. Olive Street and Grand Avenue. C. C. Hellmers, Architect.

St. James Hotel. Broadway and Walnut Street.

Laclede Merchants national bank building mobile al. Sixth and Chestnut Streets.

Grand Opera House. Diagram First Floor.

Grand Opera House. Market Street, Seats 2, Opened May 10, ; destroyed by fire Nov. 23,and immediately rebuilt; size 79 by feet. Geo. McManus, Business Manager.

Olympic Theatre. Dress Circle and Parquet.

Olympic Theatre. South Broadway. Seats 2, Pat Short, Store Manager.

Equitable Building. Northwest cor. Sixth and Locust Streets. Gen. Office Missouri Pacific Ry., H. C. Townsend, Gen. Pass. and Ticket Agt. Missouri Safe Deposit Co., Paschall Carr, Treas.

Bank Commerce Building. Northeast cor. Olive and Broadway. Bank Commerce, J. C. Van Blarcum, Cashier. Capital, $3,

American Central Insurance Company's Building. American Fire Insurance Co., Geo. T. Cram, President; Chas. Christensen, Secretary.

St. Louis Republic. Southeast cor. Third and Chestnut Streets.

Globe-Democrat Building. Southwest cor. Sixth and Pine Streets. Cost ,; eight stories. General offices of Burlington Route. Isaac Taylor, Architect.

Post-Dispatch. Olive Street. Jos. Pulitzer, President; W. L. Davis, Vice-President; D. W. Woods, Secretary and Business Manager.

Westliche Post. Southwest cor. Market and Broadway.

Anzeiger des Westens. 13 to 15 North Third Street.

Odd Fellows Building. Southeast cor. Ninth and Olive Streets. Eight stories. Cost $, General offices of Waters' Pierce Oil Co., Hydraulic Press Brick Co., National Bank of the Republic, John C. Russell, Cashier. Henry G. Isaac, Architect.

Olive Street.

Boatmens' Bank Building. Arch'ts, T. B. Annan & Sons. Cost $, Cor. Washington Ave. and Fourth St. Boatmen's Bank, capital $2, Wm. H. Thomson, Cashier. A. F. Shapleigh Hardware Co. occupy five stories. Oldest representative house in the city; founded in They employ on an average persons. A. F. Shapleigh, President; Frank Shapleigh, Vice-President; A. L. Shapleigh, Secretary.

Mercantile Club. Southwest cor. Seventh and Locust Streets. The membership is composed entirely of merchants and those in mercantile pursuits. Membershipdues $50 per annum. Open only to members; strangers are welcome. Isaac Taylor, Architect.

Capt. Samuel J. Boyd, 1st Dist. Capt. Matthew Kiely, 4th Dist. Capt. Peter Joyce, 3rd Dist. Asst. Chief Patrick Reedy. Chief Lawrence Harrigan. Capt. Anton Huebler, 2nd Dist. Capt. John W. Campbell, 5th Dist. Capt. Wm. Young, Central Dist. Capt. Wm. O. Keeble, 6th Dist.

Commercial Building. Southeast cor. Sixth and Olive Streets. Cost $, Eight stories. Eugene Jaccard Jewelry Co. General Office Wabash Railroad, F. Chandler, General Passenger and Ticket Agent.

Roe Building. Southwest cor. Broadway and Pine Street. Gen'l Office St. Louis and San Francisco Ry., D. Wishart, Gen'l Pass. Agt. Browning, King & Co., Clothiers, D. C. Young, Manager.

Laclede Building. L. Cass Miller, Architect. Cost $, Southwest cor. Fourth and Olive Streets. Gen'l Office of Cairo Short Line, Geo. E. Lary, Gen'l Pass. Agt. Laclede National Bank, James B. True, Cashier. Capital $1,

Turner Building. Peabody, Stearns & Furber Architects. North Eighth Street.

The Oriel — Sixth and Locust Streets. Owned by the Oriel Realty and Construction Co. L. B. Legg, President. E. W. Banister, Secretary. Chemical National Bank, C. S. Warner, Cashier. Capital $,

Houser Building. Chas. K. Ramsey, Architect. Northwest cor. Broadway and Chestnut Street. Gen'l Office Vandalia Line, E. A. Ford, Gen'l Pass. Agt. Gen'l Office Missouri, Kansas and Texas Ry., J. Waldo, Pres. & Traf. Manager.

Wainwright Building. Seventh and Chestnut Streets.

Security Building. Peabody, Stearns & Furber, Architects. Cost $1, Southwest cor. Fourth and Locust Streets.

Rialto Building. Isaac Taylor, Architect. Cost $, Fourth and Olive Street — (in course of erection.) Ninety feet front on Fourth Street, eighty-three feet on Olive Street. Fourth National Bank has leased the corner for twenty years. Hammett, Anderson-Wade Real Estate Co., Agents. Stockholders: B. F. Hammett, Aug. Gehner, L. E. Anderson, Wm. F. Nolker, Festus J. Wade.

Columbia Building. Isaac Taylor, Architect. Cost $, Cor. Eighth and Locust Streets — (in course of erection.) Owned by Hammett-Anderson-Wade Real Estate Company. First floor will be occupied by this firm.

Interstate Investment Company Building. Isaac Taylor, Architect. Northwest cor. Ninth and Washington Avenue. Rutledge & Horton, Agents.

New Public Library Building. Isaac Taylor, Architect. Northwest cor. Ninth and Locust Sts. This is one of the finest Library buildings in the United States, and contains 80, volumes. F. M. Crunden, Librarian.

Mercantile Library. Henry G. Isaac, Architect. Southwest cor. Broadway and Locust St. 80, volumes. Horace Kephart, Librarian. Lower floors occupied by the Scruggs, Vandevoort & Barney Dry Goods Establishment.

Fire Place, Mercantile Library.

Reading Room, Mercantile Library.

Washington Avenue. Looking west from Broadway.

First Brick Church and College,on Second Street.

Missouri Medical College. Joseph N. McDowell, Dean of Faculty. Christian Brothers' School. Brother Patrick, President.

Concordia College. Carondelet Road, south of the Arsenal. Rev. C. T. W. Walther, President. Professor Seifert. Professor Sachse, Treasurer.

Washington University. Corner of Washington Avenue and 17th Street. Wm. G. Eliot, President. Wayman Crow, Vice-President. S. A. Ranlett, Treas. and Sec. Samuel Treat, Cor. Sec.

St. Louis University. 9th Street corner of Washington Avenue. F. Coosemans, S. J. President.

Washington University. (College and Polytechnic Departments). Cor. 17th Street and Washington Avenue. Washington University was founded in It offers courses in Arts, Science, Medicine, Dentistry and Law. Its three Preparatory Schools are the Smith Academy, Manual Training School and Mary Institute. The total number of students and scholars in the University isand the number of instructors is W. S. Chaplin, Chancellor.

Mary Institute. (Washington University.) Cor. Beaumont and Locust Streets. Founded in It accomodates girls, and fits them for any college. E. H. Sears, Principal.

Smith Academy. (Washington University.) Cor. Nineteenth Street and Washington Avenue. Smith Academy was founded in It prepares boys for admission to any College or Scientific School. It accommodates boys. J. W. Fairbanks, Principal.

Manual Training School. (Washington University.) Cor. Eighteenth Street and Washington Avenue. The Manual School was founded in This was the first Manual Training School established in the United States. It accommodates pupils, and its course is three years long. Half of the time is devoted to manual training, and the other to school work. C. M. Woodward, Director.

Art Museum and School of Fine Arts. (Washington University.) Lucas Place and Nineteenth Street. Founded in Has large Art Collections, which are open to the public, and maintains day and evening schools in Drawing, Painting and Modeling. H. C. Ives, Director.

Interior Corner, Museum of Fine Arts.

St. Louis University. Grand Avenue and Pine Street. The University dates fromand was incorporated in It has 26 Professors and Instructors; 56 Students in the Philosophical Department; in the Classical; in the Commercial, and 36 in the Preparatory. Rev. Joseph Grammelsman, S. J., Pres.; Rev. John E. Kennedy, S. J., Sec.

Christian Brothers' College. King's Highway and Easton Avenue. This is a celebrated Catholic School, and has become one of the leading institutions of St. Louis. In the Brothers located in St. Louis on Cerre and EighthStreets. The present grounds contain 32 acres The building has a frontage of feet; a depth of feet, and an elevation of feet. The College usually has from to Students enrolled.

Concordia Theological Seminary. Jefferson Avenue and Winnebago Street. Founded in The new building completedcosting $, It has a frontage of feet by feet; eight large Halls; Library farmers grain of central illinois Reading Rooms; ninety smaller rooms; accommodates Students. The faculty consists of five Professors of Theology. Rev. Francis Peiper, President.

Forest Park University. (For Women.) J. G. Cairns, Architect. Clayton Road near Forest Park. Founded in Forest Park College, College of Music, School of Art and Elocution.

Fourth Street from Washington Avenue Looking South.

Chestnut St. from Ninth St. Looking East

Peabody School.

Old High School. Fifteenth and Olive Streets.

New Central High School. Furlong & Brown, Architects. Cost $, Grand Avenue, cor. Finney Avenue. Height of building feet; length, feet; depth, feet, and has 61 rooms.

Beaugenou House, Southwest cor. Main and Almond Street (now Valentine.) Was one of the first built in St. Louis, and in which the first marriage on record in the archives of St. Louis, April 20, About it was occupied by Maj. Mackey Wherry, the first Town Register.

Col. Henry Gratiot's Country Residence, (Log.) King's Highway, five miles from Town.

Thomas F. Riddick's Residence, (Brick.) He came to St. Louis in He filled, at various times public offices, such as: Assessor, Clerk Common Pleas Court, Deputy Recorder of Land Titles, Secretary Board of Land Commissioners, Justice of Peace and Second President of the Old Missouri Bank.

Wm. C. Carr's Residence (Brick.) Southeast cor. Main and Spruce Streets. In Judge Carr built the fifth brick house in St. Louis, and the first one for a dwelling exclusively. Mr. Carr played a prominant part in the political and social affairs of the place.

Maj. Wm. Christy's Residence, (Stone.) Then two miles in the coutry (now cor. Monroe and Second Streets.) It was a fine house in its day.

John P. Cabanne's Country Homestead, (Brick.) King's Highway, in survey No. This old "Cabanne Mansion" was the first brick house built outside of the old daisy red ryder bb gun parts diagram, consequently the "Pioneer Brick."

Gen. Grant's Old Home. St. Louis County, Mo. Built by the General from logs cut and hewn by himself.

John W. Kauffman's Residence. James Stewart & Co., Architects. King's Highway and Lindell Avenue.

A. G. Cochran's Residence. James Stewart & Co., Architects. Westmoreland Place.

Dr. Pinckney French's Residence. J. B. Legg, Architect. Delmar Avenue near Vandeventer Avenue.

C. A. Wickham's Residence. J. B. Legg, Architect. Taylor and McPherson Avenues.

Geo. D. Barnard's Residence. Vandeventer Place.

Interior of Old Cathedral.

Old Cathedral. Walnut, bet. Second and Third Streets. The most noted in St. Louis, being one of the most cherished landmarks in the city. Cornerstone was laid Aug. 1,and on Oct. 26, the edifice was consecrated. It is feet long and 84 feet wide. The interior of the old church is especially beautiful.

First Methodist Episcopal Church South. Corner of 8th Street and Washington Avenue.

St. Paul's Episcopal Church. Corner of 17th and Olive Streets. Rev. R. E. Terry, Rector.

Church of the Messiah (Unitarian). Olive Street, corner of 9th Street.

First Congregation Church.

Second Baptist Church. Corner of 6th and Locust Streets.

Grand Ave. Presbyterian Church. Grand Avenue, near Washington Avenue. Rev. John F. Cannon, Pastor.

Third Baptist Church. Isaac Taylor, Architect. Grand Avenue, cor. Washington Avenue. Rev. J. P. Greene, D. D., Pastor.

Church of the Holy Communion. Henry G. Isaac, Architect. Leffingwell, cor. Washington Avenue. Rev. P. J. Robert, Rector.

Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Chas. E. Illsley, Architect. Southwest cor. Lucas and Channing Avenues. Rev. B. P. Fullerton, Pastor.

Mt. Cabanne Christian Church. Rev. O. A. Bartholomew, Architect. Rev. O. A. Bartholomew, Pastor.

Pilgrim Congregational Church. Washington and Ewing Avenues. Rev. Henry A. Stimson, Pastor.

Second Baptist Church. Beaumont cor. Locust. Rev. James W. Ford, D.D., Pastor.

Centenary M. E. Church.

First Presbyterian Church.

Church of the Annunciation.

Temple of Shaare Emeth.

St. Louis Cathedral, Founded

Church of the Messiah.

Apse of Christ's Church. Thirteenth and Locust Streets.

First Presbyterian Church, St. Louis Mo. J. G. Cairns, Architect.

Residence of Jos. V. Lucus Esq., Lindell Av., J. G. Cairns Archt., St. Louis Mo.

German Protestant Orphans' Home.

Insane Asylum.

Masonic Home of Missouri. S. C. Bunn, Secretary; Dr. M. Leftwich, Superintendent.

St. Louis Children's Hospital.

Good Samaritan Hospital.

Augusta Free Hospital for Children, Channing Avenue and School Street.

Marquette Club, Grand Avenue and Pine Street.

Home for the Aged and Infirm Israelites.

City Hospital, Lafayette Avenue and Linn Street.

St. Louis Mullanphy Hospital, Bacon and Montgomery Streets.

St. Luke's Hospital. Washington Avenue and Nineteenth Street.

Alexian Brothers' Insane Asylum. South Broadway.

Ursuline Convent. Twelfth, bet. Russell and Ann Avenues. Mother Seraphine, Superior.

Insane Asylum of the Sisters of St. Vincent de Paul. Geo. R. Mann, Architect. St. Charles Rock Road and Wabash Railroad. In care of Sisters of Charity. It has an area of oversquare feet; over rooms, and can care for over patients.

Broadway. Looking north from Washington Avenue.

Bell Telephone Building. Southeast cor. Tenth and Olive Streets. General Office Bell Telephone Co. Shepley Routan & Cooledge, Architects.

Missouri Crematory Association. O. J. Wilhelmi, Architect. Capital $20, Arsenal Street and Sublette Avenue. Was founded July, Cremations up to April,Company's fee is $25, per cremation; urns, $5, and upwards. O. J. Wilhelmi, Secretary and Treasurer.

Jockey Club, Fair Grounds. Cost $50, It is unique and picturesque in its architecture; elegantly furnished. Members are only entitled to its privileges; open all the year round for their benefit.

Grand Stand, Fair Grounds. The Grand Stand is acknowledged the finest architecturally, and the largest on any track. The seating capacity is very great and commands a magnificent view of the track.

Amphitheatre — Fair Grounds. Capacity forpersons.

New Club House, Grand Stand, Betting Stand and Judges Stand of the St. Louis Fair Horse Department.

Scene in Fair Grounds.

Vandeventer Place. From North Grand Avenue to Vandeventer Avenue.

Music Stand, Lafayette Park. Barnett & Haynes, Architects.

Willow Pond, Shaw's Garden.

Lindell Boulevard. From Channing Avenue to King's Highway. feet wide.

Columbus Statue. Tower Grove Park.

Frank P. Blair Statue. Forest Park.

Shakespeare Statue. Tower Grove Park.

Statue of Victory, Shaw's Garden. Barnett & Haynes, Architects.

Mausoleum, Shaw's Garden. Barnett & Haynes, Architects.

Lotus Pond, Shaw's Garden.

A Portion of the Parterre, Shaw's Garden. Barnett & Haynes, Architects.

St. Louis From Court House Dome.

Jefferson Barracks.

Broadway. Looking north from Olive Street.

Illumination. Twelfth Street. During Fall Festivities, looking south from Olive Street.

Illumination. Twelfth Street. During Fall Festivities, looking north from Olive Street.

Grant's Monument and Illumination. Twelfth Street. During Fall Festivites, looking south from Washington Avenue.

Goddess of Liberty and Illumination. Twelfth Street. During Fall Festivities, looking north from Chestnut Street.

Winter Scene in Lafayette Park.

Office Meyer Bros. Drug Co.

Meyer Bros. Drug Co. Fourth Street, Broadway and Clark Avenue. Largest drug house in the world by feet.feet flooring or nearly four acres. Five stores and basement.

Ground Floor Plan of Samuel Cupples' Real Estate Premises. The largest building of the kind in the world, showing the location of the different wholesale houses occupying it, and showing the many railroad tracks entering it.

Samuel Cupples' Real Estate Co.'s Building. Eames & Young, Architects. Cost $1, Seventh, Poplar and Spruce Streets. Occupied by the Samuel Cupples' Woodenware Co. (the largest in the world), and the wholesale grocery houses of Goddard Peck & Co., E. C. Scudder & Co., Alkire Grocer Co., Adam Roth Grocery Co., Bauer Grocer Co., Greeley Burnham Grocer Co., and Warehouse No. 9 of Simmons Hardware Co.

Office of Samuel Cupples' Woodenware Co. Seventh and Spruce Streets.

Simmons Hardware Co. Cor. Ninth Street and Washington Avenue. Largest in the world. Above cut represents their Washington Avenue building, containing an area of 1, square feet. In addition they chase bank customer support email warehouses containingsquare feet.

Geo. D. Barnard & Co., Washington Ave

The New Famous Building. Cor. Broadway and Morgan Street. Covering a floor space of oversquare feet. The largest general outfitters for man and womankind in the west. Make it a rule to visit the Famous when you come to St. Louis.

Barr's Dry Goods Establishment. Has a frontage of feet on Sixth Street, and feet each on Locust and Olive Streets; five floors; area of ,00 square feet or nearly four acres, and employ persons.

Rice, Stix Washington Avenue and Tenth Street.

Wear-Boogher Dry Goods Co. St. Charles, southwest cor. Sixth Street.

Catlin Tobacco Co. Chestnut Street, southeast cor. Thirteenth Street.

Whitman's Agricultural Co. Eighth and Clark Avenue. Chas. E. Whitman, President; H. S. Whitman, Secretary.

B. Nugent & Bro. Dry Goods Establishment. Washington Avenue and Broadway.

St. Louis Electric Light and Power Co. Wire House on Roof; Main Buildings, Store Room (4th floor); Lighning Harvesters, Test Rack and 4th Floor; Dynamo Room, 3rd Floor; Arc Switch Board, Dynamo Room; Shafting Room, 2nd Floor; Shafting Room, 2nd Floor; Boiler House, 3rd Floor; Boiler House, Coal Pumps, 2nd Floor; Engine Room; Engine Room. Gen'l Offices North Fourth Street. The largest in the world. James Campbell, President; J. G. Kelley, Secretary; J. I. Ayer, Manager.

Building of J. A. Monks, 4th and Elm, St. Louis. J. G. Cairns, Archt.

Haydock Bros., Carriage Manufacturers. Papin and Fourteenth Streets.

Fourth St. Looking North.

Olive St. Looking West

Evans Office, Market Street. L. J. Howard, President; E. T. Howard, Secretary.

Faust's Restaurant and Fulton Market. St. Louis, Mo.

Ely Washington Avenue, Eighth and St. Charles Streets. D. D. Walker, President; W. H. Walker, Vice-President.

Mermod-Jaccard Building. Cor. Broadway and Locust Street. Mermod. Jaccard Jewelry Co. The largest of its kind in the country.

St. Louis News Co. Locust Street. G. W. Fiersheim, Manager.

Old Globe-Democrat Building. Fourth and Pine Streets.

J. B. Sickles' Saddlery Co. Washington Avenue and Twentyfirst Street. J. J. Kreher, President.

H. T. Simon, Gregory Washington Avenue, northeast cor. Seventh, Lindell Hotel block. Wholesale dry goods and small wares.

The "Lotos Club," St. Louis. Stewart, McClure

Entrance to Westmoreland Place. East to west from King's Highway to Union Avenue.

Anheuser-Busch Brewing Assn. Established in Capacity is over 1, barrels annually. A shipping capacity of , bottles annually. 2, people employed. Own 1, refrigerator cars. Use 1,, gallons of water and 1, cars of coal annually.

Offices and Factory. Washington and Lucas Avenues, from Nineteenth to Twentieth Streets. Occupying entire block.

H. H. Culver's Building. Southeast cor. Twelfth and Locust Streets.

Gay Building. Cor. Third and Pine Streets. American Exchange Bank, Walter Hill, Cashier. Capital $, R. G. Dunn's Commercial Agency, C. B. Smith, Manager.

Japanese Tea House. Broadway and Locust Street. In Scruggs, Vandevoort & Barney's Dry Goods Establishment.

Branch of Young Men's Christian Association: Northside German Branch, & St. Louis Ave. The Association was organized inand incorporated in Its total membership is over 3, T. S. McPheeters, President; Geo. T. Coxhead, Gen'l Secretary.

Branch of Young Men's Christian Association: Southside German Branch, Second Carondolet Ave.

Branch of Young Men's Christian Association: East St. Louis Railroad Branch.

Branch of Young Men's Christian Association: Central Branch, Pine

F. M. Crunden, Librarian, St. Louis Public Library.

Joseph Brown, City Auditor.

Horace Kephart, Librarian, Mercantile Library.

Secretaries of Merchants' Exchange: J. H. Alexander,

Secretaries of Merchants' Exchange: Clinton B. Fisk, Secretary of Merchants' Exchange.

Secretaries of Merchants' Exchange: Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary of Merchants' Exchange.

Bank Presidents: Adolphus Busch, South Side. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Chas. Parsons, State. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Wm. Thompson, National Bank of Commerce. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Hy Ziegenhein, Lafayette. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Henry Meier, Franklin. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Wm. Nicholls, Commercial. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: S. E. Hoffman, Laclede. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Geo. A. Baker, Continental. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: L. C. Nelson, St. Louis National. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: D. K. Ferguson, Mechanics. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: H. C. Hieatt (Retiring Pres). National Bank of the Republic. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: C. W. Bullen (New Pres). National Bank of the Republic. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: John Kraus, Southern Commercial. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: R. J. Lackland, Boatmens. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: J. C. Richardson, Chemical. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: J. B. C. Lucas, Citizens. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Peter Nicholson, American Exchange. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Geo. T. Cram, Third National. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Chester H. Krum. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Jas. O Broadhead. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Wells H. Blodgett. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Warwick Hough. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: John Lionberger. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Given Campbell. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Henry Hitchcock. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Leverett Bell. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: H. A. Clover. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Elmer B. Adams. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: C. Gibson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Wm. C. Jones. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Chas. P. Johnson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: W. Fisse. The Is almond milk good for you if you have ibs Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Walmart eye center mexico mo and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Nathan Frank. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: D. B. Lee. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Alex. G. Cochran. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Geo. W. Lubke. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Leo. Rassieur. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Ed. Kenna. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: D. P. Dyer. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Thos. H. Thoroughman. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Judges: A. A. Paxson, Police Court. J. G. Woerner, Probate Court. Thos. Morris, Police Court. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Judges, Federal Court: D. J. Brewer, W. H. Sanborn, A. M. Thayer. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Judges, Criminal Court of Correction: J. R. Claiborne, J. C. Normile.

Judges, State Court of Appeals: Wm. H. Biggs, Seymour D. Thompson, and R. E. Rombauer. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Judges, Circuit Court: Jas. E. Withrow, L. B. Valiant, Jacob Klein The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Judges, Circuit Court: Daniel Dillon, D. D. Fisher. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: P. G. Robinson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: T. L. Papin. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: A. C. Robinson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Jno. B. Johnson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: W. C. Glasgow. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: H. G. Mudd. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: J. K. Bauduy. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: E. H. Gregory. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Wm. Porter. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: L. C. Boisliniere. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Hermann Tuholsky. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: W. F. Kier. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Chas. H. Hughes. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Why is purple cabbage good for you, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: E. M. Powers. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: T. Griswold Comstock. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Y. H. Bond. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: E. S. Lemoine. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: W. M. McPheeters. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: J. P. Bryson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: R. A. Phelan. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: I. N. Love. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Thos. O'Reilly. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Aug. Bernays. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Frank. J. Lutz. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: O. G. Murray, "Big Four." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: C. J. MacKay, "Airline." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Look up my fedex account number, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: James Charlton, Chicago The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: A. R. Callaway, "Clover Leaf." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: M. Knight, Wabash. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: M. E. Ingalls, "Big Four." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: Henry Gays, Merchants Terminal. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: S. H. H. Clark, Missouri Pacific. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: Chas. M. Hays, Wabash. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: H. L. Morrill, "Frisco." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: H. C. Townsend, Missouri Pacific. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: Geo. W. Parker, Cairo Shortline. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: D. B. Martin, "Big Four." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: Jos. Hill, Vandalia. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: Geo. C. Smith, Missouri Pacific. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: C. C. Rainwater, Merchants Terminal. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: D. W. Rider, Jacksonville S. E. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad merchants national bank building mobile al Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: D. Miller, Queens The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. J. P. Greene. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Vicar General P. P. Brady. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Archbishop Kenrick. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. George E. Martin. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. John Snyder. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. Henry A. Stimson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. Samuel Sale. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. S. O. John. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. John Matthews. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. T. M. Finney. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. Thos. Bowman. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. Montgomery Schuyler. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

5

Preface.

In offering to the public the "Pictorial St. Louis, Past and Present," I have endeavored to meet a demand which has long existed for a work of this character which would reflect the interests of the city in its true light. I dedicate this work to the people of St. Louis to be handed down as an heirloom to future generations to show the growth of the metropolis of the great west. How well I have accomplished my task I leave you to determine. If it is not up to your expectations I beg your kind consideration. In the meantime I remain the public's faithful servant,
THE PUBLISHER.

6

Saint Louis Autumnal Festivities Association.

This Association was organized on May 11,at a public meeting at the Exposition building, when it was resolved to raise a fund of one million dollars for festivity and other purposes during the yearsand Upwards of $, was raised duringand the work is now in active progress. The following is the organization:

S. M. KENNARD.
President.

E. O. STANARD,
1st Vice-President.

F. A. WANS,
2d Vice-President.

JOHN S. MOFFITT,
3d Vice-President.

ROLLA WELLS,
4th Vice-President.

C. H. SAMPSON,
5th Vice-President.

FRANK GAIENNIE,
Secretary.

WALKER HILL,
Treasurer.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
A. D. Brown,
R. P. Tansey,
D. D. Walker,
J. C. Wilkinson,
S. C. Buun,
Jacob Furth,
W. T. Haydock,
M. C. Wetmore,
W. F. Nolker,
Geo. E. Leighton,
T. B. Boyd,
Goodman King,
C. D. McClure,
M. Bernheimer,
T. K. Niedringhaus,
H. J. Meyer,
Jonathan Rice,
Aug. Gehner,
J. J. Kreher,
C. H. Turner,
L. D. Kingsland,
H. C. Townsend,
Chas. M. Hayes,
R. M. Scruggs,
F. J. Wade,
Jerome Hill,
A. T. Kelley,
Geo. D. Barnard,
D. S. Holmes,
W. H. Woodward,
Patrick McGrath,
Joseph Specht,
W. H. Thompson,
Geo. M. Wright.

7

FINANCE COMMITTEE.
John S. Moffit, Chairman.
Geo. D. Barnard, Vice-Chairman.
Marcus Bernheimer,
Thomas Booth,
Henry J. Meyer,
T. B. Boyd,
S. C. Bunn.

BUREAU OF INFORMATION.
Goodman King, Chairman.
Joseph Franklin, Vice-Chairman.
James Cox, Sec'y,
Joseph Specht,
Geo. S. Bank of america phone number for credit card,
J. Furth,
H. C. Townsend,
F. J. Wade,
J. J. Lawrence.

TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE.
E. O. Stanard, Chairman.
E. C. Simmons,
E. F. Williams,
F. A. Wann,
R. S. Brookings,
D. D. Walker.

PROGRAMME COMMITTEE.
Frank Gaiennie, Chairman.
C. H. Sampson,
W. T. Haydock,
Rolla Wells,
W. H. Woodward,
F. A. Wann.

ILLUMINATION COMMITTEE.
J. C. Wilkinson, Chairman.
Geo. B. Thompson,
B. Nugent,
E. McMillin,
T. K. Niedringhaus,
T. B. Boyd,
S. A. Coale, Jr.
A. T. Kelley.

HOTEL COMMITTEE.
M. C. Wetmore, Chairman.
Henry J. Meyer,
Rolla Wells,
W. J. Thompson,
J. W. Buel,
Adolphus Busch,
J. B. Case,
J. G. Butler,
A. Mansur.

8

Saint Louis. Her Prosperity, Advantages and Prospects.

The City embraces square miles, or 30, 1/2 acres. It is seventeen miles in length from amazon flex customer service phone number to south, and miles from the river to its western limits, and has miles of river frontage. It is the fifth city in size, the fourth in commerce, and has a population ofIt is called the Mound City.

St. Louis is an independent city, being in no county, free from county legislation, and is governed under a scheme and charter which prohibits any floating indebtedness, and limits the rate of taxation, which is being gradually diminished. Tax rate is about It is next to the healthiest city in the United States. The death rate averages about 21 per 1, per annum. It is the amazon business account of the Mississippi Valley, embracing 15, square miles of navigable rivers and about 25, miles of railroads, and leads the world in a dozen different lines of business and manufacturies.

ELEVATION.

City Directrix, upon which elevations are based, is the top of a square flat stone set level with the curb on the west side of the wharf between Market and Walnut streets (being the high water mark of the year )

It is situated as to natural advantages more favorably than any other city on the continent. The Missouri River flows into the Mississippi twenty-one miles above the city, and the junction of the Illinois River is only twenty-four miles above St. Louis. It is in the heart of the food producing regions of the continent, and is central to boundless wealth of minerals. Around it are vast supplies of

10

coal, iron, granite, building stone, and earths adapted to the manufacturies of glass. Productive lead mines are in the vicinity, and seek St. Louis as a point of manufacture and distribution.

The city has grown from small beginnings to gigantic proportions, is mr pure cranberry juice good for you is to-day one of the greatest, wealthiest and most prosperous in the country, and every day of her existence proves herself more and more entitled to her proud position as the undisputed metropolis of the Mississippi Valley.

It is admirably situated for the prosecution of all departments of manufactures. In close proximity to abound-less store of all the useful metals, with vast supplies of coal almost at her gates, it is the cheapest coal market in the World, the cost to manufacturers being only $ per ton. With a boundless profusion of food products at hand, for the sustenance of any possible increase of population, and with a market comprising the entire Mississippi Valley and the Great West, it is at once a most inviting city. Its manufacturing output for the last ten years shows a greater increase than any other city in America.

THE JOBBING TRADES.

St. Louis has the largest merchants national bank building mobile al, the largest tobacco factory, the largest drug house, handles more boots and shoes, has the largest hardware, woodenware, and the largest horse and mule market in the world, and is one of the greatest grain, flour and hay markets.

The importance of St. Louis as a central source of supply for the Mississippi Valley and the West is shown in an immense volume of transaction in all jobbing lines. St. Louis offers to the country merchant inducements for trade which are not excelled in any department in any city on the continent, and in many lines positively superior to any market in the land. It is not only a mart, it is a vast and busy workshop; each succeeding year records an

12

increase in its mills, its forges and factories. The products of industry are not only bought, sold and handled in the city, they are made here. Every description of raw material for any line of manufactory which is to be found in North America can be produced in abundance within easy reach of St. Louis.
CHURCHES.

Fine church edifices abound. All shades of belief being sheltered in elegant structures, which add greatly to the architectural attractions of the city.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

St. Louis has a large number of fine public buildings. She erected more buildings in than any other city on the continent, and offers the safest and best investment to be found in any other large city in the world. Among the fine buildings are the Custom House and Post-Office, built at an expense of $6,, and is one of the finest public buildings in the country. The Armory, Four Courts, Court House, Exposition, and under construction the new "City Hall," and one of the finest Railroad Depots in the world, to cost $1,, are some of the fine structures.

ST. LOUIS PRESS.

The newspapers of St. Louis are fully up to the highest standard of Journalism. The press of the city has exercised a great influence in promoting its interest in every useful direction, and in aiding its progress towards the advanced position it holds among the great cities of the country. The leading dailies are the Globe-Democrat, the St. Louis Republic, Post-Dispatch, Star Sayings and Evening Chronicle, published in the English language. And the Anzeiger des Westens, the Westliche Post, Amerika and Tribune, German papers.

14

SCHOOL SYSTEM.

St. Louis has an excellent school system (and next to Boston has the most perfect in the world), which offers the advantages of education to all the children brought up within her limits. The public schools are conducted upon the most approved principles of teaching, while the high school offers to the ambitious youth the opportunity for securing instruction in the higher branches of knowledge. In addition to the public schools are the Universities, Colleges, Academies and Parochial Schools. There are public schools, 1, school teachers, with an enrollment of 59, public school children.

SOCIAL LIFE.

In social life there is every means provided for the pursuit of instruction or pleasure. There are many organizations devoted to social intercourse, to art, to music, to literature and to the various objects which indicate the intelligence and enlightenment of the people.

St. Louis is a live, vigorous and progressive modern city, endowed with many natural advantages, to which are added all the improvements which art or science has discovered to aid progress in business, in social life and in the pursuit of happiness. Her public museums, libraries and the numerous fine collections of paintings and works of art of her private citizens show the refinement of her people.

St. Louis has for many years been famous for its Annual Fair, for its Exposition, for its brilliant street illuminations, and for its magnificent Veiled Prophet parade. These attractions have drawn hundreds of thousands of people to visit it every fall, and its progressive citizens have decided for to eclipse every former effort in the annual festivities, and will illuminate the streets with electricity and miles of gas lit arches and pyramids.

16

Chronological and Historical Events.

Maxent, Laclede & Co. obtain licence to trade.

St. Louis founded by Laclede Liguest.

Goods removed from Fort Chartres to St. Louis.

Trading boat seized en route for Missouri river. First land grant by St. Ange.

Pontiac, Ottawa Chief, arrives to trade.

Spanish authority was asserted.

St. Louis attacked by Indians May 26th.

Ten barges of goods arrive from New Orleans.

A census showed white; colored

Henry Shaw was born at Sheffield, England.

Capts. Lewis and Clark start for Pacific Coast.

First newspaper (The Gazette) est. at St. Louis.

St. Louis first incorporated.

St. Louis had 1, population.

First brick dwelling erected.

Fur and peltry was the sole industry.

First shop to manufacture saddles and harness.

Wm. Clark appointed first Governor by President

First nails manufactured.

St. Louis had 2, population.

Arrival of first steamer called "Pike," Aug. 2d.

Bank of St. Louis incorporated.

First pottery was made.

There were twenty-one houses. Benton fought a duel.

First steamboat arrived.

Missouri Bank incorporated.

Arrival of second steamer "Constitution," Oct. 3d.

Henry Shaw came to St. Louis.

First saw mill and foundry erected.

First steamer "Independence" enters Mo. river.

First steamboat "Harriet" reaches St. L. from N. O.

Missouri Fur Co. organized.

18

St. Louis had 4, population.

City Directory published.

Dr. William Carr Lane was first Mayor.

St. Louis incorporated as a city December 9th.

West boundary of city was on Seventh Street.

Gen. Lafayette visited St. Louis.

St. Louis University opened Nov. 2d.

Branch Bank of U. S. established.

Mayor Biddle and Mr. Spencer fought a duel.

Great many Germans arrived.

Board of Public Schools organized.

Great rejoicing that goods could be sent from New York to St. Louis in the short space of 23 days.

Old Catholic French church on Walnut St. was erected.

Missouri Republican was first issued.

First steamboat launched.

Boats and barges at wharf number

First gas was made.

Incorporation of Bank of Missouri Feb. 1st.

Planters' House commenced.

David Armstrong opened first. Public School.

New Charter granted.

Dr. Carr elected Mayor second term.

Arrivals of steamers 2,

Were 6 grist mills, 6 breweries and 6 foundries.

Steamboat building inaugurated.

First steamboat "St. Louis Oak" set afloat.

There were 2, steamboat arrivals.

Mercantile Library Association formed.

Boatman's Saving Institution incorporated.

Great fire in St. Louis May 19th.

4, people died of Cholera.

Germans arrived in great numbers.

City was without system of drainage.

Ground broken for Pacific R. R.

Western boundary of City was on 18th street.

First Locomotive built in St. Louis.

Commencement of Chicago & St. Louis R. R.

20

First School Report was published.

Grand Opera House first opened.

First Great Fair held.

First Lindell Hotel opened.

Custom House and Post-Office built, Olive and 3d.

Convention to consider Federal relations Feb 28th.

Surrender of Camp Jackson May 10th.

Provisional gov't, H. S. Gamble, Gov., July 31st.

Merchants Exchange organized.

All Public Schools were made free.

Opening Southern Hotel.

St. Louis Public Library organized.

Cholera visited St. Louis again.

Olympic first opened Nov. 25th,

Foundation of Great St. Louis Bridge laid Oct. 27th.

Carondelet was taken into the city.

W. T. Harris was elected Supt. City Schools.

Southern Hotel burned.

Cotton Exchange organized.

Simmons Hardware Co. was organized.

Eads Bridge over Mississippi completed.

Union Depot established.

Present State Constitution adopted.

Merchants Exchange opened.

First Veiled Prophet Pageant.

Cotton Exchange building opened.

Opening of Great St. Louis Exposition.

Grand Opera House destroyed by fire.

Grand Opera House rebuilt Sept. 14th.

St. Louis Live Stock Exchange organized.

Corner stone laid for new City Hall.

Merchants Terminal Bridge completed.

There were vessels enrolled here.

Mercantile Club House Building being erected.

Sale of shoes amount to 21,

21 railroads centered in St. Louis.

St. Louis was years old.

22

Notable Facts of the City.

St. Louis has 14 libraries.

St. Louis has a crematory.

St. Louis has 20 hospitals.

St. Louis has churches.

St. Louis has 32 cemeteries.

St. Louis has attorneys.

St. Louis has 11 gymnasiums.

St. Louis has 16 public parks.

St. Louis has one art museum.

St. Louis has 25 shoe factories.

St. Louis has 38 fire companies.

St. Louis has public schools.

St. Louis has 46 Masonic lodges.

St. Louis has four cable railroads.

St. Louis has 30 singing societies.

St. Louis has 78 parochial schools.

St. Louis has miles of sewers.

St. Louis has 41 lodges I. O. O. F.

St. Louis owns 97 school buildings.

St. Louis has 20 lines of street cars.

St. Louis has 72 lodges A. O. U. W.

St. Louis has one zoological garden.

St. Louis has nine daily newspapers.

St. Louis has a river front of 20 miles.

St. Louis has 60 building associations.

St. Louis has one first-class race track.

St. Louis has miles of paved streets.

St. Louis has 32 academies and colleges.

St. Louis is the terminus of 27 railroads.

St. Louis has 19 rowing and athletic clubs.

St. Louis has 19 lodges Knights of Pythias.

St. Louis has 59 assemblies Knights of Labor.

St. Louis has 21 banks and two safe deposit companies.

St. Louis has put up 26, new buildings in 10 years.

St. Louis is united to Illinois by two bridges and Wiggins Ferry Company.

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St. Louis has resident consuls from every Nation in the world.

St. Louis has this only bronze statue of Columbus in the United States.

St. Louis has the only bronze statue of Shakespeare in the United States.

St. Louis has societies of a benevolent and social nature other than secret.

St. Louis has the only bronze statues of Gen'l Francis P. Blair and Edward Bates, located in Forest Park.

St. Louis has the most perfect bronze statue in the United States of George Washington, located in Lafayette Park.

St. Louis was the first city in the United States to erect a bronze statue of Gen'l Grant, located on 12th street, near Olive.

St. Louis has the only bronze statue of Humboldt in the United States, and said by his relatives to be better than any in Europe.

Twelve Branches of Industry in Which St. Louis Leads the World.

The Largest Brewing Establishment — Anheuser-Busch.

The Largest Tobacco Manufacturers — Liggett & Meyers.

The Largest Hardware House — Simmons Hardware Co.

The Largest Drug House — Meyer Bros. Drug Co.

The Largest Woodenware Co. — S. Cupples W'denware Co.

The Largest Boot and Shoe Factory — Hamilton-Brown.

The Largest Cracker Factory — Dozier-Weyl.

The Largest Terra Cotta — Winkle Terra Cotta Co.

The Largest Fire Brick — St. Louis Press Brick.

The Largest Horse and Mule Market.

The Largest Fruit Market.

The Largest Interior Cotton Market.

26

Directory.

Asylums.

Alexian Brothers' Insane Asylum, S. Broadway.

Amelia Home for Children, Garfield ave.

Baptist Orphans' Home, Lafayette ave.

Bethany Faith Home, Oak Hill ave.

Bethesda Christian Home and Infant Asylum, Russell ave., nw. corner 9th.

Blind Girls' Industrial Home, Wash.

Christian Orphans' Home, Webster ave.

Episcopal Orphans' Home, Grand ave., nw. cor, DeTonty.

Evangelical Deaconess' Home, Eugenia.

Female Night Refuge, Morgan, se. cor. 22d.

German Evangelical Lutheran Orphans' Asylum, located fifteen miles from city on Manchester road.

German Gen'l Protestant Orphans' Home, Nat'l Bde. rd.

German Lutheran Orphans' Asylum, DesPeres, St. L. Co.

German Protestant Orphans' Home: office N. B'way.

Girls' Industrial Home, N. 18th.

Home for Aged and Infirm Israelites, S. Jeff'son ave.

Home of Immaculate Conception, S. 8th.

Home of the Friendless (Old Ladies Home), S. B'way.

House of Protection, Morgan, se. cor. 22d.

House of the Good Shepherd, 17th, bet. Pine & Chestnut.

House of the Guardian Angel, Marion.

Industrial School for Girls, Morgan, se. cor. 22d.

Insane Asylum, Arsenal, near Macklind ave.

Institutional Mission Home, S. Broadway.

Little Sisters of the Poor, Hebert.

Masonic Home, Delmar ave.

Memorial Home, Grand ave., nw. cor.

Magnolia ave. Missouri Baptist Sanitarium, Taylor ave.

Mullanphy Orphan Asylum, Broadway, near LaSalle.

Methodist Orphan's Home, Laclede ave.

North-Side Day Nursery, N. 22d.

Protestant Episcopal Mission House, Washington ave.

St. Louis Protestant Orphan Asylum, Webster Grove, Mo.

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St. Ann's Widows' Home, N. 10th.

St. Francis Orphan Asylum (col'd), Page ave.

St. Joseph Female Night Refuge, Morgan, se. cor. 22d.

St. Joseph's Male Orphan Asylum, Clark ave., ne. cor. 15th.

St. Louis Colored Orphans' Home, N. 12th.

St. Mary's Female Orphan Asylum, Biddle, cor. 10th.

St. Philomena Indus'l School, nw. cor. Clark & Ewing ave.

St. Vincent's German Orphan Asylum, Hogan.

St. Vincent's Institution for the Insane, Marion, cor. 9th.

The Creche Day Nursery for Children, Papin.

The Merchants national bank building mobile al. G. Elliot Home for Nurses, Dillon.

Vanguard Pentecost Band Training Home, Randolph.

White Cross Home, N. 12th.

Women's Christian Home, Washington ave.

Boards of Trade.

Mechanic's Exchange, Olive, southeast corner 10th.

Merchants' Exchange, 3d, bet. Chestnut and Pine.

Merchants' Exchange Board of Flour Inspectors, 8 S. Main.

Mexican and Spanish-American Commercial Exchange, N. 8th.

St. Louis Cotton Exchange, Main, corner Walnut.

St. Louis Furniture Board of Trade, N. 4th.

St. Louis Mining Stock Exchange, N. 3d.

St. Louis Paint, Oil and Drug Club, N. 8th.

The Associated Wholesale Grocers of St. Louis, N. 2d.

The Farm Implement and Vehicle Association.

The Lumbermen's Exchange of St. Louis, rooms and Temple Building.

The St. Louis Wool and Fur Ass'n, Main, corner Walnut.

Building and Loan Associations, and Name of Secretary.

Accommodation, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Acme, Chestnut; T. F. Farrelly.

Active, Chestnut; Geo. W. Davis.

Advance, Chestnut; G. V. R. Mechin.

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Allemania, Pine; Albert C. Trebus.

Artisan, Pine; J. B. McCormick.

Aubert Place, Chestnut; Daniel B. Brennan.

Aubert Place No. 2, Chestnut; Daniel B. Brennan.

Aurora Mutual, Pine; Robert Rutledge.

Banner, Chestnut; F. W. Plass.

Beneficial, Chestnut; Chas. C. Nicholls.

Benton, Pine; C. E. Wehner.

Blackstone, Olive; H. W. Lindhorn.

Bohemian, Russell ave.; Anthony Klobasa.

Bohemian-American, S. 12th.

Bremen, N. Broadway; C. C. Crone.

Caledonia, Chestnut; R. F. Miller.

Centennial, 10 N. 8th; H. D. Stewart.

Central, Elliot ave., southwest corner St. Louis ave.

Charter Oak, N. Main; John G. O'Keefe.

Charter Oak No. 2, N. Main; John G. O'Keefe.

Citizens, Pine; J. F. Brady.

Clay Henry, Chestnut; Charles J. Dunnermann.

Clerks and Mechanics', Chestnut; G. M. Truesdale.

Clifton Heights, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Columbia, Carroll and 10th.

Columbia, Chestnut; Albert Wenzlick.

Commercial, Chestnut; Chas. C. Nicholls.

Common Sense, Olive; K. C. Blood.

Compton Hill, Chestnut; Gus. V. R. Mechin.

Concordia, Marion; A. Bollin.

Covenant Mutual, Chestnut; W. M. Horton.

Continental, Chestnut; Chas. C. Nicholls.

Continental, 1/2 Chestnut; F. H. Rogers.

Cooper Peter, Nos. 1, 3, 3, 4 & 5, Chestnut; J. B. Follett.

Co-operative, Chestnut, W. Terry.

Cottage, Chestnut, Martin Kelly.

Covenant, Chestnut; W. M. Horton.

Crescent, Chestnut; Charles G. Balmer.

Desoto Saving, Pine; James F. Brady.

Edison, Nos. 1 and 2, Chestnut; W. F. Parker.

Elaine, Chestnut; T. F. Terry.

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Emerald, Chestnut; James Rice.

Enterprise, S. Broadway; G. H. Quellmalz.

Equality Saving, Chestnut; G. V. R. Mechin.

Equitable Loan & Invest. Ass'n, Chestnut; W. M. Dean.

Excelsior Mutual, Chestnut; W. M. Horton.

Exchange, Chestnut; Geo. F. Bergfeld.

Famous Mutual Saving Fund, 10 N. 8th; D. H. Stewart.

Firemen's, N. 8th; R. F. Kilgen.

Fireside, N. 8th; W. A. Dorey.

Forest, Chestnut; George F. Bergfeld.

Franco-American, Pine; J. H. Trembly.

Franklin Saving, Chestnut; T. A. Rice.

Fraternal, Chestnut; Charles F. Vogel.

Future Great, 16 N. 8th; P. T. Carr.

Garfield Saving, Chestnut; T. A. Rice.

Garrison Mutual, Easton ave.; P. T. Madden.

General Hancock, Chestnut; G. V. R. Mechin.

German-American Building and Investing Association, Chestnut; G. V. R. Mechin.

German Mutual, 19 S. Broadway; W. K. Walther.

Germania, Pine; Albert C. Trebus.

Gibraltar, Chestnut; H. T. Smith.

Girard Stephen, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Gladstone, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Globe, Pine; Charles Kuhn.

Granite, N. 8th; James H. Maguire.

Great Western, N. 8th; R. F. Kilgen.

Guarantee Real Estate and House Building Co., Chestnut; John W. McIntyre.

Harlem, Chestnut; Charles F. Vogel.

Hibernia No. 2, Pine; James F. Brady.

Hoevel, St. Louis ave.; Felix Hoevel.

Home City, 19 N. 8th; L. E. Dehlendorf.

Home Comfort, N. 8th; John A. Watkins.

Home Getters', Pine; J. B. McCormick.

Home Mutual, Pine; D. J. Hayden.

Home Savings and Bank of america california Ass'n, Chestnut; G. B. Frye.

Home Seekers', Chestnut; A. R. Schollmeyer.

34

Homestead. Mutual, N. 8th; L. B. Pierce.

House and Home, Chestnut; Paul Jones.

Humboldt, Pine; A. L. Berry.

Hyde Park, N. Broadway; C. C. Crone.

Imperial, Pine; C. H. Sawyer.

Improvement, Pine; William Zink.

Industrial, Chestnut; George W. Davis.

Investment, Chestnut; Charles C. Nicholls.

Irish-American Saving, Chestnut; T. A. Rice.

Iron Hall, N. 8th; J. S. Gordon.

Jefferson, Chestnut; Martin Kelly.

Keystone, 16 N. 8th; P. What credit score you need for amazon credit card. Carr.

Knapp George Real Estate and Building Ass'n, Locust H. G. Knapp.

Knights, N. 8th; F. J. Wade.

Laclede, Pine; D. J. Hayden.

Lafayette Mutual, Pine; Arthur L. Thompson.

Legion, N. 8th; F. J. Wade.

Lincoln, Chestnut; George F. Bergfeld.

Lindell Savings, Building and Loan Ass'n, Chestnut; D. Sheppard.

Lindemwood Building, Quarry and Investment Co., Olive; S. T. Rathell.

Lucas, Chestnut; Jeremiah Ryan.

Marquette Mutual, Pine; D. J. Hayden.

Mechanics', Pine; D. J. Hayden.

Merchants and Mechanics' Mutual Saving Fund, N. Broadway; Henry Kotthoff.

Metropolitan Mutual, N. 8th; L. E. Anderson.

Mississippi, Chestnut; P. M. Manning.

Missouri Guarantee, N. 4th; E. R. Beach.

Missouri Mutual, Pine; D. J. Hayden.

Model Building, Loan & Invest. Ass'n, N. Jeff'son ave.

Mound City, Chestnut; Thomas A. Rice.

Mount Olive Nos. 1 and 2, Chestnut; G. V. R. Mechin.

Mullanphy, 19 S. Broadway; R. M. Foster.

Mutual Annuity Co., Olive.

Mutual Benefit Saving Fund Building and Loan. Ass'n, Nos. 1 and 2, Olive; Samuel Bowman.

36

National, Chestnut; Charles F. Vogel.

New Era, 1/2 Chestnut; B. W. Thornhill.

New Plan, 17 N. 8th; J. W. Bergfeld.

Nickel Saving, Investment and Building Ass'n, Chouteau ave, nw. cor. 3d; J. Walter.

Northwestern, 17 N. 8th; Andrew J. Naughton.

Oak, 17 N. 18th; J. W. Bergfeld.

Park, Olive; Charles D. Greene, jr.

Parnell Saving and Build'g Ass'n, Chestnut; T. A. Rice.

Peabody, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Peerless, Pine; C. H. Sawyer.

Phoenix, 8 N. 8th; B. F. Small.

Phoenix, Chestnut; A. R. Schollmeyer.

Printing Trades Mutual Building and Loan Ass'n, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Progressive, N. 8th; Selden P. Spencer.

Prosperity, E. Grand ave.; E. W. Woods.

Provident, 17 N. 10th; C. F. A. Miller.

Real Estate Nos. 1 and 2, Pine; William Zink.

Red Cross, 17 N. 8th; A. J. Naughton.

Reservoir, Chestnut; J. F. Klinglesmith.

Richmond, Chestnut: M. D. Browning.

Rock Spring Nos. 1 and 2, Market; A. H. Kansteiner.

Safety, Chestnut; Edwin S. Fish.

Security Nos. 1 and 2, N. 8th; Joseph H. Tiernan.

Shaw Henry, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Sherman, Chestnut; D. Sheppard.

Shoe and Leather Trade, Market; O. Zakrzewski.

South End, S. Broadway; F. W. Mott.

South Side, S. Jefferson ave.; H. W. Mepham.

Southwestern, Park ave.; Herman J. Krembs.

Standard, Olive, se. corner 9th; W. B. Anderson.

Standard, Market; O. Zakrzewski.

Starling, Chestnut; A. O. Terry.

State Savings, Fund and Building Ass'n, Nos. 1 and 2, Chestnut; C. R. Davis.

St. Louis Central, 1/2 Chestnut; B. W. Thornhill.

St. Louis Home and Saving Ass'n, N. 8th; A. O. Rule.

38

St. Louis Mutual House Building Co. No. 3, Walnut; Hugo Kromrey.

St. Louis Savings and Building Ass'n, Chestnut; Thos. A. Rice.

St. Louis Turners', Nos. 1 and 2, Market; F. Nohl.

Superior, Nos mills v board of education of the district of columbia and 2, Chestnut, J. H. Parish.

Success, Olive; S. W. Gay.

The Leader, N. 8th; J. S. Gordon.

Tower, E. Grand ave.; Jesse B. Mellor.

Tower Grove, S. Jefferson ave.; W. J. Lewis.

Turners', 10th and Carroll.

Tuscan, N. Broadway; Henry Kottshoff.

Uncle Sams', N. 4th; H. S. Tuttle.

Underwriters', Locust; G. O. Kalb.

Valley Building Co., Olive; J. F. Weston.

Very Best, N. 3d; C. A. Forse.

Virginia, Chestnut; E. M. Rice.

Wage Workers', N. 8th; W. A. Sisson.

Washington Irving, 17 N. 8th; J. W. Bergfeld.

Washington Saving and Building Ass'n, Chestnut; T. A. Rice.

West End, Chestnut; George T. Anglen.

West St. Louis, Easton ave.; Henry C. Barnard.

Western, Pine; C. H. Sawyer.

Western Mutual, N. 8th; R. F. Kilgen.

Western Union, Nos. 1, 3, 3, 4, 5 and 6, S. 9th; M. T. Bogard.

Workingmen's, 17 N. 8th; A. J. Naughton.

Churches.

BAPTIST.

Ministers' Conference, meets regularly on Mondays at 11 o'clock a. m., at Olive.

Broadway Mission, Broadway and Poplar.

Carondelet, Virginia ave., head of Robert.

Cass Avenue Mission, Cass and Garrison aves.

Delmar Avenue, Delmar and Pendleton aves.

First German, Rauschenbach ave. Fourth, Benton and 13th.

40

Fourth Mission, Angelrodt and 14th.

Grand Avenue, N. Grand ave.

Immanuel, Cates ave., near Hamilton ave.

Jefferson Avenue Mission, Walnut, corner Jefferson ave.

Lafayette Park, Lafayette ave., se. corner Mississippi ave.

Second, Beaumont, corner Locust.

Taylor Avenue Mission, Easton and Taylor aves.

Third, Grand and Washington aves.

Tower Grove, Tower Grove Station.

Water Tower, north side E. Grand ave., nr. Florissant ave.

CHRISTIAN.

Central, Finney ave., near Grand ave.

Fifth, S. 7th.

First, Locust, near Compton ave.

Fourth, Pehrose.

Second, 11th, northeast corner Tyler.

CONGREGATIONAL.

Aubert Place, Fountain ave., sw. cor. Aubert ave.

Bethany Mission, Park ave. and 12th.

Bethlehem Mission, Alien ave. and 13th.

Church of the Redeemer, Barrett and Thompson ave.

Compton Hill, Lafayette ave., ne. cor. Compton ave.

First, south side Delmar eve., nr. Grand ave.

First (German), Garfield ave., sw. cor. Spring ave.

Hope, Florence ave.

Hyde Park, Bremen ave.

Immanuel, Hancock ave., near Jamieson ave.

Manchester Road Mission, Manchester rd. nr. Macklin ave.

Maplewood, Manchester road, near Sutton ave.

Memorial, Sulphur ave., cor. Way.

Newstead Avenue, Delmar ave., cor. Newstead ave.

Olive Branch, Sidney, opposite Missouri ave.

Peoples' Tabernacle, Clark ave., sw. cor. 23d.

Pilgrim, Washington ave., se. cor. Ewing ave.

Plymouth, Belle Glade ave.

Third, Grand ave., near Page ave.

Swedish, Locust, ne. cor. 11th.

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Union, N. 10th.

Congregational City Missionary Society, N. 3d.

American Home Missionary Society, Lucas place.

EPISCOPALIAN.

The Diocese of Missouri, Rt. Rev. D, S. Tuttle, Bishop, Chestnut.

All Saints (col'd), Washington ave.

Christ, 13th, corner Locust.

Church of the Ascension,Catesave., ne. cor. Goodfellow ave.

Church of the Holy Communion, Leffingwell ave, near Washington ave.

Church of the Holy Innocents, Tholozan ave., nr. Morgan Ford road.

Grace, Marion place, near 11th.

Mission Church of the Good Shepherd, S. 8th.

Mount Calvary, cor. Jefferson and Lafayette aves.

St. Augustine's, Bruno ave., ne. cor. Blenddon place.

St. George's, Pendleton ave., nw. cor. Olive.

St. James, Goode ave., se. cor. Cote Brilliante ave.

St. John's, Hickory, ne. cor. Dolman.

St. Mark's, Washington ave., se. cor.

Vandeventer ave. St. Paul's, Michigan ave.

St. Peter's, east side Grand ave., near Olive.

Trinity, Franklin ave., cor. Channing ave.

GERMAN EVANGELICAL.

Bethania, 23d, ne. cor. Wash.

Bethlehem, Garrison ave.

Ebenezer, McNair ave.

Frieden's, 19th, sw. cor. Newhouse ave.

German Evangelical, Michigan ave., nw. cor. Koeln ave.

Salem, Margaretta ave., se. cor. Marcus ave.

St. Jacob's, College ave., cor. Blair ave.

St. Johannes, 14th, se. cor. Madison.

St. Luke's, Scott ave.

St. Mark's, 3d, nw. cor. Soulard.

St, Mathews, Jefferson ave., nw. cor. Potomac.

St. Paul's, S. 9th.

St. Paul's Friedens, Allen ave., nw. cor. 13th.

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St. Peter's, Carr, nw. cor. 14th.

Zion, Benton, cor. 25th.

ENGLISH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN.

St. Mark's, Bell ave., sw. cor. Cardinal ave.

GERMAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN.

Benton Station, Briino and Forest aves.

Bethania, Nat'l Bridg road, cor. Clay ave.

Bethlehem, 19th, sw. cor. Salisbury.

Cheltenham, Sulphur ave.

Christ, Caroline.

Church of the Holy Cross, south side Miami, nr. Ohio ave.

Ebenezer, Church road, near Hall's Ferry road.

Gnaden, Wellston station.

Immanuel, Morgan, sw. cor. 15th.

St. John's, Morgan Ford road.

St. Paul's, Prairie ave., ne. cor. Von Phul.

St. Trinity, 6th and Upton.

Trinity, Lafayette ave., cor. 8th.

Zion, Warren, se. cor. Blair ave.

HEBREW.

Beth Hami Drosh Haggodol, N. 11th.

B'Naiel, Chouteau ave. and 11th.

B'Nai Amoona, 13th, sw. cor. Carr.

Shevra Kadusha, N. 7th.

Shaare Emeth, Pine, cor. 17th.

Sheerith Israel, 11th, sw. cor. Franklin ave.

Sheerith Sphalt, N. 9th.

Temple Israel, Pine, ne. cor. Leffingwell ave.

United Hebrew, Olive, se. cor. 21st.

METHODIST EPISCOPAL.

Resident Bishop, Thos. Bowman, LL.D., Washington ave.

Rev. O. M. Martin, presiding elder, Clifton Heights.

Rev. Michael Roeder (German), presiding elder, Page ave.

Carondelet, Virginia ave.

Carondelet (German), Pennsylvania ave.

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Clifton Heights, north side Wilson ave., near Clifton, ave.

Ebenezer (German), Taylor ave.

Eden, Warren, corner 19th.

Eighth Street, 8th and Soulard.

Elliot Avenue, Elliot ave., corner Wash.

First German, Wash.

First Swedish, Leffingwell ave. and Bernard.

Gano Avenue, Gano ave., near Guy ave.

Goode Avenue, Goode ave., corner North Market.

Harlem Place, Jamieson ave., nw. cor. Fyler ave.

Jennings Station.

Neidringhause Memorial, Cass ave., nw. cor. 7th.

St. Luke's, Potomac, ne. cor. Texas ave.

Tower Grove, Kentucky ave., near Manchester road.

Trinity, corner 10th and North Market.

Union, Lucas ave., cor. Garrison ave.

Water Tower, Obear ave., nw. cor. 20th.

Wesley Chapel, Wash.

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, SOUTH.

Rev. Thos. M. Finney, presiding elder West St. Louis District; residence and office, Pine. Rev. Wm. R. Mays, presiding elder South St. Louis District; residence and office, Eads ave.

Carondelet, Virginia ave., se. cor. Haven.

Centenary, Pine, nw. cor. 16th.

Cook Avenue, Spring ave., se. cor. Cook ave.

Immanuel, Benton Station.

First, Glasgow ave., cor. Dayton.

Lafayette Park, Lafayette ave., cor. Missouri ave.

Marvin, Sidney, ne. cor. 12th,

Mount Auburn, North Market, ne. cor. Hodiamont ave.

St. John's, Locust, nw. co'r. Ewing ave.

St. Paul's, St. Louis ave.

St. Paul's Mission, Obear ave., nw. cor. Florissant ave.

Taylor Avenue, north side Maffitt ave., near Taylor ave.

M. E. Church (South), Preachers' meeting at Advocate office, Lucas place, every Monday, a. m.

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NEW JERUSALEM.

First German Church of the New Jerusalem, Tyler, nw. cor. 12th.

New Church Chapel, east side Cabanne, near Delmar ave.

Second German Church, St. Louis ave., sw. cor. Rauschenbach ave.

PRESBYTERIAN.

Biddle Street Mission, Biddle, cor. 15th.

Carondelet, Michigan ave.

Central, Lucas ave., ne. cor. Garrison ave.

Chouteau Avenue Mission, Chouteau ave.

Church of the Covenant, N. Grand ave.

Cote Brilliante, Marcus ave., near St. Louis ave.

Fairfax Mission, Fairfax ave.

First, Sarah, sw. cor. Washington ave.

First German, Autumn, cor. 10th.

Glasgow Avenue, Glasgow ave., near Dickson.

Grace, Goodfellow ave., near Theodosia ave.

Grand Avenue, Grand ave., near Washington ave.

Hope Mission, Minnesota ave.

Kossuth Avenue, Lee ave. and Prairie ave.

Lafayette Park, Missouri ave., sw. cor. Albion place.

McCausland Avenue, McCausland ave., near Bruno ave.

Memorial Tabernacle, Carr.

North, 11th, nw. cor. Chambers.

Presbyterian Mission, 38 S. Leonard ave.

Second, 17th, cor. Lucas place.

Second (German), N. 19th.

Soulard Mission, Carroll and 7th.

Sturgeon Mission, 11th, cor. Chambers.

Tabernacle Mission, Broadway and Biddle.

Washington Avenue, Compton and Washington aves.

West, Maple and Maryville aves.

Westminster, Pestalozzi.

Presbyterian Ministerial Ass'n, meets Monday, 11 a. m., at Presbyterian rooms, Olive.

PRESBYTERIAN, CUMBERLAND.

First Gethsemane (German), Sullivan ave., ne. cor. 25th.

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Lucas Avenue, Lucas ave, cor. Channing ave.

Second (German), Montgomery and 18th.

PRESBYTERIAN, UNITED.

First United, Morgan, cor. 19th.

Grand Avenue, Grand ave., cor. Forest Park Boulevard.

ROMAN CATHOLIC.

Archdiocese of St. Louis. Established Comprises that part of the State of Missouri east of Chariton river and of the west line of the counties of Cole, Maries, Pulaski, Texas and Howell. Archbishop, Most Rev. Peter Richard Kenrick, D. D., consecrated Nov. 30, Bishop of Drasa, and Coadjutor to Rt. Rev. Bishop Rosatti (first Bishop of St. Louis), became Bishop of St. Louis increated Archbishop in Vicars General, V. Rev. H. Muehlsiepen, V. Rev. Philip P. Brady. Council of the Archbishop — V. Rev. H. Muehlsiepen, V. G., V. Rev. Philip P. Walking the west highland way in 4 days, V. G., Rev. C. Ziegler, secretary; Rev. H. Van der Sauden, chancellor.

Cathedral, Walnut, bet. 2d and 3d.

Annunciation, 6th and LaSalle.

Assumption, Sidney, cor. 9th.

Church of the Holy Cross (German), Church road, near Bittner.

Church of the Holy Ghost (German), North Market, west of Taylor ave.

Church of the Holy Name of Jesus, E. Grand ave.

Church of the Sacred Heart, south side University, near 25th.

Church of the Visitation, B. V. M., Taylor ave., sw. cor. Easton ave.

Holy Angels, St. Ange ave. and LaSalle.

Holy Trinity (German), Mallinckrodt, cor. 14th.

Immaculate Conception, Jefferson ave., cor. Lucas place.

Our Lady of Mount Carmel, east side Church road, near Hall's Ferry road.

Our Lady of Perpetual Succor (German), west side 20th, near College ave.

St. Agatha (German), S, 9th.

St. Agnes, Sidney, ne. cor. Salena.

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St. Alphonsus (Redemptorist Fathers), Grand Ave., near. Cook ave.

St. Ann's, Nat'l Bridge road, 8 miles from city.

St. Anthony's (German), Meramec, cor. Compton ave.

St. Augustine (German), Lismore, cor. Hebert.

St. Bernard's, Hawk ave., near Gratiot.

St. Bonifacius (German), Michigan ave., ne. cor. Schirmer.

St. Bridget's, Carr, ne. cor. Jefferson ave.

St. Casimir's, 8th, sw. cor. Mound.

St. Columbkille's, Michigan ave., near Davis.

St. Cronan's, Boyle and Swan aves.

St. Elizabeth (col'd), N. 14th.

St. Eugelbert, Carter ave., near Marcus ave.

St. Francis of Sale's (German), Gravois ave., cor. Ohio ave.

St. Francis Xavier, Grand ave., sw. cor. Lindell ave.

St. Henry's (German), Hickory, cor. California ave.

St. James, east side Tamm ave., near Cheltenham ave.

St. John's, Chestnut, ne. cor. 16th.

St. John of Nepomuk (Bohemian), Soulard, nw. cor. 11th.

St. Joseph's (German), 11th and Biddle.

St. Kevin's, Park ave., ne. cor. Cardinal ave.

St. Lawrence O'Toole, 14th and O'Fallon.

St. Leo's, Mullanphy, nw. cor. 23d.

St. Liborius (German), North Market, se. cor. Hogan.

St. Malachy's, Clark and Ewing aves.

St. Mary's (German), 3d and Gratiot.

St. Mary's and St. Joseph's, Minnesota ave., near Iron.

St. Michael's, 11th and Clinton.

St. Nicholas (German), Lucas ave.

St. Patrick's, 6th and Biddle.

St. Paul the Apostle, Finney ave., cor. Pendleton ave.

Sts. Peter and Paul (German), 7th and Allen ave.

St. Rose, Goodfellow ave., cor. Etzel ave.

St. Stanislaus (Polish), 20th, near Cass ave.

St. Theresa's, N. Grand ave.

St. Thomas of Aquinas, Iowa ave., nw. cor. Osage.

St. Vincent's de Paul's (German and English), Park ave. and 9th.

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UNITARIAN.

Church of the Messiah, Garrison ave., ne. cor. Locust.

Church of the Unity, cor. Park and Armstrong aves.

Mission, Wash, sw. cor. 9th.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Antioch (col'd), Kennerly ave.

Baden Farmers state bank cedar rapids (col'd), Antelope.

Baden M. E. (col'd). Broadway, near Hall's Ferry road.

Bethany Presbyterian, west side 19th, near Wash.

Bethel Mission, N. Commercial.

Bethlehem Ger. Evang., Shaw ave., near Hereford.

Carondelet M. E. (col'd), Pennsylvania ave.

Central (col'd), Morgan, ne. cor. 23d.

Chambers Street Baptist, Chambers, se. cor. 10th.

Chinese Sunday School, Locust, nw. cor. 11th.

Christ Evangelical, Manchester road, near Private road.

Grace Evangelical, east side Garrison ave., near St. Louis ave.

Church of God, St. Louis ave., near Glasgow ave.

Church of Jesus Christ, Manchester road, near Pierce ave.

Compton Hill Baptist (col'd), LaSalle.

El Bethel Baptist, Athlone ave.

Fifth Baptist, Papin.

First Baptist (col'd), south side Clark ave., near 14th.

City Government.

Assessment of the Revenue, southeast wing, Court House.

Assessor and Collector of Water Rates, office south wing, 1st floor, City Hall.

Auditor, room 3, 2d floor, City Hall.

Board of Health, office south wing, City Hall.

Board of Police Commissioners, Four Courts.

Board of Public Improvements, office north wing, 3d floor, City Hall.

Collector of Revenue, east wing, Court House.

Commissioner of Public Buildings, office 11, 2d floor, City Hall.

Commissioner of Supplies, office 25, 1st floor, City Hall.

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Comptroller, room 2, 2d floor, City Hall.

Coroner, office Four Courts, cor. 11th.

Counsellor, office 12, 2d floor, City Hall.

Department of Election, and Registration, office 16, 1st floor, City Hall.

Dead Animal Contractor, office S. 11th.

Harbor and Wharf Commissioner, office 18, 1st floor, City Hall.

Health Commissioner, room 30, City Hall.

Inspectors of Boilers and Elevators, office 21, 2d floor, City Hall.

Inspector of Weights and Measures, room 28, 1st floor, City Hall.

Jailor, Four Courts.

Jury Commissioner, office 1st floor, Court House.

Lighting Department, office north wing, 3d floor, City Hall.

Marshal, Four Courts.

Mayor, room 1, 2d floor, City Hall.

Milk Inspector, office 20, 1st floor, City Hall.

Park Commissioner, office 42, 3d floor, City Hall.

Plumbing Inspection Department, office 41, 3d floor, City Hall.

Public Administrator, office 2d floor, Chestnut.

Recorder of Deeds, office south wing, Court House.

Register, room 24, 1st floor, City Hall.

Sewer Commissioner, office 3d floor, City Hall.

Sheriff, office basement north wing, Court House.

Street Commissioner, office south wing, 2d floor, City Hall.

Slop Contractor, office 1st floor, City Hall.

Superintendent Work House, Broadway, cor. Meramec.

Treasurer, room will there be a second stimulus check, 2d floor, City Hall.

Water Commissioner, office south wing, 1st floor, City Hall.

Convents.

Convent of Our Lady of Good Counsel, Cass ave.

Convent of the Carmelite Nuns, 2d Carondelet ave., cor. Victor.

Convent of the Franciscan Fathers, Meramec, se. cor. Compton ave.

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Convent of the Franciscan Sisters, N. 14th, and Blair ave., ne. cor. Mallinckrodt.

Convent of the Immaculate Conception, 8th, nw. cor. Marion.

Convent of the Maria Consilia Deaf Mute Institute, north side Cass ave., near 18th.

Convent youtube video embed responsive code the Redemptorist Fathers, Grand ave., near Easton ave.

Convent of the Visitation, Cass ave.

Convent and Academy of the Sacred Heart, Broadway, sw. cor. LaSalle.

Convent and Institute of the Sacred Heart, Meramec, near Minnesota ave.

Convent and Asylum of the House of the Good Shepherd, 17th, near Pine.

Oblate Sisters of Providence, Morgan.

Servants of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Gratiot, ne. cor. 3d.

Sisterhood of the Good Shepherd (Episcopalian), S. Compton ave.

Sisters de Notre Dame, S. 8th, S. 3d, North Market, N. Grand ave., and N. 20th.

Sisters of Loretto, Pine, and N. 25th.

Sisters of St. Joseph, N. 7th, 8th. cor. Marion, Minnesota ave., cor. Kansas, Cass ave., and Morgan.

St. Boniface Convent, Minnesota ave., nw. cor. Schirmer.

St. Joseph Convent of Mercy, Morgan, se. cor. 33d.

St. Vincent's German, Hogan, near Cass ave.

Ursuline Convent and Academy, 12th, bet. Russell and Ann aves.

Dispensaries.

American Medical College, S. Jefferson ave.

Beaumont Hospital Medical College, Pine.

Central, Franklin ave.

City, north side Market, near 11th.

Homoeopathic Medical College of Missouri, Howard.

Missouri Medical College, Lucas ave., ne. cor. 22d.

Polyclinic and Dispensary, N. 6th.

South Side Dispensary, S. Broadway.

St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, Jefferson ave., sw. cor. Gamble.

60

Educational.

ACADEMIES, COLLEGES, ETC.

Academy of the Christian Brothers, north side Easton ave., near King's highway.

American Medical College, S. Jefferson ave.

Beaumont Hospital Medical College, Pine.

Concordia Seminary, Jefferson ave., corner Winnebago.

Eden Theological College, St. Charles Rock road, southwest corner Hunt ave.

Forest Park University, Clayton road, corner Billon ave.

Henry Shaw School of Botany, Washington ave.

Homoeopathic Medical College of Missouri, Jefferson ave., southeast corner Howard.

Loretto Academy, Jefferson ave., northeast corner Pine.

Manual Training, Washington ave., southwest corner 18th.

Mary Institute, Locust, northeast corner Beaumont.

Missouri Dental Infirmary and College, Clark ave.

Missouri Medical College, Lucas ave., northeast cor. 22d.

Missouri School for the Blind, Morgan, northeast corner 19th.

Missouri School of Midwifery; Lying-in-Hospital, N. 9th.

Nurses Training School, Dillon.

Polytechnic, Washington ave., near 17th.

School of the Good Shepherd, S. Compton ave.

Smith Academy, Washington ave., corner 19th.

St. De Chantel Academy of the Visitation, Washington ave.

St. Elizabeth Institute, west side Arsenal, near Grand ave.

St. Joseph Academy, Minnesota ave., corner Kansas.

St. Louis College of Pharmacy, S. 6th.

St. Louis College of Physicians, and Surgeons, Jefferson ave., southwest corner Gamble.

St. Louis Hygienic College of Physicians and Surgeons, Chouteau ave.

St. Louis Law School, Lucas place.

St. Louis Medical College, 7th, corner Clark ave.

St. Louis Post Graduate School of Medicine, Jefferson ave., corner Lucas ave.

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St. Louis School of Midwifery, Chouteau ave.

St. Louis University, Grand ave., opposite Pine.

St. Vincent's Academy, Grand ave., corner Locust.

Washington University, 17th, corner Washington ave.

Women's Training School, N. 4th.

LIBRARIES.

Law, south wing Court House.

National Library Association, N. 8th.

St. Louis Mercantile Library Association, Locust, southwest corner Broadway.

Odd Fellows', Olive, southeast corner 9th.

Slovanska Lipa (Bohemian), Allen ave.

St. John's, Circulating, 16th, northeast corner Chestnut.

St. Louis Diocesan, Chestnut.

St. Louis Law School, Lucas place.

St. Louis Public, Chestnut, southwest corner 7th.

St. Louis Turnverein, Turners' Hall, Chouteau ave.

St. Louis University, Grand ave., opposite Pine.

Young Ladies' Sodality, Grand ave., opposite Pine.

Young Men's Christian Association, Circulating, Pine.

Young Men's Sodality, Grand ave., opposite Pine.

LOCATION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

Adams School, Norfolk ave., bet. Tower Grove and Vista aves.

Aldridge, Baden, Switzer and Christian aves.

Ames, Hebert and Fourteenth.

Arlington, Burd ave., near Cote Brilliante ave.

Ashland, Newstead and Sacramento ave.

Attucks, Seventh and Hickory.

Baden, Church road and Bittner.

Banneker, Montgomery and Leffingwell ave.

Belle ave., Belle ave. and Sarah.

Blair, Rauschenbach ave.

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Blair Branch, Dodier and St. Louis place.

Blow, South St. Unify financial credit union western way torrance ca, Virginia and Loughborough aves.

Bryan Hill, John ave.

Carondelet, Minnesota ave. and Hurck.

Carr, 15th and Carr.

Carr Lane, 23d and Carr.

Carroll, 10th and Carroll.

Charless, Shenandoah.

Chouteau, Chouteau ave.

Clay, Eleventh and Farrar.

Clinton, Grattan and Hickory.

Compton, Henrietta and Theresa ave.

Cote Brilliante, Kennerly and Cora aves.

Crow, Belle and Channing aves.

Delany, Virginia ave.

Delany (No. 6), Virginia ave., corner Bowen.

Des Peres (Blow Branch), Michigan ave, and Iron.

Dessalines, Twelfth.

Divoll, Dayton and Glasgow ave.

Douglas, 11th and Howard.

Dumas, Lucas ave.

Elliot, 15th and Walnut.

Elleardsville, Belleglade ave, and North Market.

Franklin, Lucas ave. and 17th.

Gardenville, Gravois ave.

Garneld, Jefferson ave. and Wyoming.

Garnett, Bulwer ave., near Adelaide ave.

Gratiot, Manchester road, near Billon ave.

Gravois, Gravois and Wyoming.

Grand View, Watson road, opposite Scanlan ave.

Hamilton, 23d and Dickson.

High School, Grand and The bank of greene county login aves.

Hodgen, Henrietta, southeast corner California ave.

Humboldt, 3d, near Russell ave.

Irving, Bremen ave., corner 28th.

Jackson, Maiden Lane, near Hogan.

James Dozier, Goodfellow and Maple aves.

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Jefferson, 9th, corner Wash.

Jefferson Branch, 9th, corner Wash.

Laclede, 6th, corner Poplar.

Lafayette, Ann ave., between 8th and 9th.

Lafayette Branch, S. 9th.

Lincoln, Eugenia.

Lincoln Branch, Walnut, near 23d.

Longfellow, Gratiot station.

Lowell, Adelaide ave., near 11th.

Lyon, Pestalozzi, corner 7th.

L'Ouverture (No. 4), Papin.

Madison, 7th, corner LaSalle.

Marquette, Warne ave., near Westminster place.

Meramec, Meramec, northwest corner Iowa ave.

Mullanphy (Douglas branch), 14th, between Mullanphy and Howard.

New Madison, Hickory, near 7th.

New Webster, 12th, corner Clinton. Normal, 15th and Pine.

Oak Hill, north side Tholozan ave., near Morgan Ford road.

O'Fallon, 15th, near Cass ave.

Peabody, 2d Carondelet ave., corner Carroll.

Penrose, Madison, near Leffingwell ave.

Pestalozzi, 7th, corner Barry.

Pope, Laclede ave., corner Ewing ave.

Rock Spring, Sarpy ave., near Hawk ave.

Simmons (No. 8), St. Louis ave.

Shaw, Old Manchester road, near King's highway.

Shepard, Marine ave., corner Miami.

Shepard (New), Capitol ave., Miami.

Spring ave., North Market, near Spring ave.

Stoddard, Lucas ave., corner Ewing ave.

Stunner High, 11th and Spruce.

Vashon (No. 10), Sulphur avenue, near Manchester road.

Webster, 11th, near Clinton.

Wheatly (No. 7), Manchester road, near Papin.

68

Express Offices.

Adams — North Broadway.

American — North Broadway.

Belleville & St. Louis — North Broadway.

Pacific — North Fourth St.

Southern — North Broadway.

United States — North Fourth St.

Cab and Coupe Companies.

MOUND CITY COUPE CO. — Office N. Eighth; Stable Pine; Telephones, and ; Stands, east side Eighth, bet. Pine and Olive, west side Sixth, bet. Pine and Olive, Park and Mississippi avenues, Lindell avenue.

MILEAGE RATES.

First one or two miles (14 blocks per mile) — 50c.

Additional half mile after second mile — 15c.

Additional mile after second mile — 25c.

First stop of five minutes — No charge.

Any subsequent stop, for each ten minutes or fraction thereof, 10c. When on Mileage Rates we charge from nearest stand to point where passenger enters cab.

HOUR RATES.

Within a radius of three miles from the Court House, per hour — 75c.

For each quarter of an hour or fraction thereof — 20c.

Beyond the three mile radius — per hour, $

For each quarter hour or fraction thereof — 25c.

For a continuous stop of one half hour or more when on above rates, seventy cents per hour will be charged while waiting.

Hour services charged from the time of leaving the stand nearest place calling to time necessary for Cab to return to its stand.

For each satchel or package too large to carry inside — 10c.

Double rates will be charged between the hours of 1 and 5 a. m.

All rates include either one or two persons.

When three persons ride fifty per cent additional will be charged.

No mile engagements for less than — 50c.

No hour engagements for less than one hour.

When service by the hour is desired it must be so stated when the Cab is engaged, otherwise distance rates will be charged.

Messenger Offices.

St. Louis Express and Messenger Co. — North Sixth, Telephone

Missouri Messenger Co. and Night-Watch Signal Service — Chestnut, Telephone

Excelsior — North Sixth, Telephone

Walton Express and Messenger Co. — North Sixth, Telephone

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Fire Department.

Headquarters, N. 7th.

Fire and Police Telegraph, office, Court House.

Firemen's Fund Association, N. 7th.

St. Louis Firemen's Pension Fund and Relief Ass'n, N. 7th.

Underwriters' Salvage Corps, headquarters, Locust.

Hospitals.

Alexian Brothers Hospital and Insane Asylum, S. Broadway.

Bethesda, Russell ave., nw. cor. 9th.

City, Lafayette ave., cor. Linn.

Female Hospital, north side Arsenal, near Sublette ave.

German Evangelical Lutheran Hospital, Potomac.

Good Samaritan, Jefferson ave., nw. cor. Dayton.

Lying-In, O'Fallon, se. cor. 10th.

Martha Parsons' Free Hospital for Children, Channing ave., sw. cor. School.

Missouri Pacific Railway, east side California ave., near Eads ave.

O'Fallon Park Sanitarium, O'Fallon Park.

Pius, O'Fallon, se. cor. 14th.

Quarantine and Small Pox, south of Jefferson Barracks.

St. Ann's Maternity, O'Fallon.

St. John's, Lucas place.

St. Louis Children's, Jefferson ave., se. cor. Adams.

St. Louis Iron Mountain and Southern Railway Employes' Home, Virginia ave., nw. cor. Haven.

St. Louis Mullanphy, Montgomery, ne. cor. Bacon.

St. Louis Polyclinic and Emergency, Olive.

St. Louis Surgical, N. Jefferson ave.

St. Luke's (Episcopalian), Washington ave., ne. cor. 19th.

St. Mary's Infirmary, Papin.

The Protestant Hospital Ass'n of St. Louis, N. 18th.

U. S. Marine, Marine ave., se. cor. Miami; office. Olive, se. cor. 3d.

Insurance.

St. Louis Board of Fire Underwriters, office N. 3d.

Office Board of Underwriters of St. Louis, Marine, office, Locust.

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Hotels.

Beaumont Flats — Olive.

Rossmore — Northwest corner Eighth and Chestnut.

Carondelet — South Broadway, $1.

City — South Fourth, $1 and $

Columbus House — North Broadway.

Commercial — Chestnut, 50c and upwards.

Creve Coeur — Office Pine.

European — South Second, $

Geyer House — Market.

Golden Lion — Northeast corner Seventh and Pine.

Grand Central — Poplar, $1.

Green Tree — South Second.

Heitkamp's — North Tenth.

Hoeffner — Clark avenue.

Hotel Barnum — Southeast corner Washington avenue and Sixth, $1 and $

Hotel Belvidere — Washington avenue.

Hotel Pearl — Northeast corner Thirteenth, and Pine.

Hotel Brunswick — North Seventh, 50c.

Hotel Emory — North Eleventh.

Hotel Gamier — Southeast corner Seventh and Walnut.

Hotel Gillam — 5 North Eighth.

Hotel Gienmore — Olive.

Hotel Hilton — Seventh and Pine.

Hotel Hunt — Northeast corner Ninth and Chestnut, 75c and up.

Hotel Rozier — Northeast corner Thirteenth and Olive streets, 75c to $2.

Hotel St. Louis — Southeast corner Fourth and Locust.

Hotel Strait — Northwest corner Twelfth and Poplar.

Hotel Western — North Third.

Hurst's — Southwest corner Broadway and Chestnut, $1 and up.

International — South Seventh.

Koetter's — Northeast corner Fourth and Elm.

Laclede — Southeast corner Sixth and Chestnut, $2 and $3.

Lafayette Park — Mississippi avenue, $

Lincoln Flats — Southeast corner Grand avenue and Olive.

Lindell — Northwest corner Sixth and Washington avenue, $3 to $

Meilke's — Market.

Mona House — North Sixth.

O'Fallon — North Main.

Pacific House — South Broadway.

Peabody Flats — Olive.

Sprague's European — North Broadway.

Star — Market, $2.

St. Charles Flats — North Fourteenth.

St. James — South Broadway, $2.

St. Lawrence — North Broadway.

St. Louis House — North Main, $1.

The Southern — Walnut, Fourth to Broadway, $3 to $

Union Depot — Spruce, $1.

Merchants Hotel — Southwest corner Twelfth and Olive.

Strait's European Hotel — Corner Twelfth and Poplar, opp. Union Depot.

The Montesino — and Washington avenue.

The Richelieu — Washington avenue, Fourteenth and St. Charles.

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St. Louis Post Office, Olive, Locust, Eighth and Ninth Streets.

EXECUTIVE DIVISION.

JOHN B. HARLOW — Postmaster.

ISAAC H. STURGEON — Assistant Postmaster.

JAMES H. STEGER — Secretary.

DAVID B. HAYS — Cashier.

POST OFFICE DIRECTORY.

Postmaster Assistant Postmaster. — RoomNinth street corridor. Office hours, 9 a. m., to 5 p. m., except Sunday.

Cashier and Accountant — RoomNinth street corridor. Open 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., except Sunday.

Superintendent of the Mailing Division — Corner Eighth and Locust streets. Open 8 a. m. to 6 p. m., except Sunday.

Superintendent of City Delivery (which includes Carriers, the General Delivery and Advertised Letters.) — Olive street front. Open 8 a. m. to 6 p.m., except Sunday.

General Delivery. Ladies and Gentlemen's window's and Advertised Letters — East end. Olive street front. Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m., except Sunday.

Superintendent of the Money Order Division (Foreign and Domestic Money Orders paid and issued) — RoomsandNinth street corridor. Open 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., except Sunday.

Superintendent Registry Division — North end, Ninth street corridor. Open 9 a. m. to 6 p. m., except Sunday.

Inquiry Office (Lost letters, packages, etc.) — RoomWest end. Olive street corridor. Open 9 a. m. to 6 p. m., except Sunday.

Stamp Division — West end. Olive street front. Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m., except Sunday.

Newspaper Exchange Case — Eighth street corridor. Accessible day and night.

Post Office Inspectors — Room2d floor, Locust street corridor.

Superintendent of the Railway Mail Service — Rooms,and4th floor, Ninth and Locust street corridors.

LOCATION OF P. O. STATIONS.

STATION A. — North Broadway.

STATION B. — South Broadway.

STATION C. — Corner Easton and Leonard avenues.

STATION D. — South Broadway.

STATION E. — South Jefferson avenue.

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Public Buildings and Places of Interest.

EXPOSITION AND MUSIC HALL. Olive, Thirteenth to Fourteenth streets.

FAIR GROUNDS, RACE TRACK AND ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. Grand ave. and Natural Bridge Road. Cass ave., Franklin ave., Mound City, Northern Central, Union and Lindell Railways go direct.

MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE. Third and Pine streets.

NEW CUSTOM HOUSE. Ninth and Olive streets.

EADS BRIDGE. Foot of Washington ave., entrance on Third street.

THE COURT HOUSE. Broadway and Market streets.

FOUR COURTS and JAIL. Eleventh and Clark avenue.

POST OFFICE. Olive, Eighth and Ninth streets to Locust street.

MERCANTILE LIBRARY. Broadway and Locust street.

PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBRARY. Seventh and Chestnut streets.

BELLEFONTAINE AND CALVARY CEMETERIES. Https www suntrust online banking part of city. Broadway cars and Wabash Railway from Collins street and Franklin avenue.

WATER TOWER, PUMPING WORKS AND SETTLING BASINS. Bellefontaine cars from Third street and Washington avenue and Broadway cars north.

MARINE HOSPITAL. Broadway cars south.

WATER WORKS. Northern part of city. Take Broadway cars.

RESERVOIR. Lafayette and Grand avenues. Peoples' (Cable) line.

78

THE ARSENAL. Green Line cars south from Fourth street and Chouteau avenue.

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS. Nineteenth street and Lucas Place. Olive street Cable.

CITY HOSPITAL. Lafayette avenue and Linn street, blue line cars.

ST. LOUIS HOSPITAL. Grand ave. and Pine street, Olive street line.

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY. Seventeenth street and Washington avenue.

UNION MARKET. Broadway and Morgan to Lucas avenue and Sixth street.

COTTON EXCHANGE. Main and Walnut streets.

UNION STOCKYARDS. Broadway car north.

NATIONAL STOCKYARDS. East St. Louis.

MERCANTILE CLUB. Seventh and Locust streets.

ST. LOUIS CLUB. Ewing avenue and Locust street.

UNIVERSITY CLUB. Twenty-seventh and Pine streets.

GERMANIA CLUB. Eighth and Gratiot streets.

HARMONIE CLUB. Eighteenth and Olive streets.

LIEDERKRANZ. Thirteenth and Chouteau avenue.

MARQUETTE CLUB. Grand avenue and Pine streets.

ELKS' CLUB. Laclede Building, Fourth and Olive sts.

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. Pine st.

SPORTMAN'S PARK. Grand and Sullivan avenues. Citizens', Cass ave., Lindell, Union, Mound City and Northern Central Lines go direct.

SOUTH SIDE RACE TRACK. Missouri and Russell aves. People's line. Jefferson avenue and blue line cars from Broadway and Lucas avenue go direct.

THE TUNNEL

Enters at Washington avenue and 3rd street. It is 4, feet in length; runs under Washington avenue and 8th st.

80

Land and River Transportation.

STREET RAILWAYS.

Baden & St. Louis; office, N. Broadway.

Benton-Bellefontaine; office, N. 20th.

Cass Avenue & Fair Ground; office, Eastern ave.

Citizens Railway Co.; office, Easton ave.

East St. Louis Connecting Ry. Co.; office, 24 N. 3d.

Forest Park, Laclede Ave. and Fourth Street; office, 10 S. Compton ave.

Fourth Street & Arsenal Ry. Co.; office, Park ave.

Jefferson Avenue Ry. Co.; office, Montgomery, near Jefferson ave.

Linden Ry. Co.; offices, Locust, Chouteau ave., and Finney ave., se. cor. Vandeventer ave.

Missouri Railroad Co.; office, 10 S. Compton ave.

Mound City Ry. Co.; office, A St. Louis ave.

Northern Central Railway Co.; office, Easton ave.

People's Railway Co.; office, Park ave.

Southern Railroad Co.; office, S. Broadway.

St. Louis & Suburban Ry. Co.; office. Franklin ave., ne. cor, Channing ave.

St. Louis Railroad Co.; office, N. Broadway.

St. Louis & East St. Louis Electric Ry. Co.; office, N. 3d.

Union Depot Railroad Co.; office, Gravois ave., sw. cor. Jefferson ave.

Union Ry. Co.; office, Easton ave.

RAILROADS.

Cairo Short Line, St. L., A. & T. H.; office, N. 4th.

Eureka Springs Ry. Co.; office, N. 6th.

Kansas City, St. Louis & Chicago; office, Olive.

Louisiana & Missouri River R. R.; office, N. Broadway.

Louisville, Evansville & St. Louis Consolidated; office, N. Broadway.

Louisville & Nashville; office, N. 4th.

Missouri, Kansas & Texas; office, Chestnut.

Missouri Pacific Ry., Leased and Operated Line; office, 6th, nw. cor. Locust, and 7th, near Poplar.

Ohio & Mississippi Railway; offices, N. Broadway and Union Depot.

St. Louis Bridge Co. & Tunnel; office; Bridge entrance.

82

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis; office. Broadway, sw. cor. Chestnut.

Chicago & Alton; office, N. Broadway.

Mobile & Ohio; office, N. Broadway. Terminal Railroad Ass'n of St. Louis; office, 2d floor, Union Depot.

The St. Louis, Kansas City & Colorado; office, Pine.

The Wabash Railroad; office, Olive. St. Louis Merchant Bridge Terminal Ry. Co.; office, N. 4th.

St. Louis Transfer Ry. Co.; office, 24 N. 3d.

St. Louis & Eastern Ry. Co.; office, Locust.

St. Louis & San Francisco Ry. Co.; office, Pine.

St. Louis Southeastern Ry.; office, N. 6th.

Vandalia Line; office, N. Broadway.

Vicksburg, Shreveport & Pacific; office, St. Louis & New Orleans Anchor Line wharfboat, foot of Chestnut.

STEAMBOATS.
UPPER MISSISSIPPI.

Diamond Jo Line; office, wharfboat, foot of Wash'ton ave.

Eagle Packet Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Vine.

St. Louis & Clarksville Packet Co.; office, N. B'way, and wharfboat, foot of Vine.

STEAMBOATS
LOWER MISSISSIPPI.

Cherokee Packet Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Locust.

St. Louis & New Orleans Anchor Line; office, wharfboat, foot of Chestnut.

St. Louis & Mississippi River Packet Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Vine.

St. Louis & Tennessee River Packet Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Locust.

St. Louis & Mississippi Valley Transportation Co.; office, Main, sw. cor. Walnut.

STEAMBOATS
MISSOURI RIVER.

Kansas City & Missouri River Transportation Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Olive.

St. Louis & Rocheport Packet Co.; office, Vine.

84

STEAMBOATS
ILLINOIS RIVER.

St. Louis, Naples & Peoria Packet Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Olive.

TOW BOAT COMPANIES.

Dolphin Transportation Co.; office, Chestnut.

Michael Transportation Co.; office, Kosciusko ave.

The Consolidated Coal Co. of St. Louis; office, Laclede Bldg., N. 4th, and wharf boat, foot of Pine.

Western Coal and Tow Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Carr.

FERRIES.

Louisville, Evansville & St. Louis Railroad Ferry; foot of Poplar.

Madison County Ferry; office, N. 3d.

St. Clair Ferry & Transfer Co.; office, Chestnut.

The Waterloo & Carondelet Turnpike Road and Ferry Co.; office, Chestnut.

Wiggins Ferry Co.; office, 3d, se. cor. Chestnut.

MARKETS.

Allen, 12th, nw. cor. Russell ave.

Biddle, 13th. Biddle and O'Fallon.

Central, S. Broadway.

French, Convent, junction 4th and Broadway.

Reservoir, 22d, near Benton.

Soulard, west side 7th, near Carroll.

South St. Louis, S. Broadway.

Sturgeon, North Market, Broadway and 9th.

Union, Broadway to 6th, Morgan to Lucas ave.

Public Institutions.

City Dispensary, City Hall.

City Hall, 11th, corner Market.

City Hospital, Linn, bet. Lafayette and Park aves.

City Morgue, Spruce, ne. cor. 12th.

City Poor House, Arsenal, near Sublette ave.

City Water Works, Bissell's Point.

Court House, Broadway, cor. Chestnut.

86

Female Hospital, Old Manchester road, cor. Arsenal.

House of Refuge, Osage, opposite Virginia ave.

Insane Asylum, Arsenal, near Macklind ave.

State Officers in St. Louis.

Coal Oil Inspector; office, N. Levee.

Grain Inspection Department; office, Olive.

Insurance Department; N. 8th.

The Courts.

U. S. Circuit Court, held in Custom House.

U. S. District Court, held in Custom House.

U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Custom House.

Supreme Court of Missouri, held in Jefferson City.

St. Louis Court of Appeals, held in south wing of Court House.

Probate Court, held in east wing of Court House.

Circuit Court of St. Louis, held in the Court House.

St. Louis Criminal Court, held in the Four Courts Build'g.

Court of Criminal Correction, held in Four Courts Build'g.

Police Courts (First District), Four Courts.

United States Officers in St. Louis.

Subsistence Department; office, Chestnut.

Medical Purveying Depot; N. Commercial.

Medical Department; Chestnut.

Pay Department; office, N. 8th.

Quartermaster's Department; office, N. 8th.

St. Louis Clothing Depot (Old Arsenal), 2d, near Arsenal.

Recruiting Office, Pine.

Cavalry Depot, Jefferson Barracks, Mo.

St. Louis Powder Depot, Jefferson Barracks.

U. S. Assayer; office, 3d, se. cor. Olive.

U. S. Circuit Clerk; office, Custom House.

U. S. District Attorney; office, Custom House.

U. S. District Clerk; office, Custom House.

U. S. Custom House, 8th, Olive and Locust.

Office Collector of Customs, Custom House.

U. S. Marine Hospital Service, office, 3d, se. cor. Olive.

88

U. S. Merchants national bank building mobile al of Steam Vessels; office. Custom House.

U. S. Weather Bureau; observer's office, dome of Custom House Building.

U. S. Lighthouse Inspector; headquarters, Custom House.

U. S. Engineers; rooms to Custom House.

Missouri River Commission; office, Lucas place.

Mississippi River Commission; office, Pine.

U. S. Lighthouse Engineers; office, Lucas place.

Internal Revenue; office, Custom House.

Internal Revenue Agent; Custom House.

Register in Bankruptcy; Olive.

U. S. Treasury Department; office, Custom House.

U. S. Special Examiners Pension Bureau; Custom House.

Examining Surgeons' Offices, U. S. Pension Bureau; 4th floor, Custom House.

U. S. Marshal; 3d floor. Custom House.

U. S. Jury Commissioner; office, Olive.

Post Office, 8th, cor. Olive.

Miscellaneous.

JEFFERSON BARRACKS.

Ten miles from city on St. L., I. M. & S. R. B.

NATIONAL CEMETERY.

Adjoins the Barracks.

QUARANTINE.

Between the Barracks and Arsenal, on the river. City small-pox patients are cared for here. During yellow fever epidemics steamboats and Iron Mountain trains are examined.

WATER WORKS.

On river at Bissell's Point. 3 1/2 miles north; four settling reservoirs, x feet, and 12 feet deep; capacity, 72, gallons; two engines pumping 30, gallons of water in twenty-four hours. Their entire capacity is 56,; daily consumption, 26, Compton Hill reservoir, on Grand and Lafayette avenues, occupies 36 acres; capacity, 60, gallons. Water Tower is feet high. The spiral stairway has steps. New tower is about the same height.

90

BURLINGTON ROUTE.
North Broadway.
Stations.Distance.Fare.Populat'n.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Wann 22
Upper Alton 24 1,
Woods 27
Brighton 35
Piasa 40 1 34
Medora 44
Kemper 47
Rock Bridge 52
Greenfield 57 1,
CLEVELAND, CIN., CHICAGO & ST. L.
(BIG FOUR ROUTE.)
19 North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Venice
Mitchell 15
Edwardsville Cr. 21
Wann 24
Bethalto 28
Bunker Hill 39 1,
Dorchester 44
Gillespie 49
Clyde 53
Litchfield 58 5,
JACKSONVILLE SOUTHEASTERN.
Chestnut street.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Bridge June 3
Madison 5
Basco 10
Stallings 11
Peters 14
Glen Carbon 16
Edwardsville 21 3,
Manix 26
Worden 31
Staunton 37 2,
Mt. Olive 43 1,
Litchfield 51 5,
LOUISVILLE AND NASHVILLE.
Forth Fourth street.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 25 15,
Round House
Rankin 6
French Village 9
Birkner's 12
Summit 14
Belleville 17 15,
Rentchler's 22 93
Mascoutah 27 2,
Pensoneaus
New Memphis 34
Queen's Lake 35
Venedy merchants national bank building mobile al
Okawville 41
Addieville
Vashville 51 2,
Beaucoup 56 48
Ashley 62 1,

These rates are from East Grenada cooperative bank. Louis. Add 25c to make the rate from St. Louis proper.

96

LOUISVILLE, EVANSVILLE & ST. LOUIS. — AIR LINE.
North Broadway.
Stations.Distance.Fare.Populat'n.
St. Louis ,
Relay
East St. Louis 2 15,
Harmony 11 pokemon trading card game online not loading Belleville 15
Belleville 16 15,
Grassland 24 merchants national bank building mobile al
New Baden 32
Germantown 41
Bartelso 45 32
Poseys 51
Centralia 64 4,
ILLINOIS & ST. LOUIS DIVISION.
St. Louis
East St. Louis 2 15,
Lake 8
Pittsburg 10
Harmony 11
Lenz 12
Yoch 13
Schureman 13 1/2
Wards 14
Belleville June
West Belleville 15
Belleville 16 15,
MISSOURI PACIFIC.
Broadway and Olive.
St. Louis ,
Cheltenham 5
Benton 6
Edgebrook 8
Webster 10
Kirkwood 14 1,
Barrett's 17
Valley Park 19
St. Paul 24
Glencoe 27 52
Eureka 30
Allenton 32
Pacific 37 1,
CREVE COEUR LAKE BRANCH.
St. Louis ,
Laclede June 9
Mentor 10
Von Schrader's 12
Emerson 16
Creve Coeur 21
MOBILE & OHIO.
North Broadway.
St. Louis
Millstadt June 13 1,
Columbia 14 1,
Waterloo 23 1,
Burksville 28
Red Bud 36
Baldwin 45
54 1,
OHIO & MISSISSIPPI.
North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 5 15,
Caseyville 10
Alma 17
O'Fallon 19
Lebanon 25 1,
Summerfield 27
Trenton 31
Aviston 35
Breese 40
Carlyle 48
Huey 52
Shattuck 57
Sandoval 62
Odin 65

98

ST. LOUIS & CAIRO SHORT LINE.
Laclede Building.
Stations.Distance.Fare.Populat'n.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 15,
Centreville 6
Ogles 10
Raibs 12
West Belleville 13
Belleville 14 15,
Wilderman 18
Freeburgh 22
Lementon 25
New Athens 29
Lenzburgh 33
Marissa 37
White Oak 39
Tilden 44 83
Coulterville 47
Swanwick 51
Pinckneyville 61 1,
ST. LOUIS, KANSAS CITY & COLORADO.
Pine — North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
Forest Park 4
Forsythe June 5
Forest City 6
Clayton 8
Centerton 10
Olivette 11
Lackland 12
Mokeville 15
Vigus 18
Bonner 19
Dripping Sp'ngs. 20
Creve Coeur 21
Valley Forge 23
Drew 26
Gumbo 29
Atherton 31
Centaur 34
Port Royal 36
St. Albans 39
Becker 42
Labadie 46 77
Villa Ridge 52
Derry 56
Union 59
ST. LOUIS, KEOKUK & NORTHWESTERN.
(BURLINGTON ROUTE.)
North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
Ferguson 12
Bridgeton 16
St. Charles 23 6,
St. Peters 32
Groves 36
Richfield 39
Old Monroe 43
ST. LOUIS, IRON MOUNTAIN & SOUTHERN.
Broadway and Olive.
St. Louis ,
Carondelet 6
Jefferson Bar'ck 10
Cliff Cave 13
Wicks 19
Sulphur Springs 23
Bushberg 25 81
Riverside 26
Silica 32
Hematite 36
Victoria 39
DeSoto 42 3,
Vineland 47 60
Blackwell 51 75
Cadet 57
Mineral Point 61

ST. LOUIS & SAN FRANCISCO.
St. Louis & San Francisco — North Broadway.
Stations.Distance.Fare.Populat'n.
St. Louis ,
Grand Avenue 2
Tower Grove 8
Howard's 4
Cheltenham 5
Arloe 6
Old Orchard 9
Shady Side 10
Oakland 11 1/2
Oak Ridge 12
Spring Park 13
Windsor Springs 14
Valley Park 18
Ranken 20
South Side 22
Mincke 23 70
Crescent 25
Eureka 21
Allenton 30
Pacific 34 1,
TOLEDO, ST. LOUIS & KANSAS CITY.
Olive street.
St. Louis,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Stallings 11
Edwardsville 18 3,
Alhambra 32
New Douglas 38
Sorento 44
Donnellson 50
Fillmore 62
Ramsey 72
VANDALIA.
Corner Fifth and Olive streets.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Griswold Place 9 45
Collinsville 13 3,
Cantine 15
Formosa 19
Troy 21
Sherman Park 22
St. Jacob's 27
Highland 32 1,
Pierron 37
Pocahontas 41
Stubblefield 46 1 55
Greenville 51 1,
Smithborough 55
Mulberry Grove. 59
Hagarstown 65
Vandalia 69 2,
WABASH — EAST.
North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Venice 6 33
Nameoki 11 90
Mitchell 13
Poag 17
Edwardsville Jc. 22
Carpenter 28
Worden 32
Staunton 38 2,
Mt. Olive 44 1,
Litchfield 52 5,
WABASH — WEST.
St. Louis
Ferguson 12
Bridgeton 16
Bonfils 20 81
St. Charles 23 6,
St. Peter's 32
O'Fallon 86
Gilmore 42

Banks.

BANK.LOCATION.CASHIER.CAPITAL.
American Exchange Bank Northeast corner Third and Pine streets Walker Hill $,
Boatman's Bank Northwest corner Fourth and Washington ave. W. H. Thompson 2,
Bremen Bank North Broadway J. C. Gerichten ,
Central Trust Co Oriel Building G. T. Cram ,
Chemical National Bank Southeast https www suntrust online banking Sixth and Locust streets C. S. Warner ,
Citizens' Savings Bank North Third street L. A. Battalie ,
Commercial Bank North Third street A. B. Lansing, jr ,
Continental Bank Fourth, northwest corner Olive street C. W. Bullen 2,
Fourth National Bank Fourth, northeast corner Washington avenue G. A. W. Augst 1,
Franklin Bank North Fourth street G. W. Garrels ,
German American Bank Fourth, southwest corner Franklin avenue C. E. Kircher , first federal midwest online banking Savings Institution Third, southwest corner Pine street Richard Haspes ,
International Bank Fourth, southeast corner Chestnut street Adolph Herthel , first american bank credit card National Bank Olive, southwest corner Fourth street Jas. B. True 1,
Lafayette Bank Broadway, northeast corner Merchant street P. J. Doerr ,
Mechanics Fourth, southeast corner Pine street R. R. Hutchinson. ,
Merchants' National Bank Olive street John Nickerson ,
Mississippi Valley Trust Co. North Fourth street. John Scullen, 2d V. Pres. ,
Mullanphy Savings Bank Broadway, southwest corner Cass avenue L. G. Kammerer ,
National Bank Commerce Olive, northeast corner Broadway J. C. Van Blarcom 3,
National Bank of Republic Olive, southeast corner Ninth street Jno. Caro Russell ,
Northwestern Savings Bank North Market street P. Obermier ,
St. Louis National Bank North Broadway Wm. E. Burr, jr 1,
St. Louis Safe Dep. & Sav. Bank Locust, between Fifth and Sixth streets G. A. Hayward, Sec. ,
Southern Com. & Sav. Bank South Broadway W. F. Streit ,
South Side Bank Broadway, northwest corner Pestalozzi street Chas. C. Ruess,
State Bank St. Louis North Third street J. H. McCluney ,
Third National Bank Olive street T. A. Stoddart 1,
Union Trust Co. Southwest corner Ninth and Olive Streets C. Tompkins 1,

Beer Manufactured in St. Louis.

, barrels or 14, gallons.
, barrels or 16, gallons.
, barrels or 19, gallons.
, barrels or 25, gallons.
, barrels or 29, gallons.
10,69, barrels or 33, gallons.
1, barrels or 34, gallons.
1, barrels or 34, gallons.
1, barrels or 33, gallons.
1, barrels or 39, gallons.
1, barrels or 43, gallons.
1, barrels or 46, gallons.
1, barrels or 48, gallons.
1, barrels or 58, gallons.
1, barrels or 56, gallons.

Shipments for export to foreign countries for the past year were:gallons.

Temperature.

All the figures in the following table were obtained from Prof. F. E. Nipher, for many years Director of the Missouri Meteorological Bureau; they refer only to the city of St. Louis:

 
Maximum Temp
Minimum Temp - -
Av'ge Daily Max. for July
Av'ge Daily Min. for July
Av'ge Daily Max. for Aug
Av'ge Daily Min. for Aug

Mean temperatures based on the observations of fifty-three years:
July, 80°.4; August, 70°.5; January, 31°

The difference between the average daily maximum and the average daily minimum shows the range between day and night. This difference is seen to be about eighteen degrees.

Boots and Shoes.

But a decade ago St. Louis' total output of boots and shoes was valued at the paltry $, for a year. Ten fleeting years, and to-day that same output foots up $8,

Last year St. Louis receivedcases of shoes from Boston; Chicago and New York each ranked away above her by over 60, cases, but a mighty change has taken place in the past twelve months and St. Louis has pushed past her two former superiors and fills first place with the handsome aggregate ofcases to her credit. Chicago comes second withcases, and New York is content withcases.

Following is a table showing the shipments from Boston to the principal distributing points throughout the country:

 Cases.
St. Louis ,
Chicago ,
New York ,
Baltimore ,
Philadelphia ,
Cincinnati ,
Nashville 76,
Memphis 57,
Cleveland 56,
Louisville 54,
New Orleans 47,

At this rate of progress in five years from now St. Louis will lead the world in the number of shoes manufactured and in the aggregate distribution of same. She has plowed her way through to the front, laboring under the difficulties of inexperience and lack of reputation. Inch by inch she has gained supremacy over all competitors, with but a single exception. Her goods are worn throughout the greater part of our country and find their way into export channels.

St. Louis Bridges.

 Eads.Merchants.
Centre span ft. ft. 5 in.
Other spans ft. ft. 5 in.

The pier foundations of the Eads Bridge are feet below the river surface; cost $9, The Merchants cost, with approaches, $3,

St. Louis Street Railways.

 MILES.
Benton-Bellefontaine (Electric) 8
Baden and North St. Louis (Horse) 3
Cass Avenue and Fair Grounds (Horse) 7
Forest Park and Laclede (Electric) 5 1/4
Jefferson Avenue (Horse)
Lindell, three lines (Electric) 35
Missouri, two lines (Cable and Electric) 18 1/3
Mound City (Electric) 8
Northern Central (Horse) 10
Peoples' (Cable) 10
Southern (Electric)
Union (Horse) 8
Union Depot, three lines (Electric) 27
St. Louis and Suburban (Electric)
Citizens' (Cable)
St. Louis (Cable) 14 2/3
Fourth St. and Arsenal Railway (Horse and Cable) 6
Total

Summer Gardens.

Schnaider's Mississippi and Chouteau avenues.
Uhrig's Cave Jefferson and Washington mills v board of education of the district of columbia.
Bodeman's Grove Grand avenue and Wyoming street.
Concordia Park Thirteenth and Wyoming streets.
Klausman's Cave South Broadway.
Koerner's Lafayette and 2d Carondelet avenues.
The Bellevue Easton avenue and King's Highway.

Business of St. Louis Bridges and Ferries,

And comparison with previous years. Amount of freight in tons transferred across the river at St. Louis during
BYCars.Tons.Total Tons.
The St. Louis Bridge 95, 1,
The St. Louis Bridge, by wagon , 1,
Merchants' Bridge 28, ,
The Wiggins Ferry 35, ,
The Wiggins Ferry, by wagon , ,
The Carondelet Ferry 72,
Louisville, Evansville & St. L. Ferry 8,
The Madison County Ferry 43,
Total tons West to East during 3,
Total tons West to East during 2,
Total tons West to East during 2,
Total tons West to East during 2,
Total tons West to East during 1,
Total tons West to East during 1,
Total tons West to East during 1,
Total tons West to East during 1,
BYCars.Tons. Total Tons.
The St. Louis Bridge , 2,
The St. Louis Bridge, by wagon , 3,
Merchants' Bridge 21, ,
The Wiggins Ferry 66, 1,
The Wiggins Ferry, by wagon , 1,
The Carondelet Ferry ,
Louisville, Evansville & St. L. Ferry 18,
The Madison County Ferry 72,
Total tons East to West during 5,
Total tons East to West during 4,
Total tons East to West during 4,
Total tons East to West during 4,
Total tons East to West during 4,
Total tons East to West during 4,
Total tons East to West during 3,
Total tons East to West during 3,
Total both Ways 8,
Total both Ways 7,
Total both Ways 6,
Total both Ways 6,
Total both Ways 6,

Boulevards.

The Street Commissioner of St. Louis is now at work on the plans and construction of a system of boulevards which will make this city a worthy rival of the older European cities in the beauty of its driveways and great thoroughfares. The system, as outlined by the Board of Public Improvements, will comprise boulevards embracing the following sections of the city:

Columbia avenue from west line of Clifton Heights to Kings-highway, and then continued along Magnolia avenue to Grand, 7, feet or miles.

Delmar avenue from Grand to city limits, 22, feet or miles.

Florissant avenue from Hebert street to city limits, 25, feet or miles.

Forest Park Boulevard from Grand avenue to Kingshighway, 9, feet or miles.

Grand avenue from Carondelet Park to Park avenue, 20, feet or miles.

Grand avenue from Natural Bridge road to Broadway, 4, feet or miles.

Hebert street from 12th street to Florissant avenue, 2, feet or miles.

Kingshighway from Arsenal street to Florissant avenue, 30, feet or miles.

Longhborough avenue from Broadway to Gravois, 11, feet or miles.

Lindell avenue from Grand avenue to Kingshighway, 9, feet bank of america 5.25 cash back card miles.

Macklin avenue from Arsenal street to Forest Park, 8, feet or miles.

McCausland road from Clayton road to Manchester road, 8, feet or miles.

Park avenue from 11th street to Kingshighway, 19, feet or miles.

Pine street from 12th street to Kingshighway, 20, feet or miles.

Page avenue from Easton avenue to city limits, 20, feet or miles.

Russell avenue from 12th street to Grand avenue, 8, feet or miles.

St. Louis avenue from 12th street to city limits, 26, feet or miles.

Skinker road from Clayton road to Florissant avenue, 33, feet, or miles.

Twelfth street from Russell avenue to Hebert, 17, feet or miles.

Union avenue from Forest Park to Natural Bridge road, 13, feet or miles.

Total,feet or miles.

Building Improvements.

VALUE OF BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS DURING
MONTHS.New Brick Build'gs.New Frame Build'gs
No.Value.No.Value.
January$ ,$ 79,
February,73,
March1,87,
April,,
May1,,
June,9476,
July1,99,
August1,85,
September,,
October,,
November,7553,
December,95,
Totals2,$11,1,$1,
 Brick and Stone Buildings.Frame Buildings.Total Buildings.Cost.
2,1,4,$13,
2,1,3,13,
2,1,3,9,
2,2,8,
1,2,8,
1,2,7,
2,2,7,
1,2,7,
1,2,7,
1,2,5,
1,4,
1,1,3,
1,1,3,
1,1,2,
1,2,3,
1,1,3,

Amount Coal Received in St. Louis.

R.R. ROUTE.
Bushels.

Bushels.
Ohio and Mississippi 12, 10,
Chicago, Alton & St. Louis , ,
C. C. C. and St. Louis 5, 3,
St. Louis and Iron Mountain 83, ,
St. Louis, Vandalia add Terre Haute 11, 12,
Cairo Short Line 12, 13,
Wabash 6, 7,
Louisville and Nashville 5, 4,
Louisville, Evansville and St. Louis 7, 7,
Mobile and Ohio 3, 3,
Toledo, St. Louis and Kansas City 3, 3,
Jacksonville Southeastern 1,
Missouri Pacific 4, 5,
St. Louis and San Francisco 18,
From Ohio River 1, 2,
72, 69,
 TONS.
42,
60,
52,
62,
80,
70,
65,
65,
50,
75,
74,
Receipts of Coke: 4, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 9, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 12, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 10, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 6, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 3, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 3, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 5, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 9, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 6, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 8, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 9, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: bush. of 40 lbs

Not included in receipts of Coal.

Commercial Palaces.

Merchants' Exchange — cost, $2,
Cupples' Building, 7 stories — cost, 1,
Security Building, 11 stories — cost, 1,
Equitable Building, 10 stories — cost, 1,
Exposition Building — cost, ,
Odd Fellows' Hall, 8 stories — cost, ,
American Cen. Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Mercantile Library, 6 stories — cost, ,
Laclede Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Commercial Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Globe-Democrat Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Boatmen's Bank Building, 7 stories — cost, ,
Bank of Commerce Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Turner Building, 8 stories — cost, 3,
Fagin Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Houser Building, 7 stories — cost, ,

Fair Grounds.

The annual Fair (Agricultural and Mechanical) has gained a world-wide reputation as being the finest Fair Grounds and giving the greatest exhibition of its character on the continent. Over $70, in premiums distributed. It contains acres; amphitheater holdspeople; entrance 25 cents, fair week 50 cents; race track occupies 63 acres, one mile track, arranged for hurdle; trotting and running stables for horses. Admittance to Fair Grounds and race track and chair in grand stand, $1, Boxes seating six persons, $10,

The Great Bridge.

Cost $10,; five years in building; built by J. B. Eads; entrance at Third street and Washington avenue. Total length, 6, feet; width, 55 feet; center span, 55 feet above the water; center arch feet; pipes sunk 90 feet to solid rock. Promenade ticket, 5c; 'bus, 10c; horse and buggy, 25c carriage, 35c; each passenger, 5c extra.

Comparative Business.

IN LEADING ARTICLES AT ST. LOUIS FOR
ARTICLES.
Flour, am'nt manufactured bbls. 1, 1,
Flour, am'nt handled bbls. 4, 4,
Wheat, total receipts — bushels 11, 25,
Corn, total receipts — bushels 45, 21,
Oats, total receipts — bushels 12, 12,
Rye, total receipts — bushels , 1,
Barley, total receipts — bushels 2, 2,
All grain received (including flour reduced to wheat) — bushels 77, 68,
Cotton receipts — bales , ,
Bagging, manufactured — yards 12, 15,
Hay, receipts — tons , ,
Tobacco, receipts — hhds 37, 41,
Lead, receipts in pigs 80 lb., pigs 1, 1,
Hog product, total shipments, lbs , ,
Cattle, receipts — head , ,
Sheep, receipts — head , ,
Hogs, receipts — head 1, 1,
Horses and Mules, receipts — head 82, 55,
Lumber and Logs, receipts — feet , ,
Shingles, receipts — pcs 64, 73,
Lath, receipts — pcs 16, 20,
Wool, total receipts — lbs 20, 21,
Hides, total receipts — lbs 28, 34,
Sugar, received — lbs , ,
Molasses, shipped — galls 2, 2,
Coffee, received — bags , ,
Rice, receipts — pkgs , 87,
Coal, receipts — bush 69, 72,
Nails, receipts — kegs , ,
Potatoes, receipts — bush 1, 1,
Salt, receipts — bbls , ,
Salt, receipts — sacks 33, 42,
Salt, receipts — bush. in bulk , ,
Butter — lbs 13, 13,
Tons of freight of all kinds rec'd and shipped 16, 16,

The progress that our city has made in manufactures is especially worthy of notice, demonstrating that a city can succeed both as a commercial and manufacturing center.

City Council.

OFFICERS:
CYRUS P. WALBRIDGE, — President.
WM. M. HORTON, — Vice-President.
WM. H. OSMER, — Secretary.
CHAS. GUNDLACH, — Assistant Secretary.
THOS. BRADY, — Sergeant-at-Arms.

COMMITTEES — APPOINTIVE.

WAYS AND MEANS — Nelson Cole, John C. Bensiek, Wm. Cullinane.

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS — Wm. M. Horton, Chas. James, Wm. T. Anderson.

SANITARY AFFAIRS — Chas. James, Andrew Hoolan, John A. Sloan.

POLICE — John C. Bensiek, Andrew Hoolan, Chas. E. Wehner.

CLAIMS — E. F. W. Meier, Chas, James, Wm. T. Anderson.

FIRE DEPARTMENT — Wm. Cullinane John C. Bensiek, John A. Sloan.

RAILROADS — Chas. E. Wehner, E. F. W. Meier, Andrew Hoolan.

MARKETS — Chas. James, Andrew Hoolan, Wm. M. Horton.

ENGROSSED AND ENROLLED BILLS — Albert Arnstein, Charles James, Nelson Cole.

MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS — M. M. Flesh, Wm. Cullinane, Wm. T. Anderson.

LEGISLATION — Andrew Hoolan, Chas. James, M. M. Flesh.

ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATION — Wm. T. Anderson, Wm. M. Horton, E. F. W. Meier.

COUNCIL — Wm. Cullinane, John. C. Bensiek, M. M. Flesh.

MULLANPHY FUND — Albert Arnstein, John. A. Sloan, Chas. James.

House of Delegates.

OFFICERS:
THOMAS J. WARD, — Speaker.
JAMES H. TOWNSEND, — Speaker pro tem.
THOS. E. BARRETT, — Clerk.
JOHN H. STUSSEL, — Assistant Clerk.
JAMES F. MOONEY, — Sergeant-at-Arms.
DANIEL R. GIBSON, — Page.

COMMITTEES — APPOINTIVE.

WAYS AND MEANS — James H. Townsend, Edward P. Grimley, Thomas Cosgrove, James E. Hagerty, Louis Spelbrink.

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS — Conrad Huber, Jos. Rauer, Thos. G. Kaye, Wm. H. O'Brien, James A. Dacey, Henry Alt, Julius Lehmann.

RAILROADS — Thos. F. Bradshaw, Jas. P. Egan, Jas. H. Cronin, Edward J. McGroarty, Patrick H. Clark.

CLAIMS — Peter O'Brien, John Courtney, Patrick Mullarky, Sylvester P. Keyes, Louis Diekman.

FIRE DEPARTMENT — Joseph Rauer, James A. Dacey, Jas. H. Cronin, Henry O. Siegmund, Frederick G. Uthoff.

POLICE AND WORKHOUSE — Thomas J. Kinnavey, John Courtney, Charles Schoenbeck.

SANITARY AFFAIRS — James E. Hagerty, Thomas Cosgrove, Edward J. McGroarty, John J. Bogard, Henry Alt.

LEGISLATION — Edward P. Grimley, James H. Townsend, Peter O'Brien, John J. Bogard, Hy. O. Siegmund.

MARKETS — James P. Egan, Conrad Huber, Patrick H. Clark.

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS — Patrick Mullarky, Thos. J. Kinnavey, Julius Lehman.

ELECTION AND REGISTRATION — Wm. H. O'Brien, Thos. G. Kaye, Louis Spelbrink.

HOUSE OF DELEGATES — Thos. G. Kaye, John Courtney, Sylvester P. Keyes.

ENGROSSED AND Carmax jobs login BILLS — Thomas Cosgrove, Thos. J. Bradshaw, Louis Diekmann.

Custom House Transactions,

COMMODITIESValue.Duty.
Ale and Beer $ 29, 00 $ 11, 80
Anvils 23, 00 8, 84
Artworks 5, 00 10
Books and Printed Matter 4, 80
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Merchants National Bank Building

Mobile in Mobile County, Alabama &#; The American South (East South Central)

 

Historical Marker

 

 

Merchants National Bank Building Marker image. Click for full size.

By Mark Hilton, July 26,

1. Merchants National Bank Building Marker

Inscription.

Merchants National Bank Building. Historical Marker. The incorporation of The Merchants Bank https www suntrust online banking Mobile was authorized April 13, with offices at 56 St. Francis Street. On July 1,Merchants became a national bank and occupied this eighteen story building which was dedicated October 11, Merchants National merged with First Alabama Bancshares, Inc. on October 29, The name Merchants National Bank of Mobile was changed to First Alabama Bank on July 1. This historical marker is in Mobile in Mobile County Alabama

 The incorporation of The Merchants Bank of Mobile was authorized April 13, with offices at 56 St. Francis Street. On July 1,Merchants became a national bank and occupied this eighteen story building which was dedicated October 11, Merchants National merged with First Alabama Bancshares, Inc. on October 29, The name Merchants National Bank of Mobile was changed to First Alabama Bank on July 1,
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & Commerce • Notable Buildings. A significant historical date for this entry is April 13,
 
Location. 30° &#; N, 88° &#; W. Marker is in Mobile, Alabama, in Mobile County. Marker is at the intersection of St Francis Street and St Joseph Street, in the median on St Francis Street. Plaque mounted on outside wall of bank. Touch for map. Marker is at or near merchants national bank building mobile al postal address: 56 St Joseph Street, Mobile ALUnited States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Forbes & Co. (within shouting distance of this marker); Joe Cain (about feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of Sixth Mobile Theatre (about feet away); In Memory of the Battle of Mobile Bay
Merchants National Bank Building (Now Regions Bank) image. Click for full size.

By Mark Hilton, July 26,

2. Merchants National Bank Building (Now Regions Bank)

Click or scan to see
this page online
(about feet away); Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville (about feet away); The Salvation Army in Mobile (about feet away); Mobile City Limits (about feet away); Judge Virgil Pittman / Wiley L. Bolden, Sr. (about feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mobile.
 
Also see. .  Wikipedia artcle about bank.(Submitted on July 29,by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)

 

Merchants National Bank Building with marker on left of bank. image. Click for full size.

By Mark Hilton, July 26,

3. Merchants National Bank Building with marker on left of bank.

 

 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, It was originally submitted on July 29,by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 29,by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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When you pay with your debit card, you may have a “pre-authorization hold” added to your account before the actual capital one gold mastercard login goes through. Businesses do this to make sure you have the funds available to cover the purchase, especially when the total amount is unknown at the time you use your card.

For example, when you swipe your card before pumping gas, a pre-authorization hold is put on your account for an amount that’s probably going to be higher than what you’ll actually spend. When you reserve a hotel room, a hold is placed on the account for the cost of the room, plus a little more in case you have additional services during your stay. When you pay for your meal at a restaurant, a hold may be placed for the cost of the meal plus extra for the possible tip. Once the actual amount is known, that number becomes the charge. And once the charge clears your account (typically during the bank’s evening processing), the pre-authorization hold is released.

Pre-authorization holds often can be considerably higher than what you will actually pay, and may stay on your account for a while (days, in some situations) so be sure you are prepared for this amount to be “on hold” in your account in the interim. Remember, you won’t have access to the excess funds until after the actual charge clears and the pre-authorization is released.

Example: Joe visits a gas station and swipes his debit card before pumping his gas. The business doesn’t know how much gas Joe will pump, but it assumes the charge will be $50 or under. They place a pre-authorization hold on Joe’s card for $50 to ensure the funds are available. Joe pumps $20 worth of gas. That means there now is an extra $30 on hold in Joe’s account, and he will not have access to that money until the $20 charge clears and the $50 pre-authorization hold is released.

If you have questions, call Client Care at 

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merchants national bank building mobile al

Merchants national bank building mobile al -

Customer Service & FAQs

When you pay with your debit card, you may have a “pre-authorization hold” added to your account before the actual charge goes through. Businesses do this to make sure you have the funds available to cover the purchase, especially when the total amount is unknown at the time you use your card.

For example, when you swipe your card before pumping gas, a pre-authorization hold is put on your account for an amount that’s probably going to be higher than what you’ll actually spend. When you reserve a hotel room, a hold is placed on the account for the cost of the room, plus a little more in case you have additional services during your stay. When you pay for your meal at a restaurant, a hold may be placed for the cost of the meal plus extra for the possible tip. Once the actual amount is known, that number becomes the charge. And once the charge clears your account (typically during the bank’s evening processing), the pre-authorization hold is released.

Pre-authorization holds often can be considerably higher than what you will actually pay, and may stay on your account for a while (days, in some situations) so be sure you are prepared for this amount to be “on hold” in your account in the interim. Remember, you won’t have access to the excess funds until after the actual charge clears and the pre-authorization is released.

Example: Joe visits a gas station and swipes his debit card before pumping his gas. The business doesn’t know how much gas Joe will pump, but it assumes the charge will be $50 or under. They place a pre-authorization hold on Joe’s card for $50 to ensure the funds are available. Joe pumps $20 worth of gas. That means there now is an extra $30 on hold in Joe’s account, and he will not have access to that money until the $20 charge clears and the $50 pre-authorization hold is released.

If you have questions, call Client Care at 

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Merchants Bank,

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&#;File — Box: 20, Folder: 31

Scope and Content

From the Collection: The collection contains documentation for signage produced by Zeon Sign Company. Each project consists of a job cost envelope annotated with expenses for materials, labor, overhead, total actual cost, selling price, and profit or loss. Contained within each envelope were all or some of the following:

From the Collection:
  1. Conditional sales agreement
  2. Cover letter accompanying contract
  3. Dun & Bradstreet or other credit check on customer
  4. Work order
  5. Time sheets listing last name of workers, dates, hours, categories, cost summaries
  6. Photographs; either black and white or color polaroid
  7. Drawings/diagrams/surveys
  8. City permits
  9. Miscellaneous scraps of paper

From the Collection: The majority of Zeon’s work was located in Albuquerque, NM. However, their contracts spread throughout New Mexico (Aztec, Belen, Bloomfield, Chama, Cuba, Crownpoint, Deming, Española, Farmington, Grants, Gallup, Las Vegas, Los Alamos, Los Lunas, Magdalena, Milan, Mountainair, Pojoaque, Raton, Santa Fe, Socorro, Rio Rancho, Shiprock, Tijeras, Tucumcari, Zuni, and points between) and into southwestern Colorado (Durango), Arizona (Chinle, Flagstaff, Ganado, Window Rock), Texas (Amarillo, El Paso, Uvalde), and even a few locations in California

Eddie’s Inferno Cocktail Lounge, Star Florist, Roadrunner Coffee Shop, Paris Shoe Shop, and many other businesses lining mid-twentieth century Route 66 in Albuquerque and the surrounding Southwest contracted with Zeon for their roadside signs. Thus, the collection documents some of the vitality and allure of Route

Airlines, automobile dealers, banks and loan agencies, barber shops and beauty salons, clothing stores, eateries, grocery and convenience stores, motels, and lounges, liquor stores, shoe shops, and theatres exemplify the vast array of clients utilizing the services and expertise of Zeon.

The drawings and job file documentation provide insight into the detail and aesthetics of commercial sign making. Specific tasks, staffing, costs of labor and materials are detailed in the files. The internal and external dialogue is evident in notes, correspondence, and related paperwork. The potential use of this collection crosses many humanities disciplines including art history, community planning, history of the built environment and local history. Restoration of still extant signs along Route 66 is facilitated with access to the original drawings. Additionally the Zeon company records could be used by local communities seeking to recall a vibrant part of their midth century history and identity.

Dates

Language of Materials

From the Collection: English

Access Restrictions

The collection is open for research.

Extent

From the Collection: 25 boxes (25 cu. ft.) plus 30 oversize folders

Merchants Bank, , Box: 20, Folder: UNM Center for Southwest Research & Special Collections.

Merchants Bank, , Box: 20, Folder: UNM Center for Southwest Research & Special Collections. mynewextsetup.us Accessed December 03,

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Источник: mynewextsetup.us

On November 20, , just one day before adjourning, the Alabama Territorial Legislature passed an act establishing Mobile's first bank, the Bank of Mobile. Until its closing in , the bank remained one of the most solvent in the country and time and again survived national panics and banking crises. It was called "the little monster" and "the monster of many heads" because it weathered national panics, local disasters, and runs.

The charter specified that the bank needed to raise $8, in gold and silver in order to open its doors. Unfortunately, during the summer of , the bank was robbed of $3,, which delayed its grand opening. The money was never recovered, and the thief was not brought to justice until , when George Bohannan was caught and sentenced to 39 lashes and three hours in the town pillory for the first bank robbery in the state of Alabama. The robbery did not deter the bank's founders, all prominent businessmen in Mobile as the city transitioned from its colonial years into Alabama statehood. Lewis (or Louis) Judson, the first president of the bank, had also been the first "president" of newly incorporated Mobile in In addition to Judson, a merchant, there were 11 other directors on the first board: Alvin Robeshow (chief justice of Mobile Countyin ); Addin Lewis (merchant and postmaster); David W. Crawford (merchant); John King Jr (trader); Thomas L. Hallett (merchant and shipping agent); Henry Gunnison (shipping agent); Oliver Helman (merchant); Henry Stickney (merchant); Terry McCusker (merchant and real estate agent); Benjamin H. Hall (business owner); and John Whitehead (merchant). On April 23, , this first board of directors elected Archibald W. Gordon as the Bank of Mobile's first cashier.

The bank first operated out of a frame building on Conception Street, most likely near Dauphin Street. This initial building was probably rented, because the only references to this first location are found in directions to other locations, such as an advertisement for a millinery store on "Conception Street nearly opposite the Bank." In , the bank moved into its own building on Royal Street, between Government Street and Church Street. The bank's founders were mostly from the Northeast, and so this first building was in the Federal style, as was popular in the Northeast at the time. The Greek Revival style prevalent in present-day Mobile buildings would not take hold until the boom years of the s. In , the bank moved a third time, to the corner of Royal Street and Conti Street, to a location previously inhabited by the Planters and Merchants Bank, which failed that year after only four years in operation. The bank would remain at this location until , when it moved to its final location at the northeast corner of Royal Street and St. Francis Street.

Even though the Bank of Mobile was one of the most financially sound in the nation, by itself, it could not handle the large and ever-growing commerce of the Port City. During its history, many other banks opened in the city only to fail within a few years. In , the Bank of Mobile was the city's only bank, with $1,, capital. This amount was considered too little and inadequate to meet the demands of Mobile businesses, which had exports worth $10,, that year. In , with only two banks, Mobile's banking capital was $2,, with exports worth $38,, Conversely, for the same year, New Orleans had more than eleven times ($24,,) Mobile's banking capital, but less than three times its annual export ($,,). To meet the demand, some Mobilians used private bankers or banks in other cities.

In its early years, the Bank of Mobile remained solvent thanks to cautious management. William R. Hallett ( ) was one of the most prudent presidents. On April 22, , the bank's sterling reputation would be proved by a run, or largescale and rapid withdrawal of cash by customers. Bank director Eliezer L. Andrews and his brother Zeligman (or Zalegman) Andrews of New Orleans had a mutual business shipping cotton. Their business suffered huge losses, and the brothers committed suicide by drowning on the same day, each in his respective city. When this became known, in combination with rumors that the bank had lost money in northern states, Mobilians panicked and sought to withdraw their savings. The bank brought in extra personnel and stayed open late to meet every demand. The bank's competent management of the run only further demonstrated its solvency.

Financial Troubles

In general, the Bank of Mobile survived crashes that ruined other banks. During the crash of , it was one of only four surviving banks in the country. In the Panic of and subsequent economic depression, it was one of only ten. It later lost money on advances to the state of Alabama during the Civil War, however, and was left in fragile condition. The Panic of further distressed the institution, because Charles Walsh, president at the time, had used bank funds in his private firm, Walsh, Smith & Co., which went bankrupt after the crash.

With the bank in trouble, the board of directors asked William H. Pratt, a former bank director then living in Louisiana, to return to Mobile to take over as president. Pratt's presidency appears to have been a slow return to the solvency of earlier years, but he oversaw an investigation that uncovered evidence of financial troubles. Pratt hired a special bookkeeper to investigate irregularities in the books he had been alerted to in The bookkeeper examined the books from to and found a long list of errors, on different days and with multiple depositors, that totaled several thousand dollars. The investigation continued into late Richard F. Manly, a cashier since , and both teller and cashier from to , was under suspicion for many months, but he remained cashier and was later named director.

Pratt's term ended abruptly on March 3, , when the year-old died at the Birmingham train station as he attempted to cross under the coupling of a train car and became entangled. Because of his sudden death, the board needed both a new president and director to serve out the remainder of his term. Lumberman Albert C. Danner was elected president, even though some of the directors opposed his appointment because of the nearly $80, debt that his lumber companies owed the bank. In addition, the board elected Manly to serve out the remainder of Pratt's term as director. But at a stockholder meeting before the general election in January , Manly was removed from his position as director. That April, Gaylord B. Clark, an attorney from the firm of Clark & Clark, determined that even if Manly had not personally embezzled money, he was still legally liable for the amount missing. Manly would have seen daily receipts and payables and should have noticed so many errors over the years. On May 14, , the board agreed with Clark's decision that although Manly was at fault for the missing money he should not be held responsible, and he remained in his position as cashier.

The final board of directors elected for included C. DuBose (merchant and druggist); Daniel P. Bestor (lawyer); Winston Jones (cotton factor); Marcus Lyons (merchant); Albert M. Quigley (manufacturer, business owner); William Barnewell (commission merchant); Lorenzo M. Wilson (merchant and husband of author Augusta Jane Evans Wilson); David R. Dunlap (merchant); and Danner, who remained president. After Danner's re-election, however, the directors alleged that he borrowed more money from the bank, as well as discounted notes, without their approval. Some of the directors wanted Manly to refuse all transactions with Danner without prior approval from the board. But, the rest of them felt that placing the cashier above the president was a terrible idea. They compromised and appointed two directors, Bestor and Dunlap, to oversee the personal accounts of the president.

The Bank Closes

In late June , the board of directors devised a plan to recover the bank's money from Danner. They believed his business to be on the verge of failure and wanted to get what they could before Danner was unable to pay back his debts. Instead of cash, the bank took over a mill, kilns, and other property to cover Danner's debt of more than $,, although this property turned out to be worth considerably less. It was also planned for Danner to announce his resignation and a new president to take his place. And, at the beginning of August, the bank would remove all support from Danner's companies. The plan was to be kept secret from the public for fear of panic, but before the directors could enact their plan, it became known. Mobilians panicked when they heard that the bank president had signed over his own property to the bank and resigned, and on Monday, July 8, , at a.m., the run started. By noon, the bank closed its doors.

The board called an emergency session. Although the bank had more than enough assets to cover all depositors, they could not meet the demand for immediate cash. Winston Jones, a director and partner in the cotton factor firm of Jones & DePras and a collector for the bank, was appointed to liquidate assets and pay off all debts and depositors, a role then known as "assigning" or an "assignment." The directors chose Jones because he understood the condition of the bank and its assets, he was the best collector among them, he was honest, and he was financially responsible. Thirty minutes later, the bank received an offer of a $, loan to keep the bank open, but it was too late and the Bank of Mobile closed after 66 years.

Clark thought the bank solvent even though the bank's assets were mostly in property, which was difficult to convert to cash. Clark also believed that the bank should have handled the situation differently and that stockholders would lose money through the assignment. The directors found themselves needing to explain why the bank had failed, and most blamed Danner and his debts. In a statement to explain their version of events, they acknowledged that the bank's losses began well before Danner became president but focused on the losses incurred during his presidency. Their rationale for this was that most of the directors were new to the board.

The failure of the bank was likely due to a convergence of numerous bad decisions. After William R. Hallett's death in , the bank became less reliable, and the directors loaned money to its presidents without proper collateral. The personal debts in the tens of thousands of dollars of former presidents Charles Walsh, James Crawford, and William H. Pratt all hurt the bank. The lost money from loans to the state of Alabama during the Civil War, the Crash of , and a cashier who was either an embezzler or incompetent, placed the frail bank into the hands of a bickering board and a weak president.

An examination of the bank showed its assets to be equal to the liabilities and therefore all its depositors and stockholders would be paid, but Clark felt that the bank was too impulsive in its action. As it was, Winston Jones was still working as the assignee until at least , still selling bank properties to pay liabilities. The site of the last location of the bank is now the Hancock Whitney Bank.

Additional Resources

Amos, Harriet E. Cotton City: Urban Development in Antebellum Mobile. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press,

Delaney, Caldwell. Craighead?s Mobile. Mobile: Haunted Bookshop,

Gould, Elizabeth Barrett. From Port to Port: An Architectural History of Mobile, Alabama, Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press,

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Before

&#; Father Marquette, a French missionary, travels through the Trail Creek region, preaching to the Potawatomi Indians.

&#; The Griffin (Le Griffon), the first ship larger than a canoe to navigate the upper Great Lakes, sets sail from the Niagara River, traveling through Lake Erie, Lake Huron and Lake Michigan to Green Bay (August 7). It was built by French explorer Rene&#;-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle. After departing Green Bay for its return trip on September 18, it was never seen again, most likely sinking in Lake Michigan.

&#; The Battle of the Dunes, the only Revolutionary battle fought in Northwest Indiana. A small group of American colonials and Frenchmen successfully raided Fort St. Joseph (near present-day Niles, Michigan). As the raiders returned home, British soldiers and allies overcame the colonials at a site along the Indiana Dunes.

&#; Indiana Territory is formed, with Vincennes as its capital (May 7).

&#; The State of Indiana is formed, with Corydon as its capital. Its boundaries are expanded to include a ten-mile strip on the south shore of Lake Michigan, originally part of Michigan Territory.

&#; Capital of Indiana moves to Indianapolis.

&#; New England settlers form the first congregation in the area.

&#; The Potawatomi cede a ribbon of land feet wide from the Ohio River to Lake Michigan, for the creation of Michigan Road (Oct. 16).

&#; The U.S. Congress authorized the Indiana General Assembly to build Michigan road (March 2).

&#; A group of surveyors sent by the state of Indiana determines that the mouth of Trail Creek is ideal for a harbor and shipping port.

&#; Major Isaac C. Elston, the first postmaster appointed by President Andrew Jackson, purchases land at the mouth of Trail Creek for $/acre, sight unseen. The land is divided into lots, a public park, and a marketplace, all sold to the Michigan City Land Company.

&#; Michigan City is selected as the endpoint for Michigan Road, having been called &#;the most suitable site for a commercial town and the place the best harbor could be had&#; by the selection committee. A survey of Trail Creek is ordered by the state legislature.

&#; Michigan City&#;s first mayor, Willys Peck, is elected.

&#; Michigan City loses its bid to be county seat to La Porte.

&#; Daniel Webster passes through Michigan City.

&#; The first log cabin in the city is constructed by Joseph Furman for Samuel Miller at the present-day intersection of 5th and Franklin. Samuel Miller becomes the city&#;s first permanent resident.

&#; The plat for Michigan City is recorded at the La Porte County Courthouse (September 17). In the fall, the population of Michigan City is about 50 people.

or The first school building, known as the First Ward School, is erected at Fourth and Pine on land donated by Major Isaac Elston.

&#; George Ames arrives in Michigan City. Ames owned a hardware store and was a noted philanthropist.

&#; Joseph C. Orr opens a tannery. Michigan City in the s also included a blacksmith shop, a tinsmith shop, a bank, taverns, shops, and hotels. It served as an outfitting location for settlers and recreation spot for travelers.

&#; A survey for the purposes of creating a harbor is begun, but funding is insufficient to complete it (October 10).

&#; The Army Corps reports their survey of Trail Creek.

&#; Congregational Church is built.

&#; Michigan City is incorporated on February 8 and chartered on July 4. The boundaries encompass 15 square miles, making it one of the largest cities by area in the United States at the time. More than 1, people live in Michigan City. The state grants $20, for the creation of a port at Michigan City.

&#; The first commercial ship, the Sea Serpent, enters Trail Creek (July 4).

&#; The first harbor light is installed.

&#; A Baptist congregation is formed.

&#; Potawatomi Indians in Indiana are forcibly removed by the U.S. government to Kansas, a march called the Trail of Death.

&#; The Michigan City Institute, a seminary (boarding school) is built at Tenth (Boston) and Franklin Streets. The School closed in for lack of funds. The building was moved to Second and Franklin Streets, where it was converted into the Lake House. The building was later destroyed by fire.

&#; The first Congregational Church is completed.

&#; St. Ambrose Catholic Church is established at the southeast corner of 2nd and Washington Streets.

&#; The Michigan Central Railroad reaches Michigan City and connects the city to Eastern towns. A central depot is built for the railroad.

&#; Saint Ambrose School, the first parochial school in Michigan City, opens at 2nd and Washington Streets.

&#; The first scheduled train on the city&#;s Monon Route leaves Michigan City for Lafayette (Oct.).

&#; John Barker, Sr. buys into Sherman, Haskell, Aldridge & Company, a freight car and wagon firm. In , the name changed to Haskell & Barker. Under Barker, Sr., and his son John Barker, the Haskell and Barker factory becomes the largest manufacturing plant in Indiana. Among its many achievements, the factory built the first modern assembly line and produced the PS-1 steel box car that became the standard for railroads.

&#; The Monon freight house and depot are built.

&#; The original Barker House, home of industrialist John Barker, is built.

&#; The Old Lighthouse is built. This lighthouse is now the Old Lighthouse Museum.

&#; The first Episcopal Church is completed.

– St. Mary’s Catholic Church is established at the southwest corner of 4th and Washington Streets. Its parishioners were mostly of German ancestry.

&#; Construction begins on the Indiana State Prison. The prison was completed in Charles Seely, the first warden, oversaw the construction.

s &#; The first bridge over Trail Creek is removed to develop the harbor into a shipping port.

&#; The first keeper of the lighthouse, Harriet Colfax, is appointed. She operates the lighthouse for more than four decades.

&#; The Civil War begins. Hundreds of area men join the conflict, overwhelmingly for the Union side. The area serves as a major troop shipping point and producer of war goods.

&#; Michigan City&#;s first volunteer fire department under one chief is formed (May 13). E. L. Valentine led Liberty Hose Co. #1.

&#; The original school at Fourth and Pine is replaced by a two-story brick school called the Union School or the First Ward School. It later becomes Elston Elementary.

– Greenwood Cemetery is established on Tilden Avenue. It replaces all earlier city cemeteries.

&#; The funeral train of Abraham Lincoln passes through Michigan City on its way to Springfield, Illinois (May 1).

&#; Greenwood Cemetery is relocated to Tilden Avenue.

&#; The upper harbor is dredged for the first time, allowing the area to become a lumber port and shipping harbor. The harbor is dredged again in , , and , until further dredging was considered financially inadvisable.

&#; St. Mary&#;s of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church is built when two Catholic congregations, St. Mary&#;s and St. Ambrose, merge.

&#; The St. John&#;s Evangelical Church building (now the site of the Uptown Center for the Performing Arts) is dedicated. The congregation was formed May 14,

&#; The city forms a drum and bugle corps, the Ames Second Regiment Band.

&#; John H. Barker takes over his father&#;s interest in Haskell & Barker Car Company. He becomes president of the firm in and oversees an era of unprecedented growth for the company.

&#; The original St. Mary&#;s school opens in the remodeled St. Mary&#;s Church building on the corner of Washington and Fourth St.

&#; Saint Ambrose School moves to 4th and Washington St. St. Ambrose Academy, a boarding and day school, opens in the mansion of Chauncey Blair. Both schools are taught by the Sisters of the Holy Cross.

– First transcontinental rail passengers travel Michigan Central route through Michigan City during seven-day journey from Boston to San Francisco.

&#; The Zorn Brewery is opened. The brewery produced up to 15, barrels of beer a year.

&#; Construction is begun on the Central School, a high school, at 8th & Spring (Oct). The School is dedicated on March 20, The Union School was used for elementary students.

&#; A beacon light is installed on the east pier (November 20).

&#; Canada School is built.

&#; The east pierhead light is moved to the west pier. It is destroyed during a storm in

&#; St. Paul&#;s Lutheran Church is built, following a split with St. John&#;s Church.

&#; St. John&#;s Hall or Saint Johann Verein&#;s Hall, a striking example of the Italianate style, is constructed.

&#; Mozart Hall is built on the south side of E. Michigan St. near Franklin.

&#; The Michigan City Police Department is formed, replacing the town marshals (May).

&#; The Roeske Mill is built by Christopher and August Roeske. The mill processed lumber, grist, bricks, and flour.

s &#; The Michigan Central Railroad swing bridge is built.

&#; The Congregational Church is constructed on its present site.

&#; The Jewell Hotel, soon renamed the Vreeland Hotel, is constructed. The hotel is expanded in The Vreeland is Michigan City&#;s premier luxury hotel for decades. Later, it becomes the Adner Hotel, the Chapel Hotel, and the Franklin Hotel, before the building is destroyed by a fire in

&#; Harrison School is built, replacing Canada School.

&#; Park School is founded in a rented building.

&#; St. Ambrose School, Saint Ambrose Academy, and Saint Mary&#;s combine and reopen as Saint Mary&#;s School on 10th and Buffalo.

&#; The U.S. Life-Saving Station (later called the U.S. Coast Guard station) is completed at the mouth of Trail Creek.

&#; Construction is completed on the present Trinity Episcopal Church, southeast corner of 6th and Franklin. The first Trinity Church was built in on Pine St. between 4th & 5th. A Gothic-style church was built on the 6th & Franklin lot in

&#; The German Methodist Church is built.

&#; Garfield School, also known as the Fourth Ward School, is constructed on West 11th St.

&#; The second Michigan Central railroad station is built, replacing the depot constructed in the s. The first depot had been destroyed in a fire.

&#; Eastport School is built.

&#; Mayor Martin Krueger successfully lobbies the state legislature for a law that allowed city governments to buy, sell, and trade park land. Construction begins on a bridge over Trail Creek. The wooden single-leaf swing bridge cost $10, to construct.

s &#; Elston&#;s Jim Eddy wins the high school state championship in broad jump.

s &#; The Hoosier Slide Sand Company, operated by William B. Manny, begins mining sand from the Hoosier Slide.

&#; Development of Washington Park begins.

&#; John H. Barker donates the original band stand. It is destroyed in a fire in and rebuilt.

&#; Mullen Hospital, the first hospital in Michigan City, opens (August 24). The hospital closed in followed the death of its founder, Dr. Alexander Mullen.

&#; The cornerstone is laid for the Hermitage Social Club (April 15). Martin Krueger bought the land for the Hermitage in with the idea of building a religious center, which fell through. It became a social club, mostly for German Americans, instead. It was named the Hermitage because a hermit, Gust Anderson, lived on the property. Club disputes led to falling membership, and the property was sold around to pay its debt. In the s, Haskell and Barker purchased the property to be used as a social club for its employees. Later, it was used as a rest home and health spa. The building was destroyed by arson on November 1,

&#; The Winterbotham Soldier&#;s Memorial at the entrance of Washington Park is dedicated on Decoration Day (May 31). The monument memorialized Union soldiers who died in the Civil War. The female bronze figure waving an olive branch represents Victorious Peace. The bronze belt around the monument includes the shields of the United States and Indiana, soldiers responding to the call to arms, cannons, and battle accoutrements. The Latin phrase translates to &#;It is sweet and glorious to die for one&#;s country.&#; The monument was designed by M. Muldoon of Louisville, sculpted by William O&#;Donovan and Jonathan Hartley and donated by John H. Winterbotham. The inscription reads, &#;In memory of the Soldiers of the Civil War who gave their services to perpetuate the union of the States.&#; Sixty-five feet tall, the monument is made of Vermont granite and weighs over 76 tons.

&#; The peristyle in Washington Park is completed. The peristyle was donated by John Barker and copied after a building at the Columbian Exposition.

&#; Marsh School is constructed on York St.

&#; The Central School at 8th & Spring is destroyed in a fire (January 9) and rebuilt the same year.

&#; A permanent Park School building is constructed. The school had met in rented facilities since its founding in

&#; The first automobile in Michigan City is built by Roman Eichstaedt.

&#; The East Pier is built.

&#; St. Stanislaus Kostka church is completed.

&#; Chicago&#;s Columbia Club holds their first Race to Michigan City. This annual event is the oldest continually run freshwater race in the world.

&#; The Michigan City Library Association is founded.

&#; The former Michigan City Public Library building is dedicated (October 9). The library was the result of a $5, bequest in the will of George Ames. The library was built using citizen donations, including John H. Barker, who donated 1/3 of the cost. The building serves as the library until

&#; President William McKinley speaks from his train at a rail crossing in Michigan City.

&#; The Chief Justice Waite, a passenger steamer built in which traveled between Michigan City and Chicago, is destroyed at sea (September). A month prior, it had been boarded by Chicago police, who arrested the owner, captain, and passengers for gambling offenses.

&#; Amusement area is built in Washington Park. Initially, it contains a wooden roller coaster, large carousel, Whirligig, and miniature locomotive train. Later, a Ferris Wheel, boat ride and other rides and games are added.

&#; Frederic H. Burnham Glove Company, founded in Chicago in , moves to Michigan City. A new 30, square foot plant is built at Tennessee St. The plant was expanded in , and in a retail outlet was added. Manufacturing was ceased in the Michigan City location in , but the retail outlet remains open.

&#; Michigan City and La Porte are connected by an electric interurban line.

&#; Electric street cars begin operation in Michigan City. Three routes were included &#; a west side route ending at the prison, an east side route running on Franklin Street, Ninth Street, and Michigan Street, and a south side route on Franklin to Coolspring Avenue.

&#; The original Saint Anthony Hospital is built, partially funded by a donation in the name of Mrs. John H. Barker.

&#; The current pierhead light (referred to as a lighthouse), east pier, fog signal tower and catwalk are built. The old lighthouse is remodeled and the living quarters are enlarged. The lantern is moved from the old lighthouse to the new pierhead light (October 20).

&#; The first Jewish services are held during the High Holy Days in a rented space.

&#; A fire damages the second and third stories of Mozart Hall.

&#; The Pere Marquette depot and freight house are completed in Michigan City. Depot west of Franklin Street on the former site of the DeWolfe farm; freight house east of Franklin (July)

&#; Michigan City&#;s first paid fire department is organized (May 1).

&#; The Paper Box Company begins operation.

&#; The Michigan City Yukons, the city&#;s first semi-professional baseball team, debut at Donnelly Field.

&#; The expansion of the Barker Mansion is completed. The mansion includes 38 rooms.

&#; Oscar Wellnitz builds a cottage at Sheridan Beach, the beginning of development of the Sheridan Beach area.

&#; The first Franklin Street lift bridge over Trail Creek is completed. The lift bridge replaced the swing bridge built in the s.

&#; The Grand Opera House, a 1,seat performance hall, opens. &#;The Umpire&#; is the first play performed. The Grand Opera House becomes the Orpheum Vaudeville Theater and then the Garden Theater, which burns down in The Tivoli Theater is built on the site in

&#; Charles Lawrence wins the state shot put title, the first high school state championship for Michigan City.

&#; The Michigan City YMCA is formed as a result of a citizen meeting organized by Mr. and Mrs. John H. Barker.

&#; Adath Israel, the first Jewish congregation in Michigan City, builds a synagogue on Seventh Street. The building was torn down in the late s during urban renewal.

&#; The first South Shore train arrives in Michigan City from Chicago, under the name &#;Chicago, Lake Shore and South Bend Railroad.&#; The first South Shore train runs between Michigan City and South Bend (June 30). The South Shore is the oldest remaining interurban train in the U.S.

&#; A headless body suspected to be Belle Gunness is found in a fire at her La Porte farmhouse. The remains of at least ten bodies are found buried on her property. She is suspected of killing at least 25 people.

&#; The old Elston School is built at Spring and Detroit streets, and serves as the high school. It becomes Elston Junior High is , when the new Elston High School is built adjacent to the old school.

&#; The Superior Courthouse and old post office are built.

&#; Merchants National Bank is founded. The bank&#;s first location at Franklin opened on May 3, A building at Franklin was later constructed.

&#; Two South Shore trains collide head-on near Shadyside Crossing in Porter (June 19). Eastbound South Shore train No. 59 was returning from the Cobe Cup automobile races in Crown Point when it overran a crossing point of tracks and collided with westbound train No. At least 10 people were killed, and 40 passengers were injured.

Around &#; Doll&#;s Park, a popular picnic grove, sports facility, and dance hall, opens on Carroll Avenue near the southwest corner of Carroll and Michigan Boulevard. Doll&#;s Park was a popular picnic grove with benches, tables, an open-roofed lunch counter, and an open dance hall with elevated bandstand. Doll&#;s Park began to deteriorate and was torn down in the early s. Eastgate Plaza was built on the site in the s.

&#; The Franklin Street Bridge collapses after the excursion ship United States collides with it (June 24). The bridge is rebuilt in

&#; The Ahksakewah Canoe Club builds its clubhouse on the east side of the basin. The clubhouse served as a boating and social center, but the condition of the basin steadily deteriorated due to dumping. The building was torn down in , and the club faded into obscurity.

&#; The first plane lands in the city. Donald Gregory landed the plane on a test strip in a vacant field between Barker Avenue and Greenwood Avenue.

&#; The original band shell is destroyed in a fire. A band stand designed by H.M. Miles is constructed and rededicated on July 6, The Michigan City Municipal Band held weekly summer band concerts at the band stand until , when the amphitheater was completed.

&#; The Michigan City YMCA facility is opened.

or &#; The Sinai Congregation is organized by Moses Moritz.

&#; Calumet Electric Company is incorporated on August 2, The company merges on June 2, to become the Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO).

&#; The biggest fire in the history of Michigan City begins in the south lumber yards of the Haskell & Barker Car Company. It burns for 10 hours over 20 acres, causing $, in damages, before it is brought under control.

&#; Marquette Hall is built.

&#; The Bader Elmoneer Society is founded to teach the history and practice of the Islamic faith.

&#; The second Michigan Central Railroad depot is destroyed in a fire. A new depot is built and completed the following year. The site still functions as an Amtrak stop.

&#; First Baptist Church is completed.

&#; The lake front amusement grounds catch on fire, heavily damaging the roller coaster and other attractions.

&#; The Eastland Disaster, the largest loss of life from a shipwreck on the Great Lakes &#; An excursion ship named the S.S. Eastland is commissioned to take the families of Western Electric Company workers from Chicago to Michigan City for a picnic. The overloaded ship rolls over while tied to the dock in the Chicago River, killing passengers.

&#; The Life-Saving Station is adopted into the U.S. Coast Guard.

&#; Sacred Heart Church is built.

&#; A six-day Homecoming celebration is held (August ).

&#; The United States enters World War I. More than 2, Michigan City men register for service. A total of 30 Michigan City men are killed in action, in training, or as a result of the pandemic flu outbreak during the conflict.

&#; The Michigan Central Railroad Repair Shops, employer of hundreds of skilled laborers, moves from Michigan City to Niles, Michigan.

&#; Central School at 8th & Spring is renovated.

&#; The Chamber of Commerce is formed by a group of citizens headed by Joseph Hays of the Hays Corporation. It soon attracts 22 new factories to town.

&#; The Long Beach Company is formed. The first subdivisions are platted the following year.

&#; The Spanish Influenza Pandemic strikes Michigan City, requiring the city to temporarily close church services, public gatherings, and most commerce. As many as new cases a day were reported in the worst of the outbreak.

(?) &#; Martin Krueger donates virgin woods for the creation of a Memorial Park honoring the men killed in the Great War.

&#; The YMCA Seniors, the city&#;s first semi-professional basketball team, begin play.

&#; The Dunes Highway, the shortest direct route between Detroit and Chicago at the time, is approved by the state.

&#; Warren G. Harding meets with political leaders at the Vreeland Hotel prior to the Republican Convention, at which he is nominated for President.

Twenty-two new factories, including Weil-McLain, Hoosier Factories (Jaymar-Ruby), and Steel Fabricating, open in Michigan City during a time of great economic growth.

s &#; Sheridan Beach Hotel is constructed.

&#; The Garden Theater (formerly the Grand Opera House and then the Orpheum) is destroyed in a fire (February 4).

&#; The Spaulding Hotel is completed.

&#; The Town of Long Beach is incorporated (July 5).

&#; Captain Joseph O. Simmerman and Patrolman George Spencer are killed in front of the Faroh Bros. store on Franklin St.

&#; The Tivoli Theater opens at the site of the Grand Opera House, showing films for a nickel.

&#; The Lakeview Casino opens in Washington Park. It includes table games, slots, an entertainment hall, and an eatery.

&#; The Masonic Temple is built.

&#; Haskell & Barker merges with the Pullman Company, which is later called Pullman-Standard.

&#; Automatic electric coaling station for Michigan Central Railroad is completed and placed in operation (Dec. 15).

&#; Floyd Fitzsimmons, Benton Harbor boxing promoter, builds the Sky Blue Arena, an open-air 30, seat concrete arena. Over the next five years, it features title fights and exhibitions from such boxers as Jack Dempsey, Benny Leonard, Tommy Gibbons and Georges Carpentier. The arena was demolished on September 14,

&#; The Second Street bridge is built.

&#; The Bader Elmoneer Society is reorganized and renamed the Asser El Jadeed (now The Islamic Center of Michigan City). The Asser El Jadeed building, built in the early s, was the first Shi&#;i mosque in the United States.

&#; John Lloyd Wright builds his house and studio in Long Beach. He designed the Long Beach Elementary School () and Long Beach Town Hall (), among other properties in the area.

&#; Elston High School is constructed at Detroit & Spring on the site of the old cemetery, which largely had been removed to Greenwood. The building features the well-known Robert Grafton mural of life along the Michigan City harbor in the s. The building also includes Elston Junior High. Additions are added in , , , , and

&#; The Elston Red Devils advanced to the state basketball tournament for the first time. They were defeated in the opening game.

&#; The Chicago, Lake Shore and South Bend Railroad is bought in receivership by Samuel Insull and organized as the Chicago South Shore and South Bend Railroad.

&#; Niemann School is built.

&#; The Warren Building is completed.

&#; World War I &#;doughboy&#; monument in Washington Park is dedicated on Armistice Day, November 11, The Service Star Legion War Mothers conducted a fundraising drive to erect the monument. It is composed of granite with a marble base, and features a life-sized figure of a &#;doughboy&#; and names of the servicemen.

&#; The Sixth Street bridge is constructed at a cost of $,

&#; Several utility companies, including Calumet Electric Company, merge to form NIPSCO. Samuel Insull is NIPSCO&#;s first chairman.

&#; The Merchants National Bank building at Franklin opens (February 26). The building replaced Leubke Hall, previously called Burkhart Hall.

&#; The Eleventh Street Station for the South Shore Line opens (May). The two-story building cost more than $, to complete. It has a terra-cotta facade and neoclassical design. The station was the longest lasting storefront urban depot, closing in The building is still standing.

&#; The Oasis Ballroom opens in the building of the Lakeview Casino, which went out of business. The ballroom retains the desert oasis theme of the casino. It was one of the largest dance halls in the Midwest, holding in excess of 2, people. Many top entertainers performed at the Oasis, including Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Tommy Dorsey, and Lawrence Welk. After the big band era was over, a game center was added to the building to try to capitalize on the pinball craze.

&#; Long Beach Elementary School, designed by architect John Lloyd Wright, opens at Belle Plaine and Oriole Trail.

&#; The Benevolent Protective Order of Elks building on Franklin Street is completed. The building is in use today as an office building.

&#; The &#;E&#; Street bridge over Trail Creek, a frame structure, is built.

&#; The Washington Park Zoo is built. It expands throughout the s with the assistance of WPA workers. The WPA built Monkey Island in and the Zoo Castle in , along with other installations.

&#; Stock market crashes.

&#; John Dillinger is imprisoned for almost a year at Indiana State Prison. A few years later, he is credited with facilitating the escape of ten inmates.

&#; NIPSCO begins construction on the generating plant at the site of the former Hoosier Slide, once a foot sand dune that had been mined for 30 years for glassmaking. The plant is completed around

s &#; S. Karpen and Bros. Chair factory closes.

The Civilian Conservation Corps, Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and Works Progress Administration (federal programs employing people during the Great Depression) renovates and restores Washington Park. Workers build lakefront walls, many installations at Washington Park Zoo, the Washington Park Observation Tower, gardens, tennis courts, parking lots, picnic areas, and more.

&#; A new airfield is dedicated (June 18). Construction of the airfield, located on the site of the old Majot farm off U.S. near the intersection of U.S. 20 & 35, began in the fall of The airport was operated by the private Michigan City Airport Corporation. The city had planned to purchase the field, but was unable to do so after the onset of the Great Depression. In the mids, the field became the Joe Phillips Airport. Service was offered to Midway Airport (beginning in ) and O&#;Hare (beginning in ). In , the Joe Phillips Airport was sold to the city and became the new Michigan City Municipal Airport.

&#; Patrolman Charles L. Glafcke is shot and killed by a Chicago man who had fled to Michigan City following a shooting (December 14).

&#; The Michigan City Yacht Club is organized.

&#; The George Washington Bicentennial Bridge, where Franklin St. spans Trail Creek, is dedicated (May). The bascule-style bridge replaced the lift bridge.

&#; After years of financial turmoil, electric street car service is discontinued.

&#; A centennial celebration and pageant is held on the lakefront (July ).

&#; The lighthouse gets electricity and an electronic foghorn.

&#; The Michigan City Yacht Club is formed. The club purchased their building at 12 on the Lake in and renovated it extensively in the following years to serve as a clubhouse.

&#; Michiana Shores is incorporated.

&#; Franklin Street is paved.

&#; Amelia Earhart visits Michigan City to speak in support of the city&#;s new airfield.

&#; A mass tree planting takes place in Washington Park on Arbor Day (April 9). Many of these trees still grace the park today.

&#; A major fire destroys the Henry Lumber Company&#;s planing mill (June 5). The company was founded in and remained in business until the early s.

&#; The city constructs a water filtration plant and sewage treatment plant.

&#; The first Indiana Days festival is held (July ). An estimated , people visited the city during the Indiana Days celebration.

&#; The Elston Red Devils advance to the state basketball tournament after an undefeated season. They lose in the final match to Jeffersonville after Johnny Flotow, the star player and captain, contracts the flu.

&#; International Friendship Gardens opens. It was built by the Stauffer brothers, a trio of master gardeners whose exhibit at the Chicago World&#;s Fair inspired the garden.

&#; Michigan City donates land for the construction of an armory, to be built by the WPA.

&#; Coolspring School is built.

&#; The Engineer&#;s castle and observation tower in Washington Park Zoo are dedicated (May 6).

&#; Crackdown on slot machine gambling.

&#; The Michigan City News and Evening Dispatch are consolidated into the News-Dispatch.

&#; The Moose Home at Franklin St. is destroyed in a fire (Dec. 19).

&#; Elston&#;s Richard &#;Fuzzy&#; Stephenson wins the high school state championship in shotput two years in a row.

&#; Hirsch&#;s Department Store is destroyed in a fire (April 25). Ten firefighters were injured fighting the blaze. The store was remodeled and reopened in June.

&#; U.S. Coast Guard takes over servicing the lighthouse (July 1).

&#; Construction of the Naval Armory, designed by John P. Parrish and Ben H. Bacon, is completed. It is part of the 9th Naval District until , when the Navy deactivates its Naval Reserve in Michigan City. Ships assigned to the Armory included the USS Hawk, USS Sacramento, and HSS Havre.

&#; Hirsch&#;s Department store is destroyed in a fire (April 24).

&#; Ames Field is completed. The first high school football game played at the field resulted in a Red Devils loss to Chicago Parker, (September 15).

&#; Washington Park&#;s Midway, including games and concessions, is added.

&#; Babe Ruth makes a guest appearance with the Michigan City Cubs, a semi-professional baseball team that played in Ames Field throughout the s.

&#; The Old Lighthouse is closed following the retirement of Assistant Keeper Ralph Moore.

&#; Elston&#;s golf team wins the high school state championship.

&#; Ninth Naval Reservists aboard the USS Sacramento leave Michigan City for the Hawaiian Islands to serve as defense patrol. The ship and its crew are present during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

&#; The United States enters World War II. Ninety-nine Michigan City men are killed in action during the war. Michigan City citizens contributed $18 million in war bonds.

&#; Workers at Michigan City&#;s prosperous Pullman-Standard plant go on strike to secure union representation.

&#; A new Garfield School is constructed. It is remodeled in

&#; A fire erupts in the south yards of Pullman-Standard, destroying a shed and 22 new cars and causing $, in damage (June 7).

&#; An American Airline passenger plane crashes at the east edge of International Friendship Gardens, killing the pilot and co-pilot. All passengers survived (Dec. 28).

&#; Beverly Shores is officially incorporated as an independent town (January). The vote for incorporation was held December 23,

&#; Elston&#;s Jim Weisflog wins the state track championship in yard run.

&#; Construction begins on the Michigan City Municipal Airport off U.S. , in the area where Menard&#;s and Lowe&#;s are now located. The initial runway and most of the clearing are completed in one weekend, December The first plane to land on the new runway was piloted by Al Spiers, News-Dispatch editor, with passenger M.B. Wilson, president of the Booster Club. The plane, a Vultee BT, took off from the Joe Phillips Airport and landed at the new airport on December 11,

&#; Elston&#;s tennis team goes undefeated and is rated Indiana&#;s No. 1 high school aggregation.

&#; A new Central School building is constructed at 8th & Spring. It is dedicated on December 17,

&#; Firefighter Charles Neulieb is killed while fighting a fire at Modern Trend Furniture Factory, Franklin St. (August 22).

&#; Pine School is built.

&#; The Michigan City Symphony Orchestra gives its first concert (February 27). It was founded by Palmer Myran.

&#; Frank Hobart and Norm Ross win the Indiana State Three-Cushion Billiard Tourney, the first win for the city in the tournament&#;s 43 years. Hobart was undefeated.

s &#; The decade marks the end of large ferry service to Michigan City. Throughout the preceding 50 years, ferries such as the Theodore Roosevelt, Eastland, Missouri, and United States brought hundreds of thousands of visitors a year to the city.

&#; The Korean War begins. Over the next three years of the conflict, 10 Michigan City men are killed in action.

&#; A senate investigation of race betting draws public attention to several Michigan City bookie storefront operations.

&#; Springfield School is built.

&#; A five-day old infant, Lawrence James Lyons, is stolen from the St. Anthony Hospital nursery, making national news (October 13). The case was never solved.

&#; The Red Devils win the first of 24 consecutive basketball sectional championships.

&#; Former Fire Chief Alfred Zoch is fatally injured while in route to a Beverly Shores fire (March 10).

&#; The Rose Bowl bowling alley is heavily damaged in a fire (September 10).

&#; The Sinai Temple is dedicated (May ).

&#; The new Eastport School building opens.

&#; The Park and Shop Center, Coolspring and Franklin, is dedicated (November 3). It is the first shopping center in Michigan City and the second in the state of Indiana.

&#; The first Summer Festival is held.

Eleanor Roosevelt speaks at the Sinai Sunday Evening Forum.

&#; Dan&#;s Body Shop, E St., is destroyed by a massive fire.

Edgewood School is constructed.

&#; The old Central Fire Station on West 4th Street is torn down (September 2). A new station is built on the site.

&#; The Michigan City White Caps, a New York Giants affiliate in the Midwest League, are formed. They play for four seasons before dissolving. Notable players included Juan Marichal, Manny Mota, Jose Tartabull, and Matty Alou.

&#; Michigan City native and New York Yankee Don Larsen pitches the only perfect World Series baseball game in history.

&#; St. Mary&#;s Marquette High School opens following remodeling.

&#; Four inmates from the Dr. Norman Beatty Memorial Hospital, located at the present-day Westville Correctional Facility, escape. They are captured the next day. An uprising at the facility a month later leads to the resignation of the superintendent.

&#; The Cargill grain elevator at the harbor is built.

&#; Michigan City is the site of the first official Miss Indiana Pageant, held in the Tivoli Theater.

&#; Michigan City and Lakeland merge.

&#; The Big Snow of cuts off Michigan City for nearly a week, requiring assistance from five surrounding municipalities to help dig the city out from feet of snow dumped during the freak snowstorm.

&#; Captain George Dabagia dies from smoke asphyxiation while fighting a fire at Huron St. (December 15).

&#; The Liberty Theater (formerly the Lake Theater and Starland Theater) and Edwards Store burn down in an overnight fire on January Fire Captain Lee Brady perished in the fire, and several other firefighters were injured.

&#; The Smith Brothers Cough Drop Factory closes.

&#; A Red Devil basketball player is stabbed by a classmate in the school cafeteria, requiring nine stitches to close the wound.

&#; Midwest Steel constructs a $ million mill at Burns Harbor.

&#; Michigan City Port Authority is formed.

&#; An explosion destroys the Edgewood Motor Company on S. Franklin St. (Nov. 1).

&#; The first two apartment buildings of Harborside Homes, a low-income housing development, are constructed off Michigan Boulevard, on Canal and Fourth Streets, in the neighborhood commonly called &#;the Patch.&#; Nine row houses are added two years later. Harborside included around apartments. The opening phase of construction cost $ million.

&#; The first person swims across Lake Michigan, ending at Michigan City. Ted Erickson from Chicago accomplished the feat in 36 1/2 hours.

&#; Knapp Elementary School (Oct. 8), Barker Junior High School (Oct. 15), and Joy Elementary School (Oct. 22) are dedicated.

&#; Elstonian, Elston High School&#;s yearbook, wins first place in the Columbia University Scholastic Press Association yearbook contest (October 16).

&#; A court injunction blocks the renewal of the lease for Washington Park&#;s amusement area, stating that public property could not be leased for private use. The Oasis Ballroom and amusement area at Washington Park are demolished.

&#; Work begins on the building of Bethlehem Steel mill, the largest steel mill in the world at the time.

&#; Krueger Junior High School is built.

&#; The City purchases the Old Lighthouse for historical purposes. It leases the building to the Michigan City Historical Society.

&#; A children&#;s library is opened at E. 8th St. It is moved to a house at E. 8th St. in When the new library opens in , the youth and adult collections are reunited.

&#; The Franklin Hotel burns down in a fire (Nov. 20). It was formerly the Vreeland Hotel, Michigan City&#;s luxury hotel. The Franklin Hotel had closed in and reopened the next year. It was sold several times and was under foreclosure at the time of the fire. Its ownership at the time was disputed.

&#; Tom Nowatzke, former Elston High School football player (class of ), is selected as a first-round draft pick (no. 11 overall) by the Detroit Lions in the National Football League draft (November 28). He played for the Detroit Lions from and the Baltimore Colts from He scored a touchdown in Super Bowl V for the Colts, who won over Dallas (January 17, ). He played in 96 games in the NFL, rushing for 1, yards and completing receptions for yards. He played for Indiana University in college.

&#; Michigan City is named an All-America City by the National Municipal League.

&#; Heisman Harbor, a acre marina, is developed.

&#; Building begins at Purdue North Central. The campus opens in

&#; South Shore Railroad is purchased by Chesapeake and Ohio Railway.

&#; Plans for Marquette Mall are unveiled. Sears, J.C. Penney, and other retailers move from downtown to the new shopping center.

&#; The U.S. commits troops to the conflict in Vietnam. Many Michigan City men serve bravely as troops.

&#; The Naval Reserve in Michigan City is deactivated. The Armory is leased to the city from to It is used for a teen center and Parks Department basketball games during this time.

Late s &#; The amusement area at Washington Park demolished.

&#; Michigan City Red Devils win the state high school basketball tournament against Indianapolis Tech, (March 19).

&#; The Spaulding Hotel closes.

&#; The Elston Occupations building is constructed at Elston High School. It is later renamed the A.K. Smith Area Career Center in honor of Superintendent A.K. Smith.

&#; 26 inches of snow fall in two days during a major snowstorm.

&#; A major new air pollution control ordinance is enacting, improving the community&#;s air quality.

&#; Senator Robert Kennedy visits Michigan City and speaks at the courthouse.

&#; Saint Anthony Hospital is expanded, culminating in the opening of a new five-story building on January

&#; The peristyle in Washington Park is demolished (October 7).

&#; Mullen Elementary School is constructed. It is dedicated on November 9, The school was named in honor of attorney Thomas C. Mullen.

&#; Franklin Square, a citypark and pedestrian shopping area covering the blocks of Franklin Street, is completed. It is dedicated on November 22,

&#; The Pullman-Standard factory closes on December 18, after more than 1, workers had already been laid off.

&#; Construction begins on the new NIPSCO generating plant and cooling tower.

&#; Elston students John Christopher and Kevil Mansfield win federal court ruling that they could not be suspended from school for having long hair (February 20).

&#; Two days of riots/civil disturbances occur in the city&#;s North End following the Summer Festival Parade. The disturbances were sparked by an incident in which three black men were arrested and subdued with mace by police in front of a local tavern, in what began as a parking violation. For the next two days, windows were broken, firebombs and rocks were thrown, stores were looted, and sporadic shots were fired. Fourteen-year-old Emmett Wright was shot in the left leg, and eight other people were injured. The Star Laundry was destroyed in a fire, and Henry Lumber and Kaeding Boats were damaged by fire. A state of emergency was declared and a force of police and National Guardsmen patrolled the city (July , ).

&#; Rogers High School, the second high school in Michigan City, opens on Pahs Road. It was named after physician Jesse B. Rogers ().

&#; The I/U.S. interchange is completed, linking Michigan City to the interstate.

&#; The Tivoli Theater closes (November 30).

&#; The Pullman-Standard property, in use by manufacturing companies Bobco Inc. and Poloron, burns down in a major fire that spreads to other North End properties on July Fire departments from other towns are called in to battle the fire, which encompassed eight square blocks. The cleanup was not completed for five years.

&#; The Old Lighthouse Museum opens to the public (June 9).

&#; The Old Band Stand is renovated by the Questers, a community group that continues to maintain the structure.

&#; The new post office at Washington & 4th St. begins operation (October 22).

&#; The Old Lighthouse is placed on the National Register of Historic Places (November 5).

&#; First-Merchants National Bank, Franklin Square, is constructed. First-Merchants was formed from a merger of First National Bank and Merchants National Bank in The bank later merged with Citizen&#;s Bank to become First Citizens Bank. It was renamed Horizon Bank in

&#; Johnny Cash&#;s &#;Michigan City Howdy Do&#; is released on the album One Piece at a Time.

&#; The Wonderland Discount Store is destroyed in a fire (November 22).

&#; The old Michigan Central shops, later used by Tonn and Blank, are demolished. A condominium community is built on the site.

&#; The Michigan City Public Library moves to a new facility designed by Helmut Jahn. It is dedicated on October 30, The old library building is sold to John Blank to be used as a community art center.

&#; The Army National Guard takes control of the Armory. Company B, th Engineer Battalion, is stationed there until

&#; The John G. Blank Art Center opens.

&#; The Bicentennial Amphitheater (Guy Foremen Amphitheater) is built. Michigan City Municipal Band&#;s last concert at the Old Band Stand is held.

&#; A fire causes $, in damage to the Rogers High School auditorium (June 16).

&#; The Sheridan Health Spa, previously the Hermitage Social Club, is destroyed by arson (Nov. 1).

&#; The original Saint Anthony&#;s Hospital building is demolished.

&#; The city&#;s first City Hall is opened.

&#; The Spaulding Hotel, Sears building, and Lido Theater are demolished.

&#; The library&#;s Mall Branch is closed.

Late 70s &#; new police station

&#; The first Michigan City In-Water Boat Show is held.

&#; Plans for the new North End are released.

&#; Elston Junior High building (the old Elston High School) at Detroit & Spring Streets is closed and building is demolished (April 2). A performing arts center, gymnasium and new entryway are constructed on the site.

&#; United Steelworkers Union goes on strike against NIPSCO.

&#; A siege at Indiana State Prison, during which seven men are taken hostage, lasted for 16 hours. All hostages were released safely.

&#; Production ends at Burnham Glove Company factory in Michigan City, but the retail outlet store remains open.

&#; A fire destroys nine businesses at Evergreen Park Shopping Center (April 8).

&#; The former Kubik South Side Hardware building is destroyed by fire (May 22).

&#; Cable television is brought to Michigan City.

&#; Rogers player Dan Palombizio is named Mr. Basketball, the first from Michigan City. Delray Brooks of Rogers won Mr. Basketball in , and Charles Macon of Elston won in

&#; Rogers High School girls&#; golf team wins the state championship.

&#; Amtrak begins making scheduled stops in Michigan City. The first Amtrak train, the Wolverine, stopped at Michigan City on April

&#; LaPorte mayor A.J. Rumely and his wife are shot during a break-in at their home. Rumely&#;s wife dies.

&#; Three businesses at 11th & Franklin are destroyed in a fire (February ).

&#; Rodini Restaurant is destroyed in a fire (January 15). The restaurant is later rebuilt.

&#; Rogers basketball player Delray Brooks is named Indiana Player of the Year and co-Mr. Basketball, along with Troy Lewis of Anderson.

&#; The Orak Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, is dedicated (June 3). The temple is located on north of I

&#; Michigan City teachers strike for the first time (February 19). The strike lasts 18 days.

s &#; Laser light shows are held at the NIPSCO plant, projecting images on the cooling tower.

&#; 1st Squadron, th Cavalry, LRSD, is stationed at the Armory.

&#; The Municipal Airport on U.S. closes (December 21). The city sells the land and purchases the Joe Phillips Airport on U.S. That airport is developed into the new Michigan City Municipal Airport.

&#; Construction begins on the bridge on U.S. 12 over Trail Creek, replacing the Second Street Bridge.

&#; Lighthouse Place outlet shopping center opens.

&#; Michigan City hosts the Pan Am Games yacht races.

&#; The catwalk (elevated walkway) to the east pierhead light is placed on the National Register of Historic Places (February 17).

&#; South Shore Railroad announces that it will close. The passenger railroad service is purchased by the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District.

&#; The Coast Guard station is rebuilt.

&#; th AG Company Postal is stationed at the Armory until They are deployed in Operation Desert Storm.

&#; The movie Prancer, filmed in LaPorte County and Three Oaks, MI and directed by LaPorte native John Hancock, premieres.

Present

&#; Four buildings at 7th & Franklin are destroyed in a fire, with losses of over $1 million (January 28).

&#; Franklin Square is demolished. Franklin Street reopens to traffic in the uptown area (August 10).

&#; The Michigan City Downtown Boosters are formed. They later become the Mainstreet Association.

&#; th AG Company Postal is mobilized to Saudi Arabia (October 25). They provide mail services for more than , soldiers. Half of the unit members are from Michigan City. They leave Saudi Arabia on April 27,

&#; Crowds take to the streets and march to City Hall calling for racial change in the city. Rocks and bottles are thrown in a near-riot (June 3).

&#; Elston High School basketball player Charles Macon is named Mr. Basketball.

&#; Elston High School girls&#; cross country team wins the state championship. The team wins state again in

&#; Company E (Bridge) th Engineers are stationed at the Lakefront Armory until

&#; Memorial Plaza is dedicated to all veterans on Veterans&#; Day (November 11). A monument honoring Vietnam War Medal of Honor recipient Pfc. Daniel D. Bruce is in the center of Monument Circle. Another monument honors all branches of service at the POW-MIA.

&#; Ames Field is rebuilt and used as a football stadium and site for drum and bugle corps.

&#; Rogers and Elston are consolidated into Michigan City High School, housed in the Rogers building. Elston is converted into a junior high. The school board&#;s vote to consolidate took place Oct. 25, The newly-combined Michigan City High School opens on August 25, with 1, students.

&#; Harborside Homes is demolished.

&#; The City purchases the elevated walk to the east pierhead light.

&#; Crescent Dunes is purchased by the National Lakeshore from NIPSCO.

&#; President Clinton visits Michigan City, speaking from his train en route to the Democratic National Convention in Chicago.

&#; Blue Chip Casino opens.

&#; Meijer opens on S. Franklin St.

&#; Long Beach Elementary School and Eastport Elementary School are closed.

&#; Marquette Blazers win the first of nine state volleyball championships in eleven years. Between , the Blazers played in every championship match.

&#; The last year the Miss Indiana Scholarship Pageant was held in Michigan City.

&#; The September 11th terrorist attacks lead to an outpouring of local donations and charitable efforts.

&#; LaPorte County Hazmat receives 45 reports of suspicious white substances after the national anthrax scare. All were benign.

&#; Bethlehem Steel files bankruptcy.

&#; Franklin St. is repaved and remodeled.

&#; Bethlehem Steel is taken over by the International Steel Group, keeping the mill operating.

&#; St. Mary&#;s School, Park School, and the Michigan City Alternative High School close (June).

&#; The Art Center moves to its current location on 2nd Street and is renamed the Lubeznik Center for the Arts.

&#; The th Military Police Detachment of the Army National Guard is stationed at the Lakefront Armory. They are deployed to Iraq from September 1, to May 13, The detachment&#;s location is changed to Gary in

&#; LaPorte County-based th Combat Engineers and th Military Police are deployed to Iraq.

&#; The Pullman Park skate park opens in early May. It is dedicated July World-ranked skateboarder Anthony Furlong attends the dedication.

&#; Blue Chip Casino begins construction of a hotel tower and events center. The story tower, completed in , is now the tallest building in the county.

&#; Michigan City YMCA closes, losing its charter.

&#; The body of the person believed to be serial killer Belle Gunness is exhumed for DNA analysis. The search for a reliable source of DNA comparison continues.

&#; Michigan City Municipal Airport named Airport of the Year by the Aviation Association of Indiana.

&#; Property tax reassessments fail to pass state requirements, delaying the finalization of tax bills and property tax disbursements to local governments for several years.

&#; Michigan City takes over jurisdiction of Michigan Boulevard from U.S. 12 to Indiana and begins plans for rehabilitating the infrastructure.

&#; The global financial crisis leads to increased unemployment and fiscal challenges in Michigan City and elsewhere.

&#; A new terminal building is constructed at the Michigan City Municipal Airport.

&#; The organization overseeing the South Shore proposes realigning the tracks and removing the embedded tracks in 11th Street, provoking discussion and criticism.

&#; The first Great Lakes Grand Prix is held. An estimated 80, spectators watch the professional boat race. The race is held annually.

&#; The HHD th Transportation Battalion of the National Guard are stationed at the Armory.

&#; State and federal agents search the Sanitary District for evidence of environmental crimes. A whistleblower complaint brought by the Indiana Attorney General&#;s Office is settled with the district awarding a settlement of $, The Wastewater Treatment Plant supervisor retires. He later pleads guilty to making false statements under the Clean Water Act.

&#; Michigan City is ranked #1 in the Culture and Leisure category in Forbes &#;Best Small Places for Business and Careers.&#;

&#; The Uptown Arts District is formed.

&#; The Oasis Splash Park opens in Washington Park (May 28).

&#; The Michigan City Wolves Pop Warner Jr. Peewee team wins the national championship, on the second of five consecutive trips to the national championship round.

&#; Charles C. Westcott Park (Gateway Park) opens at the site of the former Harborside Homes.

&#; The City purchases the East Pierhead Light Tower (lighthouse).

&#; Federal Mogul&#;s Michigan City plant closes.

&#; Nathan Woessner, a six-year-old boy from Illinois, falls into a sinkhole in Mount Baldy, leading to an hours-long rescue operation. He is rescued unharmed from under eleven feet of sand in an incident dubbed &#;the Miracle on Mount Baldy.&#; The story is featured on national news. Mt. Baldy is closed to the public indefinitely after more sinkholes are discovered.

&#; The Marquette High School boys basketball team wins the class 1A Indiana State Championship (March 29). The team also finished as class 1A state runner-up in

&#; Elston Middle School and Niemann Elementary School close at the conclusion of the school year.

&#; Michigan City adopts a new slogan: Create. Play. Repeat.

&#; The North Pointe Pavilion in Washington Park opens (September 26). The pavilion replaces the Jaycee stage, which was demolished.

&#; The ArtSpace Uptown Artist Lofts opens in the spring. The Michigan City Redevelopment Commission donated the Warren Building to ArtSpace in A $13 million renovation/historic preservation project is completed by ArtSpace to turn the building into artist lofts.

&#; Ground is broken for a new Franciscan St. Anthony Health Hospital on a site near Interstate 94 (May 2).

&#; Daniel Armstrong of Michigan City High School finishes first in the high jump at the Indiana State finals. Makiyah Smallwood wins the hurdles. The MCHS track team finishes second overall at the finals.

&#; Purdue University North Central and Purdue University Calumet unite to become Purdue University Northwest.

&#; The International Friendship Gardens are renamed the Friendship Botanic Gardens.

– A new police station opens at E. Michigan Boulevard.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Pictures and Illustrations.

ills

Old Fort in As seen from the foot of Walnut Street, between Fourth and Broadway. The south half is where site of the Southern Hotel now stands.

St. Louis as Seen from the Illinois Side,

Map of St. Louis as Laid Out in This Map is copied from the original map drawn by Colonel AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU, who was at the founding of the city, in , and first surveyed the land. The map was drawn in conformity to an order from the Department, at Washington.

This old map represents the town of St. Louis, nearly as it was laid out in Its breadth from the Mississippi, to the West, was to the line of the Rue de Grange (now Third street), and its length was some few blocks shorter than the map represents. The wall of fortifications was completed in The letters have the following significations:
A THE TOWER
B HALF MOONS
C BASTIONS
D GATES
E GOVERNMENT HOUSE
F THE CHURCH
G THE MARKET
H THE LITTLE RIVER
I PRIVATE TRACTS OF LAND.

The names of the streets that were given at the laying out the town were MAIN STREET, CHURCH STREET, BARN STREET, NO MAIN STREET, SECOND STREET, THIRD STREET, RUNNING NORTH AND SOUTH.

TOWER STREET, MARKET STREET, MISSOURI STREET, KICKAPOO STREET, NOW ARE WALNUT STREET, MARKET STREET, CHESNUT STREET, PINE STREET, RUNNING EAST AND WEST.

The roads leading from the gates were what are now known as Carondelet Avenue (then the well known Vide Poche Road); the Manchester Road, the St. Charles Road, with its branches; and a road which led towards were Bremen now is. What looks like blocks of wood represents fields in cultivation, and the dots show timber. The mark of the compass is only given for the purpose of guiding the reader as to the cardinal points. It must be borne in mind that in some of the localities the direction of the streets has been slightly altered, which may account for some apparent discrepancies which may appear to subsist between the map and the main narrative as the locality of the old fortifications.

Plat of the Town, With location of all the houses (March 10, ) as shown by black dots.

Map of St. Louis, The circles are a mile apart. The great bulk of the population now lies within the three mile circle, but the growth is towards the region of Forest Park. Nearly all the streets shown are Boulevards. City embraces square miles or 39, acres. Seventeen miles from north to south, and from river to western limits, and has river frontage.

1 CARONDELET PARK
2 LACLEDE PARK
3 GRAVOIS PARK
4 BENTON PARK
5 LYON PARK
6 COMPTON HILL RESERVOIR
7 LAFAYETTE PARK
8 NEW UNION DEPOT
9 NEW CITY HALL
10 GAMBLE PARK
11 CARR SQUARE
12 JACKSON PLACE
13 HYDE PARK
14 ST. LOUIS PLACE
15 SOUTH ST. LOUIS SQUARE
16 WATER WORKS

Early Settlers. 1. Aug. Chouteau. 2. P. Chouteau, Jr. 3. Chas. P. Chouteau. 4. Peter B. Lindell. 5. John G. Lindell. 6. Anton Chenie. 7. John O'Fallon. 8. Edgar Ames. 9. Wm. Christy. Robt. Campbell. Old Chouteau Mansion.

Autographs of Distinguished Men in the Early History of St. Louis.

Chouteau Pond. Now occupied by the Samuel Cupples' Real Estate premises, on Seventh, between Spruce and Poplar Streets.

Chouteau Mansion after the Renovation in

Old Market House, (Stone). Built on the Public Square (Block 7.) It was completed Sept. 1st., Sixty-four feet long by thirty feet wide, with 12 stalls, which rented from $10 to $30 per annum. Clerk of the market received $ per year.

Old Jail.

Stone Tower,

Old Green Tree House.

Fire Dep.

R. R. Church

Old Post Office.

Old Market and Levee,

Gov. Alexander McNair and His Residence. First Governor of Missouri, inaugurated Sept. 18,

Missouri Republican Only Paper Published West of Mississippi River.

Old Olympic Theatre.

Log Cabin,

Old Gratiot St. Prison.

Palace Excursion Steamer, Grand Republic. Licensed to carry 3, persons.

Eads Bridge. Cost $10,, Capt. James B. Eads, Chief Engineer. It was five years in building, and is 6, feet long and 54 feet wide. The central arch is feet, the other two feet. The center span is 55 feet above water. Completed July 4,

Merchant's Bridge. Foot of Ferry Street, North St. Louis, opened March 18, , and cost $3,,

Grand Avenue Bridge.

New Depot. Market, Eighteenth, Twentieth and Clark avenue; cost $1,, Will be the finest in the country.

New City Hall. Architect, Geo. R. Mann. Cost $1,, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Market and Clark Avenue. (Formerly Washington Square.) Covers six acres of ground, four stories, rooms; council chamber will cover 4, square feet. At the main entrance a statue of Gen. Sherman, costing $50,

Four Courts and Jail. Clark Avenue, Eleventh, Twelfth and Spruce Streets. Costs of building and site was about $1,,

Interior of Jail.

Armory Hall.

Union Market.

Ruins of Old Court House. First Court House in St. Louis, northwest corner Third and Plum Streets. Erected in Torn down

Court House. Fourth, Broadway, Chestnut and Market.

Government House, Southeast corner Main and Walnut, was opened as a public house in by Maj. Wm. Christy, and was patronized by the best class of society. Size of the house 25 by 40 feet, containing four rooms.

Custom House and Post Office. Olive, Locust, Eighth and Ninth Streets. Cost $8,, Eleven years in building, and is one of the finest in the country. J. B. Harlow, Postmaster, appointed Feb. 3,

Old Merchants' Exchange. On the Levee During Flood of

Old Merchants' Exchange. On Main between Walnut and Market. — Still standing.

Merchants' Exchange. Pine and Chestnut Streets. Cost $2,, Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary. members Jan.,

Grand Hall, Merchants' Exchange.

Presidents of the Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis. Copyright Secured , by A. C. Shewey. Scholten, Photographer. 1. Henry J. Moore. 2. Geo. Partridge. 3. Thos. Richeson. 4. Barton Able. 5. E. O. Stanton. 6. C. L. Tucker. 7. John T. Roe. 8. Geo. P. Plant. 9. Wm. J. Lewis. Gerard B. Allen. R. P. Tansey. Wm. H. Scudder. Web. M. Sumuel. D. P. Rowland. Nathan Cole.

Presidents of the Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis. Copyright Secured , by A. C. Shewey. Scholten, Photographer. John A. Schuder. Geo. Bain. John Wahl. Alex W. Smith Michael McEnnis. Chas. E. Slayback. J. C. Ewald. D. R. Francis Henry C. Haarstick. S. W. Cobb. Frank Gaiennie. Chas. F. Orthwein. Chas. A. Cox. John W. Kauffman. Marcus Bernheimer.

St. Louis Cotton Exchange. Main and Walnut Streets. James H. Allen, President. Henry W. Young, Secretary and Treasurer.

St. Louis Exposition and Music Hall. Olive, St. Charles, Thirteenth and Fourteenth Streets. Cost $,; length, feet; width, feet; height, feet; contains , square feet; opened in , and has three grand entrances. Seating capacity of Music Hall 4,; standing room for 2, Frank Gaienne, Secretary. J. B. Legg, Architect.

Music Hall. — Seating Capacity 4,

Bennett's Mansion House Hotel, (Brick.) Built by Gen'l Wm. Rector, U. S. Surveyor General for Illinois and Missouri, for his office and residence, at the northeast corner of Third and Vine. Opened as Bennett's Hotel in

Missouri Hotel, (Stone). Southwest corner of Main and Oak, (now Morgan.) Built by Thos. Brady, ; opened by David Massey, First Legistlature sat in it Sept. 18, , at which Alexander McNair was inaugurated first Governor of Missouri.

1. Barnum's Old City Hotel.

2. Old Jewish Synagogue, Benaiel, Southeast cor. Sixth and Cerre Streets.

3. Old Centenary Methodist Episcopal Church, South cor. Pine and Fifth Streets.

4. Old Planter's House.

5. Old St. Nicholas.

New Hotel. Copyright secured , by A. C. Shewey. Henry G. Isaacs, Architect. Cost $1,, Fourth, Chestnut and Pine Streets. Ten stories; Terra Cotta and Brick, by feet; balcony over grand entrance, feet long; grand entrance 46 feet wide, 76 feet long; rotunda 46 by 76 feet; grand dining-room 45 by 76 feet; apartments.

Southern Hotel. Fourth, Broadway, Walnut and Elm Streets; rooms. Burned April 11, ; rebuilt and opened May 11, , and is now one of the most thoroughly fireproof hotels in the world. Henry C. Lewis, Manager.

Southern Hotel, Walnut St. Entrance.

Southern Hotel Rotunda. The length from Walnut to Elm Streets is feet and 60 feet wide; the cross hall is feet long and 26 feet wide. One of the finest hotel rotunda's in the country.

Lindell Hotel. Washington Avenue, Sixth and Seventh Streets. Organized ; destroyed by fire March, ; rebuilt Sept. 28, ; apartments. The Rotunda is feet long by 41 feet wide.

Hotel Beers. Olive Street and Grand Avenue. C. C. Hellmers, Architect.

St. James Hotel. Broadway and Walnut Street.

Laclede Hotel. Sixth and Chestnut Streets.

Grand Opera House. Diagram First Floor.

Grand Opera House. Market Street, Seats 2, Opened May 10, ; destroyed by fire Nov. 23, , and immediately rebuilt; size 79 by feet. Geo. McManus, Business Manager.

Olympic Theatre. Dress Circle and Parquet.

Olympic Theatre. South Broadway. Seats 2, Pat Short, Store Manager.

Equitable Building. Northwest cor. Sixth and Locust Streets. Gen. Office Missouri Pacific Ry., H. C. Townsend, Gen. Pass. and Ticket Agt. Missouri Safe Deposit Co., Paschall Carr, Treas.

Bank Commerce Building. Northeast cor. Olive and Broadway. Bank Commerce, J. C. Van Blarcum, Cashier. Capital, $3,,

American Central Insurance Company's Building. American Fire Insurance Co., Geo. T. Cram, President; Chas. Christensen, Secretary.

St. Louis Republic. Southeast cor. Third and Chestnut Streets.

Globe-Democrat Building. Southwest cor. Sixth and Pine Streets. Cost ,; eight stories. General offices of Burlington Route. Isaac Taylor, Architect.

Post-Dispatch. Olive Street. Jos. Pulitzer, President; W. L. Davis, Vice-President; D. W. Woods, Secretary and Business Manager.

Westliche Post. Southwest cor. Market and Broadway.

Anzeiger des Westens. 13 to 15 North Third Street.

Odd Fellows Building. Southeast cor. Ninth and Olive Streets. Eight stories. Cost $, General offices of Waters' Pierce Oil Co., Hydraulic Press Brick Co., National Bank of the Republic, John C. Russell, Cashier. Henry G. Isaac, Architect.

Olive Street.

Boatmens' Bank Building. Arch'ts, T. B. Annan & Sons. Cost $, Cor. Washington Ave. and Fourth St. Boatmen's Bank, capital $2,, Wm. H. Thomson, Cashier. A. F. Shapleigh Hardware Co. occupy five stories. Oldest representative house in the city; founded in They employ on an average persons. A. F. Shapleigh, President; Frank Shapleigh, Vice-President; A. L. Shapleigh, Secretary.

Mercantile Club. Southwest cor. Seventh and Locust Streets. The membership is composed entirely of merchants and those in mercantile pursuits. Membership , dues $50 per annum. Open only to members; strangers are welcome. Isaac Taylor, Architect.

Capt. Samuel J. Boyd, 1st Dist. Capt. Matthew Kiely, 4th Dist. Capt. Peter Joyce, 3rd Dist. Asst. Chief Patrick Reedy. Chief Lawrence Harrigan. Capt. Anton Huebler, 2nd Dist. Capt. John W. Campbell, 5th Dist. Capt. Wm. Young, Central Dist. Capt. Wm. O. Keeble, 6th Dist.

Commercial Building. Southeast cor. Sixth and Olive Streets. Cost $, Eight stories. Eugene Jaccard Jewelry Co. General Office Wabash Railroad, F. Chandler, General Passenger and Ticket Agent.

Roe Building. Southwest cor. Broadway and Pine Street. Gen'l Office St. Louis and San Francisco Ry., D. Wishart, Gen'l Pass. Agt. Browning, King & Co., Clothiers, D. C. Young, Manager.

Laclede Building. L. Cass Miller, Architect. Cost $, Southwest cor. Fourth and Olive Streets. Gen'l Office of Cairo Short Line, Geo. E. Lary, Gen'l Pass. Agt. Laclede National Bank, James B. True, Cashier. Capital $1,,

Turner Building. Peabody, Stearns & Furber Architects. North Eighth Street.

The Oriel — Sixth and Locust Streets. Owned by the Oriel Realty and Construction Co. L. B. Legg, President. E. W. Banister, Secretary. Chemical National Bank, C. S. Warner, Cashier. Capital $,

Houser Building. Chas. K. Ramsey, Architect. Northwest cor. Broadway and Chestnut Street. Gen'l Office Vandalia Line, E. A. Ford, Gen'l Pass. Agt. Gen'l Office Missouri, Kansas and Texas Ry., J. Waldo, Pres. & Traf. Manager.

Wainwright Building. Seventh and Chestnut Streets.

Security Building. Peabody, Stearns & Furber, Architects. Cost $1,, Southwest cor. Fourth and Locust Streets.

Rialto Building. Isaac Taylor, Architect. Cost $, Fourth and Olive Street — (in course of erection.) Ninety feet front on Fourth Street, eighty-three feet on Olive Street. Fourth National Bank has leased the corner for twenty years. Hammett, Anderson-Wade Real Estate Co., Agents. Stockholders: B. F. Hammett, Aug. Gehner, L. E. Anderson, Wm. F. Nolker, Festus J. Wade.

Columbia Building. Isaac Taylor, Architect. Cost $, Cor. Eighth and Locust Streets — (in course of erection.) Owned by Hammett-Anderson-Wade Real Estate Company. First floor will be occupied by this firm.

Interstate Investment Company Building. Isaac Taylor, Architect. Northwest cor. Ninth and Washington Avenue. Rutledge & Horton, Agents.

New Public Library Building. Isaac Taylor, Architect. Northwest cor. Ninth and Locust Sts. This is one of the finest Library buildings in the United States, and contains 80, volumes. F. M. Crunden, Librarian.

Mercantile Library. Henry G. Isaac, Architect. Southwest cor. Broadway and Locust St. 80, volumes. Horace Kephart, Librarian. Lower floors occupied by the Scruggs, Vandevoort & Barney Dry Goods Establishment.

Fire Place, Mercantile Library.

Reading Room, Mercantile Library.

Washington Avenue. Looking west from Broadway.

First Brick Church and College, , on Second Street.

Missouri Medical College. Joseph N. McDowell, Dean of Faculty. Christian Brothers' School. Brother Patrick, President.

Concordia College. Carondelet Road, south of the Arsenal. Rev. C. T. W. Walther, President. Professor Seifert. Professor Sachse, Treasurer.

Washington University. Corner of Washington Avenue and 17th Street. Wm. G. Eliot, President. Wayman Crow, Vice-President. S. A. Ranlett, Treas. and Sec. Samuel Treat, Cor. Sec.

St. Louis University. 9th Street corner of Washington Avenue. F. Coosemans, S. J. President.

Washington University. (College and Polytechnic Departments). Cor. 17th Street and Washington Avenue. Washington University was founded in It offers courses in Arts, Science, Medicine, Dentistry and Law. Its three Preparatory Schools are the Smith Academy, Manual Training School and Mary Institute. The total number of students and scholars in the University is , and the number of instructors is W. S. Chaplin, Chancellor.

Mary Institute. (Washington University.) Cor. Beaumont and Locust Streets. Founded in It accomodates girls, and fits them for any college. E. H. Sears, Principal.

Smith Academy. (Washington University.) Cor. Nineteenth Street and Washington Avenue. Smith Academy was founded in It prepares boys for admission to any College or Scientific School. It accommodates boys. J. W. Fairbanks, Principal.

Manual Training School. (Washington University.) Cor. Eighteenth Street and Washington Avenue. The Manual School was founded in This was the first Manual Training School established in the United States. It accommodates pupils, and its course is three years long. Half of the time is devoted to manual training, and the other to school work. C. M. Woodward, Director.

Art Museum and School of Fine Arts. (Washington University.) Lucas Place and Nineteenth Street. Founded in Has large Art Collections, which are open to the public, and maintains day and evening schools in Drawing, Painting and Modeling. H. C. Ives, Director.

Interior Corner, Museum of Fine Arts.

St. Louis University. Grand Avenue and Pine Street. The University dates from , and was incorporated in It has 26 Professors and Instructors; 56 Students in the Philosophical Department; in the Classical; in the Commercial, and 36 in the Preparatory. Rev. Joseph Grammelsman, S. J., Pres.; Rev. John E. Kennedy, S. J., Sec.

Christian Brothers' College. King's Highway and Easton Avenue. This is a celebrated Catholic School, and has become one of the leading institutions of St. Louis. In the Brothers located in St. Louis on Cerre and EighthStreets. The present grounds contain 32 acres The building has a frontage of feet; a depth of feet, and an elevation of feet. The College usually has from to Students enrolled.

Concordia Theological Seminary. Jefferson Avenue and Winnebago Street. Founded in The new building completed , costing $, It has a frontage of feet by feet; eight large Halls; Library and Reading Rooms; ninety smaller rooms; accommodates Students. The faculty consists of five Professors of Theology. Rev. Francis Peiper, President.

Forest Park University. (For Women.) J. G. Cairns, Architect. Clayton Road near Forest Park. Founded in Forest Park College, College of Music, School of Art and Elocution.

Fourth Street from Washington Avenue Looking South.

Chestnut St. from Ninth St. Looking East

Peabody School.

Old High School. Fifteenth and Olive Streets.

New Central High School. Furlong & Brown, Architects. Cost $, Grand Avenue, cor. Finney Avenue. Height of building feet; length, feet; depth, feet, and has 61 rooms.

Beaugenou House, Southwest cor. Main and Almond Street (now Valentine.) Was one of the first built in St. Louis, and in which the first marriage on record in the archives of St. Louis, April 20, About it was occupied by Maj. Mackey Wherry, the first Town Register.

Col. Henry Gratiot's Country Residence, (Log.) King's Highway, five miles from Town.

Thomas F. Riddick's Residence, (Brick.) He came to St. Louis in He filled, at various times public offices, such as: Assessor, Clerk Common Pleas Court, Deputy Recorder of Land Titles, Secretary Board of Land Commissioners, Justice of Peace and Second President of the Old Missouri Bank.

Wm. C. Carr's Residence (Brick.) Southeast cor. Main and Spruce Streets. In Judge Carr built the fifth brick house in St. Louis, and the first one for a dwelling exclusively. Mr. Carr played a prominant part in the political and social affairs of the place.

Maj. Wm. Christy's Residence, (Stone.) Then two miles in the coutry (now cor. Monroe and Second Streets.) It was a fine house in its day.

John P. Cabanne's Country Homestead, (Brick.) King's Highway, in survey No. This old "Cabanne Mansion" was the first brick house built outside of the old town, consequently the "Pioneer Brick."

Gen. Grant's Old Home. St. Louis County, Mo. Built by the General from logs cut and hewn by himself.

John W. Kauffman's Residence. James Stewart & Co., Architects. King's Highway and Lindell Avenue.

A. G. Cochran's Residence. James Stewart & Co., Architects. Westmoreland Place.

Dr. Pinckney French's Residence. J. B. Legg, Architect. Delmar Avenue near Vandeventer Avenue.

C. A. Wickham's Residence. J. B. Legg, Architect. Taylor and McPherson Avenues.

Geo. D. Barnard's Residence. Vandeventer Place.

Interior of Old Cathedral.

Old Cathedral. Walnut, bet. Second and Third Streets. The most noted in St. Louis, being one of the most cherished landmarks in the city. Cornerstone was laid Aug. 1, , and on Oct. 26, the edifice was consecrated. It is feet long and 84 feet wide. The interior of the old church is especially beautiful.

First Methodist Episcopal Church South. Corner of 8th Street and Washington Avenue.

St. Paul's Episcopal Church. Corner of 17th and Olive Streets. Rev. R. E. Terry, Rector.

Church of the Messiah (Unitarian). Olive Street, corner of 9th Street.

First Congregation Church.

Second Baptist Church. Corner of 6th and Locust Streets.

Grand Ave. Presbyterian Church. Grand Avenue, near Washington Avenue. Rev. John F. Cannon, Pastor.

Third Baptist Church. Isaac Taylor, Architect. Grand Avenue, cor. Washington Avenue. Rev. J. P. Greene, D. D., Pastor.

Church of the Holy Communion. Henry G. Isaac, Architect. Leffingwell, cor. Washington Avenue. Rev. P. J. Robert, Rector.

Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Chas. E. Illsley, Architect. Southwest cor. Lucas and Channing Avenues. Rev. B. P. Fullerton, Pastor.

Mt. Cabanne Christian Church. Rev. O. A. Bartholomew, Architect. Rev. O. A. Bartholomew, Pastor.

Pilgrim Congregational Church. Washington and Ewing Avenues. Rev. Henry A. Stimson, Pastor.

Second Baptist Church. Beaumont cor. Locust. Rev. James W. Ford, D.D., Pastor.

Centenary M. E. Church.

First Presbyterian Church.

Church of the Annunciation.

Temple of Shaare Emeth.

St. Louis Cathedral, Founded

Church of the Messiah.

Apse of Christ's Church. Thirteenth and Locust Streets.

First Presbyterian Church, St. Louis Mo. J. G. Cairns, Architect.

Residence of Jos. V. Lucus Esq., Lindell Av., J. G. Cairns Archt., St. Louis Mo.

German Protestant Orphans' Home.

Insane Asylum.

Masonic Home of Missouri. S. C. Bunn, Secretary; Dr. M. Leftwich, Superintendent.

St. Louis Children's Hospital.

Good Samaritan Hospital.

Augusta Free Hospital for Children, Channing Avenue and School Street.

Marquette Club, Grand Avenue and Pine Street.

Home for the Aged and Infirm Israelites.

City Hospital, Lafayette Avenue and Linn Street.

St. Louis Mullanphy Hospital, Bacon and Montgomery Streets.

St. Luke's Hospital. Washington Avenue and Nineteenth Street.

Alexian Brothers' Insane Asylum. South Broadway.

Ursuline Convent. Twelfth, bet. Russell and Ann Avenues. Mother Seraphine, Superior.

Insane Asylum of the Sisters of St. Vincent de Paul. Geo. R. Mann, Architect. St. Charles Rock Road and Wabash Railroad. In care of Sisters of Charity. It has an area of over , square feet; over rooms, and can care for over patients.

Broadway. Looking north from Washington Avenue.

Bell Telephone Building. Southeast cor. Tenth and Olive Streets. General Office Bell Telephone Co. Shepley Routan & Cooledge, Architects.

Missouri Crematory Association. O. J. Wilhelmi, Architect. Capital $20, Arsenal Street and Sublette Avenue. Was founded July, Cremations up to April, , Company's fee is $25, per cremation; urns, $5, and upwards. O. J. Wilhelmi, Secretary and Treasurer.

Jockey Club, Fair Grounds. Cost $50, It is unique and picturesque in its architecture; elegantly furnished. Members are only entitled to its privileges; open all the year round for their benefit.

Grand Stand, Fair Grounds. The Grand Stand is acknowledged the finest architecturally, and the largest on any track. The seating capacity is very great and commands a magnificent view of the track.

Amphitheatre — Fair Grounds. Capacity for , persons.

New Club House, Grand Stand, Betting Stand and Judges Stand of the St. Louis Fair Horse Department.

Scene in Fair Grounds.

Vandeventer Place. From North Grand Avenue to Vandeventer Avenue.

Music Stand, Lafayette Park. Barnett & Haynes, Architects.

Willow Pond, Shaw's Garden.

Lindell Boulevard. From Channing Avenue to King's Highway. feet wide.

Columbus Statue. Tower Grove Park.

Frank P. Blair Statue. Forest Park.

Shakespeare Statue. Tower Grove Park.

Statue of Victory, Shaw's Garden. Barnett & Haynes, Architects.

Mausoleum, Shaw's Garden. Barnett & Haynes, Architects.

Lotus Pond, Shaw's Garden.

A Portion of the Parterre, Shaw's Garden. Barnett & Haynes, Architects.

St. Louis From Court House Dome.

Jefferson Barracks.

Broadway. Looking north from Olive Street.

Illumination. Twelfth Street. During Fall Festivities, looking south from Olive Street.

Illumination. Twelfth Street. During Fall Festivities, looking north from Olive Street.

Grant's Monument and Illumination. Twelfth Street. During Fall Festivites, looking south from Washington Avenue.

Goddess of Liberty and Illumination. Twelfth Street. During Fall Festivities, looking north from Chestnut Street.

Winter Scene in Lafayette Park.

Office Meyer Bros. Drug Co.

Meyer Bros. Drug Co. Fourth Street, Broadway and Clark Avenue. Largest drug house in the world by feet. , feet flooring or nearly four acres. Five stores and basement.

Ground Floor Plan of Samuel Cupples' Real Estate Premises. The largest building of the kind in the world, showing the location of the different wholesale houses occupying it, and showing the many railroad tracks entering it.

Samuel Cupples' Real Estate Co.'s Building. Eames & Young, Architects. Cost $1,, Seventh, Poplar and Spruce Streets. Occupied by the Samuel Cupples' Woodenware Co. (the largest in the world), and the wholesale grocery houses of Goddard Peck & Co., E. C. Scudder & Co., Alkire Grocer Co., Adam Roth Grocery Co., Bauer Grocer Co., Greeley Burnham Grocer Co., and Warehouse No. 9 of Simmons Hardware Co.

Office of Samuel Cupples' Woodenware Co. Seventh and Spruce Streets.

Simmons Hardware Co. Cor. Ninth Street and Washington Avenue. Largest in the world. Above cut represents their Washington Avenue building, containing an area of 1, square feet. In addition they occupy warehouses containing , square feet.

Geo. D. Barnard & Co., Washington Ave

The New Famous Building. Cor. Broadway and Morgan Street. Covering a floor space of over , square feet. The largest general outfitters for man and womankind in the west. Make it a rule to visit the Famous when you come to St. Louis.

Barr's Dry Goods Establishment. Has a frontage of feet on Sixth Street, and feet each on Locust and Olive Streets; five floors; area of ,00 square feet or nearly four acres, and employ persons.

Rice, Stix Washington Avenue and Tenth Street.

Wear-Boogher Dry Goods Co. St. Charles, southwest cor. Sixth Street.

Catlin Tobacco Co. Chestnut Street, southeast cor. Thirteenth Street.

Whitman's Agricultural Co. Eighth and Clark Avenue. Chas. E. Whitman, President; H. S. Whitman, Secretary.

B. Nugent & Bro. Dry Goods Establishment. Washington Avenue and Broadway.

St. Louis Electric Light and Power Co. Wire House on Roof; Main Buildings, Store Room (4th floor); Lighning Harvesters, Test Rack and 4th Floor; Dynamo Room, 3rd Floor; Arc Switch Board, Dynamo Room; Shafting Room, 2nd Floor; Shafting Room, 2nd Floor; Boiler House, 3rd Floor; Boiler House, Coal Pumps, 2nd Floor; Engine Room; Engine Room. Gen'l Offices North Fourth Street. The largest in the world. James Campbell, President; J. G. Kelley, Secretary; J. I. Ayer, Manager.

Building of J. A. Monks, 4th and Elm, St. Louis. J. G. Cairns, Archt.

Haydock Bros., Carriage Manufacturers. Papin and Fourteenth Streets.

Fourth St. Looking North.

Olive St. Looking West

Evans Office, Market Street. L. J. Howard, President; E. T. Howard, Secretary.

Faust's Restaurant and Fulton Market. St. Louis, Mo.

Ely Washington Avenue, Eighth and St. Charles Streets. D. D. Walker, President; W. H. Walker, Vice-President.

Mermod-Jaccard Building. Cor. Broadway and Locust Street. Mermod . Jaccard Jewelry Co. The largest of its kind in the country.

St. Louis News Co. Locust Street. G. W. Fiersheim, Manager.

Old Globe-Democrat Building. Fourth and Pine Streets.

J. B. Sickles' Saddlery Co. Washington Avenue and Twentyfirst Street. J. J. Kreher, President.

H. T. Simon, Gregory Washington Avenue, northeast cor. Seventh, Lindell Hotel block. Wholesale dry goods and small wares.

The "Lotos Club," St. Louis. Stewart, McClure

Entrance to Westmoreland Place. East to west from King's Highway to Union Avenue.

Anheuser-Busch Brewing Assn. Established in Capacity is over 1,, barrels annually. A shipping capacity of ,, bottles annually. 2, people employed. Own 1, refrigerator cars. Use 1,,, gallons of water and 1, cars of coal annually.

Offices and Factory. Washington and Lucas Avenues, from Nineteenth to Twentieth Streets. Occupying entire block.

H. H. Culver's Building. Southeast cor. Twelfth and Locust Streets.

Gay Building. Cor. Third and Pine Streets. American Exchange Bank, Walter Hill, Cashier. Capital $, R. G. Dunn's Commercial Agency, C. B. Smith, Manager.

Japanese Tea House. Broadway and Locust Street. In Scruggs, Vandevoort & Barney's Dry Goods Establishment.

Branch of Young Men's Christian Association: Northside German Branch, & St. Louis Ave. The Association was organized in , and incorporated in Its total membership is over 3, T. S. McPheeters, President; Geo. T. Coxhead, Gen'l Secretary.

Branch of Young Men's Christian Association: Southside German Branch, Second Carondolet Ave.

Branch of Young Men's Christian Association: East St. Louis Railroad Branch.

Branch of Young Men's Christian Association: Central Branch, Pine

F. M. Crunden, Librarian, St. Louis Public Library.

Joseph Brown, City Auditor.

Horace Kephart, Librarian, Mercantile Library.

Secretaries of Merchants' Exchange: J. H. Alexander,

Secretaries of Merchants' Exchange: Clinton B. Fisk, Secretary of Merchants' Exchange.

Secretaries of Merchants' Exchange: Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary of Merchants' Exchange.

Bank Presidents: Adolphus Busch, South Side. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Chas. Parsons, State. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Wm. Thompson, National Bank of Commerce. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Hy Ziegenhein, Lafayette. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Henry Meier, Franklin. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Wm. Nicholls, Commercial. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: S. E. Hoffman, Laclede. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Geo. A. Baker, Continental. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: L. C. Nelson, St. Louis National. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: D. K. Ferguson, Mechanics. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: H. C. Hieatt (Retiring Pres). National Bank of the Republic. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: C. W. Bullen (New Pres). National Bank of the Republic. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: John Kraus, Southern Commercial. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: R. J. Lackland, Boatmens. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: J. C. Richardson, Chemical. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: J. B. C. Lucas, Citizens. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Peter Nicholson, American Exchange. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Bank Presidents: Geo. T. Cram, Third National. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Chester H. Krum. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Jas. O Broadhead. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Wells H. Blodgett. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Warwick Hough. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: John Lionberger. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Given Campbell. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Henry Hitchcock. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Leverett Bell. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: H. A. Clover. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Elmer B. Adams. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: C. Gibson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Wm. C. Jones. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Chas. P. Johnson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: W. Fisse. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Nathan Frank. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: D. B. Lee. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Alex. G. Cochran. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Geo. W. Lubke. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Leo. Rassieur. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Ed. Kenna. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: D. P. Dyer. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Lawyers: Thos. H. Thoroughman. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Judges: A. A. Paxson, Police Court. J. G. Woerner, Probate Court. Thos. Morris, Police Court. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Judges, Federal Court: D. J. Brewer, W. H. Sanborn, A. M. Thayer. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Judges, Criminal Court of Correction: J. R. Claiborne, J. C. Normile.

Judges, State Court of Appeals: Wm. H. Biggs, Seymour D. Thompson, and R. E. Rombauer. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Judges, Circuit Court: Jas. E. Withrow, L. B. Valiant, Jacob Klein The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Judges, Circuit Court: Daniel Dillon, D. D. Fisher. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: P. G. Robinson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: T. L. Papin. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: A. C. Robinson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Jno. B. Johnson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: W. C. Glasgow. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: H. G. Mudd. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: J. K. Bauduy. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: E. H. Gregory. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Wm. Porter. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: L. C. Boisliniere. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Hermann Tuholsky. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: W. F. Kier. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Chas. H. Hughes. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: E. M. Powers. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: T. Griswold Comstock. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Y. H. Bond. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: E. S. Lemoine. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: W. M. McPheeters. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: J. P. Bryson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: R. A. Phelan. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: I. N. Love. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Thos. O'Reilly. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Aug. Bernays. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Some Well Known St. Louis Doctors: Frank. J. Lutz. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: O. G. Murray, "Big Four." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: C. J. MacKay, "Airline." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: James Charlton, Chicago The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: A. R. Callaway, "Clover Leaf." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: M. Knight, Wabash. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: M. E. Ingalls, "Big Four." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: Henry Gays, Merchants Terminal. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: S. H. H. Clark, Missouri Pacific. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: Chas. M. Hays, Wabash. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: H. L. Morrill, "Frisco." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: H. C. Townsend, Missouri Pacific. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: Geo. W. Parker, Cairo Shortline. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: D. B. Martin, "Big Four." The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: Jos. Hill, Vandalia. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: Geo. C. Smith, Missouri Pacific. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: C. C. Rainwater, Merchants Terminal. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: D. W. Rider, Jacksonville S. E. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Railroad Officials: D. Miller, Queens The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. J. P. Greene. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Vicar General P. P. Brady. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Archbishop Kenrick. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. George E. Martin. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. John Snyder. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. Henry A. Stimson. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. Samuel Sale. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. S. O. John. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. John Matthews. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. T. M. Finney. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. Thos. Bowman. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

Prominent Ministers: Rev. Montgomery Schuyler. The Globe-Democrat's Portrait Gallery of leading Ministers, Lawyers, Judges, Doctors, Railroad and Bank officials.

5

Preface.

In offering to the public the "Pictorial St. Louis, Past and Present," I have endeavored to meet a demand which has long existed for a work of this character which would reflect the interests of the city in its true light. I dedicate this work to the people of St. Louis to be handed down as an heirloom to future generations to show the growth of the metropolis of the great west. How well I have accomplished my task I leave you to determine. If it is not up to your expectations I beg your kind consideration. In the meantime I remain the public's faithful servant,
THE PUBLISHER.

6

Saint Louis Autumnal Festivities Association.

This Association was organized on May 11, , at a public meeting at the Exposition building, when it was resolved to raise a fund of one million dollars for festivity and other purposes during the years , and Upwards of $, was raised during , and the work is now in active progress. The following is the organization:

S. M. KENNARD.
President.

E. O. STANARD,
1st Vice-President.

F. A. WANS,
2d Vice-President.

JOHN S. MOFFITT,
3d Vice-President.

ROLLA WELLS,
4th Vice-President.

C. H. SAMPSON,
5th Vice-President.

FRANK GAIENNIE,
Secretary.

WALKER HILL,
Treasurer.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
A. D. Brown,
R. P. Tansey,
D. D. Walker,
J. C. Wilkinson,
S. C. Buun,
Jacob Furth,
W. T. Haydock,
M. C. Wetmore,
W. F. Nolker,
Geo. E. Leighton,
T. B. Boyd,
Goodman King,
C. D. McClure,
M. Bernheimer,
T. K. Niedringhaus,
H. J. Meyer,
Jonathan Rice,
Aug. Gehner,
J. J. Kreher,
C. H. Turner,
L. D. Kingsland,
H. C. Townsend,
Chas. M. Hayes,
R. M. Scruggs,
F. J. Wade,
Jerome Hill,
A. T. Kelley,
Geo. D. Barnard,
D. S. Holmes,
W. H. Woodward,
Patrick McGrath,
Joseph Specht,
W. H. Thompson,
Geo. M. Wright.

7

FINANCE COMMITTEE.
John S. Moffit, Chairman.
Geo. D. Barnard, Vice-Chairman.
Marcus Bernheimer,
Thomas Booth,
Henry J. Meyer,
T. B. Boyd,
S. C. Bunn.

BUREAU OF INFORMATION.
Goodman King, Chairman.
Joseph Franklin, Vice-Chairman.
James Cox, Sec'y,
Joseph Specht,
Geo. S. M'Grew,
J. Furth,
H. C. Townsend,
F. J. Wade,
J. J. Lawrence.

TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE.
E. O. Stanard, Chairman.
E. C. Simmons,
E. F. Williams,
F. A. Wann,
R. S. Brookings,
D. D. Walker.

PROGRAMME COMMITTEE.
Frank Gaiennie, Chairman.
C. H. Sampson,
W. T. Haydock,
Rolla Wells,
W. H. Woodward,
F. A. Wann.

ILLUMINATION COMMITTEE.
J. C. Wilkinson, Chairman.
Geo. B. Thompson,
B. Nugent,
E. McMillin,
T. K. Niedringhaus,
T. B. Boyd,
S. A. Coale, Jr.
A. T. Kelley.

HOTEL COMMITTEE.
M. C. Wetmore, Chairman.
Henry J. Meyer,
Rolla Wells,
W. J. Thompson,
J. W. Buel,
Adolphus Busch,
J. B. Case,
J. G. Butler,
A. Mansur.

8

Saint Louis. Her Prosperity, Advantages and Prospects.

The City embraces square miles, or 30, 1/2 acres. It is seventeen miles in length from north to south, and miles from the river to its western limits, and has miles of river frontage. It is the fifth city in size, the fourth in commerce, and has a population of , It is called the Mound City.

St. Louis is an independent city, being in no county, free from county legislation, and is governed under a scheme and charter which prohibits any floating indebtedness, and limits the rate of taxation, which is being gradually diminished. Tax rate is about It is next to the healthiest city in the United States. The death rate averages about 21 per 1, per annum. It is the center of the Mississippi Valley, embracing 15, square miles of navigable rivers and about 25, miles of railroads, and leads the world in a dozen different lines of business and manufacturies.

ELEVATION.

City Directrix, upon which elevations are based, is the top of a square flat stone set level with the curb on the west side of the wharf between Market and Walnut streets (being the high water mark of the year )

It is situated as to natural advantages more favorably than any other city on the continent. The Missouri River flows into the Mississippi twenty-one miles above the city, and the junction of the Illinois River is only twenty-four miles above St. Louis. It is in the heart of the food producing regions of the continent, and is central to boundless wealth of minerals. Around it are vast supplies of

10

coal, iron, granite, building stone, and earths adapted to the manufacturies of glass. Productive lead mines are in the vicinity, and seek St. Louis as a point of manufacture and distribution.

The city has grown from small beginnings to gigantic proportions, and is to-day one of the greatest, wealthiest and most prosperous in the country, and every day of her existence proves herself more and more entitled to her proud position as the undisputed metropolis of the Mississippi Valley.

It is admirably situated for the prosecution of all departments of manufactures. In close proximity to abound-less store of all the useful metals, with vast supplies of coal almost at her gates, it is the cheapest coal market in the World, the cost to manufacturers being only $ per ton. With a boundless profusion of food products at hand, for the sustenance of any possible increase of population, and with a market comprising the entire Mississippi Valley and the Great West, it is at once a most inviting city. Its manufacturing output for the last ten years shows a greater increase than any other city in America.

THE JOBBING TRADES.

St. Louis has the largest brewery, the largest tobacco factory, the largest drug house, handles more boots and shoes, has the largest hardware, woodenware, and the largest horse and mule market in the world, and is one of the greatest grain, flour and hay markets.

The importance of St. Louis as a central source of supply for the Mississippi Valley and the West is shown in an immense volume of transaction in all jobbing lines. St. Louis offers to the country merchant inducements for trade which are not excelled in any department in any city on the continent, and in many lines positively superior to any market in the land. It is not only a mart, it is a vast and busy workshop; each succeeding year records an

12

increase in its mills, its forges and factories. The products of industry are not only bought, sold and handled in the city, they are made here. Every description of raw material for any line of manufactory which is to be found in North America can be produced in abundance within easy reach of St. Louis.
CHURCHES.

Fine church edifices abound. All shades of belief being sheltered in elegant structures, which add greatly to the architectural attractions of the city.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

St. Louis has a large number of fine public buildings. She erected more buildings in than any other city on the continent, and offers the safest and best investment to be found in any other large city in the world. Among the fine buildings are the Custom House and Post-Office, built at an expense of $6,,, and is one of the finest public buildings in the country. The Armory, Four Courts, Court House, Exposition, and under construction the new "City Hall," and one of the finest Railroad Depots in the world, to cost $1,,, are some of the fine structures.

ST. LOUIS PRESS.

The newspapers of St. Louis are fully up to the highest standard of Journalism. The press of the city has exercised a great influence in promoting its interest in every useful direction, and in aiding its progress towards the advanced position it holds among the great cities of the country. The leading dailies are the Globe-Democrat, the St. Louis Republic, Post-Dispatch, Star Sayings and Evening Chronicle, published in the English language. And the Anzeiger des Westens, the Westliche Post, Amerika and Tribune, German papers.

14

SCHOOL SYSTEM.

St. Louis has an excellent school system (and next to Boston has the most perfect in the world), which offers the advantages of education to all the children brought up within her limits. The public schools are conducted upon the most approved principles of teaching, while the high school offers to the ambitious youth the opportunity for securing instruction in the higher branches of knowledge. In addition to the public schools are the Universities, Colleges, Academies and Parochial Schools. There are public schools, 1, school teachers, with an enrollment of 59, public school children.

SOCIAL LIFE.

In social life there is every means provided for the pursuit of instruction or pleasure. There are many organizations devoted to social intercourse, to art, to music, to literature and to the various objects which indicate the intelligence and enlightenment of the people.

St. Louis is a live, vigorous and progressive modern city, endowed with many natural advantages, to which are added all the improvements which art or science has discovered to aid progress in business, in social life and in the pursuit of happiness. Her public museums, libraries and the numerous fine collections of paintings and works of art of her private citizens show the refinement of her people.

St. Louis has for many years been famous for its Annual Fair, for its Exposition, for its brilliant street illuminations, and for its magnificent Veiled Prophet parade. These attractions have drawn hundreds of thousands of people to visit it every fall, and its progressive citizens have decided for to eclipse every former effort in the annual festivities, and will illuminate the streets with electricity and miles of gas lit arches and pyramids.

16

Chronological and Historical Events.

Maxent, Laclede & Co. obtain licence to trade.

St. Louis founded by Laclede Liguest.

Goods removed from Fort Chartres to St. Louis.

Trading boat seized en route for Missouri river. First land grant by St. Ange.

Pontiac, Ottawa Chief, arrives to trade.

Spanish authority was asserted.

St. Louis attacked by Indians May 26th.

Ten barges of goods arrive from New Orleans.

A census showed white; colored

Henry Shaw was born at Sheffield, England.

Capts. Lewis and Clark start for Pacific Coast.

First newspaper (The Gazette) est. at St. Louis.

St. Louis first incorporated.

St. Louis had 1, population.

First brick dwelling erected.

Fur and peltry was the sole industry.

First shop to manufacture saddles and harness.

Wm. Clark appointed first Governor by President

First nails manufactured.

St. Louis had 2, population.

Arrival of first steamer called "Pike," Aug. 2d.

Bank of St. Louis incorporated.

First pottery was made.

There were twenty-one houses. Benton fought a duel.

First steamboat arrived.

Missouri Bank incorporated.

Arrival of second steamer "Constitution," Oct. 3d.

Henry Shaw came to St. Louis.

First saw mill and foundry erected.

First steamer "Independence" enters Mo. river.

First steamboat "Harriet" reaches St. L. from N. O.

Missouri Fur Co. organized.

18

St. Louis had 4, population.

City Directory published.

Dr. William Carr Lane was first Mayor.

St. Louis incorporated as a city December 9th.

West boundary of city was on Seventh Street.

Gen. Lafayette visited St. Louis.

St. Louis University opened Nov. 2d.

Branch Bank of U. S. established.

Mayor Biddle and Mr. Spencer fought a duel.

Great many Germans arrived.

Board of Public Schools organized.

Great rejoicing that goods could be sent from New York to St. Louis in the short space of 23 days.

Old Catholic French church on Walnut St. was erected.

Missouri Republican was first issued.

First steamboat launched.

Boats and barges at wharf number

First gas was made.

Incorporation of Bank of Missouri Feb. 1st.

Planters' House commenced.

David Armstrong opened first. Public School.

New Charter granted.

Dr. Carr elected Mayor second term.

Arrivals of steamers 2,

Were 6 grist mills, 6 breweries and 6 foundries.

Steamboat building inaugurated.

First steamboat "St. Louis Oak" set afloat.

There were 2, steamboat arrivals.

Mercantile Library Association formed.

Boatman's Saving Institution incorporated.

Great fire in St. Louis May 19th.

4, people died of Cholera.

Germans arrived in great numbers.

City was without system of drainage.

Ground broken for Pacific R. R.

Western boundary of City was on 18th street.

First Locomotive built in St. Louis.

Commencement of Chicago & St. Louis R. R.

20

First School Report was published.

Grand Opera House first opened.

First Great Fair held.

First Lindell Hotel opened.

Custom House and Post-Office built, Olive and 3d.

Convention to consider Federal relations Feb 28th.

Surrender of Camp Jackson May 10th.

Provisional gov't, H. S. Gamble, Gov., July 31st.

Merchants Exchange organized.

All Public Schools were made free.

Opening Southern Hotel.

St. Louis Public Library organized.

Cholera visited St. Louis again.

Olympic first opened Nov. 25th,

Foundation of Great St. Louis Bridge laid Oct. 27th.

Carondelet was taken into the city.

W. T. Harris was elected Supt. City Schools.

Southern Hotel burned.

Cotton Exchange organized.

Simmons Hardware Co. was organized.

Eads Bridge over Mississippi completed.

Union Depot established.

Present State Constitution adopted.

Merchants Exchange opened.

First Veiled Prophet Pageant.

Cotton Exchange building opened.

Opening of Great St. Louis Exposition.

Grand Opera House destroyed by fire.

Grand Opera House rebuilt Sept. 14th.

St. Louis Live Stock Exchange organized.

Corner stone laid for new City Hall.

Merchants Terminal Bridge completed.

There were vessels enrolled here.

Mercantile Club House Building being erected.

Sale of shoes amount to 21,,

21 railroads centered in St. Louis.

St. Louis was years old.

22

Notable Facts of the City.

St. Louis has 14 libraries.

St. Louis has a crematory.

St. Louis has 20 hospitals.

St. Louis has churches.

St. Louis has 32 cemeteries.

St. Louis has attorneys.

St. Louis has 11 gymnasiums.

St. Louis has 16 public parks.

St. Louis has one art museum.

St. Louis has 25 shoe factories.

St. Louis has 38 fire companies.

St. Louis has public schools.

St. Louis has 46 Masonic lodges.

St. Louis has four cable railroads.

St. Louis has 30 singing societies.

St. Louis has 78 parochial schools.

St. Louis has miles of sewers.

St. Louis has 41 lodges I. O. O. F.

St. Louis owns 97 school buildings.

St. Louis has 20 lines of street cars.

St. Louis has 72 lodges A. O. U. W.

St. Louis has one zoological garden.

St. Louis has nine daily newspapers.

St. Louis has a river front of 20 miles.

St. Louis has 60 building associations.

St. Louis has one first-class race track.

St. Louis has miles of paved streets.

St. Louis has 32 academies and colleges.

St. Louis is the terminus of 27 railroads.

St. Louis has 19 rowing and athletic clubs.

St. Louis has 19 lodges Knights of Pythias.

St. Louis has 59 assemblies Knights of Labor.

St. Louis has 21 banks and two safe deposit companies.

St. Louis has put up 26, new buildings in 10 years.

St. Louis is united to Illinois by two bridges and Wiggins Ferry Company.

24

St. Louis has resident consuls from every Nation in the world.

St. Louis has this only bronze statue of Columbus in the United States.

St. Louis has the only bronze statue of Shakespeare in the United States.

St. Louis has societies of a benevolent and social nature other than secret.

St. Louis has the only bronze statues of Gen'l Francis P. Blair and Edward Bates, located in Forest Park.

St. Louis has the most perfect bronze statue in the United States of George Washington, located in Lafayette Park.

St. Louis was the first city in the United States to erect a bronze statue of Gen'l Grant, located on 12th street, near Olive.

St. Louis has the only bronze statue of Humboldt in the United States, and said by his relatives to be better than any in Europe.

Twelve Branches of Industry in Which St. Louis Leads the World.

The Largest Brewing Establishment — Anheuser-Busch.

The Largest Tobacco Manufacturers — Liggett & Meyers.

The Largest Hardware House — Simmons Hardware Co.

The Largest Drug House — Meyer Bros. Drug Co.

The Largest Woodenware Co. — S. Cupples W'denware Co.

The Largest Boot and Shoe Factory — Hamilton-Brown.

The Largest Cracker Factory — Dozier-Weyl.

The Largest Terra Cotta — Winkle Terra Cotta Co.

The Largest Fire Brick — St. Louis Press Brick.

The Largest Horse and Mule Market.

The Largest Fruit Market.

The Largest Interior Cotton Market.

26

Directory.

Asylums.

Alexian Brothers' Insane Asylum, S. Broadway.

Amelia Home for Children, Garfield ave.

Baptist Orphans' Home, Lafayette ave.

Bethany Faith Home, Oak Hill ave.

Bethesda Christian Home and Infant Asylum, Russell ave., nw. corner 9th.

Blind Girls' Industrial Home, Wash.

Christian Orphans' Home, Webster ave.

Episcopal Orphans' Home, Grand ave., nw. cor, DeTonty.

Evangelical Deaconess' Home, Eugenia.

Female Night Refuge, Morgan, se. cor. 22d.

German Evangelical Lutheran Orphans' Asylum, located fifteen miles from city on Manchester road.

German Gen'l Protestant Orphans' Home, Nat'l Bde. rd.

German Lutheran Orphans' Asylum, DesPeres, St. L. Co.

German Protestant Orphans' Home: office N. B'way.

Girls' Industrial Home, N. 18th.

Home for Aged and Infirm Israelites, S. Jeff'son ave.

Home of Immaculate Conception, S. 8th.

Home of the Friendless (Old Ladies Home), S. B'way.

House of Protection, Morgan, se. cor. 22d.

House of the Good Shepherd, 17th, bet. Pine & Chestnut.

House of the Guardian Angel, Marion.

Industrial School for Girls, Morgan, se. cor. 22d.

Insane Asylum, Arsenal, near Macklind ave.

Institutional Mission Home, S. Broadway.

Little Sisters of the Poor, Hebert.

Masonic Home, Delmar ave.

Memorial Home, Grand ave., nw. cor.

Magnolia ave. Missouri Baptist Sanitarium, Taylor ave.

Mullanphy Orphan Asylum, Broadway, near LaSalle.

Methodist Orphan's Home, Laclede ave.

North-Side Day Nursery, N. 22d.

Protestant Episcopal Mission House, Washington ave.

St. Louis Protestant Orphan Asylum, Webster Grove, Mo.

28

St. Ann's Widows' Home, N. 10th.

St. Francis Orphan Asylum (col'd), Page ave.

St. Joseph Female Night Refuge, Morgan, se. cor. 22d.

St. Joseph's Male Orphan Asylum, Clark ave., ne. cor. 15th.

St. Louis Colored Orphans' Home, N. 12th.

St. Mary's Female Orphan Asylum, Biddle, cor. 10th.

St. Philomena Indus'l School, nw. cor. Clark & Ewing ave.

St. Vincent's German Orphan Asylum, Hogan.

St. Vincent's Institution for the Insane, Marion, cor. 9th.

The Creche Day Nursery for Children, Papin.

The Wm. G. Elliot Home for Nurses, Dillon.

Vanguard Pentecost Band Training Home, Randolph.

White Cross Home, N. 12th.

Women's Christian Home, Washington ave.

Boards of Trade.

Mechanic's Exchange, Olive, southeast corner 10th.

Merchants' Exchange, 3d, bet. Chestnut and Pine.

Merchants' Exchange Board of Flour Inspectors, 8 S. Main.

Mexican and Spanish-American Commercial Exchange, N. 8th.

St. Louis Cotton Exchange, Main, corner Walnut.

St. Louis Furniture Board of Trade, N. 4th.

St. Louis Mining Stock Exchange, N. 3d.

St. Louis Paint, Oil and Drug Club, N. 8th.

The Associated Wholesale Grocers of St. Louis, N. 2d.

The Farm Implement and Vehicle Association.

The Lumbermen's Exchange of St. Louis, rooms and Temple Building.

The St. Louis Wool and Fur Ass'n, Main, corner Walnut.

Building and Loan Associations, and Name of Secretary.

Accommodation, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Acme, Chestnut; T. F. Farrelly.

Active, Chestnut; Geo. W. Davis.

Advance, Chestnut; G. V. R. Mechin.

30

Allemania, Pine; Albert C. Trebus.

Artisan, Pine; J. B. McCormick.

Aubert Place, Chestnut; Daniel B. Brennan.

Aubert Place No. 2, Chestnut; Daniel B. Brennan.

Aurora Mutual, Pine; Robert Rutledge.

Banner, Chestnut; F. W. Plass.

Beneficial, Chestnut; Chas. C. Nicholls.

Benton, Pine; C. E. Wehner.

Blackstone, Olive; H. W. Lindhorn.

Bohemian, Russell ave.; Anthony Klobasa.

Bohemian-American, S. 12th.

Bremen, N. Broadway; C. C. Crone.

Caledonia, Chestnut; R. F. Miller.

Centennial, 10 N. 8th; H. D. Stewart.

Central, Elliot ave., southwest corner St. Louis ave.

Charter Oak, N. Main; John G. O'Keefe.

Charter Oak No. 2, N. Main; John G. O'Keefe.

Citizens, Pine; J. F. Brady.

Clay Henry, Chestnut; Charles J. Dunnermann.

Clerks and Mechanics', Chestnut; G. M. Truesdale.

Clifton Heights, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Columbia, Carroll and 10th.

Columbia, Chestnut; Albert Wenzlick.

Commercial, Chestnut; Chas. C. Nicholls.

Common Sense, Olive; K. C. Blood.

Compton Hill, Chestnut; Gus. V. R. Mechin.

Concordia, Marion; A. Bollin.

Covenant Mutual, Chestnut; W. M. Horton.

Continental, Chestnut; Chas. C. Nicholls.

Continental, 1/2 Chestnut; F. H. Rogers.

Cooper Peter, Nos. 1, 3, 3, 4 & 5, Chestnut; J. B. Follett.

Co-operative, Chestnut, W. Terry.

Cottage, Chestnut, Martin Kelly.

Covenant, Chestnut; W. M. Horton.

Crescent, Chestnut; Charles G. Balmer.

Desoto Saving, Pine; James F. Brady.

Edison, Nos. 1 and 2, Chestnut; W. F. Parker.

Elaine, Chestnut; T. F. Terry.

32

Emerald, Chestnut; James Rice.

Enterprise, S. Broadway; G. H. Quellmalz.

Equality Saving, Chestnut; G. V. R. Mechin.

Equitable Loan & Invest. Ass'n, Chestnut; W. M. Dean.

Excelsior Mutual, Chestnut; W. M. Horton.

Exchange, Chestnut; Geo. F. Bergfeld.

Famous Mutual Saving Fund, 10 N. 8th; D. H. Stewart.

Firemen's, N. 8th; R. F. Kilgen.

Fireside, N. 8th; W. A. Dorey.

Forest, Chestnut; George F. Bergfeld.

Franco-American, Pine; J. H. Trembly.

Franklin Saving, Chestnut; T. A. Rice.

Fraternal, Chestnut; Charles F. Vogel.

Future Great, 16 N. 8th; P. T. Carr.

Garfield Saving, Chestnut; T. A. Rice.

Garrison Mutual, Easton ave.; P. T. Madden.

General Hancock, Chestnut; G. V. R. Mechin.

German-American Building and Investing Association, Chestnut; G. V. R. Mechin.

German Mutual, 19 S. Broadway; W. K. Walther.

Germania, Pine; Albert C. Trebus.

Gibraltar, Chestnut; H. T. Smith.

Girard Stephen, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Gladstone, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Globe, Pine; Charles Kuhn.

Granite, N. 8th; James H. Maguire.

Great Western, N. 8th; R. F. Kilgen.

Guarantee Real Estate and House Building Co., Chestnut; John W. McIntyre.

Harlem, Chestnut; Charles F. Vogel.

Hibernia No. 2, Pine; James F. Brady.

Hoevel, St. Louis ave.; Felix Hoevel.

Home City, 19 N. 8th; L. E. Dehlendorf.

Home Comfort, N. 8th; John A. Watkins.

Home Getters', Pine; J. B. McCormick.

Home Mutual, Pine; D. J. Hayden.

Home Savings and Loan Ass'n, Chestnut; G. B. Frye.

Home Seekers', Chestnut; A. R. Schollmeyer.

34

Homestead. Mutual, N. 8th; L. B. Pierce.

House and Home, Chestnut; Paul Jones.

Humboldt, Pine; A. L. Berry.

Hyde Park, N. Broadway; C. C. Crone.

Imperial, Pine; C. H. Sawyer.

Improvement, Pine; William Zink.

Industrial, Chestnut; George W. Davis.

Investment, Chestnut; Charles C. Nicholls.

Irish-American Saving, Chestnut; T. A. Rice.

Iron Hall, N. 8th; J. S. Gordon.

Jefferson, Chestnut; Martin Kelly.

Keystone, 16 N. 8th; P. T. Carr.

Knapp George Real Estate and Building Ass'n, Locust H. G. Knapp.

Knights, N. 8th; F. J. Wade.

Laclede, Pine; D. J. Hayden.

Lafayette Mutual, Pine; Arthur L. Thompson.

Legion, N. 8th; F. J. Wade.

Lincoln, Chestnut; George F. Bergfeld.

Lindell Savings, Building and Loan Ass'n, Chestnut; D. Sheppard.

Lindemwood Building, Quarry and Investment Co., Olive; S. T. Rathell.

Lucas, Chestnut; Jeremiah Ryan.

Marquette Mutual, Pine; D. J. Hayden.

Mechanics', Pine; D. J. Hayden.

Merchants and Mechanics' Mutual Saving Fund, N. Broadway; Henry Kotthoff.

Metropolitan Mutual, N. 8th; L. E. Anderson.

Mississippi, Chestnut; P. M. Manning.

Missouri Guarantee, N. 4th; E. R. Beach.

Missouri Mutual, Pine; D. J. Hayden.

Model Building, Loan & Invest. Ass'n, N. Jeff'son ave.

Mound City, Chestnut; Thomas A. Rice.

Mount Olive Nos. 1 and 2, Chestnut; G. V. R. Mechin.

Mullanphy, 19 S. Broadway; R. M. Foster.

Mutual Annuity Co., Olive.

Mutual Benefit Saving Fund Building and Loan. Ass'n, Nos. 1 and 2, Olive; Samuel Bowman.

36

National, Chestnut; Charles F. Vogel.

New Era, 1/2 Chestnut; B. W. Thornhill.

New Plan, 17 N. 8th; J. W. Bergfeld.

Nickel Saving, Investment and Building Ass'n, Chouteau ave, nw. cor. 3d; J. Walter.

Northwestern, 17 N. 8th; Andrew J. Naughton.

Oak, 17 N. 18th; J. W. Bergfeld.

Park, Olive; Charles D. Greene, jr.

Parnell Saving and Build'g Ass'n, Chestnut; T. A. Rice.

Peabody, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Peerless, Pine; C. H. Sawyer.

Phoenix, 8 N. 8th; B. F. Small.

Phoenix, Chestnut; A. R. Schollmeyer.

Printing Trades Mutual Building and Loan Ass'n, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Progressive, N. 8th; Selden P. Spencer.

Prosperity, E. Grand ave.; E. W. Woods.

Provident, 17 N. 10th; C. F. A. Miller.

Real Estate Nos. 1 and 2, Pine; William Zink.

Red Cross, 17 N. 8th; A. J. Naughton.

Reservoir, Chestnut; J. F. Klinglesmith.

Richmond, Chestnut: M. D. Browning.

Rock Spring Nos. 1 and 2, Market; A. H. Kansteiner.

Safety, Chestnut; Edwin S. Fish.

Security Nos. 1 and 2, N. 8th; Joseph H. Tiernan.

Shaw Henry, Chestnut; A. A. B. Woerheide.

Sherman, Chestnut; D. Sheppard.

Shoe and Leather Trade, Market; O. Zakrzewski.

South End, S. Broadway; F. W. Mott.

South Side, S. Jefferson ave.; H. W. Mepham.

Southwestern, Park ave.; Herman J. Krembs.

Standard, Olive, se. corner 9th; W. B. Anderson.

Standard, Market; O. Zakrzewski.

Starling, Chestnut; A. O. Terry.

State Savings, Fund and Building Ass'n, Nos. 1 and 2, Chestnut; C. R. Davis.

St. Louis Central, 1/2 Chestnut; B. W. Thornhill.

St. Louis Home and Saving Ass'n, N. 8th; A. O. Rule.

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St. Louis Mutual House Building Co. No. 3, Walnut; Hugo Kromrey.

St. Louis Savings and Building Ass'n, Chestnut; Thos. A. Rice.

St. Louis Turners', Nos. 1 and 2, Market; F. Nohl.

Superior, Nos 1 and 2, Chestnut, J. H. Parish.

Success, Olive; S. W. Gay.

The Leader, N. 8th; J. S. Gordon.

Tower, E. Grand ave.; Jesse B. Mellor.

Tower Grove, S. Jefferson ave.; W. J. Lewis.

Turners', 10th and Carroll.

Tuscan, N. Broadway; Henry Kottshoff.

Uncle Sams', N. 4th; H. S. Tuttle.

Underwriters', Locust; G. O. Kalb.

Valley Building Co., Olive; J. F. Weston.

Very Best, N. 3d; C. A. Forse.

Virginia, Chestnut; E. M. Rice.

Wage Workers', N. 8th; W. A. Sisson.

Washington Irving, 17 N. 8th; J. W. Bergfeld.

Washington Saving and Building Ass'n, Chestnut; T. A. Rice.

West End, Chestnut; George T. Anglen.

West St. Louis, Easton ave.; Henry C. Barnard.

Western, Pine; C. H. Sawyer.

Western Mutual, N. 8th; R. F. Kilgen.

Western Union, Nos. 1, 3, 3, 4, 5 and 6, S. 9th; M. T. Bogard.

Workingmen's, 17 N. 8th; A. J. Naughton.

Churches.

BAPTIST.

Ministers' Conference, meets regularly on Mondays at 11 o'clock a. m., at Olive.

Broadway Mission, Broadway and Poplar.

Carondelet, Virginia ave., head of Robert.

Cass Avenue Mission, Cass and Garrison aves.

Delmar Avenue, Delmar and Pendleton aves.

First German, Rauschenbach ave. Fourth, Benton and 13th.

40

Fourth Mission, Angelrodt and 14th.

Grand Avenue, N. Grand ave.

Immanuel, Cates ave., near Hamilton ave.

Jefferson Avenue Mission, Walnut, corner Jefferson ave.

Lafayette Park, Lafayette ave., se. corner Mississippi ave.

Second, Beaumont, corner Locust.

Taylor Avenue Mission, Easton and Taylor aves.

Third, Grand and Washington aves.

Tower Grove, Tower Grove Station.

Water Tower, north side E. Grand ave., nr. Florissant ave.

CHRISTIAN.

Central, Finney ave., near Grand ave.

Fifth, S. 7th.

First, Locust, near Compton ave.

Fourth, Pehrose.

Second, 11th, northeast corner Tyler.

CONGREGATIONAL.

Aubert Place, Fountain ave., sw. cor. Aubert ave.

Bethany Mission, Park ave. and 12th.

Bethlehem Mission, Alien ave. and 13th.

Church of the Redeemer, Barrett and Thompson ave.

Compton Hill, Lafayette ave., ne. cor. Compton ave.

First, south side Delmar eve., nr. Grand ave.

First (German), Garfield ave., sw. cor. Spring ave.

Hope, Florence ave.

Hyde Park, Bremen ave.

Immanuel, Hancock ave., near Jamieson ave.

Manchester Road Mission, Manchester rd. nr. Macklin ave.

Maplewood, Manchester road, near Sutton ave.

Memorial, Sulphur ave., cor. Way.

Newstead Avenue, Delmar ave., cor. Newstead ave.

Olive Branch, Sidney, opposite Missouri ave.

Peoples' Tabernacle, Clark ave., sw. cor. 23d.

Pilgrim, Washington ave., se. cor. Ewing ave.

Plymouth, Belle Glade ave.

Third, Grand ave., near Page ave.

Swedish, Locust, ne. cor. 11th.

42

Union, N. 10th.

Congregational City Missionary Society, N. 3d.

American Home Missionary Society, Lucas place.

EPISCOPALIAN.

The Diocese of Missouri, Rt. Rev. D, S. Tuttle, Bishop, Chestnut.

All Saints (col'd), Washington ave.

Christ, 13th, corner Locust.

Church of the Ascension,Catesave., ne. cor. Goodfellow ave.

Church of the Holy Communion, Leffingwell ave, near Washington ave.

Church of the Holy Innocents, Tholozan ave., nr. Morgan Ford road.

Grace, Marion place, near 11th.

Mission Church of the Good Shepherd, S. 8th.

Mount Calvary, cor. Jefferson and Lafayette aves.

St. Augustine's, Bruno ave., ne. cor. Blenddon place.

St. George's, Pendleton ave., nw. cor. Olive.

St. James, Goode ave., se. cor. Cote Brilliante ave.

St. John's, Hickory, ne. cor. Dolman.

St. Mark's, Washington ave., se. cor.

Vandeventer ave. St. Paul's, Michigan ave.

St. Peter's, east side Grand ave., near Olive.

Trinity, Franklin ave., cor. Channing ave.

GERMAN EVANGELICAL.

Bethania, 23d, ne. cor. Wash.

Bethlehem, Garrison ave.

Ebenezer, McNair ave.

Frieden's, 19th, sw. cor. Newhouse ave.

German Evangelical, Michigan ave., nw. cor. Koeln ave.

Salem, Margaretta ave., se. cor. Marcus ave.

St. Jacob's, College ave., cor. Blair ave.

St. Johannes, 14th, se. cor. Madison.

St. Luke's, Scott ave.

St. Mark's, 3d, nw. cor. Soulard.

St, Mathews, Jefferson ave., nw. cor. Potomac.

St. Paul's, S. 9th.

St. Paul's Friedens, Allen ave., nw. cor. 13th.

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St. Peter's, Carr, nw. cor. 14th.

Zion, Benton, cor. 25th.

ENGLISH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN.

St. Mark's, Bell ave., sw. cor. Cardinal ave.

GERMAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN.

Benton Station, Briino and Forest aves.

Bethania, Nat'l Bridg road, cor. Clay ave.

Bethlehem, 19th, sw. cor. Salisbury.

Cheltenham, Sulphur ave.

Christ, Caroline.

Church of the Holy Cross, south side Miami, nr. Ohio ave.

Ebenezer, Church road, near Hall's Ferry road.

Gnaden, Wellston station.

Immanuel, Morgan, sw. cor. 15th.

St. John's, Morgan Ford road.

St. Paul's, Prairie ave., ne. cor. Von Phul.

St. Trinity, 6th and Upton.

Trinity, Lafayette ave., cor. 8th.

Zion, Warren, se. cor. Blair ave.

HEBREW.

Beth Hami Drosh Haggodol, N. 11th.

B'Naiel, Chouteau ave. and 11th.

B'Nai Amoona, 13th, sw. cor. Carr.

Shevra Kadusha, N. 7th.

Shaare Emeth, Pine, cor. 17th.

Sheerith Israel, 11th, sw. cor. Franklin ave.

Sheerith Sphalt, N. 9th.

Temple Israel, Pine, ne. cor. Leffingwell ave.

United Hebrew, Olive, se. cor. 21st.

METHODIST EPISCOPAL.

Resident Bishop, Thos. Bowman, LL.D., Washington ave.

Rev. O. M. Martin, presiding elder, Clifton Heights.

Rev. Michael Roeder (German), presiding elder, Page ave.

Carondelet, Virginia ave.

Carondelet (German), Pennsylvania ave.

46

Clifton Heights, north side Wilson ave., near Clifton, ave.

Ebenezer (German), Taylor ave.

Eden, Warren, corner 19th.

Eighth Street, 8th and Soulard.

Elliot Avenue, Elliot ave., corner Wash.

First German, Wash.

First Swedish, Leffingwell ave. and Bernard.

Gano Avenue, Gano ave., near Guy ave.

Goode Avenue, Goode ave., corner North Market.

Harlem Place, Jamieson ave., nw. cor. Fyler ave.

Jennings Station.

Neidringhause Memorial, Cass ave., nw. cor. 7th.

St. Luke's, Potomac, ne. cor. Texas ave.

Tower Grove, Kentucky ave., near Manchester road.

Trinity, corner 10th and North Market.

Union, Lucas ave., cor. Garrison ave.

Water Tower, Obear ave., nw. cor. 20th.

Wesley Chapel, Wash.

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, SOUTH.

Rev. Thos. M. Finney, presiding elder West St. Louis District; residence and office, Pine. Rev. Wm. R. Mays, presiding elder South St. Louis District; residence and office, Eads ave.

Carondelet, Virginia ave., se. cor. Haven.

Centenary, Pine, nw. cor. 16th.

Cook Avenue, Spring ave., se. cor. Cook ave.

Immanuel, Benton Station.

First, Glasgow ave., cor. Dayton.

Lafayette Park, Lafayette ave., cor. Missouri ave.

Marvin, Sidney, ne. cor. 12th,

Mount Auburn, North Market, ne. cor. Hodiamont ave.

St. John's, Locust, nw. co'r. Ewing ave.

St. Paul's, St. Louis ave.

St. Paul's Mission, Obear ave., nw. cor. Florissant ave.

Taylor Avenue, north side Maffitt ave., near Taylor ave.

M. E. Church (South), Preachers' meeting at Advocate office, Lucas place, every Monday, a. m.

48

NEW JERUSALEM.

First German Church of the New Jerusalem, Tyler, nw. cor. 12th.

New Church Chapel, east side Cabanne, near Delmar ave.

Second German Church, St. Louis ave., sw. cor. Rauschenbach ave.

PRESBYTERIAN.

Biddle Street Mission, Biddle, cor. 15th.

Carondelet, Michigan ave.

Central, Lucas ave., ne. cor. Garrison ave.

Chouteau Avenue Mission, Chouteau ave.

Church of the Covenant, N. Grand ave.

Cote Brilliante, Marcus ave., near St. Louis ave.

Fairfax Mission, Fairfax ave.

First, Sarah, sw. cor. Washington ave.

First German, Autumn, cor. 10th.

Glasgow Avenue, Glasgow ave., near Dickson.

Grace, Goodfellow ave., near Theodosia ave.

Grand Avenue, Grand ave., near Washington ave.

Hope Mission, Minnesota ave.

Kossuth Avenue, Lee ave. and Prairie ave.

Lafayette Park, Missouri ave., sw. cor. Albion place.

McCausland Avenue, McCausland ave., near Bruno ave.

Memorial Tabernacle, Carr.

North, 11th, nw. cor. Chambers.

Presbyterian Mission, 38 S. Leonard ave.

Second, 17th, cor. Lucas place.

Second (German), N. 19th.

Soulard Mission, Carroll and 7th.

Sturgeon Mission, 11th, cor. Chambers.

Tabernacle Mission, Broadway and Biddle.

Washington Avenue, Compton and Washington aves.

West, Maple and Maryville aves.

Westminster, Pestalozzi.

Presbyterian Ministerial Ass'n, meets Monday, 11 a. m., at Presbyterian rooms, Olive.

PRESBYTERIAN, CUMBERLAND.

First Gethsemane (German), Sullivan ave., ne. cor. 25th.

50

Lucas Avenue, Lucas ave, cor. Channing ave.

Second (German), Montgomery and 18th.

PRESBYTERIAN, UNITED.

First United, Morgan, cor. 19th.

Grand Avenue, Grand ave., cor. Forest Park Boulevard.

ROMAN CATHOLIC.

Archdiocese of St. Louis. Established Comprises that part of the State of Missouri east of Chariton river and of the west line of the counties of Cole, Maries, Pulaski, Texas and Howell. Archbishop, Most Rev. Peter Richard Kenrick, D. D., consecrated Nov. 30, Bishop of Drasa, and Coadjutor to Rt. Rev. Bishop Rosatti (first Bishop of St. Louis), became Bishop of St. Louis in , created Archbishop in Vicars General, V. Rev. H. Muehlsiepen, V. Rev. Philip P. Brady. Council of the Archbishop — V. Rev. H. Muehlsiepen, V. G., V. Rev. Philip P. Brady, V. G., Rev. C. Ziegler, secretary; Rev. H. Van der Sauden, chancellor.

Cathedral, Walnut, bet. 2d and 3d.

Annunciation, 6th and LaSalle.

Assumption, Sidney, cor. 9th.

Church of the Holy Cross (German), Church road, near Bittner.

Church of the Holy Ghost (German), North Market, west of Taylor ave.

Church of the Holy Name of Jesus, E. Grand ave.

Church of the Sacred Heart, south side University, near 25th.

Church of the Visitation, B. V. M., Taylor ave., sw. cor. Easton ave.

Holy Angels, St. Ange ave. and LaSalle.

Holy Trinity (German), Mallinckrodt, cor. 14th.

Immaculate Conception, Jefferson ave., cor. Lucas place.

Our Lady of Mount Carmel, east side Church road, near Hall's Ferry road.

Our Lady of Perpetual Succor (German), west side 20th, near College ave.

St. Agatha (German), S, 9th.

St. Agnes, Sidney, ne. cor. Salena.

52

St. Alphonsus (Redemptorist Fathers), Grand Ave., near. Cook ave.

St. Ann's, Nat'l Bridge road, 8 miles from city.

St. Anthony's (German), Meramec, cor. Compton ave.

St. Augustine (German), Lismore, cor. Hebert.

St. Bernard's, Hawk ave., near Gratiot.

St. Bonifacius (German), Michigan ave., ne. cor. Schirmer.

St. Bridget's, Carr, ne. cor. Jefferson ave.

St. Casimir's, 8th, sw. cor. Mound.

St. Columbkille's, Michigan ave., near Davis.

St. Cronan's, Boyle and Swan aves.

St. Elizabeth (col'd), N. 14th.

St. Eugelbert, Carter ave., near Marcus ave.

St. Francis of Sale's (German), Gravois ave., cor. Ohio ave.

St. Francis Xavier, Grand ave., sw. cor. Lindell ave.

St. Henry's (German), Hickory, cor. California ave.

St. James, east side Tamm ave., near Cheltenham ave.

St. John's, Chestnut, ne. cor. 16th.

St. John of Nepomuk (Bohemian), Soulard, nw. cor. 11th.

St. Joseph's (German), 11th and Biddle.

St. Kevin's, Park ave., ne. cor. Cardinal ave.

St. Lawrence O'Toole, 14th and O'Fallon.

St. Leo's, Mullanphy, nw. cor. 23d.

St. Liborius (German), North Market, se. cor. Hogan.

St. Malachy's, Clark and Ewing aves.

St. Mary's (German), 3d and Gratiot.

St. Mary's and St. Joseph's, Minnesota ave., near Iron.

St. Michael's, 11th and Clinton.

St. Nicholas (German), Lucas ave.

St. Patrick's, 6th and Biddle.

St. Paul the Apostle, Finney ave., cor. Pendleton ave.

Sts. Peter and Paul (German), 7th and Allen ave.

St. Rose, Goodfellow ave., cor. Etzel ave.

St. Stanislaus (Polish), 20th, near Cass ave.

St. Theresa's, N. Grand ave.

St. Thomas of Aquinas, Iowa ave., nw. cor. Osage.

St. Vincent's de Paul's (German and English), Park ave. and 9th.

54

UNITARIAN.

Church of the Messiah, Garrison ave., ne. cor. Locust.

Church of the Unity, cor. Park and Armstrong aves.

Mission, Wash, sw. cor. 9th.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Antioch (col'd), Kennerly ave.

Baden Baptist (col'd), Antelope.

Baden M. E. (col'd). Broadway, near Hall's Ferry road.

Bethany Presbyterian, west side 19th, near Wash.

Bethel Mission, N. Commercial.

Bethlehem Ger. Evang., Shaw ave., near Hereford.

Carondelet M. E. (col'd), Pennsylvania ave.

Central (col'd), Morgan, ne. cor. 23d.

Chambers Street Baptist, Chambers, se. cor. 10th.

Chinese Sunday School, Locust, nw. cor. 11th.

Christ Evangelical, Manchester road, near Private road.

Grace Evangelical, east side Garrison ave., near St. Louis ave.

Church of God, St. Louis ave., near Glasgow ave.

Church of Jesus Christ, Manchester road, near Pierce ave.

Compton Hill Baptist (col'd), LaSalle.

El Bethel Baptist, Athlone ave.

Fifth Baptist, Papin.

First Baptist (col'd), south side Clark ave., near 14th.

City Government.

Assessment of the Revenue, southeast wing, Court House.

Assessor and Collector of Water Rates, office south wing, 1st floor, City Hall.

Auditor, room 3, 2d floor, City Hall.

Board of Health, office south wing, City Hall.

Board of Police Commissioners, Four Courts.

Board of Public Improvements, office north wing, 3d floor, City Hall.

Collector of Revenue, east wing, Court House.

Commissioner of Public Buildings, office 11, 2d floor, City Hall.

Commissioner of Supplies, office 25, 1st floor, City Hall.

56

Comptroller, room 2, 2d floor, City Hall.

Coroner, office Four Courts, cor. 11th.

Counsellor, office 12, 2d floor, City Hall.

Department of Election, and Registration, office 16, 1st floor, City Hall.

Dead Animal Contractor, office S. 11th.

Harbor and Wharf Commissioner, office 18, 1st floor, City Hall.

Health Commissioner, room 30, City Hall.

Inspectors of Boilers and Elevators, office 21, 2d floor, City Hall.

Inspector of Weights and Measures, room 28, 1st floor, City Hall.

Jailor, Four Courts.

Jury Commissioner, office 1st floor, Court House.

Lighting Department, office north wing, 3d floor, City Hall.

Marshal, Four Courts.

Mayor, room 1, 2d floor, City Hall.

Milk Inspector, office 20, 1st floor, City Hall.

Park Commissioner, office 42, 3d floor, City Hall.

Plumbing Inspection Department, office 41, 3d floor, City Hall.

Public Administrator, office 2d floor, Chestnut.

Recorder of Deeds, office south wing, Court House.

Register, room 24, 1st floor, City Hall.

Sewer Commissioner, office 3d floor, City Hall.

Sheriff, office basement north wing, Court House.

Street Commissioner, office south wing, 2d floor, City Hall.

Slop Contractor, office 1st floor, City Hall.

Superintendent Work House, Broadway, cor. Meramec.

Treasurer, room 4, 2d floor, City Hall.

Water Commissioner, office south wing, 1st floor, City Hall.

Convents.

Convent of Our Lady of Good Counsel, Cass ave.

Convent of the Carmelite Nuns, 2d Carondelet ave., cor. Victor.

Convent of the Franciscan Fathers, Meramec, se. cor. Compton ave.

58

Convent of the Franciscan Sisters, N. 14th, and Blair ave., ne. cor. Mallinckrodt.

Convent of the Immaculate Conception, 8th, nw. cor. Marion.

Convent of the Maria Consilia Deaf Mute Institute, north side Cass ave., near 18th.

Convent of the Redemptorist Fathers, Grand ave., near Easton ave.

Convent of the Visitation, Cass ave.

Convent and Academy of the Sacred Heart, Broadway, sw. cor. LaSalle.

Convent and Institute of the Sacred Heart, Meramec, near Minnesota ave.

Convent and Asylum of the House of the Good Shepherd, 17th, near Pine.

Oblate Sisters of Providence, Morgan.

Servants of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Gratiot, ne. cor. 3d.

Sisterhood of the Good Shepherd (Episcopalian), S. Compton ave.

Sisters de Notre Dame, S. 8th, S. 3d, North Market, N. Grand ave., and N. 20th.

Sisters of Loretto, Pine, and N. 25th.

Sisters of St. Joseph, N. 7th, 8th. cor. Marion, Minnesota ave., cor. Kansas, Cass ave., and Morgan.

St. Boniface Convent, Minnesota ave., nw. cor. Schirmer.

St. Joseph Convent of Mercy, Morgan, se. cor. 33d.

St. Vincent's German, Hogan, near Cass ave.

Ursuline Convent and Academy, 12th, bet. Russell and Ann aves.

Dispensaries.

American Medical College, S. Jefferson ave.

Beaumont Hospital Medical College, Pine.

Central, Franklin ave.

City, north side Market, near 11th.

Homoeopathic Medical College of Missouri, Howard.

Missouri Medical College, Lucas ave., ne. cor. 22d.

Polyclinic and Dispensary, N. 6th.

South Side Dispensary, S. Broadway.

St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, Jefferson ave., sw. cor. Gamble.

60

Educational.

ACADEMIES, COLLEGES, ETC.

Academy of the Christian Brothers, north side Easton ave., near King's highway.

American Medical College, S. Jefferson ave.

Beaumont Hospital Medical College, Pine.

Concordia Seminary, Jefferson ave., corner Winnebago.

Eden Theological College, St. Charles Rock road, southwest corner Hunt ave.

Forest Park University, Clayton road, corner Billon ave.

Henry Shaw School of Botany, Washington ave.

Homoeopathic Medical College of Missouri, Jefferson ave., southeast corner Howard.

Loretto Academy, Jefferson ave., northeast corner Pine.

Manual Training, Washington ave., southwest corner 18th.

Mary Institute, Locust, northeast corner Beaumont.

Missouri Dental Infirmary and College, Clark ave.

Missouri Medical College, Lucas ave., northeast cor. 22d.

Missouri School for the Blind, Morgan, northeast corner 19th.

Missouri School of Midwifery; Lying-in-Hospital, N. 9th.

Nurses Training School, Dillon.

Polytechnic, Washington ave., near 17th.

School of the Good Shepherd, S. Compton ave.

Smith Academy, Washington ave., corner 19th.

St. De Chantel Academy of the Visitation, Washington ave.

St. Elizabeth Institute, west side Arsenal, near Grand ave.

St. Joseph Academy, Minnesota ave., corner Kansas.

St. Louis College of Pharmacy, S. 6th.

St. Louis College of Physicians, and Surgeons, Jefferson ave., southwest corner Gamble.

St. Louis Hygienic College of Physicians and Surgeons, Chouteau ave.

St. Louis Law School, Lucas place.

St. Louis Medical College, 7th, corner Clark ave.

St. Louis Post Graduate School of Medicine, Jefferson ave., corner Lucas ave.

62

St. Louis School of Midwifery, Chouteau ave.

St. Louis University, Grand ave., opposite Pine.

St. Vincent's Academy, Grand ave., corner Locust.

Washington University, 17th, corner Washington ave.

Women's Training School, N. 4th.

LIBRARIES.

Law, south wing Court House.

National Library Association, N. 8th.

St. Louis Mercantile Library Association, Locust, southwest corner Broadway.

Odd Fellows', Olive, southeast corner 9th.

Slovanska Lipa (Bohemian), Allen ave.

St. John's, Circulating, 16th, northeast corner Chestnut.

St. Louis Diocesan, Chestnut.

St. Louis Law School, Lucas place.

St. Louis Public, Chestnut, southwest corner 7th.

St. Louis Turnverein, Turners' Hall, Chouteau ave.

St. Louis University, Grand ave., opposite Pine.

Young Ladies' Sodality, Grand ave., opposite Pine.

Young Men's Christian Association, Circulating, Pine.

Young Men's Sodality, Grand ave., opposite Pine.

LOCATION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

Adams School, Norfolk ave., bet. Tower Grove and Vista aves.

Aldridge, Baden, Switzer and Christian aves.

Ames, Hebert and Fourteenth.

Arlington, Burd ave., near Cote Brilliante ave.

Ashland, Newstead and Sacramento ave.

Attucks, Seventh and Hickory.

Baden, Church road and Bittner.

Banneker, Montgomery and Leffingwell ave.

Belle ave., Belle ave. and Sarah.

Blair, Rauschenbach ave.

64

Blair Branch, Dodier and St. Louis place.

Blow, South St. Louis, Virginia and Loughborough aves.

Bryan Hill, John ave.

Carondelet, Minnesota ave. and Hurck.

Carr, 15th and Carr.

Carr Lane, 23d and Carr.

Carroll, 10th and Carroll.

Charless, Shenandoah.

Chouteau, Chouteau ave.

Clay, Eleventh and Farrar.

Clinton, Grattan and Hickory.

Compton, Henrietta and Theresa ave.

Cote Brilliante, Kennerly and Cora aves.

Crow, Belle and Channing aves.

Delany, Virginia ave.

Delany (No. 6), Virginia ave., corner Bowen.

Des Peres (Blow Branch), Michigan ave, and Iron.

Dessalines, Twelfth.

Divoll, Dayton and Glasgow ave.

Douglas, 11th and Howard.

Dumas, Lucas ave.

Elliot, 15th and Walnut.

Elleardsville, Belleglade ave, and North Market.

Franklin, Lucas ave. and 17th.

Gardenville, Gravois ave.

Garneld, Jefferson ave. and Wyoming.

Garnett, Bulwer ave., near Adelaide ave.

Gratiot, Manchester road, near Billon ave.

Gravois, Gravois and Wyoming.

Grand View, Watson road, opposite Scanlan ave.

Hamilton, 23d and Dickson.

High School, Grand and Finney aves.

Hodgen, Henrietta, southeast corner California ave.

Humboldt, 3d, near Russell ave.

Irving, Bremen ave., corner 28th.

Jackson, Maiden Lane, near Hogan.

James Dozier, Goodfellow and Maple aves.

66

Jefferson, 9th, corner Wash.

Jefferson Branch, 9th, corner Wash.

Laclede, 6th, corner Poplar.

Lafayette, Ann ave., between 8th and 9th.

Lafayette Branch, S. 9th.

Lincoln, Eugenia.

Lincoln Branch, Walnut, near 23d.

Longfellow, Gratiot station.

Lowell, Adelaide ave., near 11th.

Lyon, Pestalozzi, corner 7th.

L'Ouverture (No. 4), Papin.

Madison, 7th, corner LaSalle.

Marquette, Warne ave., near Westminster place.

Meramec, Meramec, northwest corner Iowa ave.

Mullanphy (Douglas branch), 14th, between Mullanphy and Howard.

New Madison, Hickory, near 7th.

New Webster, 12th, corner Clinton. Normal, 15th and Pine.

Oak Hill, north side Tholozan ave., near Morgan Ford road.

O'Fallon, 15th, near Cass ave.

Peabody, 2d Carondelet ave., corner Carroll.

Penrose, Madison, near Leffingwell ave.

Pestalozzi, 7th, corner Barry.

Pope, Laclede ave., corner Ewing ave.

Rock Spring, Sarpy ave., near Hawk ave.

Simmons (No. 8), St. Louis ave.

Shaw, Old Manchester road, near King's highway.

Shepard, Marine ave., corner Miami.

Shepard (New), Capitol ave., Miami.

Spring ave., North Market, near Spring ave.

Stoddard, Lucas ave., corner Ewing ave.

Stunner High, 11th and Spruce.

Vashon (No. 10), Sulphur avenue, near Manchester road.

Webster, 11th, near Clinton.

Wheatly (No. 7), Manchester road, near Papin.

68

Express Offices.

Adams — North Broadway.

American — North Broadway.

Belleville & St. Louis — North Broadway.

Pacific — North Fourth St.

Southern — North Broadway.

United States — North Fourth St.

Cab and Coupe Companies.

MOUND CITY COUPE CO. — Office N. Eighth; Stable Pine; Telephones, and ; Stands, east side Eighth, bet. Pine and Olive, west side Sixth, bet. Pine and Olive, Park and Mississippi avenues, Lindell avenue.

MILEAGE RATES.

First one or two miles (14 blocks per mile) — 50c.

Additional half mile after second mile — 15c.

Additional mile after second mile — 25c.

First stop of five minutes — No charge.

Any subsequent stop, for each ten minutes or fraction thereof, 10c. When on Mileage Rates we charge from nearest stand to point where passenger enters cab.

HOUR RATES.

Within a radius of three miles from the Court House, per hour — 75c.

For each quarter of an hour or fraction thereof — 20c.

Beyond the three mile radius — per hour, $

For each quarter hour or fraction thereof — 25c.

For a continuous stop of one half hour or more when on above rates, seventy cents per hour will be charged while waiting.

Hour services charged from the time of leaving the stand nearest place calling to time necessary for Cab to return to its stand.

For each satchel or package too large to carry inside — 10c.

Double rates will be charged between the hours of 1 and 5 a. m.

All rates include either one or two persons.

When three persons ride fifty per cent additional will be charged.

No mile engagements for less than — 50c.

No hour engagements for less than one hour.

When service by the hour is desired it must be so stated when the Cab is engaged, otherwise distance rates will be charged.

Messenger Offices.

St. Louis Express and Messenger Co. — North Sixth, Telephone

Missouri Messenger Co. and Night-Watch Signal Service — Chestnut, Telephone

Excelsior — North Sixth, Telephone

Walton Express and Messenger Co. — North Sixth, Telephone

70

Fire Department.

Headquarters, N. 7th.

Fire and Police Telegraph, office, Court House.

Firemen's Fund Association, N. 7th.

St. Louis Firemen's Pension Fund and Relief Ass'n, N. 7th.

Underwriters' Salvage Corps, headquarters, Locust.

Hospitals.

Alexian Brothers Hospital and Insane Asylum, S. Broadway.

Bethesda, Russell ave., nw. cor. 9th.

City, Lafayette ave., cor. Linn.

Female Hospital, north side Arsenal, near Sublette ave.

German Evangelical Lutheran Hospital, Potomac.

Good Samaritan, Jefferson ave., nw. cor. Dayton.

Lying-In, O'Fallon, se. cor. 10th.

Martha Parsons' Free Hospital for Children, Channing ave., sw. cor. School.

Missouri Pacific Railway, east side California ave., near Eads ave.

O'Fallon Park Sanitarium, O'Fallon Park.

Pius, O'Fallon, se. cor. 14th.

Quarantine and Small Pox, south of Jefferson Barracks.

St. Ann's Maternity, O'Fallon.

St. John's, Lucas place.

St. Louis Children's, Jefferson ave., se. cor. Adams.

St. Louis Iron Mountain and Southern Railway Employes' Home, Virginia ave., nw. cor. Haven.

St. Louis Mullanphy, Montgomery, ne. cor. Bacon.

St. Louis Polyclinic and Emergency, Olive.

St. Louis Surgical, N. Jefferson ave.

St. Luke's (Episcopalian), Washington ave., ne. cor. 19th.

St. Mary's Infirmary, Papin.

The Protestant Hospital Ass'n of St. Louis, N. 18th.

U. S. Marine, Marine ave., se. cor. Miami; office. Olive, se. cor. 3d.

Insurance.

St. Louis Board of Fire Underwriters, office N. 3d.

Office Board of Underwriters of St. Louis, Marine, office, Locust.

72

Hotels.

Beaumont Flats — Olive.

Rossmore — Northwest corner Eighth and Chestnut.

Carondelet — South Broadway, $1.

City — South Fourth, $1 and $

Columbus House — North Broadway.

Commercial — Chestnut, 50c and upwards.

Creve Coeur — Office Pine.

European — South Second, $

Geyer House — Market.

Golden Lion — Northeast corner Seventh and Pine.

Grand Central — Poplar, $1.

Green Tree — South Second.

Heitkamp's — North Tenth.

Hoeffner — Clark avenue.

Hotel Barnum — Southeast corner Washington avenue and Sixth, $1 and $

Hotel Belvidere — Washington avenue.

Hotel Pearl — Northeast corner Thirteenth, and Pine.

Hotel Brunswick — North Seventh, 50c.

Hotel Emory — North Eleventh.

Hotel Gamier — Southeast corner Seventh and Walnut.

Hotel Gillam — 5 North Eighth.

Hotel Gienmore — Olive.

Hotel Hilton — Seventh and Pine.

Hotel Hunt — Northeast corner Ninth and Chestnut, 75c and up.

Hotel Rozier — Northeast corner Thirteenth and Olive streets, 75c to $2.

Hotel St. Louis — Southeast corner Fourth and Locust.

Hotel Strait — Northwest corner Twelfth and Poplar.

Hotel Western — North Third.

Hurst's — Southwest corner Broadway and Chestnut, $1 and up.

International — South Seventh.

Koetter's — Northeast corner Fourth and Elm.

Laclede — Southeast corner Sixth and Chestnut, $2 and $3.

Lafayette Park — Mississippi avenue, $

Lincoln Flats — Southeast corner Grand avenue and Olive.

Lindell — Northwest corner Sixth and Washington avenue, $3 to $

Meilke's — Market.

Mona House — North Sixth.

O'Fallon — North Main.

Pacific House — South Broadway.

Peabody Flats — Olive.

Sprague's European — North Broadway.

Star — Market, $2.

St. Charles Flats — North Fourteenth.

St. James — South Broadway, $2.

St. Lawrence — North Broadway.

St. Louis House — North Main, $1.

The Southern — Walnut, Fourth to Broadway, $3 to $

Union Depot — Spruce, $1.

Merchants Hotel — Southwest corner Twelfth and Olive.

Strait's European Hotel — Corner Twelfth and Poplar, opp. Union Depot.

The Montesino — and Washington avenue.

The Richelieu — Washington avenue, Fourteenth and St. Charles.

74

St. Louis Post Office, Olive, Locust, Eighth and Ninth Streets.

EXECUTIVE DIVISION.

JOHN B. HARLOW — Postmaster.

ISAAC H. STURGEON — Assistant Postmaster.

JAMES H. STEGER — Secretary.

DAVID B. HAYS — Cashier.

POST OFFICE DIRECTORY.

Postmaster Assistant Postmaster. — Room , Ninth street corridor. Office hours, 9 a. m., to 5 p. m., except Sunday.

Cashier and Accountant — Room , Ninth street corridor. Open 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., except Sunday.

Superintendent of the Mailing Division — Corner Eighth and Locust streets. Open 8 a. m. to 6 p. m., except Sunday.

Superintendent of City Delivery (which includes Carriers, the General Delivery and Advertised Letters.) — Olive street front. Open 8 a. m. to 6 p.m., except Sunday.

General Delivery. Ladies and Gentlemen's window's and Advertised Letters — East end. Olive street front. Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m., except Sunday.

Superintendent of the Money Order Division (Foreign and Domestic Money Orders paid and issued) — Rooms , and , Ninth street corridor. Open 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., except Sunday.

Superintendent Registry Division — North end, Ninth street corridor. Open 9 a. m. to 6 p. m., except Sunday.

Inquiry Office (Lost letters, packages, etc.) — Room , West end. Olive street corridor. Open 9 a. m. to 6 p. m., except Sunday.

Stamp Division — West end. Olive street front. Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m., except Sunday.

Newspaper Exchange Case — Eighth street corridor. Accessible day and night.

Post Office Inspectors — Room , 2d floor, Locust street corridor.

Superintendent of the Railway Mail Service — Rooms , , , and , 4th floor, Ninth and Locust street corridors.

LOCATION OF P. O. STATIONS.

STATION A. — North Broadway.

STATION B. — South Broadway.

STATION C. — Corner Easton and Leonard avenues.

STATION D. — South Broadway.

STATION E. — South Jefferson avenue.

76

Public Buildings and Places of Interest.

EXPOSITION AND MUSIC HALL. Olive, Thirteenth to Fourteenth streets.

FAIR GROUNDS, RACE TRACK AND ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. Grand ave. and Natural Bridge Road. Cass ave., Franklin ave., Mound City, Northern Central, Union and Lindell Railways go direct.

MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE. Third and Pine streets.

NEW CUSTOM HOUSE. Ninth and Olive streets.

EADS BRIDGE. Foot of Washington ave., entrance on Third street.

THE COURT HOUSE. Broadway and Market streets.

FOUR COURTS and JAIL. Eleventh and Clark avenue.

POST OFFICE. Olive, Eighth and Ninth streets to Locust street.

MERCANTILE LIBRARY. Broadway and Locust street.

PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBRARY. Seventh and Chestnut streets.

BELLEFONTAINE AND CALVARY CEMETERIES. Northern part of city. Broadway cars and Wabash Railway from Collins street and Franklin avenue.

WATER TOWER, PUMPING WORKS AND SETTLING BASINS. Bellefontaine cars from Third street and Washington avenue and Broadway cars north.

MARINE HOSPITAL. Broadway cars south.

WATER WORKS. Northern part of city. Take Broadway cars.

RESERVOIR. Lafayette and Grand avenues. Peoples' (Cable) line.

78

THE ARSENAL. Green Line cars south from Fourth street and Chouteau avenue.

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS. Nineteenth street and Lucas Place. Olive street Cable.

CITY HOSPITAL. Lafayette avenue and Linn street, blue line cars.

ST. LOUIS HOSPITAL. Grand ave. and Pine street, Olive street line.

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY. Seventeenth street and Washington avenue.

UNION MARKET. Broadway and Morgan to Lucas avenue and Sixth street.

COTTON EXCHANGE. Main and Walnut streets.

UNION STOCKYARDS. Broadway car north.

NATIONAL STOCKYARDS. East St. Louis.

MERCANTILE CLUB. Seventh and Locust streets.

ST. LOUIS CLUB. Ewing avenue and Locust street.

UNIVERSITY CLUB. Twenty-seventh and Pine streets.

GERMANIA CLUB. Eighth and Gratiot streets.

HARMONIE CLUB. Eighteenth and Olive streets.

LIEDERKRANZ. Thirteenth and Chouteau avenue.

MARQUETTE CLUB. Grand avenue and Pine streets.

ELKS' CLUB. Laclede Building, Fourth and Olive sts.

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. Pine st.

SPORTMAN'S PARK. Grand and Sullivan avenues. Citizens', Cass ave., Lindell, Union, Mound City and Northern Central Lines go direct.

SOUTH SIDE RACE TRACK. Missouri and Russell aves. People's line. Jefferson avenue and blue line cars from Broadway and Lucas avenue go direct.

THE TUNNEL

Enters at Washington avenue and 3rd street. It is 4, feet in length; runs under Washington avenue and 8th st.

80

Land and River Transportation.

STREET RAILWAYS.

Baden & St. Louis; office, N. Broadway.

Benton-Bellefontaine; office, N. 20th.

Cass Avenue & Fair Ground; office, Eastern ave.

Citizens Railway Co.; office, Easton ave.

East St. Louis Connecting Ry. Co.; office, 24 N. 3d.

Forest Park, Laclede Ave. and Fourth Street; office, 10 S. Compton ave.

Fourth Street & Arsenal Ry. Co.; office, Park ave.

Jefferson Avenue Ry. Co.; office, Montgomery, near Jefferson ave.

Linden Ry. Co.; offices, Locust, Chouteau ave., and Finney ave., se. cor. Vandeventer ave.

Missouri Railroad Co.; office, 10 S. Compton ave.

Mound City Ry. Co.; office, A St. Louis ave.

Northern Central Railway Co.; office, Easton ave.

People's Railway Co.; office, Park ave.

Southern Railroad Co.; office, S. Broadway.

St. Louis & Suburban Ry. Co.; office. Franklin ave., ne. cor, Channing ave.

St. Louis Railroad Co.; office, N. Broadway.

St. Louis & East St. Louis Electric Ry. Co.; office, N. 3d.

Union Depot Railroad Co.; office, Gravois ave., sw. cor. Jefferson ave.

Union Ry. Co.; office, Easton ave.

RAILROADS.

Cairo Short Line, St. L., A. & T. H.; office, N. 4th.

Eureka Springs Ry. Co.; office, N. 6th.

Kansas City, St. Louis & Chicago; office, Olive.

Louisiana & Missouri River R. R.; office, N. Broadway.

Louisville, Evansville & St. Louis Consolidated; office, N. Broadway.

Louisville & Nashville; office, N. 4th.

Missouri, Kansas & Texas; office, Chestnut.

Missouri Pacific Ry., Leased and Operated Line; office, 6th, nw. cor. Locust, and 7th, near Poplar.

Ohio & Mississippi Railway; offices, N. Broadway and Union Depot.

St. Louis Bridge Co. & Tunnel; office; Bridge entrance.

82

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis; office. Broadway, sw. cor. Chestnut.

Chicago & Alton; office, N. Broadway.

Mobile & Ohio; office, N. Broadway. Terminal Railroad Ass'n of St. Louis; office, 2d floor, Union Depot.

The St. Louis, Kansas City & Colorado; office, Pine.

The Wabash Railroad; office, Olive. St. Louis Merchant Bridge Terminal Ry. Co.; office, N. 4th.

St. Louis Transfer Ry. Co.; office, 24 N. 3d.

St. Louis & Eastern Ry. Co.; office, Locust.

St. Louis & San Francisco Ry. Co.; office, Pine.

St. Louis Southeastern Ry.; office, N. 6th.

Vandalia Line; office, N. Broadway.

Vicksburg, Shreveport & Pacific; office, St. Louis & New Orleans Anchor Line wharfboat, foot of Chestnut.

STEAMBOATS.
UPPER MISSISSIPPI.

Diamond Jo Line; office, wharfboat, foot of Wash'ton ave.

Eagle Packet Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Vine.

St. Louis & Clarksville Packet Co.; office, N. B'way, and wharfboat, foot of Vine.

STEAMBOATS
LOWER MISSISSIPPI.

Cherokee Packet Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Locust.

St. Louis & New Orleans Anchor Line; office, wharfboat, foot of Chestnut.

St. Louis & Mississippi River Packet Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Vine.

St. Louis & Tennessee River Packet Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Locust.

St. Louis & Mississippi Valley Transportation Co.; office, Main, sw. cor. Walnut.

STEAMBOATS
MISSOURI RIVER.

Kansas City & Missouri River Transportation Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Olive.

St. Louis & Rocheport Packet Co.; office, Vine.

84

STEAMBOATS
ILLINOIS RIVER.

St. Louis, Naples & Peoria Packet Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Olive.

TOW BOAT COMPANIES.

Dolphin Transportation Co.; office, Chestnut.

Michael Transportation Co.; office, Kosciusko ave.

The Consolidated Coal Co. of St. Louis; office, Laclede Bldg., N. 4th, and wharf boat, foot of Pine.

Western Coal and Tow Co.; office, wharfboat, foot of Carr.

FERRIES.

Louisville, Evansville & St. Louis Railroad Ferry; foot of Poplar.

Madison County Ferry; office, N. 3d.

St. Clair Ferry & Transfer Co.; office, Chestnut.

The Waterloo & Carondelet Turnpike Road and Ferry Co.; office, Chestnut.

Wiggins Ferry Co.; office, 3d, se. cor. Chestnut.

MARKETS.

Allen, 12th, nw. cor. Russell ave.

Biddle, 13th. Biddle and O'Fallon.

Central, S. Broadway.

French, Convent, junction 4th and Broadway.

Reservoir, 22d, near Benton.

Soulard, west side 7th, near Carroll.

South St. Louis, S. Broadway.

Sturgeon, North Market, Broadway and 9th.

Union, Broadway to 6th, Morgan to Lucas ave.

Public Institutions.

City Dispensary, City Hall.

City Hall, 11th, corner Market.

City Hospital, Linn, bet. Lafayette and Park aves.

City Morgue, Spruce, ne. cor. 12th.

City Poor House, Arsenal, near Sublette ave.

City Water Works, Bissell's Point.

Court House, Broadway, cor. Chestnut.

86

Female Hospital, Old Manchester road, cor. Arsenal.

House of Refuge, Osage, opposite Virginia ave.

Insane Asylum, Arsenal, near Macklind ave.

State Officers in St. Louis.

Coal Oil Inspector; office, N. Levee.

Grain Inspection Department; office, Olive.

Insurance Department; N. 8th.

The Courts.

U. S. Circuit Court, held in Custom House.

U. S. District Court, held in Custom House.

U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Custom House.

Supreme Court of Missouri, held in Jefferson City.

St. Louis Court of Appeals, held in south wing of Court House.

Probate Court, held in east wing of Court House.

Circuit Court of St. Louis, held in the Court House.

St. Louis Criminal Court, held in the Four Courts Build'g.

Court of Criminal Correction, held in Four Courts Build'g.

Police Courts (First District), Four Courts.

United States Officers in St. Louis.

Subsistence Department; office, Chestnut.

Medical Purveying Depot; N. Commercial.

Medical Department; Chestnut.

Pay Department; office, N. 8th.

Quartermaster's Department; office, N. 8th.

St. Louis Clothing Depot (Old Arsenal), 2d, near Arsenal.

Recruiting Office, Pine.

Cavalry Depot, Jefferson Barracks, Mo.

St. Louis Powder Depot, Jefferson Barracks.

U. S. Assayer; office, 3d, se. cor. Olive.

U. S. Circuit Clerk; office, Custom House.

U. S. District Attorney; office, Custom House.

U. S. District Clerk; office, Custom House.

U. S. Custom House, 8th, Olive and Locust.

Office Collector of Customs, Custom House.

U. S. Marine Hospital Service, office, 3d, se. cor. Olive.

88

U. S. Inspector of Steam Vessels; office. Custom House.

U. S. Weather Bureau; observer's office, dome of Custom House Building.

U. S. Lighthouse Inspector; headquarters, Custom House.

U. S. Engineers; rooms to Custom House.

Missouri River Commission; office, Lucas place.

Mississippi River Commission; office, Pine.

U. S. Lighthouse Engineers; office, Lucas place.

Internal Revenue; office, Custom House.

Internal Revenue Agent; Custom House.

Register in Bankruptcy; Olive.

U. S. Treasury Department; office, Custom House.

U. S. Special Examiners Pension Bureau; Custom House.

Examining Surgeons' Offices, U. S. Pension Bureau; 4th floor, Custom House.

U. S. Marshal; 3d floor. Custom House.

U. S. Jury Commissioner; office, Olive.

Post Office, 8th, cor. Olive.

Miscellaneous.

JEFFERSON BARRACKS.

Ten miles from city on St. L., I. M. & S. R. B.

NATIONAL CEMETERY.

Adjoins the Barracks.

QUARANTINE.

Between the Barracks and Arsenal, on the river. City small-pox patients are cared for here. During yellow fever epidemics steamboats and Iron Mountain trains are examined.

WATER WORKS.

On river at Bissell's Point. 3 1/2 miles north; four settling reservoirs, x feet, and 12 feet deep; capacity, 72,, gallons; two engines pumping 30,, gallons of water in twenty-four hours. Their entire capacity is 56,,; daily consumption, 26,, Compton Hill reservoir, on Grand and Lafayette avenues, occupies 36 acres; capacity, 60,, gallons. Water Tower is feet high. The spiral stairway has steps. New tower is about the same height.

90

BURLINGTON ROUTE.
North Broadway.
Stations.Distance.Fare.Populat'n.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Wann 22
Upper Alton 24 1,
Woods 27
Brighton 35
Piasa 40 1 34
Medora 44
Kemper 47
Rock Bridge 52
Greenfield 57 1,
CLEVELAND, CIN., CHICAGO & ST. L.
(BIG FOUR ROUTE.)
19 North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Venice
Mitchell 15
Edwardsville Cr. 21
Wann 24
Bethalto 28
Bunker Hill 39 1,
Dorchester 44
Gillespie 49
Clyde 53
Litchfield 58 5,
JACKSONVILLE SOUTHEASTERN.
Chestnut street.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Bridge June 3
Madison 5
Basco 10
Stallings 11
Peters 14
Glen Carbon 16
Edwardsville 21 3,
Manix 26
Worden 31
Staunton 37 2,
Mt. Olive 43 1,
Litchfield 51 5,
LOUISVILLE AND NASHVILLE.
Forth Fourth street.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 25 15,
Round House
Rankin 6
French Village 9
Birkner's 12
Summit 14
Belleville 17 15,
Rentchler's 22 93
Mascoutah 27 2,
Pensoneaus
New Memphis 34
Queen's Lake 35
Venedy 37
Okawville 41
Addieville
Vashville 51 2,
Beaucoup 56 48
Ashley 62 1,

These rates are from East St. Louis. Add 25c to make the rate from St. Louis proper.

96

LOUISVILLE, EVANSVILLE & ST. LOUIS. — AIR LINE.
North Broadway.
Stations.Distance.Fare.Populat'n.
St. Louis ,
Relay
East St. Louis 2 15,
Harmony 11
West Belleville 15
Belleville 16 15,
Grassland 24
New Baden 32
Germantown 41
Bartelso 45 32
Poseys 51
Centralia 64 4,
ILLINOIS & ST. LOUIS DIVISION.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Lake 8
Pittsburg 10
Harmony 11
Lenz 12
Yoch 13
Schureman 13 1/2
Wards 14
Belleville June
West Belleville 15
Belleville 16 15,
MISSOURI PACIFIC.
Broadway and Olive.
St. Louis ,
Cheltenham 5
Benton 6
Edgebrook 8
Webster 10
Kirkwood 14 1,
Barrett's 17
Valley Park 19
St. Paul 24
Glencoe 27 52
Eureka 30
Allenton 32
Pacific 37 1,
CREVE COEUR LAKE BRANCH.
St. Louis ,
Laclede June 9
Mentor 10
Von Schrader's 12
Emerson 16
Creve Coeur 21
MOBILE & OHIO.
North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
Millstadt June 13 1,
Columbia 14 1,
Waterloo 23 1,
Burksville 28
Red Bud 36
Baldwin 45
54 1,
OHIO & MISSISSIPPI.
North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 5 15,
Caseyville 10
Alma 17
O'Fallon 19
Lebanon 25 1,
Summerfield 27
Trenton 31
Aviston 35
Breese 40
Carlyle 48
Huey 52
Shattuck 57
Sandoval 62
Odin 65

98

ST. LOUIS & CAIRO SHORT LINE.
Laclede Building.
Stations.Distance.Fare.Populat'n.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 15,
Centreville 6
Ogles 10
Raibs 12
West Belleville 13
Belleville 14 15,
Wilderman 18
Freeburgh 22
Lementon 25
New Athens 29
Lenzburgh 33
Marissa 37
White Oak 39
Tilden 44 83
Coulterville 47
Swanwick 51
Pinckneyville 61 1,
ST. LOUIS, KANSAS CITY & COLORADO.
Pine — North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
Forest Park 4
Forsythe June 5
Forest City 6
Clayton 8
Centerton 10
Olivette 11
Lackland 12
Mokeville 15
Vigus 18
Bonner 19
Dripping Sp'ngs. 20
Creve Coeur 21
Valley Forge 23
Drew 26
Gumbo 29
Atherton 31
Centaur 34
Port Royal 36
St. Albans 39
Becker 42
Labadie 46 77
Villa Ridge 52
Derry 56
Union 59
ST. LOUIS, KEOKUK & NORTHWESTERN.
(BURLINGTON ROUTE.)
North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
Ferguson 12
Bridgeton 16
St. Charles 23 6,
St. Peters 32
Groves 36
Richfield 39
Old Monroe 43
ST. LOUIS, IRON MOUNTAIN & SOUTHERN.
Broadway and Olive.
St. Louis ,
Carondelet 6
Jefferson Bar'ck 10
Cliff Cave 13
Wicks 19
Sulphur Springs 23
Bushberg 25 81
Riverside 26
Silica 32
Hematite 36
Victoria 39
DeSoto 42 3,
Vineland 47 60
Blackwell 51 75
Cadet 57
Mineral Point 61

ST. LOUIS & SAN FRANCISCO.
St. Louis & San Francisco — North Broadway.
Stations.Distance.Fare.Populat'n.
St. Louis ,
Grand Avenue 2
Tower Grove 8
Howard's 4
Cheltenham 5
Arloe 6
Old Orchard 9
Shady Side 10
Oakland 11 1/2
Oak Ridge 12
Spring Park 13
Windsor Springs 14
Valley Park 18
Ranken 20
South Side 22
Mincke 23 70
Crescent 25
Eureka 21
Allenton 30
Pacific 34 1,
TOLEDO, ST. LOUIS & KANSAS CITY.
Olive street.
St. Louis,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Stallings 11
Edwardsville 18 3,
Alhambra 32
New Douglas 38
Sorento 44
Donnellson 50
Fillmore 62
Ramsey 72
VANDALIA.
Corner Fifth and Olive streets.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Griswold Place 9 45
Collinsville 13 3,
Cantine 15
Formosa 19
Troy 21
Sherman Park 22
St. Jacob's 27
Highland 32 1,
Pierron 37
Pocahontas 41
Stubblefield 46 1 55
Greenville 51 1,
Smithborough 55
Mulberry Grove. 59
Hagarstown 65
Vandalia 69 2,
WABASH — EAST.
North Broadway.
St. Louis ,
East St. Louis 2 15,
Venice 6 33
Nameoki 11 90
Mitchell 13
Poag 17
Edwardsville Jc.. 22
Carpenter 28
Worden 32
Staunton 38 2,
Mt. Olive 44 1,
Litchfield 52 5,
WABASH — WEST.
St. Louis ,
Ferguson 12
Bridgeton 16
Bonfils 20 81
St. Charles 23 6,
St. Peter's 32
O'Fallon 86
Gilmore 42

Banks.

BANK.LOCATION.CASHIER.CAPITAL.
American Exchange Bank Northeast corner Third and Pine streets Walker Hill $,
Boatman's Bank Northwest corner Fourth and Washington ave. W. H. Thompson 2,,
Bremen Bank North Broadway J. C. Gerichten ,
Central Trust Co Oriel Building G. T. Cram ,
Chemical National Bank Southeast corner Sixth and Locust streets C. S. Warner ,
Citizens' Savings Bank North Third street L. A. Battalie ,
Commercial Bank North Third street A. B. Lansing, jr ,
Continental Bank Fourth, northwest corner Olive street C. W. Bullen 2,,
Fourth National Bank Fourth, northeast corner Washington avenue G. A. W. Augst 1,,
Franklin Bank North Fourth street G. W. Garrels ,
German American Bank Fourth, southwest corner Franklin avenue C. E. Kircher ,
German Savings Institution Third, southwest corner Pine street Richard Haspes ,
International Bank Fourth, southeast corner Chestnut street Adolph Herthel ,
Laclede National Bank Olive, southwest corner Fourth street Jas. B. True 1,,
Lafayette Bank Broadway, northeast corner Merchant street P. J. Doerr ,
Mechanics Fourth, southeast corner Pine street R. R. Hutchinson. ,
Merchants' National Bank Olive street John Nickerson ,
Mississippi Valley Trust Co. North Fourth street. John Scullen, 2d V. Pres. ,
Mullanphy Savings Bank Broadway, southwest corner Cass avenue L. G. Kammerer ,
National Bank Commerce Olive, northeast corner Broadway J. C. Van Blarcom 3,,
National Bank of Republic Olive, southeast corner Ninth street Jno. Caro Russell ,
Northwestern Savings Bank North Market street P. Obermier ,
St. Louis National Bank North Broadway Wm. E. Burr, jr 1,,
St. Louis Safe Dep. & Sav. Bank Locust, between Fifth and Sixth streets G. A. Hayward, Sec. ,
Southern Com. & Sav. Bank South Broadway W. F. Streit ,
South Side Bank Broadway, northwest corner Pestalozzi street Chas. C. Ruess,
State Bank St. Louis North Third street J. H. McCluney ,
Third National Bank Olive street T. A. Stoddart 1,,
Union Trust Co. Southwest corner Ninth and Olive Streets C. Tompkins 1,,

Beer Manufactured in St. Louis.

, barrels or 14,, gallons.
, barrels or 16,, gallons.
, barrels or 19,, gallons.
, barrels or 25,, gallons.
, barrels or 29,, gallons.
10,69, barrels or 33,, gallons.
1,, barrels or 34,, gallons.
1,, barrels or 34,, gallons.
1,, barrels or 33,, gallons.
1,, barrels or 39,, gallons.
1,, barrels or 43,, gallons.
1,, barrels or 46,, gallons.
1,, barrels or 48,, gallons.
1,, barrels or 58,, gallons.
1,, barrels or 56,, gallons.

Shipments for export to foreign countries for the past year were: , gallons.

Temperature.

All the figures in the following table were obtained from Prof. F. E. Nipher, for many years Director of the Missouri Meteorological Bureau; they refer only to the city of St. Louis:

 
Maximum Temp
Minimum Temp - -
Av'ge Daily Max. for July
Av'ge Daily Min. for July
Av'ge Daily Max. for Aug
Av'ge Daily Min. for Aug

Mean temperatures based on the observations of fifty-three years:
July, 80°.4; August, 70°.5; January, 31°

The difference between the average daily maximum and the average daily minimum shows the range between day and night. This difference is seen to be about eighteen degrees.

Boots and Shoes.

But a decade ago St. Louis' total output of boots and shoes was valued at the paltry $, for a year. Ten fleeting years, and to-day that same output foots up $8,,

Last year St. Louis received , cases of shoes from Boston; Chicago and New York each ranked away above her by over 60, cases, but a mighty change has taken place in the past twelve months and St. Louis has pushed past her two former superiors and fills first place with the handsome aggregate of , cases to her credit. Chicago comes second with , cases, and New York is content with , cases.

Following is a table showing the shipments from Boston to the principal distributing points throughout the country:

 Cases.
St. Louis ,
Chicago ,
New York ,
Baltimore ,
Philadelphia ,
Cincinnati ,
Nashville 76,
Memphis 57,
Cleveland 56,
Louisville 54,
New Orleans 47,

At this rate of progress in five years from now St. Louis will lead the world in the number of shoes manufactured and in the aggregate distribution of same. She has plowed her way through to the front, laboring under the difficulties of inexperience and lack of reputation. Inch by inch she has gained supremacy over all competitors, with but a single exception. Her goods are worn throughout the greater part of our country and find their way into export channels.

St. Louis Bridges.

 Eads.Merchants.
Centre span ft. ft. 5 in.
Other spans ft. ft. 5 in.

The pier foundations of the Eads Bridge are feet below the river surface; cost $9,, The Merchants cost, with approaches, $3,,

St. Louis Street Railways.

 MILES.
Benton-Bellefontaine (Electric) 8
Baden and North St. Louis (Horse) 3
Cass Avenue and Fair Grounds (Horse) 7
Forest Park and Laclede (Electric) 5 1/4
Jefferson Avenue (Horse)
Lindell, three lines (Electric) 35
Missouri, two lines (Cable and Electric) 18 1/3
Mound City (Electric) 8
Northern Central (Horse) 10
Peoples' (Cable) 10
Southern (Electric)
Union (Horse) 8
Union Depot, three lines (Electric) 27
St. Louis and Suburban (Electric)
Citizens' (Cable)
St. Louis (Cable) 14 2/3
Fourth St. and Arsenal Railway (Horse and Cable) 6
Total

Summer Gardens.

Schnaider's Mississippi and Chouteau avenues.
Uhrig's Cave Jefferson and Washington avenues.
Bodeman's Grove Grand avenue and Wyoming street.
Concordia Park Thirteenth and Wyoming streets.
Klausman's Cave South Broadway.
Koerner's Lafayette and 2d Carondelet avenues.
The Bellevue Easton avenue and King's Highway.

Business of St. Louis Bridges and Ferries,

And comparison with previous years. Amount of freight in tons transferred across the river at St. Louis during
BYCars.Tons.Total Tons.
The St. Louis Bridge 95, 1,,
The St. Louis Bridge, by wagon , 1,,
Merchants' Bridge 28, ,
The Wiggins Ferry 35, ,
The Wiggins Ferry, by wagon , ,
The Carondelet Ferry 72,
Louisville, Evansville & St. L. Ferry 8,
The Madison County Ferry 43,
Total tons West to East during 3,,
Total tons West to East during 2,,
Total tons West to East during 2,,
Total tons West to East during 2,,
Total tons West to East during 1,,
Total tons West to East during 1,,
Total tons West to East during 1,,
Total tons West to East during 1,,
BYCars.Tons. Total Tons.
The St. Louis Bridge , 2,,
The St. Louis Bridge, by wagon , 3,,
Merchants' Bridge 21, ,
The Wiggins Ferry 66, 1,,
The Wiggins Ferry, by wagon , 1,,
The Carondelet Ferry ,
Louisville, Evansville & St. L. Ferry 18,
The Madison County Ferry 72,
Total tons East to West during 5,,
Total tons East to West during 4,,
Total tons East to West during 4,,
Total tons East to West during 4,,
Total tons East to West during 4,,
Total tons East to West during 4,,
Total tons East to West during 3,,
Total tons East to West during 3,,
Total both Ways 8,,
Total both Ways 7,,
Total both Ways 6,,
Total both Ways 6,,
Total both Ways 6,,

Boulevards.

The Street Commissioner of St. Louis is now at work on the plans and construction of a system of boulevards which will make this city a worthy rival of the older European cities in the beauty of its driveways and great thoroughfares. The system, as outlined by the Board of Public Improvements, will comprise boulevards embracing the following sections of the city:

Columbia avenue from west line of Clifton Heights to Kings-highway, and then continued along Magnolia avenue to Grand, 7, feet or miles.

Delmar avenue from Grand to city limits, 22, feet or miles.

Florissant avenue from Hebert street to city limits, 25, feet or miles.

Forest Park Boulevard from Grand avenue to Kingshighway, 9, feet or miles.

Grand avenue from Carondelet Park to Park avenue, 20, feet or miles.

Grand avenue from Natural Bridge road to Broadway, 4, feet or miles.

Hebert street from 12th street to Florissant avenue, 2, feet or miles.

Kingshighway from Arsenal street to Florissant avenue, 30, feet or miles.

Longhborough avenue from Broadway to Gravois, 11, feet or miles.

Lindell avenue from Grand avenue to Kingshighway, 9, feet or miles.

Macklin avenue from Arsenal street to Forest Park, 8, feet or miles.

McCausland road from Clayton road to Manchester road, 8, feet or miles.

Park avenue from 11th street to Kingshighway, 19, feet or miles.

Pine street from 12th street to Kingshighway, 20, feet or miles.

Page avenue from Easton avenue to city limits, 20, feet or miles.

Russell avenue from 12th street to Grand avenue, 8, feet or miles.

St. Louis avenue from 12th street to city limits, 26, feet or miles.

Skinker road from Clayton road to Florissant avenue, 33, feet, or miles.

Twelfth street from Russell avenue to Hebert, 17, feet or miles.

Union avenue from Forest Park to Natural Bridge road, 13, feet or miles.

Total, , feet or miles.

Building Improvements.

VALUE OF BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS DURING
MONTHS.New Brick Build'gs.New Frame Build'gs
No.Value.No.Value.
January$ ,$ 79,
February,73,
March1,,87,
April,,
May1,,,
June,9476,
July1,,99,
August1,,85,
September,,
October,,
November,7553,
December,95,
Totals2,$11,,1,$1,,
 Brick and Stone Buildings.Frame Buildings.Total Buildings.Cost.
2,1,4,$13,,
2,1,3,13,,
2,1,3,9,,
2,2,8,,
1,2,8,,
1,2,7,,
2,2,7,,
1,2,7,,
1,2,7,,
1,2,5,,
1,4,,
1,1,3,,
1,1,3,,
1,1,2,,
1,2,3,,
1,1,3,,

Amount Coal Received in St. Louis.

R.R. ROUTE.
Bushels.

Bushels.
Ohio and Mississippi 12,, 10,,
Chicago, Alton & St. Louis , ,
C. C. C. and St. Louis 5,, 3,,
St. Louis and Iron Mountain 83, ,
St. Louis, Vandalia add Terre Haute 11,, 12,,
Cairo Short Line 12,, 13,,
Wabash 6,, 7,,
Louisville and Nashville 5,, 4,,
Louisville, Evansville and St. Louis 7,, 7,,
Mobile and Ohio 3,, 3,,
Toledo, St. Louis and Kansas City 3,, 3,,
Jacksonville Southeastern 1,,
Missouri Pacific 4, 5,
St. Louis and San Francisco 18,
From Ohio River 1,, 2,,
72,, 69,,
 TONS.
42,
60,
52,
62,
80,
70,
65,
65,
50,
75,
74,
Receipts of Coke: 4,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 9,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 12,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 10,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 6,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 3,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 3,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 5,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 9,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 6,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 8,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: 9,, bush. of 40 lbs
Receipts of Coke: bush. of 40 lbs

Not included in receipts of Coal.

Commercial Palaces.

Merchants' Exchange — cost, $2,,
Cupples' Building, 7 stories — cost, 1,,
Security Building, 11 stories — cost, 1,,
Equitable Building, 10 stories — cost, 1,,
Exposition Building — cost, ,
Odd Fellows' Hall, 8 stories — cost, ,
American Cen. Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Mercantile Library, 6 stories — cost, ,
Laclede Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Commercial Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Globe-Democrat Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Boatmen's Bank Building, 7 stories — cost, ,
Bank of Commerce Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Turner Building, 8 stories — cost, 3,
Fagin Building, 8 stories — cost, ,
Houser Building, 7 stories — cost, ,

Fair Grounds.

The annual Fair (Agricultural and Mechanical) has gained a world-wide reputation as being the finest Fair Grounds and giving the greatest exhibition of its character on the continent. Over $70, in premiums distributed. It contains acres; amphitheater holds , people; entrance 25 cents, fair week 50 cents; race track occupies 63 acres, one mile track, arranged for hurdle; trotting and running stables for horses. Admittance to Fair Grounds and race track and chair in grand stand, $1, Boxes seating six persons, $10,

The Great Bridge.

Cost $10,,; five years in building; built by J. B. Eads; entrance at Third street and Washington avenue. Total length, 6, feet; width, 55 feet; center span, 55 feet above the water; center arch feet; pipes sunk 90 feet to solid rock. Promenade ticket, 5c; 'bus, 10c; horse and buggy, 25c carriage, 35c; each passenger, 5c extra.

Comparative Business.

IN LEADING ARTICLES AT ST. LOUIS FOR
ARTICLES.
Flour, am'nt manufactured bbls. 1,, 1,,
Flour, am'nt handled bbls. 4,, 4,,
Wheat, total receipts — bushels 11,, 25,,
Corn, total receipts — bushels 45,, 21,,
Oats, total receipts — bushels 12,, 12,,
Rye, total receipts — bushels , 1,,
Barley, total receipts — bushels 2,, 2,,
All grain received (including flour reduced to wheat) — bushels 77,, 68,,
Cotton receipts — bales , ,
Bagging, manufactured — yards 12,, 15,,
Hay, receipts — tons , ,
Tobacco, receipts — hhds 37, 41,
Lead, receipts in pigs 80 lb., pigs 1,, 1,,
Hog product, total shipments, lbs ,, ,,
Cattle, receipts — head , ,
Sheep, receipts — head , ,
Hogs, receipts — head 1,, 1,,
Horses and Mules, receipts — head 82, 55,
Lumber and Logs, receipts — feet ,, ,,
Shingles, receipts — pcs 64,, 73,,
Lath, receipts — pcs 16,, 20,,
Wool, total receipts — lbs 20,, 21,,
Hides, total receipts — lbs 28,, 34,,
Sugar, received — lbs ,, ,,
Molasses, shipped — galls 2,, 2,,
Coffee, received — bags , ,
Rice, receipts — pkgs , 87,
Coal, receipts — bush 69,, 72,,
Nails, receipts — kegs , ,
Potatoes, receipts — bush 1,, 1,,
Salt, receipts — bbls , ,
Salt, receipts — sacks 33, 42,
Salt, receipts — bush. in bulk , ,
Butter — lbs 13,, 13,,
Tons of freight of all kinds rec'd and shipped 16,, 16,,

The progress that our city has made in manufactures is especially worthy of notice, demonstrating that a city can succeed both as a commercial and manufacturing center.

City Council.

OFFICERS:
CYRUS P. WALBRIDGE, — President.
WM. M. HORTON, — Vice-President.
WM. H. OSMER, — Secretary.
CHAS. GUNDLACH, — Assistant Secretary.
THOS. BRADY, — Sergeant-at-Arms.

COMMITTEES — APPOINTIVE.

WAYS AND MEANS — Nelson Cole, John C. Bensiek, Wm. Cullinane.

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS — Wm. M. Horton, Chas. James, Wm. T. Anderson.

SANITARY AFFAIRS — Chas. James, Andrew Hoolan, John A. Sloan.

POLICE — John C. Bensiek, Andrew Hoolan, Chas. E. Wehner.

CLAIMS — E. F. W. Meier, Chas, James, Wm. T. Anderson.

FIRE DEPARTMENT — Wm. Cullinane John C. Bensiek, John A. Sloan.

RAILROADS — Chas. E. Wehner, E. F. W. Meier, Andrew Hoolan.

MARKETS — Chas. James, Andrew Hoolan, Wm. M. Horton.

ENGROSSED AND ENROLLED BILLS — Albert Arnstein, Charles James, Nelson Cole.

MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS — M. M. Flesh, Wm. Cullinane, Wm. T. Anderson.

LEGISLATION — Andrew Hoolan, Chas. James, M. M. Flesh.

ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATION — Wm. T. Anderson, Wm. M. Horton, E. F. W. Meier.

COUNCIL — Wm. Cullinane, John. C. Bensiek, M. M. Flesh.

MULLANPHY FUND — Albert Arnstein, John. A. Sloan, Chas. James.

House of Delegates.

OFFICERS:
THOMAS J. WARD, — Speaker.
JAMES H. TOWNSEND, — Speaker pro tem.
THOS. E. BARRETT, — Clerk.
JOHN H. STUSSEL, — Assistant Clerk.
JAMES F. MOONEY, — Sergeant-at-Arms.
DANIEL R. GIBSON, — Page.

COMMITTEES — APPOINTIVE.

WAYS AND MEANS — James H. Townsend, Edward P. Grimley, Thomas Cosgrove, James E. Hagerty, Louis Spelbrink.

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS — Conrad Huber, Jos. Rauer, Thos. G. Kaye, Wm. H. O'Brien, James A. Dacey, Henry Alt, Julius Lehmann.

RAILROADS — Thos. F. Bradshaw, Jas. P. Egan, Jas. H. Cronin, Edward J. McGroarty, Patrick H. Clark.

CLAIMS — Peter O'Brien, John Courtney, Patrick Mullarky, Sylvester P. Keyes, Louis Diekman.

FIRE DEPARTMENT — Joseph Rauer, James A. Dacey, Jas. H. Cronin, Henry O. Siegmund, Frederick G. Uthoff.

POLICE AND WORKHOUSE — Thomas J. Kinnavey, John Courtney, Charles Schoenbeck.

SANITARY AFFAIRS — James E. Hagerty, Thomas Cosgrove, Edward J. McGroarty, John J. Bogard, Henry Alt.

LEGISLATION — Edward P. Grimley, James H. Townsend, Peter O'Brien, John J. Bogard, Hy. O. Siegmund.

MARKETS — James P. Egan, Conrad Huber, Patrick H. Clark.

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS — Patrick Mullarky, Thos. J. Kinnavey, Julius Lehman.

ELECTION AND REGISTRATION — Wm. H. O'Brien, Thos. G. Kaye, Louis Spelbrink.

HOUSE OF DELEGATES — Thos. G. Kaye, John Courtney, Sylvester P. Keyes.

ENGROSSED AND ENROLLED BILLS — Thomas Cosgrove, Thos. J. Bradshaw, Louis Diekmann.

Custom House Transactions,

COMMODITIESValue.Duty.
Ale and Beer $ 29, 00 $ 11, 80
Anvils 23, 00 8, 84
Artworks 5, 00 10
Books and Printed Matter 4, 80
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