Skip to content

Archives

Is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection


is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection

Cleaning your dogs ears will also help prevent ear mites and other skin conditions that can develop in the inner ear, as well as earwax build up. Dog owners likely relish rubbing their dogs' ears. or downright stinky, it's likely that a bacterial or yeast infection is brewing. There are a lot of reasons why dogs get ear infections, which are one of the most No matter what, do not try to treat your dog's ear infection at home.

Is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection -

By Monica Weymouth

There are two types of dog owners in this world—those who routinely stick their noses in their BFFs ears sniffing for signs of foul play, and those who don’t.

If you fall in the former camp, you certainly know the smell of a dreaded ear infection, as well as the telltale itching and headshaking that go along with it. Not to mention the frequent vet visits, piles of over-the-counter ear washes and old wives’ tale “remedies.”

You’re also far from alone. Ears are the perfect place for an infection to settle in, and if your dog is predisposed, issues can become chronic. “The most common causes of infection are yeast and bacteria, and they thrive in moist, dark areas—ears are perfect for that,” says Natasha Kassell, VMD, a holistic house-care veterinarian based in Philadelphia. “But there’s certainly a genetic component—all dogs have ears, but not all dogs have ear infections.”

Is your pooch stuck in the stinky ear club? Read on for tips on prevention, treatment and—finally—breaking the cycle of ear infections with tips from holistic veterinarians.

Smarter Grooming Many well-meaning owners and groomers remove dogs’ inner ear hair to prevent infections—but in the process, may be causing the problem. “As a young veterinarian I believed the floppy, hairy-eared dogs developed more ear infections due to this anatomy which prevented air flow,” says Jodie Gruenstern DVM, CVA, a holistic veterinarian and practice owner in Wisconsin. “There may be some truth to this, however, what I found to be most correlated is that after a dog's ear hair was ‘plucked’ while at a groomer, the dog commonly developed an ear infection about two weeks later. Akin to waxing, this plucking hurts! It leaves the sensitive ear canal abraded and scabby deep inside where it is then vulnerable to microbial attack.”

Natural Oils and Washes

When it comes to keeping ears clean and healthy, you may already have the supplies in your pantry. “I don't generally recommend ear washes as they break up the natural wax coating on the ear canal which can lead to irritation,” says Erika Halle, DVM, a veterinary acupuncturist and chiropractor in Oregon. “I recommend cleaning with just a couple of drops of oil, such as coconut or olive, placed into the ear canal. This softens the excess wax and helps it move up and out where it can be wiped away with a tissue.”

Although Gruenstern does recommend a commercial aloe-based herbal rinse for dogs who are prone to post-swim ear infections, she cautions that such washes are only preventative, and once an infection is present, a visit to your veterinarian is always in order. “Many astringent, even natural, ear washes are misused,” she says. “If the pet guardian suspects an ear infection, it is too late for an ear wash. The canal is already sensitive, so an ear wash ‘burns’ the sensitive tissue, even blisters it, perpetuating the problem.”

Boric Acid

From treating acne to killing ants, boric acid has a ton of uses—including preventing ear infections. Kassell recommends sprinkling some of the powder in your dog’s ears after swimming or bathing, and even uses boric acid to treat some mild infections. “It makes the ears a less favorable place for yeast and bacteria to grow,” she explains of the acidity. Because boric acid shouldn’t be swallowed or inhaled, be careful to protect your dog’s (and your own!) eyes, nose and mouth.

Conventional Treatments

If an ear infection is confirmed, a holistic veterinarian will often recommend a conventional treatment plan. “I have tried many topical, natural products such as garlic/mullein and even some Chinese herbal ear drops. I have been disappointed with their effectiveness,” says Gruenstern. “The conventional medications which contain an antifungal for yeast, an antibiotic for bacteria and a steroid for inflammation gives the pet the fastest relief. Then we look for the underlying cause.” Next on her agenda: a full thyroid panel, a probiotic product to balance out the gut and…

Dietary Changes

To prevent future infections, holistic veterinarians take their exam from the ear canal to the food bowl. “If a dog is fed a high starch diet, which is what is used in baking to grow yeast, then yeast will flourish on the skin,” explains Gruenstern. “Excessive starch in the diet leads to insulin resistance and a whole inflammatory cascade. A fresh, species-appropriate diet is very important to prevent the development of most conditions.”

Halle also recommends removing starch, as well as exploring other meats. “The first things I have people cut out are grains and chicken,” she says. “After that, it depends on the dog. You may need to try some other proteins like turkey or beef, or even a novel protein like kangaroo or brushtail.”

Not all veterinarians agree that grain-free diets are a good option, so make sure to consult your own vet before making a switch to a grain-free food.

Preventative Evaluation

If your dog is suffering frequent infections, a holistic veterinarian may look at the number of vaccines—as well as flea and tick treatments—that are being administered throughout the year.  “While vaccines are incredibly useful at preventing serious disease such as rabies, distemper and parvo, they stimulate the immune system in an unnatural way, and may play a role in the vast amount of chronic diseases we’re seeing in dogs, from cancer to autoimmune diseases to ear infections,” says Kassell, “My goal as a holistic veterinarian is to help guardians minimize use of potentially harmful products while still protecting their pets against contagious viruses, fleas, ticks, etc."   

The bottom line: If your dog is showing signs of an ear infection, make an appointment with your veterinarian and discuss how you can avoid the next visit.

See Also

Image: didesign via Shutterstock

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

How to Treat Ear Infections with Apple Cider Vinegar

What causes ear infections?

Ear infections are caused by bacteria, viruses, and even fungi getting trapped in the middle or outer ear. Children are more likely to get ear infections than adults.

More commonly, a cold, flu, allergies, or smoking may be the catalyst for a middle ear infection. Getting water in your ear canal, as from swimming, may contribute to outer ear infections.

Conditions that may increase the risk for ear infections in adults include:

An earache may be a sign of mild ear infection, and it will usually go away on its own. However, if an earache doesn’t go away after three days, it’s a good idea to see a doctor. This is especially true for children. Whether you’re a child or an adult, you should see a doctor if you have:

Apple cider vinegar may help mild ear infections of the outer. It has antimicrobial properties, meaning it kills bacteria, fungi, and possibly viruses.

Treatment with apple cider vinegar

There are no studies to definitively prove that apple cider vinegar cures ear infections, but it does contain acetic acid.

According to a study, acetic acid is antibacterial, which means it kills bacteria. shows apple cider vinegar can also kill fungi. A third study has shown apple cider vinegar to be effective against bacteria, fungi, and viruses.

Apple cider vinegar shouldn’t be considered a replacement for a visit with your doctor or traditional treatment for ear infections. It should only be used for outer ear infections.

Middle ear infections should be seen and treated by a doctor, especially in children. If you have ear pain and are not sure which type of ear infection is causing it, see your doctor for a diagnosis before putting anything in your ear.

Apple cider vinegar with warm water ear drops

  • Mix equal parts apple cider vinegar with warm, not hot, water.
  • Apply 5 to 10 drops in each affected ear using a clean dropper bottle or baby syringe.
  • Cover your ear with a cotton ball or clean cloth and lean on your side to let drops enter and sit in the ear. Do this for about 5 minutes.
  • Repeat this application as often as desired to treat an outer ear infection.

Apple cider vinegar with rubbing alcohol ear drops

This recipe is identical to the one above except it involves rubbing alcohol instead of warm water.

Rubbing alcohol is both antimicrobial and antibacterial. Do not use this method if you have drainage from your ear or think you may have a middle ear infection. Also, do not continue with this mixture if you have any stinging or discomfort when using these drops.

  • Mix equal parts apple cider vinegar with rubbing alcohol (isopropyl alcohol).
  • Apply 5 to 10 drops in each affected ear using a clean dropper bottle or baby syringe.
  • Cover your ear with a cotton ball or clean cloth and lean on your side to let drops enter and sit in the ear. Do this for about 5 minutes.
  • Repeat this application as often as desired to fight ear infection.

Apple cider vinegar warm water gargle

Apple cider vinegar can also be gargled to help symptoms that may come along with ear infections. It’s not as directly effective as ear drops but might be of extra help, especially for a cold, the flu, and upper respiratory infections.

Mix equal parts apple cider vinegar with warm water. Gargle with this solution for about 30 seconds two to three times per day to help with ear infections or their symptoms.

Ear infection symptoms

Ear infection symptoms in children include:

  • earache
  • inflammation
  • pain and tenderness
  • fussiness
  • vomiting
  • decreased hearing
  • fever

In adults, symptoms may include:

  • earache
  • inflammation and swelling
  • pain and tenderness
  • hearing changes
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • fever

If an earache or infection doesn’t go away after three days, see a doctor. Always see a doctor if ear discharge, fever, or loss of balance occurs with an ear infection.

Alternative treatments

There are other home remedies for ear infections you can try. None of these should replace doctor visits or traditional treatments.

They should also only be used for outer ear infections. Middle ear infections should be seen and treated by a doctor.

Be aware that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration doesn’t regulate essential oils so be sure to purchase them from a reputable source. Prior to using any essential oil, test a drop or two on a small area of your skin for 24 hours to see if any reaction occurs.

Even if the oil does not irritate your skin, it could still cause irritation or discomfort if you put it in your ear. Always follow directions on labels for specific essential oils and keep out of the reach of children.

The bottom line

Some research supports the use of apple cider vinegar for helping treat outer ear infections at home, but more studies are needed. Apple cider vinegar could be especially helpful for mild outer ear infections when used correctly in children and adults.

No home remedy should replace a doctor’s recommendations and medications. If ear infections worsen, last for more than three days, and are accompanied by fever or other symptoms, stop the use of apple cider vinegar and see your doctor.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us
Natural Treatment for Dog Ear Infections" src="mynewextsetup.us?v=">So your dog has started shaking his head, scratching at his ears, the ear looks red and inflamed, there might be a coffee grounds like substance present in the ear canals and outer ear and ear flaps - you might even be able to see the mites, smell the yeast, or hear your dog whining in pain.

Please understand, an ear infection is simply a symptom of an underlying condition that has not been diagnosed or dealt with, and here lies the dilemma for you, as a dog-owner.  Of course you  accept the diagnosis of an ear infection from the vet and duly take the medication prescribed however it might pay to also begin a conversation around why your dog has the ear infection in the first place?  Occasionally you may be told, it is caused by an allergy or an adverse food reaction and yes, these two reasons account for approximately 97% of ear infections.  So most dog-owners will accept this information, nodding, and leave the clinic with their dog and the medication, none the wiser.  But the question of absolute, paramount importance here is - have you got to the bottom of the issue - the root cause?  Let me take you on a journey to show you, you may not have the whole picture.  A piece of the puzzle may be missing.

I am taking it that if you are reading this you are trying to investigate why it may be that your dog keeps having recurring ear infections and nothing seems to be working as over time it simply reappears again.

Otitis - or inflammation of the ear - is the second most common reason most dog-owners will front up at the vets, after itchiness, and before allergies.  Dogs, it appears, have a lot of ‘inflammatory” issues these days.  So let's have a closer look at why this may be, and it doesn’t matter if we are talking about otitis externa (outer ear) the most common, otitis media (middle ear) or otitis interna (the inner ear).  Let me state, it does not matter how many times you clean your dog's ears with a cotton ball wound into a strip or stop him or her from getting water in the ears, or even how often you use a cleaning solution.  If you are not dealing with the root cause - ear infections will continue over time - as a persistent, ongoing issue.  Ready to read?

If Hippocrates deemed that medicine be thy food, are we able to look at what your dog eats and say “If I were a dog - that's exactly what I would want to be eating every day?”  So if we looked at our food could we ascertain what proportion of the food we put in our mouths is nutrient-dense?  By this, I mean the foods that are exploding with high levels of vitamins and minerals and antioxidants known to slow the ageing process and feed our amazing immune system.  Could we boast it’s at least 50%?  Is our daily diet teeming with billions of beneficial bacteria from yoghurt, kefir, fermented foods, and possibly a bit of kombucha because we have learnt from our ancestors these foods are crucial for good health?  If you missed the science class that detailed the major benefits of the bacteria found in these foods, known today as probiotics, it would have looked something like this possibly ….

Probiotics

  • PROBIOTICS produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which actually inhibit the growth and activity of harmful bacteria, such as certain strains of coli, Salmonella, and Clostridium - now there’s a benefit already right?
  • PROBIOTICS reduce allergic reactions by decreasing intestinal permeability and controlling inflammation - just keeps getting better and better right?
  • PROBIOTICS significantly influence your dog’s physical and psychological health
  • PROBIOTICS have positive effects on a dog’s cholesterol levels
  • PROBIOTICS Increases your dog's ability to resist gastroenteritis (chronic diarrhoea)
  • PROBIOTICS reduces the frequency and duration of gastrointestinal illnesses, such as diarrhoea, following antibiotic use.
  • PROBIOTICS can even provide anti-tumour properties
  • PROBIOTICS relieves constipation and irritable bowel syndrome
  • PROBIOTICS minimise allergy symptoms by strengthening and stabilising the immune system
  • PROBIOTICS improve mineral metabolism to help dogs achieve healthy bone density and bone stability
  • PROBIOTICS improve coat and skin health
  • PROBIOTICS provide chemicals necessary for manufacturing the vitamins biotin (for skin), folic acid and most B group vitamins
  • PROBIOTICS facilitate removal of toxins by enhancing digestive processes
  • PROBIOTICS probiotics stimulate cellular and humoral (that’s extra-cellular or ‘outside of the cell’) immunity. This is a really big deal - that constitutes ALL adaptive immunity. 

In the book Immunobiology: The Immune System in Health and Disease, it states,

‘Many of the bacteria that cause infectious disease in humans multiply in the extracellular spaces of the body, and most intracellular pathogens spread by moving from cell to cell through the extracellular fluids. The extracellular spaces are protected by the humoral immune response, in which antibodies produced by B cells cause the destruction of extracellular microorganisms and prevent the spread of intracellular infections’.

I hope you stayed with me on that one - basically, if probiotics can enhance immunity, then the destruction of any pathogen - be it in the cell or outside of the cells in your dog - has to be a thing worth paying for, right? Re-establishing the beneficial microbes is of paramount importance.

Now let's talk about the ramifications of your dog having depleted levels of probiotics - if not practically non-existent levels.  And trust me here, if your dog has recurring ear infections, your dog has depleted or non-existent beneficial bacteria and an over-abundance of pathogenic bacteria.  Not convinced?

Here’s a list of all the things that affect or kill beneficial bacteria - or probiotics as I like to call them - see how many you can relate to, specifically for your dog;

  • animals born from animals with gut dysbiosis
  • use of food previously sprayed or grown using glyphosate (Round-Up) - as Roundup was patented as an antibiotic believe it or not
  • grain-based or soy-based diet, and chemicals such as those listed on an ingredient list starting with ‘E’
  • de-worming drugs
  • flea and tick treatments (many contain pesticides)
  • chlorinated drinking water
  • use of antibiotics
  • use of steroids
  • use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • genetically modified foods - in NZ - corn or soy found in pet foods
  • stress (causes a rise in the hormone cortisol which can break down the protective mucosal lining of the gut)
  • vaccines
  • anti-histamines

So you know what kills the good bacteria now and you know that a lack of them can cause all sorts of issues because they play such a powerful and complex role, here's the scoop …

Determine how many of these you answer no to …

  • Has your dog been free from antibiotics in the last two years
  • Can you remember the last time you gave your dog a canine-specific probiotic?
  • Is your dog currently allergy-free
  • Have you not had to take your dog to the vet in the last two years
  • Do you feed your dog raw food or a BARF diet?
  • Does your dog get exercised daily?

If you have answered no to all or even most of these you definitely need to keep reading - I am talking directly to you now!

Have you heard of the seven pillars to good health? Don Colbert wants to challenge and motivate you to pay attention to these seven areas and I do too.  They are

  • water, (make sure its chlorine-free)
  • sleep, (it's a dog’s life so this isn’t usually a problem)
  • rest, (again, not really an issue)
  • living food, (this is the nutrient-dense, power-packed formula for good health, not the ‘dead’ food from a round plastic wrap or a tin or a bag - this is what I’m talking about)
  • exercise, (dogs were not supposed to live a sedentary life either)
  • detoxification, (supplement with the herb milk thistle as a tincture once a year, for a week at a time, mixed with your dog food)
  • supplements, (in the form of herbal additions such as slippery elm (anti-inflammatory, soothing and healing),
  • coping with stress (for the times your dog seems stressed how about trying a dose of Rescue Remedy, works wonders for dogs).

If they apply to humans I say they sure do apply to dogs as well! So take these seven pillars and add one more pillar to health - probiotics! Need I say more - you have your EIGHT Steps to Getting to the Root Cause of your Dogs Ear Infection now!

So it's not about taking a pill for an ill!  The piece of the puzzle you were missing? It's about learning what the foundations to good health are, specific to your dog, and putting them into practice.  Yes, its a pain in the proverbial - yes, it's time-consuming - yes it's more expensive initially - possibly!  But ask yourself “Is your dog worth it?

Because until you accept, that you will need to make life-changing alterations to your dog's life, in the form of diet, re-establishing healthy microbes, and detoxifying, you will keep getting more of the same!  So for the sake of your dog, take a little time to ponder is he or she really worth it?   

Oct 31, 19  •  By Maria

Share    
Источник: mynewextsetup.us
Dog Ear Infections

Dog Ear Infections  <div><h2>What can underlie Canine Ear Infections  <div><h2>Dog Yeast Infection Home Remedy</h2><div><p> Some dogs are prone to developing yeast infections on their bodies. These infections may need special treatments from the veterinarian to help soothe the skin and kill the yeast but some remedies are also available to help manage yeast infections at home. Depending on the severity of the infection, these remedies may not be all your dog needs, but they can still be helpful in keeping them comfortable. </p><h3> What is a Yeast Infection? </h3><p> Yeast is a type of fungus and it grows and multiplies in warm, moist environments. There are many different types of yeast but, usually, only one type of yeast causes infections in dogs - <em>Malassezia pachydermatis</em>. This specific type of yeast can only be seen microscopically but it typically causes skin redness, itching, scaling, and even an odor that is obvious to most pet owners. </p><p> Yeast infections are not contagious from dog to dog but some dogs with immune system issues, oily skin, or allergies are more prone to developing an overgrowth of <em>Malassezia. </em>These dogs may therefore regularly battle yeast infections. </p><h3> Where Do Dogs Develop Yeast Infections? </h3><p> Dogs are most likely to develop either yeast dermatitis or yeast otitis but some dogs may even have both types of yeast infections at the same time. Dermatitis is an infection and inflammation of the skin and otitis is an infection and inflammation of the ears. Both kinds of yeast infections can cause discomfort and itching and owners usually notice the symptoms right away if they know what to look for. </p><p> Yeast otitis usually causes redness inside the ear, scaling of the ear flap or pinna, head shaking, scratching at the ear, face rubbing, and an odor. </p><p> Yeast dermatitis can occur anywhere on the skin of a dog but is most common in the armpits, feet, and any skin folds. Redness, scaling or skin flaking, itching, and odor are most commonly noticed on these parts of the body if they are harboring a yeast infection. </p><h3> How is a Yeast Infection Diagnosed? </h3><p> Your veterinarian will most commonly diagnose your dog with a yeast infection after collecting a sample on a cotton swab from your dog's ear or by pressing some tape or a microscope slide onto the affected skin. This sample will then be stained in the laboratory to highlight the yeast so that it can be identified under the microscope. </p><p> Yeast looks different from bacteria and requires different types of treatment. Because of this, it is important for your veterinarian to distinguish between the two types of infections. Some dogs may develop both bacterial and yeast infections at the same time. </p><h3> How Can You Help a Dog With a Yeast Infection? </h3><p> There are a few things you can do to help your dog if it has a yeast infection. Many of these remedies are often used alongside prescription therapies recommended by your veterinarian but some may help to battle a mild yeast infection all on their own. </p><ul><li><strong>Apple cider vinegar - </strong>Vinegar changes the pH of your dog's skin so that the yeast cannot grow when it is applied topically. A solution of half apple cider vinegar and half water can be used to bathe your dog or wipe onto the infected areas.</li><li><strong>Beta-glucans - </strong>These polysaccharides are found in the cell walls of yeast, mushrooms, and cereal grains. If they are bioactive, they can help give your dog's immune system a little help. Since the immune system is partially responsible for inflammation, beta-glucans can help support dogs that are prone to developing yeast infections. Beta-glucans can be found in pet products like Imuquin® and Zenapet Dog Immune Support.</li><li><strong>Ear cleaners with drying agents - </strong>If your dog has yeast otitis, then an ear cleaner designed for dogs with a drying agent can help to keep your dog's ears yeast-free. This cleaner can be used after baths and when your dog goes swimming to help decrease the moisture in the ears.</li><li><strong>Avoid allergens - </strong>If your dog is sensitive to certain foods or things in the environment, avoiding them can help decrease the severity and likelihood of a yeast infection.</li><li><strong>Degreasing shampoos - </strong>Shampoos with degreasers and even simple dish soap can help strip the excessive oils from a dog's skin. These shampoos should not be used regularly unless instructed by a veterinarian but can help <a href=america vs tigres en vivo dogs that are oily and prone to yeast infections.

Many other remedies are often touted as being safe options for treating yeast infections in dogs but little to no scientific one medical passport physician login is available to support their use.

You should always consult with your vet when your dog displays symptoms of a yeast infection. You will need to make sure that it is appropriate to use any of the above-mentioned treatments on their own or alongside veterinary treatments.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us
  • Skin folds.
  • Bacterial infection.
  • Medication such as antibiotics or corticosteroids.

Certain dog breeds are also more predisposed to developing yeast infection. These include the Basset Hound, Shih Tzu, Golden Retriever or Cocker Spaniel.

Treatments for yeast infection in dogs

Topical treatment for yeast infection in dogs

Anti-fungal shampoos are usually the first recommendation. Depending on the progress of the infection, you might have to apply the topical medications a few times a week to the affected area or even a few times a day. The chemicals in the medicated shampoo will kill the yeast, so your dog’s skin should start to improve within about a week. For dog ear yeast infection the same anti-fungal agents are concentrated in ear drops that can be used to successfully treat the infection.

Oral treatment for yeast infection in dogs

If the yeast infection does not respond to the topical treatment, oral medications might be prescribed. It is essential to pay a visit to the vet as the treatment can vary depending on your dog’s age and any underlying conditions.

Anti-inflammatory medication can also help reduce the swelling. If this is necessitated, your vet will prescribe them – do not use any over-the-counter medications or tablets you might have at home as these could cause further problems or even be toxic.

If you think your dog has a yeast infection or any skin condition, please don’t try to treat your dog with home remedies as you could risk making the problem worse. You should always take your dog to the vet for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate, tailored treatment for your dog’s particular condition. An allergy can look very similar to a yeast infection in dogs and vice versa, so it’s important to ask for professional help to ensure your dog gets the best care possible.

Read more about other skin problems in dogs and keep up to date with tips for keeping you and your dog healthy.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Eliminate Ear Infections in Dogs and Cats

Recently, I have seen an exorbitant number of new clients with pets with chronic ear infections, called otitis. One new client brought her sheltie to see me with a six-month history of ear mite infestation. I asked this new client who diagnosed this problem. She said a pet store clerk told her that it was ear mites after she described dark, gritty debris in her sheltie&#;s ears. Every week, for the last six months, this client has been cleaning her pet&#;s ears and treating with ear mite medication with no success.

After gathering her pet&#;s history and performing a complete physical examination, I took a swab of her pet&#;s ear debris, applied a special stain, and looked under the microscope for presence of yeast, bacteria and mites. As you may have guessed, there were no mites. This pet had a terrible yeast infection.

This client was upset and embarrassed. She could not believe that she allowed her pet to suffer six months. &#;Good news,&#; I told her, &#;today we will begin a new treatment plan to resolve your pet&#;s yeast infection.&#;

Why do ear infections happen?

Ear infections do not spontaneously occur. Some event or underlying disease must precipitate it. My top reason why pets get ear infections is allergies.

Allergies may be triggered by ingestion of certain foods, like beef, dairy products, chicken, lamb, fish, eggs, corn, wheat, and soy. Allergies may also be triggered by allergens your pet&#;s skin, eyes, ears and nose may come in contact with &#; like tree pollen, grasses, house dust, molds, weeds, perfumes, aerosol home cleaning products, insects and wool.

In the is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection event that allergies are not the underlying cause for your pet&#;s ear infection, I would then suspect the following predisposing factors: high moisture (swimming), poor ventilation (big floppy ears), suppressed immune system (like pets with hypothyroidism and Cushing&#;s Disease), mites, foreign bodies (like plant material) and poor conformation (like narrow ear canals found commonly in Chinese Shar-pei, Pug and Pekingese dogs).

How can I resolve it? First, see your veterinarian for an accurate diagnosis. Your veterinarian will take a complete oral history before he/she performs a comprehensive physical examination. During this discussion, your veterinarian will ask you some key questions:

1. Have you noticed that your pet gets an ear infection around the same time every year? For example, &#;Does your pet itch and rub his/her ears every spring during peak tree pollen season?&#; 2. Does your pet have ear problems all the time? Food, house dust and mold allergies occur year-round. 3. Does your pet itch elsewhere? Pets with food allergies frequently scratch their ears and shake their head, rub their face, and lick their paws and anal area. 4. Is your pet on flea preventative? Pets with allergic reaction to fleabites will frequently scratch their hindquarters, but may also scratch around head and neck area. This is especially true in 2020 jaguar f pace 35t. 5. Does your pet get ear infections two to three days after swimming or being groomed? Increased moisture in ear canal may be an issue for this pet.

Second, your veterinarian will use a special instrument, called an otoscope, to closely examine your pet&#;s ears. In a tolerant pet, your veterinarian will visualize the ear canal to see if it is swollen or ulcerated, debris or mass present, and if the tympanic membrane (a clear, curtain-like membrane that separates the outer ear from the middle ear) is intact. Sometimes, the pet is so painful; it is impossible or inhumane to examine the ear canal while it is awake. It is not unusual for us to sedate pets with severe ear infections to properly diagnose, clean, and treat the ears.

If a ruptured tympanic membrane is discovered, the outer ear will then directly communicate with the middle ear and may result in temporary hearing loss. Pets with a ruptured tympanic membrane will require special ear cleaning instructions and medication.

A swab of debris will be collected and evaluated under the microscope for yeast, bacteria, and mites to help characterize the problem and allow for proper selection of medication. A bacterial culture and sensitivity may be recommended if the infection is severe, reoccurring and/or tympanic membrane is ruptured to insure the best treatment protocol.

How do I treat the ear infection? In order to properly treat the ear infection, your veterinarian first must properly clean the ear canal. It would be foolish to apply topical antibiotics or antifungal agents into an ear that is filled with debris. Debris traps the organism and provides a safe environment for it to thrive and avoid contact with the ear medication. Sometimes it is not possible to clean a dog&#;s ear when he/she is awake and painful, and sedation is required. Many times, however, it can be performed with minimal restraint of your pet.

To clean your pet&#;s ears effectively requires the proper selection of ear cleaning products. Recently, there has been an explosion of ear cleaning products available for your pet. Please ask your veterinarian for the best ear cleaning solution for your pet. Please do not ask a pet store clerk or groomer for advice. They are not medically trained to deliver veterinary medical advice.

At Animal Medical Center of Chicago, if my patient&#;s ears are full of waxy debris, I frequently recommend a gentle product, called Cerumene by Vetoguinol, to soften and loosen the earwax. For pets with a bacterial ear infection, I frequently select a product that has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties, like Douxo Micellar Solution by Sogeval. I tend to gravitate to alkalizing ear-cleaning solutions that contain triz EDTA if I am highly suspicious of a nasty bacterial infection called Pseudomonas. For yeast infection, I frequently recommend an ear-cleaning product that contains ketoconazole. Alternatively, for mild yeast infections I will recommend a homemade mixture of 1- part white vinegar to 2-parts warm water as a nice cleaning solution. Remember, before purchasing any ear cleaning solution, please contact your veterinarian for advice. Using the wrong ear cleaning solution may aggravate your huntington bank careers login ear infection.

Additionally, to clean a pet&#;s ears requires patience and respect. Do not use cotton tipped applicators to clean your pet&#;s ears. Cotton tips are abrasive and feel like a coarse pad on the surface of your dog&#;s sensitive ear canal. In addition, these tips can push ear debris further down into the canal making the ear infection worse. I recommend gently squirting the veterinary recommended ear cleaning solution directly into your pet&#;s ear canal and let it sit for 5 to 10 minutes before wiping it out with a lightly moistened gauze or cotton ball. It is advisable to do this activity outside or in a bathroom where the walls can be easily wiped clean after your pet shakes its head.

After your veterinarian cleans your pet&#;s ears, he/she will prescribe topical ear medication. The exact selection of medication will be based on your pet&#;s history, physical examination findings, and ear swab results. Topical ear medication is almost always recommended for ear infections because of the high local active drug concentration it can achieve. In some situations, I will prescribe oral antibiotics or anti-fungal agents if I believe that topical therapy will not be sufficient, a middle ear infection is suspected, or the owner cannot properly administer it. A new favorite ear medication of mine, called Osurnia by Elanco, was recently introduced. This product is designed to help pets with bacterial and yeast ear infections. Your veterinarian will apply one medication-filled tube in each ear on first and seventh day of treatment, and that&#;s it! It works really well and my clients are happy that they do not need to medicate their pet&#;s ears at home.

How long do I treat the ear infections? This is a great question to ask your veterinarian for it is dependent on the cause and severity of the infection. I strongly recommend before you stop the medication to schedule a recheck appointment with your veterinarian. Don&#;t incorrectly assume after days your pet&#;s ear infection has resolved. Often my clients think the ear infection has resolved completely and I discover at their recheck appointment first federal savings bank of boston andover ma it&#;s only dramatically better not % resolved. Failure to resolve the ear infection completely only guarantees your is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection will suffer from reoccurrence.

How to avoid ear infections? One must first discover and control the underlying cause of the ear infection to avoid reoccurrence. If inhalant or contact allergies are suspected, then you must address the allergy issue to break the cycle. This may include allergy testing via single blood sample collection or intra-dermal skin testing by your veterinarian. Once your pet is diagnosed with inhalant or contact allergies, you may begin symptomatic treatment with avoidance, antihistamines, steroids, immune modulating products, shampoos and/or topical spray products to help minimize your pet&#;s signs of allergies. Specific desensitization to the offending allergen(s) can be performed and should be discussed with your veterinarian.

If food allergies are suspected, your veterinarian will recommend that you feed your pet a single, unique protein diet exclusively for 8 to 12 weeks. Only a veterinary prescribed prescription diet or a homemade diet will meet this allergy food trial criteria. Even though there are numerous over-the-counter labeled single protein source diets at pet and grocery stores, these diets are frequently contaminated with other protein products by virtue of how they are processed.

If there is an underlying thyroid issue, I recommend a thyroid blood test for your pet. If there is an underlying metabolic issue, like hyperadrenocorticism, this must be pursued.

If you find that your pet gets ear infections after swimming, bathe the pet with a hypoallergenic shampoo after swimming or, at the minimum, rinse your pet&#;s coat with water and then, dry out the ears with a cloth. There are a few topical ear-drying products available for purchase to decrease moisture in your pet&#;s ear. Please discuss this concept with your veterinarian before using one.

Finally, inspect your pet&#;s ears bi-monthly. If you see mild waxy debris, clean it out with appropriate cleaning solution. In most patients, I strongly recommend not to clean your pet&#;s ears more than once every weeks otherwise you disrupt the normal self-cleaning mechanism that naturally exists in the ear. In fact, I can&#;t remember the last time I cleaned my own dog&#;s ears. If all is well, leave the ears alone. If your pet&#;s ears are red and inflamed, substantial debris present, or a pungent odor exists, see your veterinarian.

Are ear infections painful? Absolutely. Please discuss appropriate pain medication with your veterinarian. Most ear medications delivered topically include an anti-inflammatory drug in its composition to reduce your pet&#;s discomfort. For pets who have swollen ear canals and it is impossible for you to deliver topical ear medications properly, it is not uncommon, that I send the pet home with pain medication and oral steroids for a few days. Then, I have the client and patient return for re-evaluation, ear cleaning and topical drug therapy.

Ear infections are almost always the result of another disease process, like allergies, thyroid or adrenal disease. Please schedule an appointment with your veterinarian as soon as your pet starts shaking or rubbing his/her ears. Pets with ear infections are uncomfortable and your veterinarian can help relieve his/her pain immediately. Please don&#;t dismiss your pet&#;s chronic ear infections with the comment, &#;He always has one&#. Instead, ask your veterinarian, &#;Why does my pet have an ear infection?&#; This knowledge will allow you to begin an effective treatment plan to break this annoying and painful ear infection cycle in your pet.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us
Canine Ear Infections

Can apple cider vinegar treat ear infections?

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

Ear infections can occur in the inner, middle, or outer part of the ear. They are usually due to an overgrowth of infectious bacteria or a virus.

Some people believe that apple cider vinegar (ACV) may help to treat ear infections. However, there is currently no specific research investigating the efficacy of ACV for ear infections.

However, some research does suggest that apple cider vinegar has antimicrobial properties. We discuss this research and consider whether these properties in the vinegar might help treat ear infections. We also provide tips on how to use the vinegar for ear infections, as well as the potential risks involved.

Does ACV help with ear infections?

A investigated the general antimicrobial effects of ACV. The researchers studied two species of bacteria that are a cause of ear infections — Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus).

The researchers applied ACV to each of the bacterial cultures. They found that the ACV inhibited the growth of both types of bacteria.

The researchers then prepared samples of bacterial cultures mixed with immune cells. They exposed some of these samples to ACV and found that these showed fewer signs of inflammation. This suggests that ACV could reduce the severity of certain bacterial infections.

The researchers of the note that the antimicrobial effects of ACV may partly be due to its acetic acid content. Research has shown that acetic acid can damage the cell walls of microbes.

In a study, ACV showed strong antibacterial effects, even at concentrations as low as 25%.

It is still not clear whether ACV has antiviral properties.

So far, research into the antibacterial effects of ACV appears promising. However, scientists have conducted most of their research on bacterial cultures grown in the lab, so they do not know whether ACV will have the same effects on people. Scientists will need to carry out well controlled studies on humans to investigate this claim.

How to use ACV for ear infections

The simplest way to use ACV for ear infections is to add it to homemade ear drops. However, do not use ACV ear drops in place of conventional treatments, and always talk to a doctor first.

To make the ear drops, combine equal parts of ACV and warm water. Ensure the water is only slightly warm as the skin within the ear will be sensitive.

How to apply the ear drops

To get the drops into the ear canal, follow the steps below:

  • Suck up some of the ear drop mixture, using a dropper.
  • Sit or lie with the head tilted to one side so that the affected ear faces upward.
  • Squeeze 4–5 drops of the mixture into the ear.
  • Keep the head tilted for a couple of minutes to ensure the drops reach the ear canal.
  • Tilt the head in the opposite direction to allow the mixture to fall out.
  • Use a clean face cloth or cotton ball to wipe the ear, but do not insert anything into the ear canal.

Repeat the above process a few times each day.

Possible risks

It is essential to dilute ACV. Stronger concentrations of ACV may damage the sensitive skin of the ear.

Even after diluting ACV, irritation is still possible. If irritation occurs, stop using the mixture.

Anyone who suspects they have an inner or middle ear infection should avoid using ear drops until is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection see their doctor. Ear drops are also not suitable for people who experience drainage from the ears.

People who experience ear drainage or an infection of the inner or middle ear should see a doctor.

Alternative home remedies for ear infections

Home remedies that might help to alleviate symptoms of pain and swelling that often accompany an ear infection include:

Warm compresses: Laying a warm towel over the affected ear helps to increase circulation in the area. This, in turn, can help to reduce pain.

Over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers: OTC drugs such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil) can help to reduce pain and fever.

Other OTC products: Some OTC ear drops may help alleviate symptoms while stopping the underlying bacterial infection from spreading. People should ask their pharmacist for advice on which drops to buy.

When to see a doctor for ear infection

An ear infection can cause serious complications if left untreated.

People should see a doctor if their symptoms worsen, or they experience any of the following:

A person with these symptoms may require antibiotics or other treatments.

Summary

Ear infections are usually the result of a viral or bacterial infection. They can be very painful.

ACV shows promise as an antibacterial treatment. However, is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection is no specific research investigating ACV as a is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection for ear infection.

As a result, people who wish to try ACV ear drops should use them in combination with conventional medical treatments.

People who have ear drainage or an infection of the middle or inner ear should not use ACV. People should see a doctor if symptoms worsen or persist.

Apple cider vinegar is available in grocery stores and online.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

How to Treat Ear Infections with Apple Cider Vinegar

What causes ear infections?

Ear infections are caused by bacteria, viruses, and even fungi getting trapped in the middle or outer ear. Children are more likely to get ear infections than adults.

More commonly, a cold, flu, allergies, or smoking may be the catalyst for a middle ear infection. Getting water in your ear canal, as from swimming, may contribute to outer ear infections.

Conditions that may increase the risk for ear infections in adults include:

An earache may be a sign of mild ear infection, and it will usually go away on its own. However, if an earache doesn’t go away after three days, it’s a good idea to see a doctor. This is especially true for children. Whether you’re a child or an adult, you should see a is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection if you have:

Apple cider vinegar may help mild ear infections of the outer. It has antimicrobial properties, meaning it kills bacteria, fungi, and possibly viruses.

Treatment with apple cider vinegar

There are no studies to definitively prove that apple cider vinegar cures ear infections, but it does contain acetic acid.

According to a study, acetic acid is antibacterial, which means it kills bacteria. shows apple cider vinegar can also kill fungi. A third study has shown apple cider vinegar to be effective against bacteria, fungi, and viruses.

Apple cider vinegar shouldn’t be considered a replacement for a visit with your doctor or traditional treatment for ear infections. It should only be used for outer ear infections.

Middle ear infections should be seen and treated by a doctor, especially in children. If you have ear amazon kindle seller account login and are not sure which type of ear infection is causing it, see your doctor for a diagnosis before putting anything in your ear.

Apple cider vinegar with warm water ear drops

  • Mix equal parts apple cider vinegar with warm, not hot, water.
  • Apply 5 to 10 drops in each affected ear using a clean dropper bottle or baby syringe.
  • Cover your ear with a cotton ball or clean cloth and lean on your side to let drops enter and sit in the ear. Do this for about 5 minutes.
  • Repeat this application as often as desired to treat an outer ear infection.

Apple cider vinegar with rubbing alcohol ear drops

This recipe is identical to the one above except it involves rubbing alcohol instead of warm water.

Rubbing alcohol is both antimicrobial and antibacterial. Do not use this method if you have drainage from your ear or think you may have a middle ear infection. Also, do not continue with this cabin homes for sale in texas if you have any stinging or discomfort when using these drops.

  • Mix equal parts apple cider vinegar with rubbing alcohol (isopropyl alcohol).
  • Apply 5 to 10 drops in each affected ear using a clean dropper bottle or baby syringe.
  • Cover your ear with a cotton ball or clean cloth and lean on your side to let drops enter and sit in the ear. Do this for about 5 minutes.
  • Repeat this application as often as desired to fight ear infection.

Apple cider vinegar warm water gargle

Apple cider vinegar can also be gargled to help symptoms that may come along with ear infections. It’s not as directly effective as ear drops but might be of extra help, especially for a cold, the flu, and upper respiratory infections.

Mix equal parts apple cider vinegar with warm water. Gargle with this solution for about 30 seconds two to three times per day to help with ear infections or their symptoms.

Ear infection symptoms

Ear infection symptoms in children include:

  • earache
  • inflammation
  • pain and tenderness
  • fussiness
  • vomiting
  • decreased hearing
  • fever

In adults, symptoms may include:

  • earache
  • inflammation and swelling
  • pain and tenderness
  • hearing changes
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • fever

If an earache or infection doesn’t go away after three days, see a doctor. Always see a doctor if ear discharge, fever, or loss of balance occurs with an ear infection.

Alternative treatments

There are other home remedies for ear infections you can try. None of these should replace doctor visits or traditional treatments.

They should also only be used for outer ear infections. Middle ear infections should be seen and treated by a doctor.

Be aware that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration doesn’t regulate essential oils so be sure to purchase them from a reputable source. Prior to using any essential oil, test a drop or two on a small area of your skin for 24 hours to see if any reaction occurs.

Even if the oil does not irritate your skin, it could still cause irritation or discomfort if you put it in your ear. Always follow directions on labels for specific essential oils and keep out of the reach of children.

The bottom line

Some research supports the use of apple cider vinegar for helping treat outer ear infections at home, but more studies are needed. Apple cider vinegar could be especially helpful for mild outer ear infections when used correctly in children and adults.

No home remedy should replace a doctor’s recommendations and medications. If ear infections worsen, last for more than three days, and are accompanied by fever or other symptoms, stop the use of apple cider vinegar and see your doctor.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

By Monica Weymouth

There are two types of dog owners in this world—those who routinely stick their noses in their BFFs ears sniffing for signs of foul play, and those who don’t.

If you fall in the former is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection, you certainly know the smell of a dreaded ear infection, as well as the telltale itching and headshaking that go along with it. Not to mention the frequent vet visits, piles of over-the-counter ear washes and old wives’ tale “remedies.”

You’re also far from alone. Ears are the perfect place for an infection to settle in, and if your dog is predisposed, issues can become chronic. “The most common causes of infection are yeast and bacteria, and they thrive in moist, dark areas—ears are perfect for that,” says Natasha Kassell, VMD, a holistic house-care veterinarian based in Philadelphia. “But there’s certainly a genetic component—all dogs have ears, but not all dogs have ear infections.”

Is your pooch stuck in the stinky ear club? Read on for tips on prevention, treatment and—finally—breaking the cycle of ear infections with tips from holistic veterinarians.

Smarter Grooming Many well-meaning owners and groomers remove dogs’ inner ear hair to prevent infections—but in the process, may be causing the problem. “As a young veterinarian I believed the floppy, hairy-eared dogs developed more ear infections due to this anatomy which prevented air flow,” says Jodie Gruenstern DVM, CVA, a holistic veterinarian and practice owner in Is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection. “There may be some truth to this, however, what I found to be most correlated is that after a dog's ear hair was ‘plucked’ while at a groomer, the dog commonly developed an ear infection about two weeks later. Akin to waxing, this plucking hurts! It leaves the sensitive ear canal abraded and scabby deep inside where it is then vulnerable to microbial attack.”

Natural Oils and Washes

When it comes to keeping ears clean and healthy, you may already have the supplies in your pantry. “I don't generally recommend ear washes as they break up the natural wax coating on the ear canal which can lead to irritation,” says Erika Halle, DVM, a veterinary acupuncturist and chiropractor in Oregon. “I recommend cleaning with just a couple of drops of oil, such as coconut or olive, placed into the ear canal. This softens the excess wax and helps it move up and out where it can be wiped away with a tissue.”

Although Gruenstern does recommend a commercial aloe-based herbal rinse for dogs who are prone to post-swim ear infections, she cautions that such washes are only preventative, and once an infection is present, a visit to your veterinarian is always in order. “Many astringent, even natural, ear washes are misused,” she says. “If the pet guardian suspects an ear infection, it is too late for an ear wash. The canal is already sensitive, so an ear wash ‘burns’ the sensitive tissue, even blisters it, perpetuating the problem.”

Boric Acid

From treating acne to killing ants, boric acid has a ton of uses—including preventing ear infections. Kassell recommends sprinkling some of the powder in your dog’s ears after swimming or bathing, and even uses boric acid to treat some mild infections. “It makes the ears a less favorable place for yeast and bacteria to grow,” she explains of the acidity. Because boric acid shouldn’t be swallowed or inhaled, be careful to protect your dog’s (and your own!) eyes, nose and mouth.

Conventional Treatments

If an ear infection is confirmed, a holistic veterinarian will often recommend a conventional treatment plan. “I have tried many topical, natural products such as garlic/mullein and even some Chinese herbal ear drops. I have been disappointed with their effectiveness,” says Gruenstern. “The conventional medications which contain an antifungal for yeast, an antibiotic for bacteria and a steroid for inflammation gives the pet the fastest relief. Then we look for the underlying cause.” Next on her agenda: a full thyroid panel, a probiotic product to balance out the gut and…

Dietary Changes

To prevent future infections, holistic veterinarians take their exam from the ear canal to the food bowl. “If a dog is fed a high starch diet, which is what is used in baking to grow yeast, then yeast will flourish on the skin,” explains Gruenstern. “Excessive starch in the diet leads to insulin resistance and a whole inflammatory cascade. A fresh, species-appropriate diet is very important to prevent the development of most conditions.”

Halle also recommends removing starch, as well as exploring other meats. “The first things I have people cut out are grains and chicken,” she says. “After that, it depends on the dog. You may need to try some other proteins like turkey or beef, or even a novel protein like kangaroo or brushtail.”

Not all veterinarians agree that grain-free diets are a good option, so make sure to consult your own vet before making a switch to a grain-free food.

Preventative Evaluation

If your dog is suffering frequent infections, a holistic veterinarian may look at the number of vaccines—as well as flea and tick treatments—that are being administered throughout the year.  “While vaccines are incredibly useful at preventing serious disease such as rabies, distemper and parvo, they stimulate the immune system in an unnatural way, and may play a role in the vast amount of chronic diseases we’re seeing in dogs, from cancer to autoimmune diseases to ear infections,” says Kassell, “My goal as a holistic veterinarian is to help guardians minimize use of potentially harmful products while still protecting their pets against contagious viruses, fleas, ticks, etc."   

The bottom line: If your dog is showing signs of an ear infection, make an appointment with your veterinarian and discuss how you can avoid the next visit.

See Also

Image: didesign via Shutterstock

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection -

How Do Dogs Get Ear Mites?

How Do Dogs Get Ear MitesDoes your dog have itchy ears? Are they keeping you up at night scratching and digging at their ears? Are they starting to get painful, causing scabs or even bleeding on their ears? It is possible they could have ear mites causing these symptoms. It is also possible they could have a bacterial or yeast infection in their ears and not ear mites. In this article we will discuss ear mites and why they are actually not the most common cause of itchy ears in dogs.

Symptoms of Ear Mites in Dogs

Ear mites cause your dog’s ear to be very itchy. Your dog will scratch constantly at their ears, especially when they are at rest and not doing anything. Your dog may also shake their head quite a bit, or rub their ears on the floor. You may find your dog also rubbing their ears on the sides of furniture. You may notice brown, dry, flakey, crusty discharge coming from your dog’s ears.

If your dog’s ears are painful, they may even yelp out or shy away from you if you touch their ears.

Here is a list of the symptoms of ear mites in dogs:

  • Shaking head
  • Scratching at ears
  • Rubbing ears on the floor or on furniture
  • Painful ears
  • Dry, crusty, brown debris and discharge in the ears

How Dogs Get Ear Mites

Ear mites are parasitic bugs that infect dogs’ ears. They are contagious dog-to-dog. If your dog has ear mites, they likely got them from coming into contact with another animal who had ear mites. It is more common for puppies or dogs who have been wondering outside on their own to get ear mites.

You will not be able to see them with your naked eye. For your dog to be diagnosed with ear mites, you will need to schedule an appointment with your vet. While your vet will check for ear mites, they will also examine your dog for other causes of itchy ears. This is because the truth is that ear mites are actually not very common in dogs.

Diagnosing Ear Mites

To diagnose ear mites, your vet will use a cotton swab to collect some debris and gunk from inside your dog’s ears. They will press this material onto a slide, mix some mineral oil with it, and look at the sample under a microscope. Ear mites will easily be seen if they are present, and sometimes they will even be seen moving around.

Your vet may also stain the slide of the sample from your dog’s ear with a special stain to look under the microscope for bacteria and yeast. If ear mites are not identified, it is more likely your dog has a bacterial or yeast infection in their ears causing the itchiness, discharge, and discomfort.

Ear Mite Treatments

Ear mites can be killed with anti-parasitic medications, such as Revolution (Selamectin) and Advantage Multi (Moxidectin + Imidacloprid). These medications are actually NOT given into the ears. You apply them topically to the skin of your dog, in between their shoulder blades. These are the same medications that are used to prevent heartworm infection and to treat intestinal parasites. You need a prescription from a veterinarian for these medications.

These are the only medications proven effective to treat ear mites. Even though there are other over-the-counter medications labeled to treat ear mites, most of them do not work effectively. This is why many pet owners may get frustrated buying “ear mite treatments” online and still end up having to take their pet to the vet. Ear cleansers can be used to clean the debris and gunk out of your dog’s ears, but they will not necessarily kill the ear mites.

Also, ear mites only account for a very small percentage of ear problems in dogs. Most dogs with itchy ears actually need ear medications that contain an antibiotic, antifungal, and/or anti-inflammatory product in them. This can be prescribed by your veterinarian. Your vet may also discuss with you about possibilities your dog may have underlying allergies that are contributing to your dog’s itchy ears.

Cost for Ear Mite Treatments

The cost for the prescription treatments will ultimately depend on the weight and size of your dog. One dose of the ear mite treatment may cost between $ If your dog is diagnosed with a bacterial or fungal infection instead of ear mites, the ear drops prescribed may cost anywhere between $

Finally, if your dog has a lot of discharge and debris build-up down in their ears, your vet may prescribe an ear cleanser to help you clean out your dog’s ears for a few days. Ear cleanser may cost between $ per bottle.

Of course, there will also be the cost associated with your pet being examined by the vet and the diagnostics your vet did to look for ear mites. The cost of the exam and diagnostics will be $

Home Remedies for Dog Ear Mites

There are many suggested “home remedies” for treating ear mites in dogs all over the internet. We will discuss some of them here, but do not recommend any of these so-called home remedies. Most of them are not effective, and some of them could even harm your dog’s ear canals. It is always best for you to take your dog to the vet, to get the correct diagnosis, and to get the proper, safe, and effective treatment.

Olive Oil

You may have read that a home remedy for dog ear mites is olive oil. It is thought to work by drowning the mites. However, you have to apply a small amount of it in the ears for at least six weeks daily, and this may not kill all of the mites. The oil can be soothing to dry, cracked ears, but we don’t know if it could also affect your dog’s hearing or cause other problems.

Mineral Oil

Some vets who support natural medicine, recommend trying drops of mineral oil in your dog’s ears daily for at least 3 weeks. They recommend using a dropper and only applying a few drops daily, wiping away any excess. This also works by suffocating the mites. However, some mite could be quick and avoid it, and it may not be the most effective way to clear your dog of ear mites.

Hydrogen Peroxide

Hydrogen Peroxide can be damaging to the eyes. If you attempt this method of treating ear mites, you have to be extremely careful to not get any of the peroxide near your dog’s eyes, nose, or mouth. A recommendation is to use a Q-tip to dip into the solution. Mix 1-part hydrogen peroxide to 1-part water. Soak a Q-tip in the mixture, then use the Q-tip to clean your dog’s ear canal. Do this for 10 days.

Again, this method could cause more problems that it is worth, and the mites could evade coming into contact with the hydrogen peroxide. It is best to just stick with what your vet prescribes.

Tea Tree Oil

Some people recommend tea tree oil for treating ear mites. This just works in the same way as the mineral oil and olive oil- suffocating or drowning the mites. It does not do anything else directly to kill the mites. If you choose to use tea tree oil, though, make sure to dilute it properly. If your dog ingests it, it can be toxic to them as well.

The best way to treat ear mites in dogs is with a prescription from your veterinarian. The importance of this is not just to effectively treat ear mites, but to also get the diagnosis right and make sure your dog is actually dealing with ear mites and not a different infection. Otherwise, you may try various home remedies unsuccessfully, prolonging the time your dog is dealing with a worsening ear infection and being in pain.

Leslie Brooks

Leslie Brooks graduated from the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine in After graduation she moved to Indianapolis to do an intensive one-year internship at a specialty practice and then began working as a small animal general practitioner. She ran her own house call practice for three years, visiting pets in people&#;s homes. Currently, she works part time in clinical practice and volunteering her free time to serve pets of the homeless. Read more about us here.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us
  • Skin folds.
  • Bacterial infection.
  • Medication such as antibiotics or corticosteroids.

Certain dog breeds are also more predisposed to developing yeast infection. These include the Basset Hound, Shih Tzu, Golden Retriever or Cocker Spaniel.

Treatments for yeast infection in dogs

Topical treatment for yeast infection in dogs

Anti-fungal shampoos are usually the first recommendation. Depending on the progress of the infection, you might have to apply the topical medications a few times a week to the affected area or even a few times a day. The chemicals in the medicated shampoo will kill the yeast, so your dog’s skin should start to improve within about a week. For dog ear yeast infection the same anti-fungal agents are concentrated in ear drops that can be used to successfully treat the infection.

Oral treatment for yeast infection in dogs

If the yeast infection does not respond to the topical treatment, oral medications might be prescribed. It is essential to pay a visit to the vet as the treatment can vary depending on your dog’s age and any underlying conditions.

Anti-inflammatory medication can also help reduce the swelling. If this is necessitated, your vet will prescribe them – do not use any over-the-counter medications or tablets you might have at home as these could cause further problems or even be toxic.

If you think your dog has a yeast infection or any skin condition, please don’t try to treat your dog with home remedies as you could risk making the problem worse. You should always take your dog to the vet for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate, tailored treatment for your dog’s particular condition. An allergy can look very similar to a yeast infection in dogs and vice versa, so it’s important to ask for professional help to ensure your dog gets the best care possible.

Read more about other skin problems in dogs and keep up to date with tips for keeping you and your dog healthy.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Labrador Ear Infection. Home Remedies and Treatment

labrador ear infection feat

  • More than 20% of dogs suffer from some sort of ear infections.
  • Because of the labrador ear shape, they are more prone to ear infections and yeast.
  • Prevention is the most effective way to stop labrador ear infection.
  • When you notice your dog showing any early signs of an ear infection, you should take him to the vet as soon as possible.
  • Are you looking for information on Labrador ear infection? Do you suspect your lab is suffering from ear disease? In this article we will outline the reasons for labrador ear problems, the signs, symptoms, treatments and more. 

    Dogs are, perhaps, a man’s best friend. They stick around through thick and thin and bring a smile on your face. Talk about Labrador Retriever only – the sweet-faced “handsome fellow.” Labs are energetic and enthusiastic athletes who love to socialize.

    Labs are true companions who not only form a bond with the owner and their family but also neighbor dogs. While Labs are a cheerful breed, ear infections can cause a serious nuisance to them. Ear infections are common to most pets; however, dogs are the most vulnerable.

    Labrador Ear Infection

    Do you know that more than 20 percent of dogs have some form of ear disease, including infection? So, your Lab is not alone dealing with the pain. Dogs with floppy ears, such as Basset Hounds, Cocker Spaniels, and Labrador Retriever, are more susceptible to ear infections due to their ear structure.

    A Labrador’s Ear Structure

    labrador ear infectionLabrador ear anatomy. Image from Pinterest & Pixabay

    Unlike humans, the ear canal of dogs is more vertical, giving it an L-shape. The shape holds in fluid, such as wax and bacteria. Labradors have floppy ears that give them an endearing distinctive look. However, the same soft ear flaps make a Lab vulnerable to ear diseases.

    The soft furry flaps cover the ear canal, creating a dark warm environment. No to mention, germs thrive in such places. Also, the flopped-ears trap ear wax, dirt, and other bacteria in the ear canal and inner ear structure.

    Labrador Retriever Ear Infection types

    The ear is the ideal place for infections to settle in and can occur anywhere in the ear. Your dog may develop an infection in the inner, middle, or outer ear.

    1. Otitis Externa - It is the most common ear infection in Labrador Retrievers. Otitis externa is the infection of external ear, which causes inflammation. It affects the layer of cells lining outside the ear canal.
    2. Otitis Media - Otitis media occurs in the middle ear of the dogs. When otitis externa worsens, it reaches the middle ear canal.
    3. Otitis Interna - It is the advanced stage of the infection and affects the inner ear canal.

    Both otitis media and interna can cause serious health problems for your companion. It may lead to facial paralysis, deafness, and vestibular signs.

    Symptoms of Labrador Ear Infection

    The big question: How do you know that your Lab is dealing with an ear infection? The most common sign is the excessive production of earwax or hypothyroidism. As a result, your dog may begin to

    • Scratch its ear
    • Whimper
    • Shake head incessantly
    • Also, examine your Labs’ ear for these symptoms
    • Redness or swelling
    • A foul discharge
    • Odor

    Causes of Labrador Ear Infection

    Many factors can trigger an infection in your Labrador’s ear. Adult dogs develop ear infections mostly because of yeast and bacteria. In young puppies, ear mites are a major cause of ear infections. Some of the other causes include:

    • Moisture in the ear
    • Skin allergies (in 50% of dogs) and food sensitivities (in 80% of dogs)
    • Hormonal abnormalities
    • Endocrine disorders, such as thyroid problems
    • Foreign bodies
    • Trauma or injury to the ear canal
    • Excessive cleaning

    Labrador Ear Infection Home Remedy

    Nature has an abundance of sources that can help alleviate the symptoms of your dog’s ear infection. The best thing is that you can find most of the ingredients in your home only.

    1. Natural Oil - Rather than washing your dog ears excessively, you can pour a couple of coconut or olive oil drops in the ear. Natural oils soften the wax buildup in the ear canal and help move it up. You can easily wipe the wax with a tissue.
    2. Mullein Oil - Mullein is a plant with antibacterial properties. It helps alleviate the pain, kills bacteria, and reduces the swelling. Soak the mullein leaves in olive oil and add a clove of garlic in the mixture for weeks. Strain the liquid and apply a few drops on your dog’s ear.
    3. Apple Cider Vinegar - Vinegar is a potent antiseptic and antibiotic substance for fighting bacteria and infections. Prepare a mixture of water and apple cider vinegar. You may either spray the mixture in the infected ear or soak a cotton ball in it to clean out the ear. 
    4. Baking Soda - Baking soda is a potent neutralizing agent that helps eradicate most of the fungal infection. Mix one teaspoon of baking soda in one-liter water. Spray the solution on the infected area.
    5. Vitamin C -Adding Vitamin C in your dog’s diet can prevent ear infections and improve aural health. Fresh lemon is one of the best sources of Vitamin C. Use an equal amount of water and fresh lemon juice to prepare a solution. Massage your dog’s earlobes with the mixture. Its citrus smell repels fleas and pushes them away from your buddy.

    Labrador Ear Infection Treatment

    If you notice adverse symptoms of ear infection in your Labrador, visit your veterinarian as soon as possible. Acute ear infections take weeks to resolve. The vet will recommend a conventional treatment plan with some conventional medications.

    Non-surgical Treatment

    The first step, however, is the thorough examination of your dog’s ear with a medicated cleanser. After examination, your vet may prescribe a topical anti-fungal for the yeast. For severe infection, he/she may also give oral antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medicines for fast relief.

    Surgical Treatment

    In the case of chronic ear infection in one or both the ears, conventional treatment may fail. The vet, therefore, may recommend surgery, such as TECA –Total Ear Canal Ablation. During the procedure, the vet removes the ear canal, which eventually removes the affected tissue from your dog’s ear.

    Final Word

    Your dog is your companion who is unable to express their pain through words. However, if you “talk” to your Lab more often, you can detect the early signs of an ear infection or other ear diseases. You may treat your “friend” with some natural remedies.

    Also, you may go for conventional treatment, such as steroids and antibiotics. However, make sure there are no lapses in the treatment as this may lead to other infections.

    Craig Davis

    Craig is a lifelong pet owner and dog advocate with a special interest in animal and human longevity. He founded Vet Organics to develop an affordable, all-natural, safe and effective ear infection remedy for his dog, Lucy, whose chronic ear problems could not be solved by the vet.

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    Can apple cider vinegar treat ear infections?

    We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

    Ear infections can occur in the inner, middle, or outer part of the ear. They are usually due to an overgrowth of infectious bacteria or a virus.

    Some people believe that apple cider vinegar (ACV) may help to treat ear infections. However, there is currently no specific research investigating the efficacy of ACV for ear infections.

    However, some research does suggest that apple cider vinegar has antimicrobial properties. We discuss this research and consider whether these properties in the vinegar might help treat ear infections. We also provide tips on how to use the vinegar for ear infections, as well as the potential risks involved.

    Does ACV help with ear infections?

    A investigated the general antimicrobial effects of ACV. The researchers studied two species of bacteria that are a cause of ear infections — Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus).

    The researchers applied ACV to each of the bacterial cultures. They found that the ACV inhibited the growth of both types of bacteria.

    The researchers then prepared samples of bacterial cultures mixed with immune cells. They exposed some of these samples to ACV and found that these showed fewer signs of inflammation. This suggests that ACV could reduce the severity of certain bacterial infections.

    The researchers of the note that the antimicrobial effects of ACV may partly be due to its acetic acid content. Research has shown that acetic acid can damage the cell walls of microbes.

    In a study, ACV showed strong antibacterial effects, even at concentrations as low as 25%.

    It is still not clear whether ACV has antiviral properties.

    So far, research into the antibacterial effects of ACV appears promising. However, scientists have conducted most of their research on bacterial cultures grown in the lab, so they do not know whether ACV will have the same effects on people. Scientists will need to carry out well controlled studies on humans to investigate this claim.

    How to use ACV for ear infections

    The simplest way to use ACV for ear infections is to add it to homemade ear drops. However, do not use ACV ear drops in place of conventional treatments, and always talk to a doctor first.

    To make the ear drops, combine equal parts of ACV and warm water. Ensure the water is only slightly warm as the skin within the ear will be sensitive.

    How to apply the ear drops

    To get the drops into the ear canal, follow the steps below:

    • Suck up some of the ear drop mixture, using a dropper.
    • Sit or lie with the head tilted to one side so that the affected ear faces upward.
    • Squeeze 4–5 drops of the mixture into the ear.
    • Keep the head tilted for a couple of minutes to ensure the drops reach the ear canal.
    • Tilt the head in the opposite direction to allow the mixture to fall out.
    • Use a clean face cloth or cotton ball to wipe the ear, but do not insert anything into the ear canal.

    Repeat the above process a few times each day.

    Possible risks

    It is essential to dilute ACV. Stronger concentrations of ACV may damage the sensitive skin of the ear.

    Even after diluting ACV, irritation is still possible. If irritation occurs, stop using the mixture.

    Anyone who suspects they have an inner or middle ear infection should avoid using ear drops until they see their doctor. Ear drops are also not suitable for people who experience drainage from the ears.

    People who experience ear drainage or an infection of the inner or middle ear should see a doctor.

    Alternative home remedies for ear infections

    Home remedies that might help to alleviate symptoms of pain and swelling that often accompany an ear infection include:

    Warm compresses: Laying a warm towel over the affected ear helps to increase circulation in the area. This, in turn, can help to reduce pain.

    Over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers: OTC drugs such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil) can help to reduce pain and fever.

    Other OTC products: Some OTC ear drops may help alleviate symptoms while stopping the underlying bacterial infection from spreading. People should ask their pharmacist for advice on which drops to buy.

    When to see a doctor for ear infection

    An ear infection can cause serious complications if left untreated.

    People should see a doctor if their symptoms worsen, or they experience any of the following:

    A person with these symptoms may require antibiotics or other treatments.

    Summary

    Ear infections are usually the result of a viral or bacterial infection. They can be very painful.

    ACV shows promise as an antibacterial treatment. However, there is no specific research investigating ACV as a treatment for ear infection.

    As a result, people who wish to try ACV ear drops should use them in combination with conventional medical treatments.

    People who have ear drainage or an infection of the middle or inner ear should not use ACV. People should see a doctor if symptoms worsen or persist.

    Apple cider vinegar is available in grocery stores and online.

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    What can underlie Canine Ear Infections

    By Monica Weymouth

    There are two types of dog owners in this world—those who routinely stick their noses in their BFFs ears sniffing for signs of foul play, and those who don’t.

    If you fall in the former camp, you certainly know the smell of a dreaded ear infection, as well as the telltale itching and headshaking that go along with it. Not to mention the frequent vet visits, piles of over-the-counter ear washes and old wives’ tale “remedies.”

    You’re also far from alone. Ears are the perfect place for an infection to settle in, and if your dog is predisposed, issues can become chronic. “The most common causes of infection are yeast and bacteria, and they thrive in moist, dark areas—ears are perfect for that,” says Natasha Kassell, VMD, a holistic house-care veterinarian based in Philadelphia. “But there’s certainly a genetic component—all dogs have ears, but not all dogs have ear infections.”

    Is your pooch stuck in the stinky ear club? Read on for tips on prevention, treatment and—finally—breaking the cycle of ear infections with tips from holistic veterinarians.

    Smarter Grooming Many well-meaning owners and groomers remove dogs’ inner ear hair to prevent infections—but in the process, may be causing the problem. “As a young veterinarian I believed the floppy, hairy-eared dogs developed more ear infections due to this anatomy which prevented air flow,” says Jodie Gruenstern DVM, CVA, a holistic veterinarian and practice owner in Wisconsin. “There may be some truth to this, however, what I found to be most correlated is that after a dog's ear hair was ‘plucked’ while at a groomer, the dog commonly developed an ear infection about two weeks later. Akin to waxing, this plucking hurts! It leaves the sensitive ear canal abraded and scabby deep inside where it is then vulnerable to microbial attack.”

    Natural Oils and Washes

    When it comes to keeping ears clean and healthy, you may already have the supplies in your pantry. “I don't generally recommend ear washes as they break up the natural wax coating on the ear canal which can lead to irritation,” says Erika Halle, DVM, a veterinary acupuncturist and chiropractor in Oregon. “I recommend cleaning with just a couple of drops of oil, such as coconut or olive, placed into the ear canal. This softens the excess wax and helps it move up and out where it can be wiped away with a tissue.”

    Although Gruenstern does recommend a commercial aloe-based herbal rinse for dogs who are prone to post-swim ear infections, she cautions that such washes are only preventative, and once an infection is present, a visit to your veterinarian is always in order. “Many astringent, even natural, ear washes are misused,” she says. “If the pet guardian suspects an ear infection, it is too late for an ear wash. The canal is already sensitive, so an ear wash ‘burns’ the sensitive tissue, even blisters it, perpetuating the problem.”

    Boric Acid

    From treating acne to killing ants, boric acid has a ton of uses—including preventing ear infections. Kassell recommends sprinkling some of the powder in your dog’s ears after swimming or bathing, and even uses boric acid to treat some mild infections. “It makes the ears a less favorable place for yeast and bacteria to grow,” she explains of the acidity. Because boric acid shouldn’t be swallowed or inhaled, be careful to protect your dog’s (and your own!) eyes, nose and mouth.

    Conventional Treatments

    If an ear infection is confirmed, a holistic veterinarian will often recommend a conventional treatment plan. “I have tried many topical, natural products such as garlic/mullein and even some Chinese herbal ear drops. I have been disappointed with their effectiveness,” says Gruenstern. “The conventional medications which contain an antifungal for yeast, an antibiotic for bacteria and a steroid for inflammation gives the pet the fastest relief. Then we look for the underlying cause.” Next on her agenda: a full thyroid panel, a probiotic product to balance out the gut and…

    Dietary Changes

    To prevent future infections, holistic veterinarians take their exam from the ear canal to the food bowl. “If a dog is fed a high starch diet, which is what is used in baking to grow yeast, then yeast will flourish on the skin,” explains Gruenstern. “Excessive starch in the diet leads to insulin resistance and a whole inflammatory cascade. A fresh, species-appropriate diet is very important to prevent the development of most conditions.”

    Halle also recommends removing starch, as well as exploring other meats. “The first things I have people cut out are grains and chicken,” she says. “After that, it depends on the dog. You may need to try some other proteins like turkey or beef, or even a novel protein like kangaroo or brushtail.”

    Not all veterinarians agree that grain-free diets are a good option, so make sure to consult your own vet before making a switch to a grain-free food.

    Preventative Evaluation

    If your dog is suffering frequent infections, a holistic veterinarian may look at the number of vaccines—as well as flea and tick treatments—that are being administered throughout the year.  “While vaccines are incredibly useful at preventing serious disease such as rabies, distemper and parvo, they stimulate the immune system in an unnatural way, and may play a role in the vast amount of chronic diseases we’re seeing in dogs, from cancer to autoimmune diseases to ear infections,” says Kassell, “My goal as a holistic veterinarian is to help guardians minimize use of potentially harmful products while still protecting their pets against contagious viruses, fleas, ticks, etc."   

    The bottom line: If your dog is showing signs of an ear infection, make an appointment with your veterinarian and discuss how you can avoid the next visit.

    See Also

    Image: didesign via Shutterstock

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us
    is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection
    is there a home remedy for dog ear yeast infection

    Comments

    1. Mo Faal I Was really broke then I herd about jack giving out funds and I chatted jack up requesting for some funds on my credit card then get my credit score increased and defaults cleared and I was credited with $10,000 and my credit score boosted. jack is really an expert contact @jack.smith_07 on instagram or +14233527300 on WhatsApp i have tested him and confirmed he is 💯% trust worthy

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *