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Home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies


home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies

Diarrhea can be caused by viruses (rotavirus, norovirus), bacteria (food Most cases of diarrhea can be treated at home with natural remedies and. It often can be treated at home without the need for medical care. Caution: do NOT give your baby any fever medicine before being seen. Other signs of gastroenteritis can include nausea, diarrhea, fever, to help care for children with nausea and vomiting at home.
home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies

Home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies -

Symptoms Diagnosis

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis is a very common condition that causes diarrhoea and vomiting. It's usually caused by a bacterial or viral tummy bug.

It affects people of all ages, but is particularly common in young children.

Most cases in children are caused by a virus called rotavirus. Cases in adults are usually caused by norovirus (the "winter vomiting bug") or bacterial food poisoning.

Gastroenteritis can be very unpleasant, but it usually clears up by itself within a week. You can normally look after yourself or your child at home until you're feeling better.

Try to avoid going to your GP, as gastroenteritis can spread to others very easily. Phone the service or your GP if you're concerned or need any advice.

This page covers:

Symptoms of gastroenteritis

What to do if you have gastroenteritis

When to get medical advice

Looking after a child with gastroenteritis

Getting medical advice for your child

How gastroenteritis is spread

Preventing gastroenteritis

Symptoms of gastroenteritis

The main symptoms of gastroenteritis are:

  • sudden, watery diarrhoea
  • feeling sick
  • vomiting, which can be projectile
  • a mild fever

Some people also have other symptoms, such as a loss of appetite, an upset stomach, aching limbs and headaches.

The symptoms usually appear up to a day after becoming infected. They typically last less than a week, but can sometimes last longer.

What to do if you have gastroenteritis

If you experience sudden diarrhoea and vomiting, the best thing to do is stay at home until you're feeling better. There's not always a specific treatment, so you have to let the illness run its course.

You don't usually need to get medical advice, unless your symptoms don't improve or there's a risk of a more serious problem.

To help ease your symptoms:

  • Drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration – You need to drink more than usual to replace the fluids lost from vomiting and diarrhoea. Water is best, but you could also try fruit juice and soup.
  • Take paracetamol for any fever or aches and pains.
  • Get plenty of rest.
  • If you feel like eating, try small amounts of plain foods, such as soup, rice, pasta and bread.
  • Use special rehydration drinks made from sachets bought from pharmacies if you have signs of dehydration, such as a dry mouth or dark urine – read about treating dehydration.
  • Take anti-vomiting medication (such as metoclopramide) and/or antidiarrhoeal medication (such as loperamide) if you need to – some types are available from pharmacies, but check the leaflet that comes with the medicine. You can also ask your pharmacist or GP for advice about whether they're suitable. 

Gastroenteritis can spread very easily, so you should wash your hands regularly while you're ill and stay off work or school until at least 48 hours after your symptoms have cleared, to reduce the risk of passing it on (see Preventing gastroenteritis).

When to get medical advice

You don't normally need to see your GP if you think you have gastroenteritis, as it should get better on its own.

Visiting your GP surgery can put others at risk, so it's best to phone or your GP if you're concerned or feel you need advice.

Get medical advice if:

  • you have symptoms of severe dehydration, such as persistent dizziness, only passing small amounts of urine or no urine at all, or if you're losing consciousness
  • you have bloody diarrhoea
  • you're vomiting constantly and are unable to keep down any fluids
  • you have a fever over 38C (F)
  • your symptoms haven't started to improve after a few days
  • in the last few weeks you've returned from a part of the world with poor sanitation
  • you have a serious underlying condition, such as kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease or a weak immune system, and have diarrhoea and vomiting

Your GP may suggest sending off a sample of your poo to a laboratory to check what's causing your symptoms. Antibiotics may be prescribed if this shows you have a bacterial infection.

Looking after a child with gastroenteritis

You can look after your child at home if they have diarrhoea and vomiting. There's not usually any specific treatment and your child should start feeling better in a few days.

You don't normally need to get medical advice unless their symptoms don't improve or there's a risk of a more serious problem.

To help ease your child's symptoms:

  • Encourage them to drink plenty of fluids. They need to replace the fluids lost from vomiting and diarrhoea. Water is generally best. Avoid giving them fizzy drinks or fruit juice, as they can make their diarrhoea worse. Babies should continue to feed as usual, either with breast milk or other milk feeds.
  • Make sure they get plenty of rest.
  • Let your child eat if they're eating solids and feel hungry. Try small amounts of plain foods, such as soup, rice, pasta and bread.
  • Give them paracetamol if they have an uncomfortable fever or aches and pains. Young children may find liquid paracetamol easier to swallow than tablets.
  • Use special rehydration drinks made from sachets bought from pharmacies if they're dehydrated. Your GP or pharmacist can advise on how much to give your child. Don't give them antidiarrhoeal and anti-vomiting medication, unless advised to by your GP or pharmacist.

Make sure you and your child wash your hands regularly while your child is ill and keep them away from school or nursery until at least 48 hours after their symptoms have cleared (see Preventing gastroenteritis).

Getting medical advice for your child

You don't usually need to see your GP if you think your child has gastroenteritis, as it should get better on its own, and taking them to a GP surgery can put others at risk.

Phone the service or your GP if you're concerned about your child, or they:

  • have symptoms of dehydration, such as passing less urine than normal, being unusually irritable or unresponsive, pale or mottled skin, or cold hands and feet
  • have blood in their poo or green vomit
  • are vomiting constantly and are unable to keep down any fluids or feeds
  • have had diarrhoea for more than a week
  • have been vomiting for three days or more
  • have signs of a more serious illness, such as a high fever (over 38C or F), shortness of breath, rapid breathing, a stiff neck, a rash that doesn't fade when you roll a glass over it or a bulging fontanelle (the soft spot on a baby's head)
  • have a serious underlying condition, such as inflammatory bowel disease or a weak immune system, and have diarrhoea and vomiting

Your GP may suggest sending off a sample of your child's poo to a laboratory to confirm what's causing their symptoms. Antibiotics may be prescribed if this shows they have a bacterial infection.

How gastroenteritis is spread

The bugs that cause gastroenteritis can spread very easily from person to person.

You can catch the infection if small particles of vomit or poo from an infected person get into your mouth, such as through:

  • close contact with someone with gastroenteritis – they may breathe out small particles of vomit
  • touching contaminated surfaces or objects
  • eating contaminated food – this can happen if an infected person doesn't wash their hands before handling food, or you eat food that has been in contact with contaminated surfaces or objects, or hasn't been stored and cooked at the correct temperatures (read more about the causes of food poisoning)

A person with gastroenteritis is most infectious from when their symptoms start until 48 hours after all their symptoms have passed, although they may also be infectious for a short time before and after this.

Preventing gastroenteritis

It's not always possible to avoid getting gastroenteritis, but following the advice below can help stop it spreading:

  • Stay off work, school or nursery until at least 48 hours after the symptoms have passed. You or your child should also avoid visiting anyone in hospital during this time.
  • Ensure you and your child wash your hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and water, particularly after using the toilet and before preparing food. Don't rely on alcohol hand gels, as they're not always effective.
  • Disinfect any surfaces or objects that could be contaminated. It's best to use a bleach-based household cleaner.
  • Wash contaminated items of clothing or bedding separately on a hot wash.
  • Don't share towels, flannels, cutlery or utensils while you or your child is ill.
  • Flush away any poo or vomit in the toilet or potty and clean the surrounding area.
  • Practice good food hygiene. Make sure food is properly refrigerated, always cook your food thoroughly, and never eat food that is past its use-by date – read more about preventing food poisoning. 

Take extra care when travelling to parts of the world with poor sanitation, as you could pick up a stomach bug. For example, you may need to boil tap water before drinking it.

Young children can have the rotavirus vaccination when they’re 2 to 3 months old, which can reduce their risk of developing gastroenteritis.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Treatment of Viral Gastroenteritis (“Stomach Flu”)

How can I treat viral gastroenteritis?

In most cases, people with viral gastroenteritis get better on their own without medical treatment. You can treat viral gastroenteritis by replacing lost fluids and electrolytes to prevent dehydration. In some cases, over-the-counter medicines may help relieve your symptoms.

Research shows that following a restricted diet does not help treat viral gastroenteritis. When you have viral gastroenteritis, you may vomit after you eat or lose your appetite for a short time. When your appetite returns, you can most often go back to eating your normal diet, even if you still have diarrhea. Find tips on what to eat when you have viral gastroenteritis.

If your child has symptoms of viral gastroenteritis, such as vomiting or diarrhea, don’t hesitate to call a doctor for advice.

Replace lost fluids and electrolytes

When you have viral gastroenteritis, you need to replace lost fluids and electrolytes to prevent dehydration or treat mild dehydration. You should drink plenty of liquids. If vomiting is a problem, try sipping small amounts of clear liquids.

Most adults with viral gastroenteritis can replace fluids and electrolytes with liquids such as

  • water
  • fruit juices
  • sports drinks
  • broths

Eating saltine crackers can also help replace electrolytes.

If your child has viral gastroenteritis, you should give your child an oral rehydration solution—such as Pedialyte, Naturalyte, Infalyte, and CeraLyte—as directed to replace lost fluids and electrolytes. Oral rehydration solutions are liquids that contain glucose and electrolytes. Talk with a doctor about giving these solutions to your infant. Infants should drink breast milk or formula as usual.

Older adults, adults with a weakened immune system, and adults with severe diarrhea or symptoms of dehydration should also drink oral rehydration solutions.

Over-the-counter medicines

In some cases, adults can take over-the-counter medicines such as loperamide (Imodium) and bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol, Kaopectate) to treat diarrhea caused by viral gastroenteritis.

These medicines can be unsafe for infants and children. Talk with a doctor before giving your child an over-the-counter medicine.

If you have bloody diarrhea or fever—signs of infections with bacteria or parasites—don’t use over-the-counter medicines to treat diarrhea. See a doctor for treatment.

How do doctors treat viral gastroenteritis?

Your doctor may prescribe medicine to control severe vomiting. Doctors don’t prescribe antibiotics to treat viral gastroenteritis. Antibiotics don’t work for viral infections.

In some cases, your doctor may recommend probiotics. Probiotics are live microbes, most often bacteria, that are like the ones you normally have in your digestive tract. Studies suggest that some probiotics may help shorten a case of diarrhea. Researchers are still studying the use of probiotics to treat viral gastroenteritis. For safety reasons, talk with your doctor before using probiotics or any other complementary or alternative medicines or practices.

Anyone with signs or symptoms of dehydration should see a doctor right away. Doctors may need to treat people with severe dehydration in a hospital.

How can I prevent viral gastroenteritis?

You can take several steps to keep from getting or spreading infections that cause viral gastroenteritis. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water

  • after using the bathroom
  • after changing diapers
  • before and after handling, preparing, or eating food

You can clean surfaces that may have come into contact with infected stool or vomit, such as countertops and changing tables, with a mixture of 5 to 25 tablespoons of household bleach and 1 gallon of water.7 If clothes or linens may have come into contact with an infected person’s stool or vomit, you should wash them with detergent for the longest cycle available and machine dry them. To protect yourself from infection, wear rubber gloves while handling the soiled laundry and wash your hands afterward.7

If you have viral gastroenteritis, avoid handling and preparing food for others while you are sick and for 2 days after your symptoms stop.7 People who have viral gastroenteritis may spread the virus to any food they handle, especially if they do not thoroughly wash their hands. Contaminated water may also spread a virus to foods before they are harvested. For example, contaminated fruits, vegetables, and oysters have been linked to norovirus outbreaks. Wash fruits and vegetables before using them, and thoroughly cook oysters and other shellfish.7Find tips to help keep food safe.

The flu vaccine does not protect against viral gastroenteritis. Although some people call viral gastroenteritis “stomach flu,” influenza (flu) viruses do not cause viral gastroenteritis. However, rotavirus vaccines can prevent viral gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus.

Rotavirus Vaccines

Two vaccines, which infants receive by mouth, are approved to protect against rotavirus infections8

  • RotaTeq: Infants receive three doses, at ages 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months
  • Rotarix: Infants receive this vaccine in two doses, at ages 2 months and 4 months

For the rotavirus vaccine to be most effective, infants should receive the first dose by 15 weeks of age. Infants should receive all doses by 8 months of age.

If you have a baby, talk with your baby’s doctor about rotavirus vaccination.

References

[7] Preventing norovirus infection. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. mynewextsetup.us Updated July 15, Accessed August 31,

[8] Rotavirus: vaccination. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. mynewextsetup.us Updated August 12, Accessed August 31,

Last Reviewed May

This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Stomach flu in babies and toddlers

Shows any of signs of mild to moderate dehydration
If your child shows signs of serious dehydration, take her to the emergency room right away. Young children can become dangerously dehydrated very quickly.

Can medication help when my baby or toddler has the stomach flu?

If your child has a bacterial infection, the doctor may prescribe antibiotics. Medication won't be helpful for a case of viral gastroenteritis because, like all viral infections, it just has to run its course.

Don't give your child antidiarrheal medication &#; it could prolong her illness and have potentially serious side effects. If your child's symptoms are severe, her doctor may prescribe an anti-nausea, anti-vomiting medicine.

If your baby is older than 3 months and has a fever and seems uncomfortable, acetaminophen may help. Call the doctor first if your baby is younger than 3 months old.

How should I keep my baby or toddler hydrated?

Dehydration is the main concern whenever a child is losing fluid, whether it's through vomiting, diarrhea, or a fever. Offer your baby frequent breast or bottle feedings, and your toddler or young child plenty of water.

If your child isn't able to keep down formula, breast milk, or water, the doctor may advise you to give small sips of a pediatric electrolyte solution throughout the day to replace lost fluids, minerals, and salts. The solutions also come as ice pops, which your child may tolerate better if he can't keep liquids down. If your baby is eating solids, you can partially melt an ice pop and try spoon-feeding the "slush" to him.

Stay away from sweet beverages, including soda (such as ginger ale) and sports drinks, which have a higher concentration of sugar than pediatric electrolyte solutions.

What should my baby or toddler eat when she has the stomach flu?

If your child is eating solids, resume her normal diet as soon as she can keep liquids down. That includes such staples as whole-grain breads and cereals, lean meats, yogurt, fruits, and vegetables. If your child has a relatively mild case of gastroenteritis &#; say, a little diarrhea but no vomiting &#; and can tolerate eating, she can continue to eat normally throughout the course of her illness.

Stay away from food with a lot of sugar, including flavored gelatin, which can make stomach flu symptoms worse. Gastroenteritis can temporarily damage the lining of the small intestine, making it difficult to digest these sweet foods.

Studies show that reintroducing a standard diet soon after acute symptoms ease can shorten a child's bout of gastroenteritis because it restores nutrients to the system that are necessary to fight infection. On the other hand, if the bug kills your child's appetite and she misses a few days of good nutrition, don't worry. As long as she stays hydrated, she'll be fine.

Note: The BRAT (bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast) diet that doctors used to advise feeding kids with the stomach flu is no longer recommended.

How can I help protect my child against gastroenteritis?

Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water after every diaper change and bathroom visit, and before preparing food. Hand sanitizer won't kill the germs. It's also a good idea to wash your child's hands often throughout the day.

To prevent your baby from getting the stomach flu from the rotavirus: Your baby should receive two or three doses of the rotavirus vaccine, depending on which version of the vaccine your doctor recommends. The doses are given by oral drops usually given between 2 and 6 months of age. The vaccine is not given to children 8 months or older.

How do I keep gastroenteritis from spreading to the rest of my family?

Keep in mind that people with gastroenteritis can spread germs to others for days or even weeks after they feel better, so continue to wash hands with warm, soapy water &#; especially after going to the bathroom.

You may also want to:

  • Make a solution of 5 to 25 tablespoons of bleach per gallon of water to clean vomit and diarrhea off hard surfaces.
  • Wash soiled bed linens and clothing on the hottest, longest cycle available. Dry them on high heat.
  • Be extra diligent following safe food preparation.
  • If you're sick with the stomach flu, let someone else prepare meals.
  • Don't share food or drinks with each other.

The stomach flu is no fun &#; and parents brace themselves when it starts "going around" at daycare or school. Here are some tips on keeping your child healthy when cold and flu season strikes.

Learn more

Diarrhea in babies

Vomiting in babies

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Gastroenteritis in Children

What is gastroenteritis and what causes it?

Gastroenteritis is an infection of the gut (intestines). It is common. Many children have more than one episode in a year. The severity can range from a mild tummy upset for a day or two with some mild diarrhoea, to severe diarrhoea and being sick (vomiting) for several days or longer. Many viruses, bacteria and other microbes (germs) can cause gastroenteritis.

A virus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis. Rotavirus is the most common virus causing gastroenteritis in children in the UK. Almost every child in the UK has a rotavirus infection before they are 5 years old. Once you have had rotavirus, your body usually becomes immune to getting it again. Therefore, it is uncommon for adults to get rotavirus because most will have had it as a child. Adenoviruses are another common group of viruses that cause gastroenteritis in children. Adenovirus and rotavirus infection are more common in infants and younger children than in teenagers.

Viruses are easily spread from an infected person to another by close contact. This is often because of the virus being present on the infected person's hands after they have been to the toilet. Surfaces or objects touched by the infected person can also allow transmission of the virus. The virus can also be passed on if the infected person prepares food. Outbreaks of a virus causing gastroenteritis can often occur - for example, in schools or hospitals.

Food poisoning (from eating food infected with microbes) causes some cases of gastroenteritis. Food poisoning is usually caused by a bacterial infection. Common examples are species of bacteria called Campylobacter, Salmonella and Escherichia coli (usually shortened to E. coli). Poisons (toxins) produced by bacteria can also cause food poisoning. Another group of microbes called parasites can also be a cause of food poisoning. Parasites are living things (organisms) that live within, or on, another organism.

Water contaminated by bacteria or other microbes is another common cause, particularly in countries with poor sanitation.

This is a general leaflet about gastroenteritis. Click the links for other leaflets that give more details about some of the different microbes that cause gastroenteritis.

What are the symptoms of gastroenteritis?

  • The main symptom is diarrhoea, often with being sick (vomiting) as well. Diarrhoea means loose or watery stools (faeces), usually at least three times in 24 hours. Blood or mucus can appear in the stools with some infections. Diarrhoea and vomiting may cause dehydration. See also the separate leaflet called Acute Diarrhoea in Children.
  • Crampy pains in the tummy (abdomen) are common. Pains may ease for a while each time some diarrhoea is passed.
  • A high temperature (fever), headache and aching limbs sometimes occur.

In most children, the symptoms are mild and they tend to get better within a few days. If vomiting occurs, it often lasts only a day or so but sometimes longer. Diarrhoea often continues after the vomiting stops and commonly lasts for between 5 to 7 days. Slightly loose stools may persist for a week or so further before a normal pattern returns. Sometimes the symptoms last longer.

How is gastroenteritis diagnosed and does my child need any tests?

Most parents recognise gastroenteritis in their children because of their typical symptoms. The symptoms will often be quite mild and commonly get better within a few days without any treatment, other than drinking plenty of fluids. You will often not need to take your child to see a doctor or seek medical advice.

However, in some circumstances, you may need to seek medical advice for your child (see below). If this is the case, the doctor may ask you questions about:

  • Recent travel abroad.
  • Whether your child has been in contact with someone with similar symptoms.
  • Whether they have recently taken antibiotics.
  • Whether they have recently been admitted to hospital.

This is to look for a possible cause of their gastroenteritis. They will usually examine your child for signs of lack of fluid in the body (dehydration). They may check their temperature and heart rate. They may also examine your child's tummy (abdomen) to look for any tenderness.

Tests are not usually needed. However, in certain cases, the doctor may ask you to collect a stool (faeces) sample from your child. For example, if your child:

  • Is particularly unwell.
  • Has bloody stools.
  • Is admitted to hospital.
  • Has suspected food poisoning.
  • Has recently travelled abroad.
  • Has symptoms which are not getting better.

The stool sample can then be examined in the laboratory to look for the cause of the infection.

When should I seek medical advice?

Most children who have gastroenteritis have mild symptoms which will get better in a few days. The important thing is to ensure that they have plenty to drink. In many cases, you do not need to seek medical advice. However, you should seek medical advice in the following situations (or if there are any other symptoms that you are concerned about):

  • If your child is under the age of 6 months.
  • If your child has an underlying medical condition (for example, heart or kidney problems, diabetes, history of premature birth).
  • If your child has a high temperature (fever).
  • If you suspect lack of fluid in the body (dehydration) is developing (see earlier).
  • If your child appears drowsy or confused.
  • If your child is being sick (vomiting) and unable to keep fluids down.
  • If there is blood in their diarrhoea or vomit.
  • If your child has severe tummy (abdominal) pain.
  • Infections caught abroad.
  • If your child has severe symptoms, or if you feel that their condition is getting worse.
  • If your child's symptoms are not settling (for example, vomiting for more than days, or diarrhoea that does not start to settle after days).

What is the treatment for gastroenteritis in children?

Symptoms of gastroenteritis often settle within a few days or so as a child's immune system is usually able to clear the infection. Children can usually be treated at home. Occasionally, admission to hospital is needed if symptoms are severe, or if complications develop. For information about treatment, see the separate leaflet called Acute Diarrhoea in Children.

Note: if you suspect that your child is dehydrated, or is becoming dehydrated, you should seek medical advice urgently.

Medication is not usually needed

You should not give medicines to stop diarrhoea to children under 12 years old. They sound attractive remedies but are unsafe to give to children, due to possible serious complications. However, you can give paracetamol or ibuprofen to ease a high temperature or headache.

Racecadotril is a prescription-only medicine that is occasionally prescribed to children over the age of 3 months. It helps to reduce the amount of fluid lost in the poo in children who are still getting diarrhoea with fluid replacement therapy. .

See also the separate leaflet called Diarrhoea Medicine.

Are there any complications that can occur from gastroenteritis?

Complications from gastroenteritis in children are uncommon in the UK. They are more likely in very young children. They are also more likely if your child has an ongoing (chronic) illness such as diabetes, or if their immune system is not working fully. For example, if they are taking long-term steroid medication or they are having chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Possible complications include the following:

  • Lack of fluid and salt (electrolyte) imbalance in the body. This is the most common complication. It occurs if the water and salts that are lost in your child's stools (faeces), or when they have been sick (vomited), are not replaced by them drinking enough fluids. If your child drinks well, then it is unlikely to occur, or is only likely to be mild and will soon recover as your child drinks.
  • Reactive complications. Rarely, other parts of the body can react to an infection that occurs in the gut (intestines). This can cause symptoms such as joint inflammation (arthritis), skin inflammation and eye inflammation (either conjunctivitis or uveitis). Reactive complications are uncommon if it is a virus causing gastroenteritis.
  • Spread of infection to other parts of your child's body such as their bones, joints, or the meninges that surround their brain and spinal cord. This is rare. If it does occur, it is more likely if gastroenteritis is caused by Salmonella spp. infection.
  • Persistent diarrhoea syndromes may rarely develop.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome is sometimes triggered by a bout of gastroenteritis.
  • Lactose intolerance can sometimes occur for a while after gastroenteritis. It is known as secondary or acquired lactose intolerance. Your child's gut lining can be damaged by the episode of gastroenteritis. This leads to lack of a chemical (enzyme) called lactase that is needed to help the body digest a sugar called lactose that is in milk. Lactose intolerance leads to bloating, tummy (abdominal) pain, wind and watery stools after drinking milk. The condition gets better when the infection is over and the gut lining heals.
  • Haemolytic uraemic syndrome is a rare complication. It is usually associated with gastroenteritis caused by a certain type of E. coli infection - E. coli O It is a serious condition where there is anaemia, a low platelet count in the blood and kidney failure. If recognised and treated, most children recover well.
  • Malnutrition may follow some gut infections. This is mainly a risk for children in developing countries.

Preventing spread of infection to others

Gastroenteritis can very easily be passed on from person to person. Therefore, you and your child need to take measures to try to reduce this chance.

If your baby has gastroenteritis, be especially careful to wash your hands after changing nappies and before preparing, serving, or eating food. Ideally, use liquid soap in warm running water but any soap is better than none. Dry your hands properly after washing. For older children, whilst they have gastroenteritis, the following are recommended:

  • Regularly clean the toilets used, with disinfectant. Also, clean the flush handle, toilet seat, sink taps, bathroom surfaces and door handles at least daily with hot water and detergent. Disposable cleaning cloths should be used (or a cloth just for toilet use).
  • If a potty has to be used, wear gloves when you handle it, dispose of the contents into a toilet, then wash the potty with hot water and detergent and leave it to dry.
  • Make sure your child washes their hands after going to the toilet. Ideally, they should use liquid soap in warm running water but any soap is better than none. Dry properly after washing.
  • If clothing or bedding is soiled, first remove any stools (faeces) into the toilet. Then wash in a separate wash at as high a temperature as possible.
  • Don't let your child share towels and flannels.
  • Don't let them help to prepare food for others.
  • They should stay off school, nursery, etc, until at least 48 hours after the last episode of diarrhoea or being sick (vomiting). They should also avoid contact with other children, where possible, during this time. (Sometimes this time may be longer with certain infections. Check with your doctor if you are not sure.)
  • If the cause of gastroenteritis is known to be (or suspected to be) a germ called Cryptosporidium spp., your child should not swim in swimming pools for two weeks after the last episode of diarrhoea.

Can gastroenteritis be prevented?

The advice given in the previous section is aimed at preventing the spread of infection to other people. But, even when we are not in contact with someone with gastroenteritis, proper storage, preparation and cooking of food and maintaining good hygiene help to prevent gastroenteritis. In particular, always wash your hands, and teach children to wash theirs:

  • After going to the toilet (and after changing nappies).
  • Before touching food. And also, between handling raw meat and food ready to be eaten. (There may be some germs (bacteria) on raw meat.)
  • After gardening.
  • After playing with pets (healthy animals can carry certain harmful bacteria).

The simple measure of washing hands regularly and properly is known to make a big difference to the chance of developing gastroenteritis.

You should also take extra measures when in countries of poor sanitation. For example, avoid water and other drinks that may not be safe and avoid food washed in unsafe water.

Breastfeeding is also protective. Breast-fed babies are much less likely to develop gastroenteritis compared to bottle-fed babies.

Immunisation

As mentioned earlier, rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children. There is an effective vaccine against rotavirus. In the UK it was decided to routinely vaccinate babies against rotavirus. From September babies were offered drops (by mouth) to prevent rotavirus, along with their other routine vaccinations. These drops are given at 2 and 3 months of age. 

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Stomach flu in babies and toddlers

Shows any of signs of mild to moderate dehydration
If your child shows signs of serious dehydration, take her to the emergency room right away. Young children can become dangerously dehydrated very quickly.

Can medication help when my baby or toddler has the stomach flu?

If your child has a bacterial infection, the doctor may prescribe antibiotics. Medication won't be helpful for a case of viral gastroenteritis because, like all viral infections, it just has to run its course.

Don't give your child antidiarrheal medication &#; it could prolong her illness and have potentially serious side effects. If your child's symptoms are severe, her doctor may prescribe an anti-nausea, anti-vomiting medicine.

If your baby is older than 3 months and has a fever and seems uncomfortable, acetaminophen may help. Call the doctor first if your baby is younger than 3 months old.

How home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies I keep my baby or toddler hydrated?

Dehydration is the main concern whenever a child is losing fluid, whether it's through vomiting, diarrhea, or a fever. Offer your baby frequent breast or bottle feedings, and your toddler or young child plenty of water.

If your child isn't able to keep down formula, breast milk, or water, the doctor may advise you to give small sips of a pediatric electrolyte solution throughout the day to replace lost fluids, minerals, and salts. The solutions also come as ice pops, which your child may tolerate better if he can't keep liquids down. If your baby is eating solids, you can partially melt an ice pop and try spoon-feeding the "slush" to him.

Stay away from sweet beverages, including soda (such as ginger ale) and sports drinks, which have a higher concentration of sugar than pediatric electrolyte solutions.

What should my baby or toddler eat when she has the stomach flu?

If your child is eating solids, resume her normal diet as soon as she can keep liquids down. That includes such staples as whole-grain breads and cereals, lean meats, yogurt, fruits, and vegetables. If your child has a relatively mild case of gastroenteritis &#; say, a little diarrhea but no vomiting &#; and can tolerate eating, she can continue to eat normally throughout the course of her illness.

Stay away from food with a lot of sugar, including flavored gelatin, which can make stomach flu symptoms worse. Capital one teamsters credit card review can temporarily damage the lining of the small intestine, making it difficult to digest these sweet foods.

Studies show that reintroducing a standard diet soon after acute symptoms ease can shorten a child's bout of gastroenteritis because it restores nutrients to the system that are necessary to fight infection. On the other hand, if the bug kills your child's appetite and she misses a few days of good nutrition, don't worry. As long as she stays hydrated, she'll be fine.

Note: The BRAT (bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast) diet that doctors used to advise feeding kids with the stomach flu is no longer recommended.

How can I help protect my child against gastroenteritis?

Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water after every diaper change and bathroom visit, and before preparing food. Hand sanitizer won't kill the germs. It's also a good idea to wash your child's hands often throughout the day.

To prevent your baby from getting the stomach flu from the rotavirus: Your baby should receive two or three doses of the rotavirus vaccine, depending on which version of the vaccine your doctor recommends. The doses are given by oral drops usually given between 2 and 6 months of age. The vaccine is not given to children 8 months or older.

How do I keep gastroenteritis from spreading to the rest of my family?

Keep in mind that people with gastroenteritis can spread germs to others for days or even weeks after they feel better, so continue to wash hands with warm, soapy water &#; especially after going to the bathroom.

You may also want to:

  • Make a solution of 5 to 25 tablespoons of bleach per gallon of water to clean vomit and diarrhea off hard surfaces.
  • Wash soiled bed linens and clothing on the hottest, longest cycle available. Dry them on high heat.
  • Be extra diligent following safe food preparation.
  • If you're sick with the stomach flu, let someone else prepare meals.
  • Don't share food or drinks with each other.

The stomach flu is no fun &#; and parents brace themselves when it starts "going around" at daycare or school. Here are some tips on keeping your child healthy when cold and flu season strikes.

Learn more

Diarrhea in babies

Vomiting in babies

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Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis is a very common condition that causes diarrhoea and vomiting. It's usually caused by a bacterial or viral tummy bug.

It affects people of all ages, but is particularly common in young children.

Most cases in children are caused by a virus called rotavirus. Cases in home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies are usually caused by norovirus (the "winter vomiting bug") or bacterial food poisoning.

Gastroenteritis can be very unpleasant, but it usually clears up by itself within a week. You can normally look after yourself or your child at home until you're feeling better.

Try to avoid going to your GP, as gastroenteritis can spread to others very easily. Phone the service or your GP if you're concerned or need any advice.

This page covers:

Symptoms of gastroenteritis

What to do if you have gastroenteritis

When to get medical advice

Looking after a child with gastroenteritis

Getting medical advice for your child

How gastroenteritis is spread

Preventing gastroenteritis

Symptoms of gastroenteritis

The main symptoms of gastroenteritis are:

  • sudden, watery diarrhoea
  • feeling sick
  • vomiting, which can be projectile
  • a mild fever

Some people also have other symptoms, such as a loss of appetite, an upset stomach, aching limbs and headaches.

The symptoms usually appear up to a day after becoming infected. They typically last less than a week, but can sometimes last longer.

What to do if you have gastroenteritis

If you experience sudden diarrhoea and vomiting, the best thing to do is stay at home until you're feeling better. There's not always a specific treatment, so you have to let the illness run its course.

You don't usually need to get medical advice, unless your symptoms don't improve or there's a risk of a more serious problem.

To help ease your symptoms:

  • Drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration – You need to drink more than usual to replace the fluids lost from vomiting and diarrhoea. Water is best, but you could also try fruit juice and soup.
  • Take paracetamol for any fever or aches and pains.
  • Get plenty of rest.
  • If you feel like eating, try small amounts of plain foods, such as soup, rice, pasta and bread.
  • Use special rehydration drinks made from sachets bought from pharmacies if you have signs of dehydration, such as a dry mouth or dark urine – read about treating dehydration.
  • Take anti-vomiting medication (such as metoclopramide) and/or antidiarrhoeal medication (such as loperamide) if you need to – some types are available from pharmacies, but check the leaflet that comes with the medicine. You can also ask your pharmacist or GP for advice about whether they're suitable. 

Gastroenteritis can spread very easily, so you should wash your hands regularly while you're ill and stay off work or school until at least 48 hours after your symptoms have cleared, to reduce the risk of passing it on (see Preventing gastroenteritis).

When to get medical advice

You don't normally need to see your GP if you think you have gastroenteritis, as it should get better on its own.

Visiting your GP surgery can put others at risk, so it's best to phone or your GP if you're concerned or feel you need advice.

Get medical advice if:

  • you have symptoms of severe dehydration, such as persistent dizziness, only passing small amounts of urine or no urine at all, or if you're losing consciousness
  • you have bloody diarrhoea
  • you're vomiting constantly and are unable to keep down any fluids
  • you have a fever over 38C (F)
  • your symptoms haven't started to improve after a few days
  • in the home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies few weeks you've returned from a part of the world with poor sanitation
  • you have a serious underlying condition, such as kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease or a weak immune system, and have diarrhoea and vomiting

Your GP may suggest sending off a sample of your poo to a laboratory to check what's causing your symptoms. Antibiotics may be prescribed if this shows you have a bacterial infection.

Looking after a child with gastroenteritis

You can look after your child at home if they have diarrhoea and vomiting. There's not usually any specific treatment and your child should start feeling better in a few days.

You don't normally need to get medical advice unless their symptoms don't improve or there's a risk of a more serious problem.

To help ease your child's symptoms:

  • Encourage them to drink plenty of fluids. They need to replace the fluids lost from vomiting and diarrhoea. Water is generally best. Avoid giving them fizzy drinks or fruit juice, as they can make their diarrhoea worse. Babies should continue to feed as usual, either with breast milk or other milk feeds.
  • Make sure they get plenty of rest.
  • Let your child eat if they're eating solids and feel hungry. Try small amounts of plain foods, such as soup, rice, pasta and bread.
  • Give them paracetamol if they have an uncomfortable fever or aches and pains. Young children may find liquid paracetamol easier to swallow than tablets.
  • Use special rehydration drinks made from sachets bought from pharmacies if they're dehydrated. Your GP or pharmacist can advise on how much to give your child. Don't give them antidiarrhoeal and anti-vomiting medication, unless advised to by your GP or pharmacist.

Make sure you and your child wash your hands regularly while your child is ill and keep them away from school or nursery until at least 48 hours after their symptoms have cleared (see Preventing gastroenteritis).

Getting medical advice for your child

You don't usually need to see your GP if you think your child has gastroenteritis, as it should get better on its own, and taking them to a GP surgery can put others at risk.

Phone the service or your GP if you're concerned about your child, or they:

  • have symptoms of dehydration, such as passing less urine than normal, being unusually irritable or unresponsive, pale or mottled skin, or cold hands and feet
  • have blood in their poo or green vomit
  • are vomiting constantly and are unable to keep down any fluids or feeds
  • have had diarrhoea for more than a week
  • have been vomiting for three days or more
  • have signs of a more serious illness, such as a high fever (over 38C or F), shortness of breath, rapid breathing, a stiff neck, a rash that doesn't fade when you roll a glass over it or a bulging fontanelle (the soft spot on a baby's head)
  • have a serious underlying condition, such as inflammatory bowel disease or a weak immune system, and have diarrhoea and vomiting

Your GP may suggest sending off a sample of your child's poo to a laboratory to confirm what's causing their symptoms. Antibiotics may be prescribed if this shows they have a bacterial infection.

How gastroenteritis is spread

The bugs that cause gastroenteritis can spread very easily from person to person.

You can catch the infection if small particles of vomit or poo from an infected person get into your mouth, such as through:

  • close contact with someone with gastroenteritis – they may breathe out small particles of vomit
  • touching contaminated surfaces or objects
  • eating contaminated food – this can happen if an infected person doesn't wash their hands before handling food, or you eat food that has been in contact with contaminated surfaces or objects, or hasn't been stored and cooked at the correct temperatures (read more about the causes of food poisoning)

A person with gastroenteritis is most infectious from when their symptoms start until 48 hours after all their symptoms have passed, although they may also be infectious for a short time before and after this.

Preventing gastroenteritis

It's not always possible to avoid getting gastroenteritis, but following the advice below can help stop it spreading:

  • Stay off work, school or nursery until at least 48 hours after the symptoms have passed. You or your child should also avoid visiting anyone in hospital during this time.
  • Ensure you and your child wash your hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and water, particularly after using the toilet and before preparing food. Don't rely on alcohol hand gels, as they're not always effective.
  • Disinfect any surfaces or objects that could be contaminated. It's best to use a bleach-based household cleaner.
  • Wash contaminated items of clothing or bedding separately on a hot wash.
  • Don't share towels, flannels, cutlery or utensils while you or your child is ill.
  • Flush away any poo or vomit in the toilet or potty and clean the surrounding area.
  • Practice good food hygiene. Make sure food is properly refrigerated, always cook your food thoroughly, and never eat food that is past its use-by date – read more about preventing food poisoning. 

Take extra care when travelling to parts of the world with poor sanitation, as you could pick up a stomach bug. For example, you may need to boil tap water before drinking it.

Young children can have the rotavirus vaccination when they’re 2 to 3 months old, which can reduce their risk of developing gastroenteritis.

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3 Effective Home Remedies for Diarrhea

You can get diarrhea from a virus or bacteria and it usually goes away on its own in two to three days.

Some people reach for Imodium (loperamide) the moment they have loose stool. But the drugs are meant for frequent or severe diarrhea rather than an occasional episode.

This article goes over ways that you can get rid of diarrhea without turning to medicine.

Treating Mild Diarrhea Without Medicine

In some cases, taking an antidiarrheal drug will replace watery stools with constipation. Both are unpleasant. Try these helpful home remedies to treat a mild episode of diarrhea without using pills.

Drink Plenty of Fluids

One of the biggest problems with diarrhea is dehydration. This is what leads many people to the emergency room.

Diarrhea causes the body to lose a lot of water and electrolytes it needs to function normally. Electrolytes are minerals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium that are needed for various bodily processes

It's important to treat dehydration properly. Otherwise, it can become dangerous, especially in young children.

To manage a mild bout of diarrhea, you need to replace the fluids and electrolytes you lost. Drink plenty of water, clear juices, clear broths, or an electrolyte-rich sports drink.

There are also things you should avoid when you have home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies episode of diarrhea. Avoid coffee, caffeinated drinks, prune juice, sugary drinks, sodas, and alcohol. These all have a laxative effect. It's also a good idea to avoid dairy products if you're lactose intolerant, home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies means you can't digest the main sugar in milk well.

Young children and babies with diarrhea need pediatric rehydration drinks. These are marketed under certain brand names, like:

  • Pedialyte
  • Enfalyte
  • Gastrolyte

Breastfed babies should continue to breastfeed. Children should continue eating their regular diet. Also, they should drink rehydrating fluids. This is better than putting them on a restrictive diet.

Some people want to avoid the artificial colorings or flavorings in some rehydration drinks. You can make a homemade rehydration drink with only salt, sugar, and water.

You can also buy oral rehydration salts over the counter at most drugstores. Follow the preparation instructions and don't use too much salt. That can be harmful, especially to children.

Eat a Bland Diet 

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases doesn't recommend following a restrictive diet to treat diarrhea. But that doesn't mean all foods are the same. There are some foods you should avoid, as well as foods you might tolerate better.

The BRAT diet was a commonly-recommended food plan for easing digestive distress.

The diet is made up of four bland, low-fiber foods:

  • Bananas
  • Rice
  • Applesauce
  • Toast

Bananas are especially useful. They help restore any potassium your body lost through diarrhea.

You can add other bland, easy-to-digest foods as your diarrhea symptoms start to get better. This includes:

  • Baked, skinless chicken breasts
  • Oatmeal
  • Baked potatoes
  • Chicken soup with saltines

Don't eat or drink foods or beverages that cause gas, such as:

  • Carbonated drinks, like sodas or seltzer
  • Beans
  • Legumes
  • Cruciferous vegetables, like cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower

If diarrhea lasts more than a couple of days, check the foods that you're eating. Diarrhea can get worse if you eat foods high in fiber (such as bran, whole grains, and brown rice) as well as greasy foods or those sweetened with sorbitol.

Use Probiotics

Taking probiotics in food or or as supplements might help shorten a mild bout of diarrhea. Probiotics are live bacteria and yeast that are beneficial to your digestive system.

Diarrhea can cause you to lose a lot of the healthy bacteria in your stomach and intestines.

Probiotics can quickly replace these protective microorganisms and help restore normal bowel function. Some helpful probiotics include:

  • Lactobacillus bacteria
  • Bifidobacterium bacteria
  • Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) yeast

In particular, S. boulardii has powerful antidiarrheal effects.

It may be best to avoid some dairy products during diarrhea, but not all. Certain dairy foods, like yogurt or kefir with live probiotic bacteria, are extremely beneficial.

Other natural probiotic sources are fermented foods like:

  • Miso
  • Kombucha
  • Sauerkraut
  • Aged soft cheeses
  • Cottage cheese
  • Green olives
  • Sourdough bread
  • Tempeh

Kimchi is another popular fermented food. Some people even call it a "super-probiotic." But kimchi has hot spices that might make your diarrhea worse.

Side effects of probiotics, whether in food or supplement form, tend to be mild and may include an upset stomach, bloating, and gas.

When to Seek Medical Help

You should never ignore diarrhea. If you have tried the above-listed home remedies and still have loose stools, call your doctor or your pharmacist. They might recommend over-the-counter medicine that can help.

On the other hand, you should see a doctor right away if you or your child have persistent or severe diarrhea or show signs of dehydration, such as:

Adults
  • Diarrhea for three days or more

  • Severe stomach pain

  • Bloody or black stools

  • Fever over F (39 C)

  • Little or no urination

  • Extreme weakness

  • Dry skin and mouth

  • Excessive thirst

  • Dark urine

Children
  • Diarrhea for more than 24 hours

  • No wet diapers in three hours

  • Fever over F (39 C)

  • Dry mouth or tongue

  • Crying without tears

  • Unusual sleepiness

  • Black or bloody stools

  • Sunken cheeks or eyes

  • Skin that doesn't retract when pinched

Babies under 3 months old with diarrhea should be taken to a doctor or emergency room right away. Don't wait or try to treat the condition at home.

Summary

You might be able to treat diarrhea without taking medication. Try changing your diet temporarily, taking probiotics, and drinking lots of liquids. Talk to your healthcare provider if the diarrhea doesn't go away.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Bland, low-fiber foods are the best choice. Some low-fiber foods include potatoes, white rice, bananas, apples, fish, and chicken or turkey without the skin. Changing your diet and drinking plenty of water to avoid dehydration can help treat diarrhea symptoms faster.

  • Certain drinks including alcohol, coffee, prune juice, or soda have a laxative effect that can cause diarrhea.

  • It may not be possible to fully prevent diarrhea, but these steps can reduce the chances of it:

    • Practice proper hygiene. Washing your hands regularly throughout the day can reduce the spread of viruses that cause diarrhea.
    • Get a vaccination for rotavirus, a gastrointestinal infection that can cause diarrhea and dehydration.
    • Avoid eating spoiled food, keep food at recommended temperatures, and cook food to recommended temperatures.
    • If you travel to other countries, avoid drinking tap water unless you know the water is safe.

10 Causes of Sudden or Chronic Diarrhea

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Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Cleveland Clinic. Diarrhea.

  2. Munos MK, Walker CL, Black RE. The effect of oral rehydration solution and recommended home fluids on diarrhoea mortality. Int J Epidemiol. ;39 Suppl 1:i doi/ije/dyq

  3. Nemeth V, Zulfiqar H, Pfleghaar N. Diarrhea. In: StatPearls. Updated June 22,

  4. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Eating, diet & nutrition for diarrhea. Updated November

  5. Churgay CA, Zafra A. Gastroenteritis in children: Part II. Prevention and management. Am Fam Physician. Jun 1;85(11)

  6. Verna EC, Lucak S. Use of probiotics in gastrointestinal disorders: what to recommend?Therap Adv Gastroenterol. ;3(5) doi/X

  7. Guandalini S. Probiotics for prevention and treatment of diarrhea. J Clin Gastroenterol. ;45 Suppl:S doi/MCG.0bee98

  8. Shaheen NA, Alqahtani AA, Assiri H, Alkhodair R, Hussein MA. Public knowledge of dehydration and fluid intake practices: variation by participants' characteristics.BMC Public Health. ;18(1) doi/s

  9. Cleveland Clinic. Rotavirus.

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Rotavirus and Stomach Flu in Babies and Toddlers

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by Maria Masters

Medically Reviewedby Lauren Crosby, M.D., F.A.A.P.

Medical Review Policy

All What to Expect content that addresses health or safety is medically reviewed by a team of vetted health professionals. Our Medical Review Board includes OB/GYNs, pediatricians, infectious disease specialists, doulas, lactation counselors, endocrinologists, fertility specialists and more. 

We believe you should always know the source of the information you're reading. Learn more about our editorial and medical review policies.

 on January 22,

Does your baby or toddler seem to have a stomach bug? Here are the symptoms to look out for and simple ways to prevent and treat your little one's stomach flu, which may be caused by rotavirus disease.

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It can be stressful when your baby or toddler comes down with a stomach bug and may leave you feeling pretty helpless.

Stomach viruses can be caused by a number of gastrointestinal illnesses, and sometimes they're not viruses at all but food poisoning from a bacterial infection. One of the most common causes of a stomach bug in babies and toddlers is rotavirus disease. 

This guide to symptoms, causes, treatments and prevention of rotavirus has the info you need to get your little one (and the rest of the family) through it.

What is rotavirus?

Rotavirus is a contagious viral infection, a leading cause of stomach flu (which isn't actually related to the flu) in infants and toddlers, and the most common cause of severe diarrhea in little green dot customer service live person phone number disease — which tends to rear its infectious head during the winter and spring months, though you can get it at any time of the year — can infect adults, but its symptoms in babies and toddlers tend to be more serious because of their developing immune systems.

The good news is that the rotavirus vaccine, added in to the recommended schedule of vaccines for babies, protects kids against the virus.

What causes rotavirus in children?

Rotavirus spreads through the stool of infected people, which is why changing tables and bathrooms are prime areas where the virus can lurk.

When people don’t wash their hands well after changing an infected baby’s diaper or infected toddlers don’t wash their hands well after using the potty, they can easily spread rotavirus to others.

Babies and toddlers most often come down with the virus, typically after touching something that’s been contaminated and then putting their hands in their mouths or putting unwashed hands with traces of feces in their mouths.

Continue Reading Below

But it can also spread through contaminated water, food or sometimes even through droplets in the air from coughs and sneezes.

Though a child’s first case of rotavirus disease may be pretty severe, if she gets infected again, the symptoms are usually much milder.

Stomach flu and rotavirus symptoms in babies and toddlers 

Here are the most common symptoms of rotavirus and stomach flu in little ones:

  • Vomiting and watery diarrhea, usually lasting three to eight days
  • Fever
  • Abdominal pain
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dehydration (symptoms of dehydration include decreased urination, dry mouth and throat, feeling dizzy when standing up, crying with few or no tears, a sunken soft spot and unusual sleepiness or fussiness)

What home remedies and treatments can help children with rotavirus and stomach flu?

Usually you can treat rotavirus and other stomach viruses in babies and toddlers at home (antibiotics won’t work to kill a virus), and symptoms will usually fade within a few days.

Your doctor will probably recommend these strategies to ease your little one’s symptoms:

  • Offer your child plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration, but home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies careful how much and when. For babies who haven’t yet started solids, nurse or give formula but not when they're still in the throes of vomiting. Wait at least an hour or two after the last bout of throwing up before offering either tiny sips of breast milk, formula or rehydrating fluids  like Pedialyte every 10 minutes. If they can keep it down for at least an hour of just small sips, then you can very gradually increase the amounts offered per minute intervals. For older babies and toddlers, offer water and rehydrating liquids, but again not when your little one is actively vomiting or it can lead to more vomiting. Pediatricians typically recommend waiting an hour or two after the last bout of vomiting and then offering about a teaspoon (or less) of breast milk, formula, water or Pedialyte every 10 minutes for the next hour to see if your child can keep it down. If that works, gradually give slightly more over the course of the next few hours. Overdoing it can lead to more vomiting, which is why you have to tread cautiously. Rehydration fluids are often better than water or milk, at least in the beginning.
  • Use fever-reducing meds if recommended. Give acetaminophen (to babies 2 months and older) or ibuprofen (to those 6 months or older) to reduce fever.
  • Serve bland foods (bananas, plain pasta, crackers or plain toast) that won’t irritate your child’s digestive system any more than it already is — and avoid giving apple juice, dairy products and home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies foods, which can make your little one’s diarrhea worse.
  • Rest and more rest. Do your best to help your baby or toddler get a lot of sleep and rest.

When should I call the doctor about stomach flu in children?

It's a good idea to call your pediatrician at the first onset of stomach flu symptoms. It's especially important to call right away if your child has bloody diarrhea, excessive vomiting or a fever ( degrees Fahrenheit or higher).

Also, contact your pediatrician right away or go to the emergency room if you notice any of these signs of severe dehydration — which may need to be treated with intravenous (IV) fluids in the hospital:

  • Your child is very lethargic or difficult to wake up
  • Unusual fussiness
  • Crying with few or no tears
  • Infrequent urination or a dry diaper
  • Dizziness
  • Dry mouth and throat
  • Sunken fontanelle

How can I prevent the stomach flu and rotavirus in children?

Rotavirus disease and other stomach illnesses are extremely contagious, so while there's nothing foolproof you can do to stop your little one from coming down with a general stomach virus, you can help prevent rotavirus specifically by taking the following steps to keep your child from getting sick:

  • Ask your pediatrician about the rotavirus vaccine, which is given as drops at either 2, 4 and 6 months or at 2 and 4 months, depending on the brand. Your child must get the first dose of rotavirus vaccine before 15 weeks of age, and the last by 8 months. Even though your baby is young and already getting a lot of shots, don’t put off getting it or skip it altogether. The vaccine doesn’t guarantee your child won’t get the illness, but it reduces the chances and it will make any rotavirus he does get less severe. Most children (about 9 out of 10) who get the vaccine will be protected from severe rotavirus disease. About 7 out of 10 children will be protected from rotavirus disease of any severity.
  • Practice good hygiene — wash your child’s hands and your own regularly, especially after diaper changes and bathroom visits and before eating — and teach your child hand-washing basics.
  • Be extra careful about disinfecting your child’s changing table area and toys, particularly if you know there has been an outbreak of stomach bug symptoms in your community or day care.
Following these tips and making sure to stay in close touch with your pediatrician will have your baby or toddler feeling better and back to normal before you know it.

From the What to Expect editorial team and Heidi Murkoff, author of What to Expect When You're Expecting. What to Expect follows strict reporting guidelines and uses only credible sources, such as peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions and highly respected health organizations. Learn how we keep our content accurate and up-to-date by reading our medical review and editorial policy.

  • What to Expect the First Year, 3rd edition, Heidi Murkoff.
  • mynewextsetup.us, Rotavirus Vaccine, February
  • mynewextsetup.us, Types of Vomiting in Babies and Toddlers, July
  • mynewextsetup.us, Hand Washing: Teaching Kids the Basics, March
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Rotavirus, November
  • American Academy of Pediatrics, Rotavirus, February
  • American Academy of Pediatrics, Rotavirus Vaccine: What Your Need to Know (VIS), October
  • The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Rotavirus, January
  • KidsHealth From Nemours, Vomiting, May

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What is the flu?

Influenza (also called flu) is a virus that can cause serious illness. It’s more than just a runny nose and sore throat. It’s really important to protect babies and young children from the flu because it can make them very sick. In rare cases, flu can cause death. Inthe flu caused a record number of deaths in children. Most of the children who died didn’t get a flu vaccine.

How does the flu spread?

The flu spreads easily from person to person. When someone with the flu coughs, sneezes or speaks, the virus spreads through the air. Your baby can get infected with the flu if she breathes the virus in or if she touches something (like a toy) that has the flu virus on it and then touches her nose, eyes or mouth.

People with the flu may be able to infect others from 1 day before they get sick up to 5 to 7 days after. People who are very sick with the flu or young children may be able to spread the flu longer, especially if they still have symptoms.

Does your child need a flu vaccine every year?

Yes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (also called CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (also called AAP) recommend that everyone 6 months and older get the flu vaccine each year. It’s especially important for children younger than 5 to get it because they’re more likely than older kids to have serious home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies problems caused by the flu. The flu can be dangerous for all children, even healthy children. 

The best way to protect your child from the flu is to make sure he gets a flu vaccine each year before flu season (October through May). Even though your child’s more likely to get the flu during flu season, he can get it any time of year. 

There are two ways for your child to get the flu vaccine:  

  1. Flu shot. Children 6 months and older can get the flu shot.
  2. Flu nasal spray. This is a spray your child’s provider puts in your child’s nose. Most children 2 years or older can get the flu nasal spray. But it’s not recommended for children who have certain health conditions, like asthma, heart and lung problems, or a weak immune system that doesn’t protect him well from infection. The flu nasal spray also isn’t recommended for children who take certain medicines for a long time, like aspirin (called long-term aspirin therapy).

The first time your baby gets the flu vaccine, he gets two doses to give him the best protection from the flu. Your child gets one dose of the vaccine every year after.

If you’re not sure which vaccine is best home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies your child, ask his health care provider. Visit mynewextsetup.us to learn more about flu vaccines. 

The flu vaccine is safe for most children, even babies born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy). But if your child had a bad reaction to the flu vaccine in the past, tell his provider. The provider may want to watch your child closely after getting the vaccine to check for a reaction. If your child is allergic to eggs, talk to his provider to decide if it’s OK to get the flu vaccine. Some flu vaccines are made from eggs.

There are many different flu viruses, and they’re always changing. Each year a new flu vaccine is made to protect against three or four flu viruses that are likely to make people sick during the upcoming flu season. With the vaccine, protection from the flu lasts about a year, so it’s important to get your child vaccinated each year. You get the vaccine from his provider or from other places, like pharmacies, that offer it. Use the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to find out where you can get a flu vaccine for your child.

Are some children more likely to have serious health problems caused by flu than others?

Yes. Babies and children younger than 5 years old—and especially those younger than 2 years old-- are more likely than older children to have complications from the flu. Premature babies also are at increased risk of serious complications from flu. The CDC recommends that premature babies get most vaccines, including the flu vaccine, according to their chronological age (the time since birth). Even if a baby is born small or with a low birthweight, she can get her vaccine at the same time as other babies who are the same age. If you have a premature baby, talk your baby’s provider to make sure your baby gets the flu vaccine on time. Children with chronic health conditions, like asthma, heart disease or blood disorders, also are at high risk of flu complications. 

What health problems can flu cause in children?

Complications from flu in children younger than 5 years old include:

  • Making chronic health conditions, like heart disease or asthma, worse
  • Brain problems, like encephalopathy. Encephalopathy is any brain disease that affects the brain’s structure or how the brain works.
  • Dehydration. This means not having enough water in your body.
  • Pneumonia. This is an infection in one or both lungs.
  • Sinus problems and ear infections. Sinuses are hollow air spaces within the bones around the nose. Sinus infections can happen when fluid builds up in the sinuses.
  • Death. Flu complications can sometimes lead to death, but this is rare. 

What are signs and symptoms that your baby has the flu?

Signs of a condition are things someone else can see or know about you, like you have a rash or you’re coughing. Symptoms are things you feel yourself that others can’t see, like having a sore throat or feeling dizzy. If your baby has any of these signs and symptoms of the flu, call his health care provider right away or take him to see his provider:

  • Being very tired or sleepy (also called fatigue)
  • Cough  
  • Fever ( F or above), chills or body shakes. Not everyone who has the flu has a fever.
  • Headache, or muscle or body aches
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Sore throat
  • Vomiting (throwing up) or diarrhea

The flu often comes on quickly.  Fever and most other signs and symptoms can last a week or longer. While your baby can’t tell you how she’s feeling, babies who have the flu often are sicker, fussier and seem more uncomfortable and unhappy than babies with a common cold. If you think your baby has the flu even if she got a flu vaccine, call her health care provider.

If your baby has any of these signs or symptoms, take her to a hospital emergency room: 

  • Being so fussy that she doesn’t want to be held
  • Bluish color of lips or face
  • Chronic health conditions, like asthma, get worse
  • Fast breathing, trouble breathing, chest pain or ribs pulling in with each breath
  • Fever in a baby younger than 12 weeks old, fever above F in older babies or children, or fever with a rash
  • Fever or cough that gets better but then returns and gets worse
  • Having seizures. A seizure is when the whole body or parts of the body move without control.
  • Not drinking enough fluids or not making as much urine as she normally does. If your baby doesn’t make urine for 8 hours, has a dry mouth or doesn’t make tears when crying, she may be dehydrated.  
  • Not waking up, or not being alert or interacting with you when she is awake
  • Severe muscle pain. It may be so severe your child can’t walk.
  • Vomiting (throwing up) that’s severe or doesn’t stop

How is flu treated in babies and children?

Your baby’s provider may prescribe an antiviral medicine to prevent or treat the flu. An antiviral is a medicine that kills infections caused by viruses. Antivirals can make your baby’s flu milder and help your baby feel better faster. Antivirals also can help prevent serious flu complications, like a lung infection called pneumonia. For flu, antivirals work best if used within 2 days of having signs or symptoms. 

If your baby is at high risk for flu, his provider may prescribe an antiviral as soon as he begins to have flu symptoms. All children younger than 5 are at high risk for flu, especially children younger than 2. Children who were born prematurely  or who have chronic health conditions, like asthma or sickle cell disease, also are at high risk.

Three medicines are approved in the United States for preventing or treating the flu in children:

  1. Oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) for children as young as 2 weeks.  This medicine comes as a capsule or liquid.
  2. Zanamivir (Relenza®) for children at least 5 years old.  This medicine is a powder that your child breathes in by mouth. It isn’t recommended for people with breathing problems, like asthma.
  3. Peramivir (Rapivab®) for children at least 2 years old. This medicine is given through a needle into a vein (also called IV) by a health care provider.

If your child has the flu, help him get lots of rest and drink plenty of fluids. He may not want to eat much. Try giving him small meals to help his body get better.

If your baby seems uncomfortable from a fever, home remedies for viral diarrhea in babies her provider if you can give her infant’s or children’s acetaminophen (Tylenol®) or ibuprofen (Motrin® or Advil®). Don’t give her aspirin without checking with her health care provider. Aspirin can cause a rare but life-threatening liver disorder called Reye syndrome in children with certain illnesses, such as colds, the flu and chickenpox.

If your baby has a cough or a cold, don’t give her over-the-counter cough and cold medicine. These are medicines you can buy without a prescription from a health care provider. AAP says these medicines can cause serious health problems for children. Talk to your baby’s provider before you give your baby any kind of medicine.

How can you stop the flu from spreading? 

Everyone 6 months and older needs to get a flu vaccine. This means you, especially if you have or take care of a baby younger than 6 months. Getting a flu vaccine can help keep you from spreading the flu.

If you or your child has the flu, you can spread it to others. Here’s how to help prevent the flu from spreading:

  • Keep your child home from day care, school or camp for at least 24 hours after her fever ( F or higher) is gone. The fever should be gone without using a medicine that lowers fever.
  • Avoid contact with other people.
  • Don’t kiss your baby and avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Teach your child to cough or sneeze into a tissue or his arm. Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water before and after caring for your baby. You also can use alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Use enough hand sanitizer so that it takes at least 15 seconds for your hands to dry.
  • Clean surfaces and toys that may have the flu virus on them.
  • Use hot, soapy water or a dishwasher to clean your baby’s dishes and utensils.
  • Don’t share any of your baby’s dishes, glasses, utensils or his toothbrush. 

More information

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See also:Flu and pregnancy, Your baby’s vaccinations

Last reviewed: September,

 

Источник: mynewextsetup.us
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Comments

  1. not for all. And yet trashing your baby or seven year old kid on random road is not okay right?

  2. confusing display on the board - what are 0483? Country code or financial institution number.

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