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Home remedies for uti in 5 year old


home remedies for uti in 5 year old

A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection of the urinary bladder (cystitis Infants and children under age 2 years with a UTI may have fever. Natural Home Remedies for UTI's ^ · 1. Drink More Water · 2. D-Mannose · 3. Vitamin C · 4. Uva Ursi · 5. Garlic · 6. Bromelain · 7. Goldenseal & Echinacea. Children age 2 years and older · Burning with urination (dysuria). · Fever. · Frequent need to urinate (frequency) without being able to pass much urine. · A strong.
home remedies for uti in 5 year old

Home remedies for uti in 5 year old -

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Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children ages one to five

What is a urinary tract infection (UTI)?

A UTI is an infection of your child's bladder, kidneys or the tubes that carry her wee (NHS , NICE ). UTIs are fairly common, particularly in girls (NHS ). At least eight per cent of girls and two per cent of boys will get a UTI before they turn seven (NICE ).

UTIs aren't usually serious, but if left untreated, they can sometimes lead to complications (NHS ), such as high blood pressure or kidney problems (NICE ). With antibiotic treatment, they usually clear up within a few days (NHS ).

There are two main types of UTI:

  • Upper urinary tract infection: when the infection is in the kidneys or ureters (the tubes that connect the kidneys and the bladder).
  • Lower urinary tract infection: when the infection is in the bladder or urethra (the tube that carries wee from the bladder out of the body). A bladder infection is also known as cystitis.
    (NHS )

What causes UTIs in children?

Almost all UTIs are caused by a bacterial infection (NICE ). In many cases, it's bacteria from your child's poo that causes the problem (Harding ).

Some bacteria can live in the bowel without causing any problems, but if they get into the urinary tract, they can cause a UTI (Harding ). There are two main ways this can happen:

  • If your child is still in nappies, bacteria from her bottom can get into her urethra when she does a poo, no matter how quickly you change her.
  • If your child is potty trained, bacteria from her bottom can get into her urethra on toilet paper. This is particularly the case in girls who wipe from back to front, though it can happen to boys, too.
    (NHS )

A UTI is also more likely if your child doesn't empty her bladder completely when she does a wee (NHS , NICE ). This can happen if she's constipated, as the poo in her bowel can press against the bladder and prevent all the wee from getting out (NHS ). Children who are being potty trainedcan also sometimes deliberately hold in their wee (NHS ).

Less commonly, a condition called kidney reflux, or vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), can also cause a UTI. This happens when there are problems with the valves in the tubes that lead from the kidney to the bladder (ureters). Wee leaks back up towards the kidney, which can cause a UTI (NHS ).

What are the symptoms of UTIs in children?

It can be difficult to tell if your child has a UTI. Your little one may be generally unwell with symptoms such as:

  • fever
  • vomiting
  • being more tired or irritable than usual
  • lack of appetite or poor weight gain
    (NHS )

More specific signs of a UTI can be hard to spot, particularly if your child isn't talking yet (Harding). But you may notice the following signs of a UTI:

  • pain when she wees – this can cause some children to deliberately hold in their wee
  • weeing herself or wetting the bed, if she doesn't usually
  • needing to wee more often than usual
  • pain in her tummy, side or lower back
  • wee that smells bad, looks cloudy, or has blood in it
    (NHS )

Should I take my child to the doctor if I suspect a UTI?

Yes, if you suspect a UTI – or if your child is generally unwell and you're not sure what's causing it - take her to see your GP. If she does have a UTI, then the sooner it's treated, the better (NHS ).

Your GP will probably recommend a urine test, to check whether it's a UTI or something else that's causing your child's symptoms (NHS , NICE ). Depending on your child's age, whether or not she's potty trained, and how ill she is, the wee can be collected by the following methods:

  • If your little one is still in nappies, your GP may give you an absorbent pad to put in her nappy. Your GP can then extract the wee for testing using a syringe.
  • Another option for young babies is to use a plastic bag that sticks onto the skin and collects your child's wee.
  • If your child is potty-trained, your GP will probably ask you to try to catch your child's wee in a sterile container.
  • If none of these options work, your GP will refer you to hospital, where a nurse will collect your child's wee through her urethra using a thin, flexible tube (catheter), or by using a thin, sterile needle. However, this is very unlikely to be necessary.
    (Harding )

Your GP can usually test your child's wee straight away, in the surgery. This won't tell you for sure if your child has a UTI, but it may be able to rule it out (NICE ).

If the test shows that your little one could have a UTI, your GP will start treatment with antibiotics straight away. He may also send the sample of your child's wee to a laboratory for further tests to confirm the diagnosis (NICE ).

Why has my child been referred to hospital for tests?

Your GP may refer you to hospital for further tests if your child:

  • is very ill
  • doesn't get better within a day or two of starting treatment
  • has any unusual symptoms, such as high blood pressure or a lump in her tummy
  • keeps getting UTIs
    (Harding )

Tests that you may be offered if you're referred to hospital will look at how your child's urinary tract is working, to try to identify the cause of any problems. These tests include:

  • An ultrasound scan to look at your child's urinary tract.
  • A dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan to check your child's kidneys. A doctor will give your child an injection of DMSA, which shows up on a special camera to show pictures of the kidneys.
  • A micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG) to check your child's bladder. A doctor will insert a thin, flexible tube in your child's urethra, and use it to pass dye into her bladder. This dye shows up on X-rays to give a clear picture of your little one's bladder.
    (NHS )

Most UTIs don’t cause any long-term problems (NHS ). But to be on the safe side, your doctor may offer these scans weeks or months after your child’s UTI clears up, just to make sure the infection hasn’t caused any damage (NHS ).

How will my child’s UTI be treated?

Your doctor may prescribe a course of antibiotics for your child to take at home (NICE ). How long your child will need to take them depends on what kind of UTI she has:

  • If your GP suspects an upper UTI, your child will need to take antibiotics for seven to 10 days.
  • If your GP suspects a lower UTI, your child will need to take antibiotics for three days.
    (NICE )

Your child’s UTI should clear up a day or two after treatment starts. But make sure that she finishes the course of antibiotics, even if she seems better (NICE ).

If your little one doesn't start to get better within a day or two of antibiotics, take her back to your GP. He may offer further tests, or refer you to hospital for tests or treatment (NICE ).

If your child is very poorly, she may need to go to hospital, where she will be given antibiotics through a drip in her arm (intravenous) (NHS ). It can be upsetting if your child has to go into hospital, but charities such as Rainbow Trusthave plenty of advice and support to make things easier.

All about antibiotics

GP Claire Kaye explains what to expect when your child is taking mynewextsetup.us child health videos

What complications can a UTI cause?

In most cases, a UTI should be easily treated with antibiotics, and shouldn't cause your child any long-term problems (NHS ). But sometimes, UTIs that are left untreated can cause complications.

The most common complication from UTIs is scarring or damage to the kidneys. It's thought that this happens in about 15 per cent of UTIs in young children. Although uncommon, it's more likely to happen if your little one has an upper UTI, particularly if it's caused by her wee backing up from the bladder to the kidney (kidney reflux) (NICE ). Getting treatment for your child quickly can dramatically reduce the risk of this happening (Coulthard et al )

Scarring to your child's kidneys is unlikely to cause her any immediate problems, unless it's very severe. But it could cause issues for her as she grows up, for example making her more prone to high blood pressure (Coulthard et al ).

If there is any scarring to your child's kidneys, her doctors will give you all the treatment and advice you need to minimise the risk of any problems as she grows.

How should I care for my child while she has a UTI?

The most important thing is to make sure that she's taking her medication as advised by your GP (NICE ). These tips can also help while your child has a UTI:

  • If she's in pain, offer the correct dose of infant paracetamol or ibuprofen (NICE ). Check the packet or ask your pharmacist if you're unsure how much to give and when.
  • Encourage her to drink plenty throughout the day, to keep her well hydrated (NICE ). Keep an eye out for signs of dehydration (NHS ), such as feeling very thirsty, dark yellow and smelly wee, feeling tired, dizzy or lightheaded, and dry mouth and eyes (NHS ). If you think your child may be becoming dehydrated, take her back to your GP.
  • If your little one's potty trained, try to make sure there's a potty or toilet nearby at all times until she's better. Encourage her to go regularly, and try to take her to the loo as soon as she looks like she needs a wee (NICE ).

Can I prevent my child's UTI from coming back?

UTIs can sometimes come back again and again, which is known as a recurring or recurrent UTI. Almost half of all girls, and two in five boys, who get a UTI will experience another one at some point (NICE ).

There's no foolproof way to prevent your child from getting a UTI, but the following tips may help:

  • If your child is a girl, wipe her bottom from front to back, and teach her to do the same once she's old enough. This reduces the risk of bacteria from her bottom getting into her urethra (NHS )
  • Encourage her to drink regularly throughout the day, and to wee whenever she needs to. Holding in wee can contribute to a UTI (NHS ).
  • Buy her loose-fitting underwear in natural materials such as cotton. Synthetic fabrics can make it easier for bacteria to flourish (NHS ).
  • Use unscented soap and bath products, as fragranced varieties can increase the risk of developing a UTI (NHS ).
  • Constipation can also cause UTIs, so keeping your little one's bowel movements healthy will also help. There are plenty of tips in our article on constipation in children.

There's no evidence that giving your little one cranberry juice or cranberry supplements can help to prevent a UTI (NHS ). If you want to try any kind of natural remedy, always check with your pharmacist first, as some supplements aren't safe for young children.

If you think that your little one's UTI has come back, see your GP. In most cases though, a UTI is a mild, one-off illness that should quickly get better with antibiotics (NHS ).

More tips and advice:

References

Coulthard MG, Lambert HJ, Vernon SJ et al. Does prompt treatment of urinary tract infection in preschool children prevent renal scarring: mixed retrospective and prospective audits. Arch Dis Child

Harding M. Urine infection in children. Patient. mynewextsetup.us [Accessed July ]

NHS. Dehydration. NHS Choices, Health A-Z. mynewextsetup.us [Accessed July ]

NHS. Urinary tract infection (UTI) in children. NHS Inform, Illnesses and conditions. mynewextsetup.us [Accessed July ]

NICE. Urinary tract infection – children. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, Clinical Knowledge Summaries. mynewextsetup.us [Accessed July ]

Show referencesHide references

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Mayo Clinic Q and A: Urinary tract infections in children

a medical illustration of the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra, with E. coli in the background, and a young girl holding her belly and looking distressed - illustrating UTIs in childrenDEAR MAYO CLINIC: What could be the cause of recurrent urinary tract infections in kids? Is it possible to prevent them, or are some kids just more susceptible?

ANSWER: Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, usually happen when bacteria get into the urinary tract through the urethra and begin to multiply in the bladder. In children, the most common causes of UTIs are constipation, incomplete bladder emptying and holding urine. You and your child can take several steps that may decrease the likelihood of recurrent UTIs.

A UTI is an infection in any part of the urinary system — the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra (the tube that carries urine from your bladder out of your body). Most infections involve the lower urinary tract — the bladder and the urethra. UTIs in children typically include symptoms such as a strong, persistent urge to urinate; a burning or painful sensation when urinating; or passing frequent, small amounts of urine.

In some cases, a UTI may lead to pelvic pain. Some children also may develop a fever. Although uncommon, the presence of a fever, back pain or vomiting may signal a more serious infection that could be affecting the kidneys. If your child has these symptoms, see his or her primary care provider for an evaluation right away. A referral should be made to see a pediatric urologist if your child has had a UTI accompanied by a fever.

Constipation is a frequent cause of UTIs in children. If stool fills up the rectum and colon, it can place pressure on, or even obstruct, the bladder, so the bladder cannot empty completely. The urine left in the bladder can be the perfect place for the growth of bacteria that may cause infection.

If your child has constipation, it’s important to treat it promptly. In most cases, children should have at least one soft bowel movement a day. If that’s not happening, talk to your child’s health care provider. Treatment for constipation ranges from self-care steps — such as eating more high-fiber foods, being more physically active and drinking more fluids (especially water) — to medication, such as stool softeners, fiber supplements and laxatives.

Children also may develop a UTI if they hold urine in for long periods of time, or if they don’t relax their pelvic floor muscles completely when they urinate. Encourage your child to use the bathroom regularly — about every two hours during the daytime. Make sure your child isn’t rushing when using the bathroom, but instead takes time to empty the bladder completely. Teach girls to wipe carefully from front to back after going to the bathroom.

The benefits of cranberry in helping to prevent and treat UTIs are often highlighted. But no solid evidence shows that it’s effective for children with recurrent UTIs. If you want to learn more, talk to your child’s health care provider.

Probiotics also have been publicized as being able to help to prevent UTIs. Found in food such as yogurt, these microorganisms are a type of “good” bacteria that may help with digestion and protect the body from harmful bacteria. Their overall benefit in children with UTIs is debatable. If you want to learn more, talk to your child’s health care provider.

It is possible that an anatomic abnormality or problems with a child’s immune system can lead to recurrent UTIs without fevers, but both of these situations are rare.

If your child continues to have UTIs despite taking measures at home and in conjunction with your child’s health care provider to help prevent them, make a follow-up appointment to see your child’s health care provider. By reviewing the child’s symptoms and medical history, as well as doing a physical exam, your provider may be able to shed light on the underlying cause of recurrent UTIs, and determine if a referral to a subspecialist is necessary. — Dr. Candace Granberg, Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

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Urinary tract infection (UTI) in children

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children are fairly common, but not usually serious. They can be effectively treated with antibiotics.

A UTI may be classed as either:

  • an upper UTI – if it's a kidney infection or an infection of the ureters, the tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder
  • a lower UTI – if it's a bladder infection (cystitis) or an infection of the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body

When to seek medical advice

If you think your child is unwell and could have a UTI, contact your GP as soon as possible.

Although UTIs aren't normally a serious type of infection, they should be diagnosed and treated quickly to reduce the risk of complications.

Symptoms of a UTI in children

It can be difficult to tell whether your child has a UTI, as the symptoms can be vague and young children can't easily communicate how they feel.

General signs that may suggest your child is unwell include:

  • a high temperature (fever)
  • vomiting
  • tiredness and lack of energy (lethargy)
  • irritability
  • poor feeding
  • not gaining weight properly
  • in very young children, yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice)

More specific signs that your child may have a UTI include:

  • pain or a burning sensation when peeing
  • needing to pee frequently
  • deliberately holding in their pee
  • a change in their normal toilet habits, such as wetting themselves or wetting the bed
  • pain in their tummy (abdomen), side or lower back
  • unpleasant-smelling pee
  • blood in their pee
  • cloudy pee

Diagnosing UTIs in children

In most cases, your GP can diagnose a UTI by asking about your child's symptoms, examining them, and arranging for a sample of their pee to be tested.

Treatment usually begins soon after a urine sample has been taken, and your child won't need any further tests.

In a few circumstances, further tests may be needed in hospital to check for abnormalities. Your GP may refer you straight to hospital if your child is very young.

Read more about diagnosing UTIs in children

Causes of UTIs in children

Most UTIs in children are caused by bacteria from the digestive system entering the urethra.

There are many ways this can happen, including:

  • when a child wipes their bottom and soiled toilet paper comes into contact with their genitals – this is more of a problem for girls than boys because girls' bottoms are much nearer the urethra
  • babies getting small particles of poo in their urethra when they soil their nappies – particularly if they squirm a lot when being changed

There's often no obvious reason why some children develop UTIs and others don't. 

However, some children may be more vulnerable to UTIs because of a problem with emptying their bladder, such as:

  • constipation – this can sometimes cause part of the large intestine to swell, which can put pressure on the bladder and prevent it emptying normally
  • dysfunctional elimination syndrome – a relatively common childhood condition where a child "holds on" to their pee, even though they have the urge to pee
  • vesicoureteral reflux– an uncommon condition where urine leaks back up from the bladder into the ureters and kidneys; this occurs as a result of a problem with the valves in the ureters where they enter the bladder

Treating UTIs in children

Most childhood UTIs clear up within 24 to 48 hours of treatment with antibiotics and won't cause any long-term problems.

In many cases, treatment involves your child taking a course of antibiotic tablets at home.

As a precaution, babies under three months old and children with more severe symptoms are usually admitted to hospital for a few days to receive antibiotics directly into a vein (intravenous antibiotics).

Read more about treating UTIs in children

Preventing UTIs in children

It isn't possible to prevent all childhood UTIs, but there are some things you can do to reduce the risk of your child getting one.

The following advice may help:

  • if possible, exclusively breastfeed your baby for the first six months after they're born – this can help improve your baby's immune system and reduce their risk of constipation
  • encourage girls to wipe their bottom from front to back– this helps to minimise the chances of bacteria entering the urethra
  • make sure your child is well hydrated and goes to the toilet regularly – not urinating regularly and "holding in" urine can make it easier for bacteria to infect the urinary tract
  • avoid nylon and other types of synthetic underwear – these can help promote the growth of bacteria; loose-fitting cotton underwear should be worn instead
  • avoid using scented soaps or bubble baths – these can increase your child's risk of developing a UTI
  • take steps to reduce your child's risk of constipation – make sure they drink enough to keep their urine pale and clear during the day, and speak to your GP about medications that can help if constipation is a persistent problem

Some people feel that drinking cranberry juice or taking cranberry supplements can help reduce their risk of UTIs.

However, recent high-quality research into these claims found little evidence to suggest cranberries have a significant impact on your chances of developing a UTI.

Recurrent UTIs in children

A small number of children have recurring UTIs. If your child's had a UTI before, it's important that both of you watch for the return of any associated symptoms.

Tell your GP about any symptoms as soon as possible so a diagnosis can be confirmed and treatment can begin.

If your child has a problem that increases their risk of UTIs, such as faulty valves that allow urine to flow the wrong way, they may be prescribed low-dose antibiotics as a long-term measure to prevent further infections.

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5 Ways to Conquer Painful UTI Symptoms

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Urinary tract infection - children

A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection of the urinary tract. This article discusses urinary tract infections in children.

The infection can affect different parts of the urinary tract, including the bladder (cystitis), kidneys (pyelonephritis), and urethra, the tube that empties urine from the bladder to the outside.

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can occur when bacteria get into the bladder or to the kidneys. These bacteria are common on the skin around the anus. They can also be present near the vagina.

Some factors make it easier for bacteria to enter or stay in the urinary tract, such as:

  • Vesicoureteral reflux in which urine flow backs up into the ureters and kidneys.
  • Brain or nervous system illnesses (such as myelomeningocele or spinal cord injury).
  • Bubble baths or tight-fitting clothes (girls).
  • Changes or birth defects in the structure of the urinary tract.
  • Not urinating often enough during the day.
  • Wiping from back (near the anus) to front after going to the bathroom. In girls, this can bring bacteria to the opening where the urine comes out.

UTIs are more common in girls. This may occur as children begin toilet training around 3 years of age. Boys who are not circumcised have a slightly higher risk of UTIs before age 1.

Young children with UTIs may have a fever, poor appetite, vomiting, or no symptoms at all.

Most UTIs in children only involve the bladder. It may spread to the kidneys.

Symptoms of a bladder infection in children include:

Signs that the infection may have spread to the kidneys include:

  • Chills with shaking
  • Fever
  • Flushed, warm, or reddened skin
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pain in the side (flank) or back
  • Severe pain in the belly area

A urine sample is needed to diagnose a UTI in a child. The sample is examined under a microscope and sent to a lab for a urine culture.

It may be hard to get a urine sample in a child who is not toilet trained. The test cannot be done using a wet diaper.

Ways to collect a urine sample in a very young child include:

  • Urine collection bag --  A special plastic bag is placed over the child's penis or vagina to catch the urine. This is not the best method because the sample may become contaminated.
  • Catheterized specimen urine culture -- A plastic tube (catheter) placed into the tip of the penis in boys, or straight into the urethra in girls, collects urine right from the bladder.
  • Suprapubic urine collection -- A needle is placed through the skin of the lower abdomen and muscles into the bladder. It is used to collect urine.

Imaging may be done to check for any anatomical abnormalities or to check kidney function, including:

Your health care provider will consider many things when deciding if and when a special study is needed, including:

  • The child's age and history of other UTIs (infants and younger children usually need follow-up tests)
  • The severity of the infection and how well it responds to treatment
  • Other medical problems or physical defects the child may have

In children, UTIs should be treated quickly with antibiotics to protect the kidneys. Any child under 6 months old or who has other complications should see a specialist right away.

Younger infants will most often need to stay in the hospital and be given antibiotics through a vein. Older infants and children are treated with antibiotics by mouth. If this is not possible, they may need to get treated in the hospital.

Your child should drink plenty of fluids when being treated for a UTI.

Some children may be treated with antibiotics for periods as long as 6 months to 2 years. This treatment is more likely when the child has had repeat infections or vesicoureteral reflux.

After antibiotics are finished, your child's provider may ask you to bring your child back to do another urine test. This may be needed to make sure that bacteria are no longer in the bladder.

Most children are cured with proper treatment. Most of the time, repeat infections can be prevented.

Repeated infections that involve the kidneys can lead to long-term damage to the kidneys.

Call your provider if your child's symptoms continue after treatment, or come back more than twice in 6 months or your child have:

  • Back pain or flank pain
  • Bad-smelling, bloody, or discolored urine
  • Fever of °F (39°C) in infants for longer than 24 hours
  • Low back pain or abdominal pain below the belly button
  • Fever that does not go away
  • Very frequent urination, or need to urinate many times during the night
  • Vomiting

Things you can do to prevent UTIs include:

  • Avoid giving your child bubble baths.
  • Have your child wear loose-fitting underpants and clothing.
  • Increase your child's intake of fluids.
  • Keep your child's genital area clean to prevent bacteria from entering through the urethra.
  • Teach your child to go the bathroom several times every day.
  • Teach your child to wipe the genital area from front to back to reduce the spread of bacteria.

To prevent recurrent UTIs, the provider may recommend low-dose antibiotics after the first symptoms have gone away.

UTI - children; Cystitis - children; Bladder infection - children; Kidney infection - children; Pyelonephritis - children

American Academy of Pediatrics. Subcommittee on urinary tract infection. Reaffirmation of AAP clinical practice guideline: the diagnosis and management of the initial urinary tract infection in febrile infants and young children months of age. Pediatrics. ;(6):e PMID: mynewextsetup.us

Jerardi KE and Jackson EC. Urinary tract infections. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM. eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; chap

Sobel JD, Brown P. Urinary tract infections. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ eds. Mandell, Douglas and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; chap

Wald ER. Urinary tract infections in infants and children. In: Kellerman RD, Rakel DP, eds. Conn's Current Therapy . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier;

Updated by: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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Urinary Tract Infections in Boys

Urinary tract infections (UTI) in boys are the result of bacteria getting into the bladder and staying there. UTIs are common in kids, especially girls and uncircumcised boys. E. Coli, responsible for over 75% of UTIs, doubles every 20 minutes in the bladder. That means if there are bacteria of E. Coli in the bladder and you wait three hours to go to the bathroom, you will have over 50, bacteria in your bladder. The more bacteria in the bladder and the longer it stays there, the more likely you are to get a UTI.

There are many things that can be done to both treat urinary tract infections in boys and prevent them in the future.

two young boys playing ganmes on a tablet

What are recurrent UTIs?

Some boys get UTIs again and again &#; these are called recurrent UTIs. If left untreated, recurrent UTIs can cause kidney damage, especially in kids younger than 6. It&#;s important to recognize signs of these infections and get help for your child.

What are the symptoms of UTIs in children?

Symptoms of a UTI can include:

  • Pain when peeing
  • Changes in frequency of urination
  • Changes in appearance or smell of pee
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Lower back pain or discomfort

Causes of Urinary Tract Infections in Boys

  • Poor water intake
  • Improper genital hygiene
  • Infrequent voiding
  • Constipation

Types of UTIs in Children

Common types of UTIs include:

  • Cystitis: this bladder infection is the most common type of UTI. Cystitis occurs when bacteria move up the urethra (the tube-like structure that allows urine to exit the body from the bladder) and into the bladder
  • Urethritis: when bacteria infect the urethra
  • Pyelonephritis: a kidney infection caused by infected urine flowing backward from the bladder into the kidneys or an infection in the bloodstream reaching the kidneys

Preventing Urinary Tract Infections in Boys

Many UTIs can be prevented by changing infants&#; diapers frequently, encouraging kids to practice good hygiene, and instructing kids not to &#;hold it&#; when they have to pee because urine that remains in the bladder gives bacteria a good place to grow. Here are some tips on how to prevent UTIs in boys:

Increase Water Intake

Children should drink one cup of water (equal to eight ounces) for each year they are old. For example, if a child is 4 years old, he should drink four cups of water each day. Once a child reaches 8 years old, he should be drinking close to two liters (a little over eight cups) per day and stay at this amount into adulthood. Increasing water dilutes the urine, making it more difficult for bacteria to grow. Monitoring the color of urine in the toilet is a good way to ensure good water intake. Urine should be clear to very pale yellow at each void. Darker urine tells us that the child needs more water.

Timed Voiding

Children should urinate about seven times each day&#;that’s every 2 hours while awake&#;even if he doesn’t feel like he needs to go. Children who hold their urine and wait until they absolutely have to go to the bathroom tend to be at a higher risk for UTIs and other bladder dysfunction problems.

Foreskin

If the child is uncircumcised, he should practice proper genital hygiene. This means pushing his foreskin back, so he can clean the head of the penis when he is in the shower or bath, just like he would clean any other part of his body. He must also return the foreskin back over the head of the penis once cleaning is complete. It is also important that he pulls his foreskin all the way back before urinating and then pulls it back over when he is done. Not doing this could allow urine to get stuck under the foreskin. When urine gets trapped under the foreskin, bacteria can form and eventually get into the urethra and bladder.

Get Going Everyday

Children should have a soft, easy-to-pass bowel movement every day. By increasing water, fiber (dried fruit, fresh fruit and vegetables) and activity, many children can find constipation relief. If this is not enough, then adding Miralax® (as directed) may help him go every day. Stool is where most of the E. Coli that causes UTIs comes from.

Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections in Boys

Prophylactic Antibiotics

Children may be given a prescription for prophylactic antibiotics. It is a very low dose of antibiotics that they should take every day, as prescribed, to help keep their urine sterile. It is important not to take medication that has not been prescribed for you specifically, please never share your medication with anyone.

CHOC Urology Center have experts to effectively diagnose, treat and create prevention plans. If the child has an infection, our staff may also perform some or all of the following studies:

  • Cystoscopy
  • Renal ultrasound
  • Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG)
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Home remedies for uti in 5 year old -

5 kitchen remedies for a urinary tract infection

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uti1

Vitamin C
If you experience a burning sensation while peeing, see a doctor pronto so that he can prescribe a course of antibiotics. However, meanwhile, you can also tank up on plenty of vitamin C. According to the Johns Hopkins Medicine health library, vitamin C inhibits the growth of bacteria by making your urine acidic.

uti2

Water
This is the easiest remedy of all and probably the most effective. You need to drink lots of water so that the microorganisms in your urinary tract can be flushed out every time you pee. All kinds of fluid except the caffeinated and carbonated kinds are good.

uti3

Baking soda
The wonder home remedy for many an ailment, baking soda is helpful in relieving UTI symptoms too. The alkaline nature of baking soda neutralises the acidity in your urine and thereby reduces the burning sensation. Mix a teaspoon of baking soda in an ml glass of water and drink up. This remedy should be taken in moderation.

uti4

Parsley
Boil a cup of fresh parsley in a pan of water and simmer for 10 minutes. Drink up the cooled reduction. This drink acts as a diuretic that makes you flush out the harmful bacteria by peeing more often.

uti4

Cucumbers
Cucumbers are filled with water so you can crunch of some cooling slices when you are tired of drinking too much water. Do note, however, that it would be unwise to reduce the intake of fluids, cucumber are at best a juicy diversion from the tedium!

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Urinary tract infection - children

A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection of the urinary tract. This article discusses urinary tract infections in children.

The infection can affect different parts of the urinary tract, including the bladder (cystitis), kidneys (pyelonephritis), and urethra, the tube that empties urine from the bladder to the outside.

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can occur when bacteria get into the bladder or to the kidneys. These bacteria are common on the skin around the anus. They can also be present near the vagina.

Some factors make it easier for bacteria to enter or stay in the urinary tract, such as:

  • Vesicoureteral reflux in which urine flow backs up into the ureters and kidneys.
  • Brain or nervous system illnesses (such as myelomeningocele or spinal cord injury).
  • Bubble baths or tight-fitting clothes (girls).
  • Changes or birth defects in the structure of the urinary tract.
  • Not urinating often enough during the day.
  • Wiping from back (near the anus) to front after going to the bathroom. In girls, this can bring bacteria to the opening where the urine comes out.

UTIs are more common in girls. This may occur as children begin toilet training around 3 years of age. Boys who are not circumcised have a slightly higher risk of UTIs before age 1.

Young children with UTIs may have a fever, poor appetite, vomiting, or no symptoms at all.

Most UTIs in children only involve the bladder. It may spread to the kidneys.

Symptoms of a bladder infection in children include:

Signs that the infection may have spread to the kidneys include:

  • Chills with shaking
  • Fever
  • Flushed, warm, or reddened skin
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pain in the side (flank) or back
  • Severe pain in the belly area

A urine sample is needed to diagnose a UTI in a child. The sample is examined under a microscope and sent to a lab for a urine culture.

It may be hard to get a urine sample in a child who is not toilet trained. The test cannot be done using a wet diaper.

Ways to collect a urine sample in a very young child include:

  • Urine collection bag --  A special plastic bag is placed over the child's penis or vagina to catch the urine. This is not the best method because the sample may become contaminated.
  • Catheterized specimen urine culture -- A plastic tube (catheter) placed into the tip of the penis in boys, or straight into the urethra in girls, collects urine right from the bladder.
  • Suprapubic urine collection -- A needle is placed through the skin of the lower abdomen and muscles into the bladder. It is used to collect urine.

Imaging may be done to check for any anatomical abnormalities or to check kidney function, including:

Your health care provider will consider many things when deciding if and when a special study is needed, including:

  • The child's age and history of other UTIs (infants and younger children usually need follow-up tests)
  • The severity of the infection and how well it responds to treatment
  • Other medical problems or physical defects the child may have

In children, UTIs should be treated quickly with antibiotics to protect the kidneys. Any child under 6 months old or who has other complications should see a specialist right away.

Younger infants will most often need to stay in the hospital and be given antibiotics through a vein. Older infants and children are treated with antibiotics by mouth. If this is not possible, they may need to get treated in the hospital.

Your child should drink plenty of fluids when being treated for a UTI.

Some children may be treated with antibiotics for periods as long as 6 months to 2 years. This treatment is more likely when the child has had repeat infections or vesicoureteral reflux.

After antibiotics are finished, your child's provider may ask you to bring your child back to do another urine test. This may be needed to make sure that bacteria are no longer in the bladder.

Most children are cured with proper treatment. Most of the time, repeat infections can be prevented.

Repeated infections that involve the kidneys can lead to long-term damage to the kidneys.

Call your provider if your child's symptoms continue after treatment, or come back more than twice in 6 months or your child have:

  • Back pain or flank pain
  • Bad-smelling, bloody, or discolored urine
  • Fever of °F (39°C) in infants for longer than 24 hours
  • Low back pain or abdominal pain below the belly button
  • Fever that does not go away
  • Very frequent urination, or need to urinate many times during the night
  • Vomiting

Things you can do to prevent UTIs include:

  • Avoid giving your child bubble baths.
  • Have your child wear loose-fitting underpants and clothing.
  • Increase your child's intake of fluids.
  • Keep your child's genital area clean to prevent bacteria from entering through the urethra.
  • Teach your child to go the bathroom several times every day.
  • Teach your child to wipe the genital area from front to back to reduce the spread of bacteria.

To prevent recurrent UTIs, the provider may recommend low-dose antibiotics after the first symptoms have gone away.

UTI - children; Cystitis - children; Bladder infection - children; Kidney infection - children; Pyelonephritis - children

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Updated by: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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Mayo Clinic Q and A: Urinary tract infections in children

a medical illustration of the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra, with E. coli in the background, and a young girl holding her belly and looking distressed - illustrating UTIs in childrenDEAR MAYO CLINIC: What could be the cause of recurrent urinary tract infections in kids? Is it possible to prevent them, or are some kids just more susceptible?

ANSWER: Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, usually happen when bacteria get into the urinary tract through the urethra and begin to multiply in the bladder. In children, the most common causes of UTIs are constipation, incomplete bladder emptying and holding urine. You and your child can take several steps that may decrease the likelihood of recurrent UTIs.

A UTI is an infection in any part of the urinary system — the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra (the tube that carries urine from your bladder out of your body). Most infections involve the lower urinary tract — the bladder and the urethra. UTIs in children typically include symptoms such as a strong, persistent urge to urinate; a burning or painful sensation when urinating; or passing frequent, small amounts of urine.

In some cases, a UTI may lead to pelvic pain. Some children also may develop a fever. Although uncommon, the presence of a fever, back pain or vomiting may signal a more serious infection that could be affecting the kidneys. If your child has these symptoms, see his or her primary care provider for an evaluation right away. A referral should be made to see a pediatric urologist if your child has had a UTI accompanied by a fever.

Constipation is a frequent cause of UTIs in children. If stool fills up the rectum and colon, it can place pressure on, or even obstruct, the bladder, so the bladder cannot empty completely. The urine left in the bladder can be the perfect place for the growth of bacteria that may cause infection.

If your child has constipation, it’s important to treat it promptly. In most cases, children should have at least one soft bowel movement a day. If that’s not happening, talk to your child’s health care provider. Treatment for constipation ranges from self-care steps — such as eating more high-fiber foods, being more physically active and drinking more fluids (especially water) — to medication, such as stool softeners, fiber supplements and laxatives.

Children also may develop a UTI if they hold urine in for long periods of time, or if they don’t relax their pelvic floor muscles completely when they urinate. Encourage your child to use the bathroom regularly — about every two hours during the daytime. Make sure your child isn’t rushing when using the bathroom, but instead takes time to empty the bladder completely. Teach girls to wipe carefully from front to back after going to the bathroom.

The benefits of cranberry in helping to prevent and treat UTIs are often highlighted. But no solid evidence shows that it’s effective for children with recurrent UTIs. If you want to learn more, talk to your child’s health care provider.

Probiotics also have been publicized as being able to help to prevent UTIs. Found in food such as yogurt, these microorganisms are a type of “good” bacteria that may help with digestion and protect the body from harmful bacteria. Their overall benefit in children with UTIs is debatable. If you want to learn more, talk to your child’s health care provider.

It is possible that an anatomic abnormality or problems with a child’s immune system can lead to recurrent UTIs without fevers, but both of these situations are rare.

If your child continues to have UTIs despite taking measures at home and in conjunction with your child’s health care provider to help prevent them, make a follow-up appointment to see your child’s health care provider. By reviewing the child’s symptoms and medical history, as well as doing a physical exam, your provider may be able to shed light on the underlying cause of recurrent UTIs, and determine if a referral to a subspecialist is necessary. — Dr. Candace Granberg, Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

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Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children ages one to five

What is a urinary tract infection (UTI)?

A UTI is an infection of your child's bladder, kidneys or the tubes that carry her wee (NHS , NICE ). UTIs are fairly common, particularly in girls (NHS ). At least eight per cent of girls and two per cent of boys will get a UTI before they turn seven (NICE ).

UTIs aren't usually serious, but if left untreated, they can sometimes lead to complications (NHS ), such as high blood pressure or kidney problems (NICE ). With antibiotic treatment, they usually clear up within a few days (NHS ).

There are two main types of UTI:

  • Upper urinary tract infection: when the infection is in the kidneys or ureters (the tubes that connect the kidneys and the bladder).
  • Lower urinary tract infection: when the infection is in the bladder or urethra (the tube that carries wee from the bladder out of the body). A bladder infection is also known as cystitis.
    (NHS )

What causes UTIs in children?

Almost all UTIs are caused by a bacterial infection (NICE ). In many cases, it's bacteria from your child's poo that causes the problem (Harding ).

Some bacteria can live in the bowel without causing any problems, but if they get into the urinary tract, they can cause a UTI (Harding ). There are two main ways this can happen:

  • If your child is still in nappies, bacteria from her bottom can get into her urethra when she does a poo, no matter how quickly you change her.
  • If your child is potty trained, bacteria from her bottom can get into her urethra on toilet paper. This is particularly the case in girls who wipe from back to front, though it can happen to boys, too.
    (NHS )

A UTI is also more likely if your child doesn't empty her bladder completely when she does a wee (NHS , NICE ). This can happen if she's constipated, as the poo in her bowel can press against the bladder and prevent all the wee from getting out (NHS ). Children who are being potty trainedcan also sometimes deliberately hold in their wee (NHS ).

Less commonly, a condition called kidney reflux, or vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), can also cause a UTI. This happens when there are problems with the valves in the tubes that lead from the kidney to the bladder (ureters). Wee leaks back up towards the kidney, which can cause a UTI (NHS ).

What are the symptoms of UTIs in children?

It can be difficult to tell if your child has a UTI. Your little one may be generally unwell with symptoms such as:

  • fever
  • vomiting
  • being more tired or irritable than usual
  • lack of appetite or poor weight gain
    (NHS )

More specific signs of a UTI can be hard to spot, particularly if your child isn't talking yet (Harding). But you may notice the following signs of a UTI:

  • pain when she wees – this can cause some children to deliberately hold in their wee
  • weeing herself or wetting the bed, if she doesn't usually
  • needing to wee more often than usual
  • pain in her tummy, side or lower back
  • wee that smells bad, looks cloudy, or has blood in it
    (NHS )

Should I take my child to the doctor if I suspect a UTI?

Yes, if you suspect a UTI – or if your child is generally unwell and you're not sure what's causing it - take her to see your GP. If she does have a UTI, then the sooner it's treated, the better (NHS ).

Your GP will probably recommend a urine test, to check whether it's a UTI or something else that's causing your child's symptoms (NHS , NICE ). Depending on your child's age, whether or not she's potty trained, and how ill she is, the wee can be collected by the following methods:

  • If your little one is still in nappies, your GP may give you an absorbent pad to put in her nappy. Your GP can then extract the wee for testing using a syringe.
  • Another option for young babies is to use a plastic bag that sticks onto the skin and collects your child's wee.
  • If your child is potty-trained, your GP will probably ask you to try to catch your child's wee in a sterile container.
  • If none of these options work, your GP will refer you to hospital, where a nurse will collect your child's wee through her urethra using a thin, flexible tube (catheter), or by using a thin, sterile needle. However, this is very unlikely to be necessary.
    (Harding )

Your GP can usually test your child's wee straight away, in the surgery. This won't tell you for sure if your child has a UTI, but it may be able to rule it out (NICE ).

If the test shows that your little one could have a UTI, your GP will start treatment with antibiotics straight away. He may also send the sample of your child's wee to a laboratory for further tests to confirm the diagnosis (NICE ).

Why has my child been referred to hospital for tests?

Your GP may refer you to hospital for further tests if your child:

  • is very ill
  • doesn't get better within a day or two of starting treatment
  • has any unusual symptoms, such as high blood pressure or a lump in her tummy
  • keeps getting UTIs
    (Harding )

Tests that you may be offered if you're referred to hospital will look at how your child's urinary tract is working, to try to identify the cause of any problems. These tests include:

  • An ultrasound scan to look at your child's urinary tract.
  • A dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan to check your child's kidneys. A doctor will give your child an injection of DMSA, which shows up on a special camera to show pictures of the kidneys.
  • A micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG) to check your child's bladder. A doctor will insert a thin, flexible tube in your child's urethra, and use it to pass dye into her bladder. This dye shows up on X-rays to give a clear picture of your little one's bladder.
    (NHS )

Most UTIs don’t cause any long-term problems (NHS ). But to be on the safe side, your doctor may offer these scans weeks or months after your child’s UTI clears up, just to make sure the infection hasn’t caused any damage (NHS ).

How will my child’s UTI be treated?

Your doctor may prescribe a course of antibiotics for your child to take at home (NICE ). How long your child will need to take them depends on what kind of UTI she has:

  • If your GP suspects an upper UTI, your child will need to take antibiotics for seven to 10 days.
  • If your GP suspects a lower UTI, your child will need to take antibiotics for three days.
    (NICE )

Your child’s UTI should clear up a day or two after treatment starts. But make sure that she finishes the course of antibiotics, even if she seems better (NICE ).

If your little one doesn't start to get better within a day or two of antibiotics, take her back to your GP. He may offer further tests, or refer you to hospital for tests or treatment (NICE ).

If your child is very poorly, she may need to go to hospital, where she will be given antibiotics through a drip in her arm (intravenous) (NHS ). It can be upsetting if your child has to go into hospital, but charities such as Rainbow Trusthave plenty of advice and support to make things easier.

All about antibiotics

GP Claire Kaye explains what to expect when your child is taking mynewextsetup.us child health videos

What complications can a UTI cause?

In most cases, a UTI should be easily treated with antibiotics, and shouldn't cause your child any long-term problems (NHS ). But sometimes, UTIs that are left untreated can cause complications.

The most common complication from UTIs is scarring or damage to the kidneys. It's thought that this happens in about 15 per cent of UTIs in young children. Although uncommon, it's more likely to happen if your little one has an upper UTI, particularly if it's caused by her wee backing up from the bladder to the kidney (kidney reflux) (NICE ). Getting treatment for your child quickly can dramatically reduce the risk of this happening (Coulthard et al )

Scarring to your child's kidneys is unlikely to cause her any immediate problems, unless it's very severe. But it could cause issues for her as she grows up, for example making her more prone to high blood pressure (Coulthard et al ).

If there is any scarring to your child's kidneys, her doctors will give you all the treatment and advice you need to minimise the risk of any problems as she grows.

How should I care for my child while she has a UTI?

The most important thing is to make sure that she's taking her medication as advised by your GP (NICE ). These tips can also help while your child has a UTI:

  • If she's in pain, offer the correct dose of infant paracetamol or ibuprofen (NICE ). Check the packet or ask your pharmacist if you're unsure how much to give and when.
  • Encourage her to drink plenty throughout the day, to keep her well hydrated (NICE ). Keep an eye out for signs of dehydration (NHS ), such as feeling very thirsty, dark yellow and smelly wee, feeling tired, dizzy or lightheaded, and dry mouth and eyes (NHS ). If you think your child may be becoming dehydrated, take her back to your GP.
  • If your little one's potty trained, try to make sure there's a potty or toilet nearby at all times until she's better. Encourage her to go regularly, and try to take her to the loo as soon as she looks like she needs a wee (NICE ).

Can I prevent my child's UTI from coming back?

UTIs can sometimes come back again and again, which is known as a recurring or recurrent UTI. Almost half of all girls, and two in five boys, who get a UTI will experience another one at some point (NICE ).

There's no foolproof way to prevent your child from getting a UTI, but the following tips may help:

  • If your child is a girl, wipe her bottom from front to back, and teach her to do the same once she's old enough. This reduces the risk of bacteria from her bottom getting into her urethra (NHS )
  • Encourage her to drink regularly throughout the day, and to wee whenever she needs to. Holding in wee can contribute to a UTI (NHS ).
  • Buy her loose-fitting underwear in natural materials such as cotton. Synthetic fabrics can make it easier for bacteria to flourish (NHS ).
  • Use unscented soap and bath products, as fragranced varieties can increase the risk of developing a UTI (NHS ).
  • Constipation can also cause UTIs, so keeping your little one's bowel movements healthy will also help. There are plenty of tips in our article on constipation in children.

There's no evidence that giving your little one cranberry juice or cranberry supplements can help to prevent a UTI (NHS ). If you want to try any kind of natural remedy, always check with your pharmacist first, as some supplements aren't safe for young children.

If you think that your little one's UTI has come back, see your GP. In most cases though, a UTI is a mild, one-off illness that should quickly get better with antibiotics (NHS ).

More tips and advice:

References

Coulthard MG, Lambert HJ, Vernon SJ et al. Does prompt treatment of urinary tract infection in preschool children prevent renal scarring: mixed retrospective and prospective audits. Arch Dis Child

Harding M. Urine infection in children. Patient. mynewextsetup.us [Accessed July ]

NHS. Dehydration. NHS Choices, Health A-Z. mynewextsetup.us [Accessed July ]

NHS. Urinary tract infection (UTI) in children. NHS Inform, Illnesses and conditions. mynewextsetup.us [Accessed July ]

NICE. Urinary tract infection – children. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, Clinical Knowledge Summaries. mynewextsetup.us [Accessed July ]

Show referencesHide references

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Urinary Tract Infections in Boys

Urinary tract infections (UTI) in boys are the result of bacteria getting into the bladder and staying there. UTIs are common in kids, especially girls and uncircumcised boys. E. Coli, responsible for over 75% of UTIs, doubles every 20 minutes in the bladder. That means if there are bacteria of E. Coli in the bladder and you wait three hours to go to the bathroom, you will have over 50, bacteria in your bladder. The more bacteria in the bladder and the longer it stays there, the more likely you are to get a UTI.

There are many things that can be done to both treat urinary tract infections in boys and prevent them in the future.

two young boys playing ganmes on a tablet

What are recurrent UTIs?

Some boys get UTIs again and again &#; these are called recurrent UTIs. If left untreated, recurrent UTIs can cause kidney damage, especially in kids younger than 6. It&#;s important to recognize signs of these infections and get help for your child.

What are the symptoms of UTIs in children?

Symptoms of a UTI can include:

  • Pain when peeing
  • Changes in frequency of urination
  • Changes in appearance or smell of pee
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Lower back pain or discomfort

Causes of Urinary Tract Infections in Boys

  • Poor water intake
  • Improper genital hygiene
  • Infrequent voiding
  • Constipation

Types of UTIs in Children

Common types of UTIs include:

  • Cystitis: this bladder infection is the most common type of UTI. Cystitis occurs when bacteria move up the urethra (the tube-like structure that allows urine to exit the body from the bladder) and into the bladder
  • Urethritis: when bacteria infect the urethra
  • Pyelonephritis: a kidney infection caused by infected urine flowing backward from the bladder into the kidneys or an infection in the bloodstream reaching the kidneys

Preventing Urinary Tract Infections in Boys

Many UTIs can be prevented by changing infants&#; diapers frequently, encouraging kids to practice good hygiene, and instructing kids not to &#;hold it&#; when they have to pee because urine that remains in the bladder gives bacteria a good place to grow. Here are some tips on how to prevent UTIs in boys:

Increase Water Intake

Children should drink one cup of water (equal to eight ounces) for each year they are old. For example, if a child is 4 years old, he should drink four cups of water each day. Once a child reaches 8 years old, he should be drinking close to two liters (a little over eight cups) per day and stay at this amount into adulthood. Increasing water dilutes the urine, making it more difficult for bacteria to grow. Monitoring the color of urine in the toilet is a good way to ensure good water intake. Urine should be clear to very pale yellow at each void. Darker urine tells us that the child needs more water.

Timed Voiding

Children should urinate about seven times each day&#;that’s every 2 hours while awake&#;even if he doesn’t feel like he needs to go. Children who hold their urine and wait until they absolutely have to go to the bathroom tend to be at a higher risk for UTIs and other bladder dysfunction problems.

Foreskin

If the child is uncircumcised, he should practice proper genital hygiene. This means pushing his foreskin back, so he can clean the head of the penis when he is in the shower or bath, just like he would clean any other part of his body. He must also return the foreskin back over the head of the penis once cleaning is complete. It is also important that he pulls his foreskin all the way back before urinating and then pulls it back over when he is done. Not doing this could allow urine to get stuck under the foreskin. When urine gets trapped under the foreskin, bacteria can form and eventually get into the urethra and bladder.

Get Going Everyday

Children should have a soft, easy-to-pass bowel movement every day. By increasing water, fiber (dried fruit, fresh fruit and vegetables) and activity, many children can find constipation relief. If this is not enough, then adding Miralax® (as directed) may help him go every day. Stool is where most of the E. Coli that causes UTIs comes from.

Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections in Boys

Prophylactic Antibiotics

Children may be given a prescription for prophylactic antibiotics. It is a very low dose of antibiotics that they should take every day, as prescribed, to help keep their urine sterile. It is important not to take medication that has not been prescribed for you specifically, please never share your medication with anyone.

CHOC Urology Center have experts to effectively diagnose, treat and create prevention plans. If the child has an infection, our staff may also perform some or all of the following studies:

  • Cystoscopy
  • Renal ultrasound
  • Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG)
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Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) and its Home Remedies

Urinary tract infection (UTI) in children

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children are fairly common, but not usually serious. They can be effectively treated with antibiotics.

A UTI may be classed as either:

  • an upper UTI – if it's a kidney infection or an infection of the ureters, the tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder
  • a lower UTI – if it's a bladder infection (cystitis) or an infection of the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body

When to seek medical advice

If you think your child is unwell and could have a UTI, contact your GP as soon as possible.

Although UTIs aren't normally a serious type of infection, they home remedies for uti in 5 year old be diagnosed and treated quickly to reduce the risk of complications.

Symptoms of a UTI in children

It can be difficult to tell whether your child has a UTI, as the symptoms can be vague and young children can't easily communicate how they feel.

General signs that may suggest your child is unwell include:

  • a high temperature (fever)
  • vomiting
  • tiredness and lack of energy (lethargy)
  • irritability
  • poor feeding
  • not gaining weight properly
  • in very young children, yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice)

More specific signs that your child may have a UTI include:

  • pain or a burning sensation when peeing
  • needing to pee frequently
  • deliberately holding in their pee
  • a change in their normal toilet habits, such as wetting themselves or wetting the bed
  • pain in their tummy (abdomen), side or lower back
  • unpleasant-smelling pee
  • blood in their pee
  • cloudy pee

Diagnosing UTIs in children

In most cases, your GP can diagnose a UTI by asking about your child's symptoms, examining them, and arranging for a sample of their pee to be tested.

Treatment usually begins soon after a urine sample has been taken, and your child won't need any further tests.

In a few circumstances, further tests may be needed in hospital to check for abnormalities. Your GP may refer you straight to hospital if your child is very young.

Read more about diagnosing UTIs in children

Causes of UTIs in children

Most UTIs in children are caused by bacteria from the digestive system entering the urethra.

There are many ways this can happen, including:

  • when a child wipes their bottom and soiled toilet paper comes into contact with their genitals – this is more of a problem for girls than boys because girls' bottoms are much nearer the urethra
  • babies getting small particles of poo in their urethra when they soil their nappies – particularly if they squirm a lot when being changed

There's often no obvious reason why some children develop UTIs and others don't. 

However, some children may be more vulnerable to UTIs because of a problem with emptying their bladder, such as:

  • constipation – this can sometimes cause part of the large intestine to swell, which can put pressure on the bladder and prevent it emptying normally
  • dysfunctional elimination syndrome – a relatively common childhood condition where a child "holds on" to their pee, even though they have the urge to pee
  • vesicoureteral reflux– an uncommon condition where urine leaks back up from the bladder into the ureters and kidneys; this occurs as a result of a problem with the valves in the ureters where they enter the bladder

Treating UTIs in children

Most childhood UTIs clear up within 24 to 48 hours of treatment with antibiotics and won't cause any long-term problems.

In many cases, treatment involves your child taking a course of antibiotic tablets at home.

As a precaution, babies under three months old and children with more severe symptoms are usually admitted to hospital for a few days to receive antibiotics directly into a vein (intravenous antibiotics).

Read more about treating UTIs in children

Preventing UTIs in children

It isn't possible to prevent all childhood UTIs, but there are some things you can do to reduce the risk of your child getting one.

The following advice may help:

  • if possible, exclusively breastfeed your baby for the first six months after they're born – this can help improve your baby's immune system and reduce their risk of constipation
  • encourage girls to wipe their bottom from front to back– this helps to minimise the chances of bacteria entering the urethra
  • make sure your child is well hydrated and goes to the toilet regularly – not urinating regularly and "holding in" urine can make it easier for bacteria to infect the urinary tract
  • avoid nylon and other types of synthetic underwear – these can help promote the growth of bacteria; loose-fitting cotton underwear should be worn instead
  • avoid using scented soaps or bubble baths – these can increase your child's risk of developing a UTI
  • take steps to reduce your child's risk of constipation – make sure they drink enough to keep their urine pale and home remedies for uti in 5 year old during the day, and speak to your GP about medications that can help if constipation is a persistent problem

Some people feel that drinking cranberry juice or taking cranberry supplements can help reduce their risk of UTIs.

However, recent high-quality research into these claims found little evidence to suggest cranberries have a significant impact on your chances of developing a UTI.

Recurrent UTIs in children

A small number of children have recurring UTIs. If your child's had a UTI before, it's important that both of you watch for the return of any associated symptoms.

Tell your GP about any symptoms as soon as possible so a diagnosis can be confirmed and treatment can begin.

If your child has a problem that increases their risk of UTIs, such as faulty valves that allow urine to flow the wrong way, they may be prescribed low-dose antibiotics as a long-term measure to prevent further infections.

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Urinary tract infection in women

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Chen SL, Wu M, Henderson JP, et al. Genomic diversity and fitness of E. coli strains recovered from the intestinal and urinary tracts of women with recurrent urinary tract infections. Sci Transl Med. ;5()ra

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Dryden GW Jr, Deaciuc I, Arteel G, McClain CJ. Clinical implications of oxidative stress and antioxidant therapy. Curr Gastroenterol Rep. ;7(4)

Epp A, Larochelle A, Lovatsis D, Walter JE, Easton W, Farrell SA. Recurrent urinary tract infection. J Obstet Gynaecol Can. ;32(11)

Gagyor I, Bleidorn J, Kochen MM, Schmiemann G, Wegscheider K, Hummers-Pradier E. Ibuprofen versus fosfomycin for uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women: randomised controlled trial. BMJ. ;h

Griffin C. Probiotics in obstetrics and gynaecology. Aust N Z J Obstet and gynaecol. ;55(3)

Grover ML, Bracamonte JD, Kanodia AK, et al. Assessing adherence to evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and management of uncomplicated urinary tract infection. Mayo Clin Proc. ;82(2)

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Marschall J, Carpenter CR, Fowler S, Trautner BW. Antibiotic prophylaxis for urinary tract infections after removal of urinary catheter: meta-analyis. BMJ. ;f

Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders;

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Urinary tract infection - children

A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection of the urinary tract. This article discusses urinary tract infections in children.

The infection can affect different parts of the urinary tract, including the bladder (cystitis), kidneys (pyelonephritis), and urethra, the tube that empties urine from the bladder to the outside.

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can occur when bacteria get into the bladder or to the kidneys. These bacteria are common on the skin around the anus. They can also be present near the vagina.

Some factors make it easier for bacteria to enter or stay in the urinary tract, such as:

  • Vesicoureteral reflux in which urine flow backs up into the ureters and kidneys.
  • Brain or nervous system illnesses (such as myelomeningocele or spinal cord injury).
  • Bubble baths or tight-fitting clothes (girls).
  • Changes or birth defects in the structure of the urinary tract.
  • Not urinating often enough during the day.
  • Wiping from back (near the anus) to front after going to the bathroom. In girls, this can bring bacteria to the opening where the urine comes out.

UTIs are more common in girls. This may occur as children begin toilet training around 3 years of age. Boys who are not circumcised have a slightly higher risk of UTIs before age 1.

Young children with UTIs may have a fever, poor appetite, vomiting, or no symptoms at all.

Most UTIs in children only involve the bladder. It may spread to the kidneys.

Symptoms of a bladder infection in children include:

Signs that the infection may have spread to the kidneys include:

  • Chills with shaking
  • Fever
  • Flushed, warm, or reddened skin
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pain in the side (flank) or back
  • Severe pain in the belly area

A urine sample is needed to diagnose a UTI in a child. The sample is examined under a microscope and sent to a lab for a urine culture.

It may be hard to get a urine sample in a child who is not toilet trained. The test cannot be done using a wet diaper.

Ways to collect a urine sample in a very young child include:

  • Urine collection bag --  A special plastic bag is placed over the child's penis or vagina to catch the urine. This is not the best method because the sample may become contaminated.
  • Catheterized specimen urine culture -- A plastic tube (catheter) placed into home remedies for uti in 5 year old tip of the penis in boys, or straight into the urethra in girls, collects urine right from the bladder.
  • Suprapubic urine collection -- A needle is placed through the skin of the lower abdomen and muscles into the bladder. It is used to collect urine.

Imaging may be done home remedies for uti in 5 year old check for any anatomical abnormalities or to check kidney function, including:

Your health care provider will consider many things when deciding if and when a special study is needed, including:

  • The child's age and history of other UTIs (infants and younger children usually need follow-up tests)
  • The severity of the infection and how well it responds to treatment
  • Other medical problems or physical defects the child may have

In children, UTIs should be treated quickly with antibiotics to protect the kidneys. Any child under 6 months old or who has other complications should see a specialist right away.

Younger infants will most often need to stay in the hospital and be given antibiotics through a vein. Older infants and children are treated with antibiotics by mouth. If this is not possible, they may need to get treated in the hospital.

Your child should drink plenty of fluids when being treated for a UTI.

Some children may be treated with antibiotics for periods as long as 6 months to 2 years. This treatment is more likely when the child has had repeat infections or vesicoureteral reflux.

After antibiotics are finished, your child's provider may ask you to bring your child back to do another urine test. This may be needed to make sure that bacteria are no longer in the bladder.

Most children are cured with proper treatment. Most of the time, repeat infections can be prevented.

Repeated infections that involve the kidneys can lead to long-term damage to the kidneys.

Call your provider if your child's symptoms continue after treatment, or come back more than twice in 6 months or your child have:

  • Back pain or flank pain
  • Bad-smelling, bloody, or discolored urine
  • Fever of °F (39°C) in infants for longer than 24 hours
  • Low back pain or abdominal pain below the belly button
  • Fever that does not go away
  • Very frequent urination, or need to urinate many times during the night
  • Vomiting

Things you can do to prevent UTIs include:

  • Avoid giving your child bubble baths.
  • Have your child wear loose-fitting underpants and clothing.
  • Increase your child's intake of fluids.
  • Keep your child's genital area clean to prevent bacteria from entering through the urethra.
  • Teach your child to go the bathroom several times every day.
  • Teach your child to wipe the genital area from front to back to reduce the spread of bacteria.

To prevent recurrent UTIs, the provider may recommend low-dose antibiotics after the first symptoms have gone away.

UTI - children; Cystitis - children; Bladder infection - children; Kidney infection - children; Pyelonephritis - children

American Academy of Pediatrics. Subcommittee on urinary tract infection. Reaffirmation of AAP clinical practice guideline: the diagnosis and management of the initial urinary tract infection in febrile infants and young children months of age. Pediatrics. ;(6):e PMID: mynewextsetup.us

Jerardi KE and Jackson EC. Urinary tract infections. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM. eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; chap

Sobel JD, Brown P. Urinary tract infections. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ eds. Mandell, Douglas and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; chap

Wald ER. Urinary tract infections in infants and children. In: Kellerman RD, Rakel DP, eds. Conn's Current Therapy . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier;

Updated by: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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Mayo Clinic Q and A: Urinary tract infections in children

a medical illustration of the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra, with E. coli in the background, and a young girl holding her belly and looking distressed - illustrating UTIs in childrenDEAR MAYO CLINIC: What could be the cause of recurrent urinary tract infections in kids? Is it possible to prevent them, or are some kids just more susceptible?

ANSWER: Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, usually happen when bacteria get into the urinary tract through the urethra and begin to multiply in the bladder. In children, the most common causes of UTIs are constipation, incomplete bladder emptying and holding urine. You and your child can take several steps that may decrease the likelihood of recurrent UTIs.

A UTI is an infection in any part of the urinary system — the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra (the tube that carries urine from your bladder out of your body). Most infections involve the lower urinary tract — the bladder and the urethra. UTIs in children typically include symptoms such as a strong, persistent urge to urinate; a burning or painful sensation when urinating; or passing frequent, small amounts of urine.

In some cases, a UTI may lead to pelvic pain. Some children also may develop a fever. Although uncommon, the presence of a fever, back pain or vomiting may signal a more serious infection that could be affecting the kidneys. If your child has these symptoms, see his or her primary care provider for an evaluation right away. A referral should be made to see a pediatric urologist if your child has had a UTI accompanied by a fever.

Constipation is a frequent cause of UTIs in children. If stool fills up the rectum and colon, it can place pressure on, or even obstruct, the bladder, so the bladder cannot empty completely. The urine left in the bladder can be the perfect place for the growth of bacteria that may cause infection.

If your child has constipation, it’s important to treat it promptly. In most cases, children should have at least one soft bowel movement a day. If that’s not happening, talk to your child’s health care provider. Treatment for constipation ranges from self-care steps — such as eating more high-fiber foods, being more physically active and drinking more fluids (especially water) — to medication, such as stool softeners, fiber supplements and laxatives.

Children also may develop a UTI if they hold urine in for long periods of time, or if they don’t relax their pelvic floor muscles completely when they urinate. Encourage your child to use the bathroom regularly — about every two hours during the daytime. Make sure your child isn’t rushing when using the bathroom, but instead takes time to empty the home remedies for uti in 5 year old completely. Teach girls to wipe carefully from front to back after going to the bathroom.

The benefits of cranberry in helping to prevent and treat UTIs are often highlighted. But no solid evidence shows that it’s effective for children with recurrent UTIs. If you want to learn more, talk to your child’s health care provider.

Probiotics also have been publicized as being able to help to prevent UTIs. Found in food central bank of india college of commerce patna as yogurt, these microorganisms are a type of “good” bacteria that may help with digestion and protect the body from harmful bacteria. Their overall benefit in children with UTIs is debatable. If you want to learn more, talk to your child’s health care provider.

It is possible that an anatomic abnormality or problems with a child’s immune system can lead to recurrent UTIs without fevers, but both of these situations are rare.

If your child continues to have UTIs despite taking measures at home and in conjunction with your child’s health care provider to help prevent them, make a follow-up appointment to see your child’s health care provider. By reviewing the child’s symptoms and medical history, as well as doing a physical exam, your provider may be able to shed light on the underlying cause of recurrent UTIs, and determine if a referral to a subspecialist is necessary. — Dr. Candace Granberg, Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

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5 Ways to Conquer Painful UTI Symptoms

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home remedies for uti in 5 year old
home remedies for uti in 5 year old

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