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home remedies for sinus infection sore throat

Here are the most effective home remedies for a sore throat. help clear mucous membranes, keeping things flowing and preventing sinus infections. Pain medication. Throat Infections. A throat infection is often related to a bacterial or viral infection. Common bacteria and viruses that may cause a sore. Sinusitis is an infection of the sinuses. the back of the throat (postnasal drip); Headache; Cough; Pain or soreness over sinuses; Fever; Loss of smell.

: Home remedies for sinus infection sore throat

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Home remedies for sinus infection sore throat
Home remedies for sinus infection sore throat
Home remedies for sinus infection sore throat
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Can You Treat a Sinus Infection at Home?

Whether it is allergies, a cold, or the flu, most of us have experienced the unique discomfort of extreme sinus congestion. While there are many things that can make it feel like someone has stuffed an entire pillow inside your face, the sinus infection is a unique form capital one customer service contact us misery that is worse than a simple common cold or seasonal allergies.

What is Sinusitis?

A sinus infection, or sinusitis, is a condition where the tissues of the sinus cavities become infected and inflamed. Symptoms tend to be similar to those of the common cold, though there are some differences. The most recognizable symptoms include:

  • pain or pressure around the eyes, cheeks, and forehead
  • bad breath
  • blocked nose
  • nasal discharge
  • sinus headache
  • a heavy cough with thick mucus
  • reduced senses of taste and smell
  • fever
  • toothache
  • yellow or green mucus when you blow your nose
  • fatigue
  • post-nasal drip

Unlike the viruses that cause the common cold, sinus infections are typically caused by bacteria, though fungi and viruses can be responsible in rare occasions.

Sinus pressure is something many people feel after coming down with a cold or the flu. This pressure is caused by the mucosal layer lining the nasal passages becoming inflamed and swollen. When this happens, normal sinus drainage stops happening, allowing bacteria or fungi to build up, causing a sinus infection. This is also the reason a bacterial infection can follow exposure to allergens such as pollen or mold.

Some people are more prone than others to sinus infections. Those with a compromised immune system may find that bacteria form more readily in the nasal passages. People prone to seasonal allergies, or those who get colds easily, are at a greater risk for sinusitis.

Can You Get Rid of a Sinus Infection Without Antibiotics?

For most healthy people, even a moderate sinus infection can be cleared up if the nasal passages are allowed to drain. There are many different over-the-counter medications and home remedies that can provide relief from nasal congestion, and in some cases sinus infections can be handled by your body’s immune system.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications to treat sinus issues fall into a few different categories depending on your symptoms. Decongestants and antihistamines are designed to help alleviate the swelling that is preventing normal sinus drainage. Pain relievers such as ibuprofen can also help with reducing vans chima review and inflammation. Many cold and allergy relief drugs are a combination of two or three of these components.

In recent years, decongestant nasal sprays have become more popular, but increasing research is showing there can be dangers to this form of treatment. You should always be careful when using nasal sprays, and always follow treatment directions carefully. In most cases, you should not use a nasal spray for more than three days, as there is a risk of your nasal congestion getting worse over time with long-term use of sprays.

In addition to treating the sinus blockage itself, many people find it useful to take OTC pain relievers to alleviate the facial pain caused by swollen nasal passages. While pain medication such as ibuprofen will not reduce the amount of congestion, it can help you feel better while your sinus cavities heal.

One of the most effective ways to fight off a sinus infection is also the hardest for some of us to get. A little extra rest and a few good nights’ sleep will go a long way toward helping your body fight off an infection. In many cases, this is the goal of decongestants and pain relievers, as the symptoms of a sinus infection can keep you from sleeping soundly.

How Do You Get Rid of a Sinus Infection Naturally?

For those who want to limit their intake of all medications, including over-the-counter drugs, there are several natural home remedies that can provide relief from sinus pressure.

Many home remedies for sinus infections rely on hydration of the nasal passages. This can take the form of anything from holding a warm compress to your face, keeping your head over a bowl of hot water to breath in the steam, or even taking a hot shower. Increasing the amount of moisture in the nasal cavities can help flush irritants out of your nose, which will reduce your inflammation.

One of the most popular ways to treat a sinus infection at home is with the use of a neti pot. This treatment involves nasal irrigation where the sinuses are flushed with saline solution or distilled water either by pouring water from a neti pot or injecting it carefully into the sinuses with a bulb or syringe.

Just because nasal irrigation with a neti pot or small syringe is natural does not mean it is universally safe. It is vital that you use distilled water, as further infection can result from untreated tap water being placed in the sinus cavities. The infections caused by improper use of a neti pot have resulted in death, and for this reason some medical professionals are hesitant to recommend this treatment.

How Do You Treat Chronic Sinusitis?

Whether it is seasonal allergies that return every year like clockwork, or naturally small nasal passages that do not drain readily, some people find that chronic sinusitis is a part of life. In these cases, proactive treatment with decongestants and antihistamines can help to stave off the sinus congestion that can give rise to an infection.

Changes to your home environment such as eliminating dust and mold where possible and using a humidifier can all help provide relief as well. Many people who have recurring or chronic sinusitis also make use of steam therapy or neti pots to keep their sinus passages hydrated when symptoms begin. In extreme cases, having a doctor who knows your symptoms and knows when to give prescription medications may be necessary.

When Should I Ask My Doctor About a Farmers state bank cedar rapids Infection?

As with any other medical condition, it is imperative that you see a doctor if certain worrisome symptoms begin to appear. This is especially true during the ongoing COVID pandemic. While the first hint of sinus pain may not be a reason to head to the doctor, if you have been exposed to others who have tested positive or may be infected with the coronavirus, you should get tested if you begin feeling poorly. Similarly, a bit of nasal decongestion may not be cause for concern, but if you begin experiencing severe shortness of breath, get medical help immediately.

One of the reasons many people do not seek medical attention when they should is uncertainty about when they can get an appointment with their healthcare provider. At TrustCare, our many walk-in clinics are open every day of the week to make sure you can get the care you need without the hassle of making an appointment. If you are experiencing symptoms that seem like more than a bit of nasal congestion, visit one of our TrustCare locations today.

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How to Treat Post-Nasal Drip At Home

Post-nasal drip occurs when your sinuses produce excess mucus discharge that runs down the back of your throat. Under normal circumstances, the glands in your nose and throat produce mucus in order to moisten your nasal membranes and fight off infection.

Post-nasal drip has many possible causes, such as the common cold, a sinus infection, or allergies. If you are experiencing symptoms regularly, be sure to speak with your healthcare provider in order to identify the cause of your symptoms and discuss post-nasal drip treatment.

Symptoms of Post-Nasal Drip

When too much mucus builds up, post-nasal drip occurs, causing the following symptoms:

  • A sensation of liquid dripping from the back of your nose and into your throat
  • Cough that tends to worsen at night and/or when you're lying down
  • Sore throat
  • Tickling, scratchy, or itchy sensation at the back of your throat
  • Hoarse voice

Post-Nasal Drip: Overview and More

Home Remedies & Lifestyle

Here's a look at several all-natural remedies often used for mild cases of post-nasal drip. It should be noted that there is a lack of research on their effects, and none of these remedies should be used as a substitute for standard care.

Keep Fluid Intake High

Thick mucus is more likely to be uncomfortable and disrupt your breathing. Thinning it out can help to reduce blockages, reducing your risk of sinus or ear infections. An easy method to thin your mucus is to drink an adequate amount of fluids each day.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that women take in about 9 cups of fluid per day, and that men drink about cups. By checking the color of your urine, it's easy to tell whether you're adequately hydrated. Urine should be a pale yellow ("straw") color. Urine that is darker can be a sign of dehydration.

It is estimated that almost 33% of American adults are inadequately hydrated.

Avoid Cigarette Smoke

Chemicals in cigarettes can irritate your nasal passages and cause mucus to build up. This is the case whether you are a smoker yourself, or whether you are exposed to secondhand smoke. Not only is cigarette smoke an irritant, but it has been found to inhibit the natural process of clearing our airways.

Use Humidifiers

Using a cool mist humidifier can help to raise the moisture level in the home remedies for sinus infection sore throat. Dry air can worsen postnasal drip symptoms. The mist from a humidifier helps to moisten the tissues inside your sinuses and help to thin your secretions.

Eat Chicken Soup

Chicken soup is an old home remedy for many kinds of respiratory issues. Researchers have shown that chicken soup may have some modest anti-inflammatory effects during colds, but they note that the real benefits of chicken soup may have more to do with the psychosocial support that we receive when someone lovingly makes soup for us.

Try a Hot Shower

Some people find that the steam of a hot shower helps to decongest their sinuses. The steam may also have the added benefit of moisturizing dry sinuses and airways.

Dust and Sun times apartment rentals Regularly

This can help particularly if the cause of your post-nasal drip is allergies. Dusting and vacuuming regularly can help to manage allergies that are present year-round, like animal dander, dust mites, mold, and cockroaches.

OTC Treatment

There are many over-the-counter (OTC) remedies you can try to see whether they help with post-nasal drip. These are available without a prescription.

Medications

  • Antihistamines block the inflammation that happens in an allergic reaction. Examples include older antihistamines like Benadryl (diphenhydramine) and newer ones like Zyrtec (cetirizine) and Allegra (fexofenadine).
  • Decongestants help to constrict the blood vessels in the sinuses, leading to less swelling and stuffiness. Examples include medications like Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) and Sudafed PE (phenylephrine).
  • Glucocorticoid nasal spray medications like Flonase Allergy or Rhinocort help to lower inflammation home remedies for sinus infection sore throat inflamed tissues.

Saline Nasal Mist

A saline nasal spray has the advantage of directly moisturizing your sinuses and helping to thin secretions in your sinuses. Using saline is better than water because saline is more like the natural fluids in your body. Saline nasal spray has no medication in it, just salt and water.

Neti Pot

Nasal irrigation (a procedure that involves using a sterile salt-water rinse to clear the nasal passages) may help reduce post-nasal drip in people with chronic sinusitis and allergies, particularly with higher volumes home remedies for sinus infection sore throat saline, such as is found with syringes, squeeze bottles, and neti pots.

A neti pot is usually made of ceramic or plastic, and it resembles a flattened teapot. The sterile saline solution is placed inside the neti pot.

Tilting your head to the side, place your head low enough that your sinuses are lower than your throat. Put the spout of the neti pot into your nostril and begin to slowly pour the saline gently into one side of the nose, and it will flow out the other. You should not use tap water or any liquid that isn't sterile in your neti pot.

How to Use a Neti Pot for Health Benefits

Salt Water Gargle

Gargling with warm salt water may help to clear mucus from the back of the throat and soothe a sore throat. Similar to using saline to wash our sinuses, gargling with salt water can help to moisturize our tissues with a liquid more like our body's natural saline.

Try stirring 1 teaspoon of salt into 8 fluid ounces (1 cup) of lukewarm water. The water does not need to be sterile for this purpose.

When to See a Healthcare Provider

Home remedies may help provide some relief from the uncomfortable symptoms of post-nasal drip. While they may offer relief in mild cases, call your healthcare provider if:

  • You have trouble breathing because you're congested.
  • You have new symptoms, or your symptoms are worsening.
  • You have a fever, severe sinus pain, or other signs of an infection (such as yellow mucus).

While post-nasal drip is sometimes temporary, if you experience symptoms regularly, be sure to talk with your healthcare provider to determine the underlying cause. 

Frequently Asked Questions

How long does post-nasal drip last?

It depends on the cause. If the cause is a virus, it should resolve soon after symptoms, but some people with allergies have ongoing issues with post-nasal drip until their allergies are resolved.

What does post-nasal drip feel like?

Post-nasal drip can make you feel like you want to constantly clear your throat, give you a cough, or make your throat feel scratchy and irritated.

How do you stop post-nasal drip cough?

The best way to stop the cough is to stop the cause of the post-nasal drip. Remedies that thin the mucus, moisturize the airways, and relieve irritation in the throat can also help.

Why does post-nasal drip cause sore throat?

Frequent mucus drainage irritates the throat, as does repeatedly coughing and clearing the throat. The germs or allergens that trigger the post-nasal drip may also affect the throat directly.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Gordon B. How much water do you need? Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Reviewed March

  2. Chang T, Ravi N, Plegue MA, Sonneville KR, Davis MM. Inadequate hydration, BMI, and obesity among US adults: NHANES google store synchrony login Fam Med. ;14(4) home remedies for sinus infection sore throat /afm

  3. Reh DD, Higgins TS, Smith TL. Impact of tobacco smoke on chronic rhinosinusitis – a review of the literature. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. ;2(5) doi: /alr

  4. Rennard SI, Kalil AC, Casaburi R. Chicken soup in the time of covid.Chest. ;(3) doi: /mynewextsetup.us

  5. Hamilos DL. Patient education: Chronic rhinosinusitis (Beyond the Basics). UpToDate. Updated May 30,

  6. Piromchai P, Puvatanond C, Kirtsreesakul V, Chaiyasate S, Suwanwech T. A multicenter survey on the effectiveness of nasal irrigation devices in rhinosinusitis patients.Laryngoscope Investig Home remedies for sinus infection sore throat. ;5(6) doi: /lio

Additional Reading
  • Jaruvongvanich V, Mongkolpathumrat P, Chantaphakul H, Klaewsongkram J. Extranasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis are difficult to treat and affect quality of life. Allergol Int. Apr;65(2) doi/mynewextsetup.us

  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Get the facts: Drinking water and intake. Reviewed December 3,

  • Yu JL, Becker SS. Postnasal drip and postnasal drip-related cough. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. Feb;24(1) doi/MOO

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Sinusitis develops when mucus builds up in the cavities between the nose and head. This causes the cavities to become swollen and inflamed. The skeletal system has many air pockets or sinus cavities lined by the mucus membranes. Sinusitis disturbs the way mucus membrane drains and makes your nose stuffy and breathing difficult. Also Read: Top 3 Remedies To Try For Chronic Sinusitis

The regions around the eyes may look swollen and tender. A sinus infection or recurrent sinusitis can cause pain and pressure in your face and it may take a toll on your normal activities.

Having Breathing Trouble Due To Blocked Nose? Try Some Of Our Ayurvedic Supplements For Sinusitis!

Sinusitis relapses often which results in discomfort and pressure around the nose, poor sense of smell and taste, headache, fatigue and tiredness. Sinusitis is caused when the small hair cells that line the nose do not eliminate mucus causing blockages. Some of the causes for sinusitis include:

  • Viral or fungal or bacterial infections
  • Common cold
  • Allergies
  • Asthma
  • Other home remedies for sinus infection sore throat problems like deviated nasal septum or nasal polyps

People suffering from sinusitis lookout for simple and effective home remedies to ease pain and discomfort. Home remedies and palliative measures can work effectively to calm the irritated passage and improve the flow of mucus so that you don’t feel stuffed.
essential oils for sinus

1. Essential Oils

The amazing blend of eucalyptus, lavender and lemon essential oils works as a natural decongestant aid. The strong anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties of eucalyptus oil help in lessening the inflammation and combats infection. While lavender oil is calming for the mind and lemon oil is a potent analgesic eases pain.

Mix equal quantities of all the three oils and apply it gently over the face, forehead, temples and back of the neck with your fingers.

Take a deep breath and inhale the vapours of these essential oils.

2. Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV)

The immense amount of essential nutrients present in ACV reduces the symptoms associated with sinusitis. ACV aids in balancing the pH and clears out the excess mucus that has built up in the cavities. Furthermore, antibacterial and antifungal properties of ACV assist in battling the infection.

Take 2 teaspoons of ACV with ¼ cup of water you can either drink or swill this water home remedies for sinus infection sore throat better relief from sinusitis.

3. Ginger Tea

Ginger is imbued with a rich antioxidant profile which makes it an amazing natural remedy in treating sinusitis. The anti-inflammatory properties reduce the inflammation and irritation in the nasal passage. Moreover, being a natural antimicrobial agent, it helps in clearing t mobile simple choice plan vs t mobile one sinus infection. Also Read: Ginger The Healthiest Spice


Make a concoction of ginger tea by adding a few pieces of ginger in one cup of water, boil well for 10 minutes and drink this concoction thrice daily for instant relief from sinus.

4. Grapefruit Extract

Grapefruit extracts are loaded with an ample amount of vitamin C and antioxidants which bolsters the immune system. Quercetin the potent antioxidant in grapefruit extract works as a natural antihistamine. In addition, the antibacterial and antifungal properties of grapeseed extracts assist in treating sinus infections.

Mix a few drops of grapeseed extract in hot water and inhale vnb toll to get relieved from nose irritation and congestion.

5. Honey

The vast reserve of the antimicrobial agent in honey work against bacteria, fungus and viruses that causes sinus infections. Honey can calm the nasal passage, irritated throat and clear the excess mucus causing sinus. 

Blend a teaspoon of honey with 1 teaspoon of lemon juice and drink this mixture twice daily to get relief from sinus.

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HEAD CONGESTION: CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS

What is Head Congestion?

Head congestion refers to the pressure and discomfort you feel from a runny or stuffy nose. Though head congestion is usually harmless, it can leave you feeling miserable and exhausted for several days.

What Causes Head Congestion?

Your head g star hotel san jose occidental mindoro congested when mucus builds up, causing blood vessels in your nose to become inflamed and resulting in swollen tissues and head pressure. The cause for this extra mucus varies, but below are some common reasons you might be feeling stuffy.

A Common Cold

With more than 1 billion colds in the United States each year, it’s likely your head congestion is caused by the home remedies for sinus infection sore throat cold. When you catch a cold, a virus infects your nose and throat, resulting in head cold symptoms like a runny nose, sneezing, coughing and headaches.

This virus causes your nose to make thick, clear mucus, which helps wash away the germs from your nose and sinuses. This mucus also causes the nasal swelling that feels like head pressure.

When your nose swells, it can eventually interfere with your sinuses ability to drain, causing more mucus buildup. As a result, pressure builds and leads to pain in your forehead, between or behind your eyes and even your teeth.

If you’re experiencing head congestion, you probably want to know: How long does a head cold last? Most signs of a cold go away after seven to 10 days.

The Flu

Similarly, the influenza virus leads to head congestion by infecting your nose, throat and lungs, and causing nasal swelling. People often confuse a cold with the flu because their symptoms are similar. However, flu symptoms often come on quicker and are more severe, resulting in a fever, body aches, chills and more.

A Sinus Infection

Sometimes a runny nose and nasal swelling are actually a result of sinus congestion. Head and sinus congestion have different causes and treatments, but a sinus infection occurs when the swelling in your nose interferes with your sinuses’ ability to drain, causing a mucus buildup that attracts bacteria and other germs. If your cold symptoms haven’t improved after a week, see your doctor. You could be developing a sinus infection.

How to Relieve a Head Cold and Head Congestion

If you start to feel bad from nasal home remedies for sinus infection sore throat or a stuffy nose, you can take steps to improve your symptoms and make yourself more comfortable. Here are some remedies for head congestion. Be sure to talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns.

Rest

Whether you catch the cold or flu, what your body needs most is rest. Go to bed early, take naps when needed, and don’t be afraid to take time off work or keep your children home from school. Not only will this prevent you from overexerting yourself, but it also helps avoid spreading your germs to others.

Stay Hydrated

Drinking lots of fluids is key to helping your immune system function properly, so consume even more than you do when healthy. Water, fruit juices with vitamin C, clear broth or warm lemon water with honey do the best job of keeping you hydrated and loosening congestion. Alcoholic and caffeinated beverages like coffee or soda make dehydration worse, so avoid them until symptoms improve.

Add Moisture to the Air

Though it seems counterproductive, you don’t want your nasal passages to dry up. Dry airways can increase nasal swelling that leads to a stuffy nose and nasal congestion. Keep moisture in the air with a cool-mist vaporizer or humidifier; be sure to change the water and clean the unit properly. Steam from a shower or a best cd rates discover cup of tea can also add extra moisture to the nasal passages to help with drainage.

Don’t Use Antibiotics to Treat Colds

Because colds are caused by viruses and not by bacteria, antibiotics are ineffective at treating colds. They will not relieve your symptoms and inappropriate use can lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Get Ahead of Cold Symptoms

Though there’s no promise you’ll escape cold and flu season without a runny nose or sore throat, there are some steps you can take to increase your chances of staying healthy.

  • Wash your hands frequently to help prevent coming into contact with or five nights at freddys shirts harmful germs.
  • Disinfect your environment and frequently clean commonly touched surfaces such as sink handles, doorknobs and handrails.
  • Avoid sharing personal items, especially those that come in contact with your eyes, nose or mouth like utensils, washcloths or cups.
  • Do not come in close contact with people who have colds or other upper respiratory infections.

Overall, pursue a healthy home remedies for sinus infection sore throat to boost immunity by eating nutritious food, sleeping eight hours, drinking water, exercising and managing stress.

Fight Head Congestion with SUDAFED®

Consider taking SUDAFED PE® Head Congestion+Pain. With Ibuprofen (pain reliever) and phenylephrine (nasal decongestant), this coated tablet can help provide relief from your head cold symptoms and combat pesky nasal congestion and swelling, sinus pressure, headache, fever, and body aches. Always read and follow the label carefully, and make sure the product is right for you.

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Sinusitis

Most people with sinusitis don't need to see their GP. The condition is normally caused by a viral infection that clears up on its own.

Your symptoms will usually pass within two or three weeks (acute sinusitis) and you can look huntington national bank address yourself at home.

If the condition is severe, gets worse, or doesn't improve (chronic sinusitis), you may need additional treatment from your GP or a hospital specialist. This can be difficult to treat and it may be several months before you're feeling better.

Looking after yourself at home

If your symptoms are mild and have lasted less than a week or so, you can usually take care of yourself without seeing your GP.

The following tips may help you feel better until you recover:

  • Take over-the-counter painkillers such as paracetamol and ibuprofen to relieve a high temperature and pain – check the leaflet that comes with home remedies for sinus infection sore throat medication first to check it's suitable, and never give aspirin to children under 16 years of age.
  • Use over-the-counter decongestant nasal sprays or drops to help unblock your nose and allow you to breathe more easily – these shouldn't be used for more than a week at a time.
  • Apply warm packs to your face to soothe your pain and help mucus drain from your sinuses.
  • Regularly clean the inside of your nose with a salt water solution to help unblock your nose and reduce nasal discharge.

Cleaning inside your nose

You can clean the inside of your nose using either a home-made salt water solution or a solution made with sachets of ingredients bought from a pharmacy.

To make the solution at home, mix a teaspoon of salt and a teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda into a pint of boiled water that has been left to cool. To rinse mills v board of education of the district of columbia nose:

  • wash and dry your hands
  • stand over a sink, cup the palm of one hand and pour a small amount of the solution into it
  • sniff the water into one nostril at a time

Repeat these steps until your nose feels more comfortable (you may not need to use all of the solution). You should make a fresh solution each day. Don't re-use a solution made the day before.

Special devices you can use instead of your hand are also available for pharmacies. If you choose to use one of these, make sure you follow the manufacturer's instructions about using and cleaning it.

Treatments from your GP

See your GP if your symptoms are severe, don't start to improve within 7 to 10 days, or are getting worse. They may recommend additional treatment with corticosteroid drops or sprays, or antibiotics.

If these treatments don't help, you GP may refer you to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist for an assessment and to discuss whether surgery is a suitable option.

Corticosteroid drops or sprays

Corticosteroids, also known as steroids, are a group of medications that can help to reduce inflammation.

If you have persistent symptoms of sinusitis, your GP may prescribe steroid nasal drops or sprays to help reduce the swelling in your sinuses. These may need to be first bank financial centre for several months.

Possible side effects include nasal irritation, a sore throat and nosebleeds.

Antibiotics

If your GP thinks your sinuses may be infected with bacteria, they will prescribe a course of antibiotic tablets or capsules to treat the infection.

You'll usually need to take these for a week, although sometimes a longer course may be prescribed.

Possible side effects of antibiotics include feeling and being sick, diarrhoea and abdominal (tummy) pain.

Surgery

If your symptoms don't improve despite trying the treatments mentioned above, a type of surgery called functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) may be recommended. This is a procedure to improve the drainage of mucus from your sinuses.

FESS is usually carried out under general anaesthetic. During the procedure, the surgeon will insert an endoscope into your nose. This is a thin tube with a lens at one end that magnifies the inside of your nose. It will allow the surgeon to see the home remedies for sinus infection sore throat of your sinuses and insert small surgical instruments.

The surgeon will then either:

  • remove any tissues, such as nasal polyps (growths), that are blocking the affected sinus
  • inflate a tiny balloon in the drainage passages from your sinuses to widen them, before the balloon is deflated and gap visa signature credit card login (this is known as a balloon catheter dilation)

Potential side effects and risks of these procedures include temporary discomfort and crusting inside the nose, bleeding from the nose and infection. Make sure you discuss the risks with your surgeon beforehand.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) also provides information about balloon catheter dilation for chronic sinusitis.

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home remedies for sinus infection sore throat

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8 Effective, FAST, Natural Cold \u0026 Sinus Infection Remedies - Frugal Living - At Home Treatments

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Turmeric to Garlic: 5 powerful home remedies for sinus infection

We live in an era where speed is of the utmost essence and so falling ill is a luxury that we can&#;t afford. But every once in a while, we tend to fall sick despite taking all the necessary precautions. Blame it on the changing season or the irresistible dish that you ate from a nearby street vendor, cough and cold are an inevitable part of our body&#;s yearly cycle. While it&#;s relatively easier to deal with sore throats, colds, especially sinus infections can make your life a living hell (trust me!).

The downside is that sinus infection doesn&#;t clear up easily even on taking tons of antibiotic medication. So here are some simple homemade remedies that will help you clear out the infection in no time. But before you know how to cure it, let&#;s find out what you are up against&#;

Sinus infection is caused due to inflammation in the sinus cavities. Common cold, allergic rhinitis and small growths in the lining of the nose called nasal polyps accompanied with pain and tenderness in the face are some of its common symptoms.

Here are five simple home remedies to cure it:

Lemon-honey mixture

Lemon with honey

Lemon with honey (Photo: PxHere)

Honey is a natural antiseptic and consumption of Vitamin C helps in getting rid of Sinus. Lemon juice mixed with warm water can also be used to cure a sore throat and it works just as well for a sinus infection as well.

Remedy: Slice and squeeze a lemon> Add the juice to a cup of lukewarm water> Add honey to taste.
Tip: For fast relief drink this mixture at least twice in a day.

Garlic

Garlic

Garlic (Photo: Wikimedia)

You can easily recognise garlic from its typical smell. Even though the spice smells terrible, it&#;s power-packed with a lot of substances that can help you get rid of certain bacteria, viruses, and even fungi.

Remedy: Add one crushed garlic to a cup of boiled water> Inhale the steam.

Turmeric

Turmeric

Turmeric (Photo: Wikipedia)

Turmeric not only contains powerful antioxidants but also has a component called curcumin that can be very helpful for clearing up the sinus.

Remedy:Add one tablespoon of turmeric powder to a cup of hot water> Drink it.
Tip: Drink it thrice a day for better results.

ALSO READ: 13 Beers served in India that you can totally afford. Cheapest one is for Rs 30

Tea tree oil

Tea Tree Oil

Tea Tree Oil (Photo: Wikimedia)

It&#;s antimicrobial, antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal properties can easily provide you relief from any infection. Plus it&#;s good for getting rid of pimples as well.

Remedy: Add few drops of tea tree oil to hot water> Inhale the steam.

ALSO READ: The really fattening food that your favourite celeb eat on their CHEAT days

Ginger

Ginger

Ginger (Photo: Pixabay)

Ginger is one of the very useful spices used commonly in the kitchen. Add to your veggies or to your tea, it&#;s an all-rounder spice loaded with health benefits. The good part is that it can also provide relief from a sinus headache.

Remedy: Slice a ginger and add it to a cup of hot water> Cover the cup and let it steep for 10 minutes> Drink it.

For interesting entertainment and lifestyle videos from InUth, follow us on mynewextsetup.us

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Sinusitis (sinus infection)

Sinusitis is swelling of the sinuses, usually caused by an infection. It's common and usually clears up on its own within 2 to 3 weeks. But medicines can help if it's taking a long time to go away.

Check if you have sinusitis

Sinusitis is common after a cold or flu.

Symptoms of sinusitis include:

  • pain, swelling and tenderness around your cheeks, eyes or forehead
  • a blocked nose
  • a reduced sense of smell
  • green or yellow mucus from your nose
  • a sinus headache
  • a high temperature
  • toothache
  • bad breath

Signs of sinusitis in young children may also include irritability, difficulty feeding, and breathing through their mouth.

How you can treat sinusitis yourself

You can often treat mild sinusitis without seeing a GP by:

  • getting plenty of rest
  • drinking plenty of fluids
  • taking painkillers, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen (do not give aspirin to children under 16)
  • avoiding allergic triggers and not smoking
  • cleaning your nose with a salt water solution to ease congestion

A pharmacist can help with sinusitis

A pharmacist can advise you about medicines that can help, such as:

  • decongestant nasal sprays or drops to unblock your nose (decongestants should not be taken by children under 6)
  • salt water nasal sprays or solutions to rinse out the inside of your nose

You can buy nasal sprays without a prescription, but they should not be used for more than 1 week.

Find a pharmacy

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:

  • your symptoms are severe
  • painkillers do not help or your symptoms get worse
  • your symptoms do not improve after 1 week
  • you keep getting sinusitis
Information:

Coronavirus (COVID) update: how to contact a GP

It's still important to get help from a GP if you need it. To contact your GP surgery:

  • visit their website
  • use the NHS App
  • call them

Find out about using the NHS during COVID

Treatment for sinusitis from a GP

If you have sinusitis, a GP may be able to recommend other medicines to help with your symptoms, such as:

  • steroid nasal sprays or drops – to reduce the swelling in your sinuses
  • antihistamines – if an allergy is causing your symptoms
  • antibiotics – if a bacterial infection is causing your symptoms and you're very unwell or at risk of complications (but antibiotics are often not needed, as sinusitis is usually caused by a virus)

You might need to take steroid nasal sprays or drops for a few months. They sometimes cause irritation, sore throats or nosebleeds.

A GP may refer you to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist if, for example, you:

  • still have sinusitis after 3 months of treatment
  • keep getting sinusitis
  • only have symptoms on 1 side of your face

They may also recommend surgery in some cases.

Surgery for sinusitis

Surgery to treat chronic sinusitis is called functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS).

FESS is carried out under general anaesthetic (where you're asleep).

The surgeon can widen your sinuses by either:

  • removing some of the blocked tissue
  • inflating a tiny balloon in the blocked sinuses, then removing it

You should be able to have FESS within 18 weeks of your GP appointment.

The ENT UK website has more information about FESS.

Page last reviewed: 02 February
Next review due: 02 February

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

HEAD CONGESTION: CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS

What is Head Congestion?

Head congestion refers to the pressure and discomfort you feel from a runny or stuffy nose. Though head congestion is usually harmless, it can leave you feeling miserable and exhausted for several days.

What Causes Head Congestion?

Your head feels congested when mucus builds up, causing blood vessels in your nose to become inflamed and resulting in swollen tissues and head pressure. The cause for this extra mucus varies, but below are some common reasons you might be feeling stuffy.

A Common Cold

With more than 1 billion colds in the United States each year, it’s likely your head congestion is caused by the common cold. When you catch a cold, a virus infects your nose and throat, resulting in head cold symptoms like a runny nose, sneezing, coughing and headaches.

This virus causes your nose to make thick, clear mucus, which helps wash away the germs from your nose and sinuses. This mucus also causes the nasal swelling that feels like head pressure.

When your nose swells, it can eventually interfere with your sinuses ability to drain, causing more mucus buildup. As a result, pressure builds and leads to pain in your forehead, between or behind your eyes and even your teeth.

If you’re experiencing head congestion, you probably want to know: How long does a head cold last? Most signs of a cold go away after seven to 10 days.

The Flu

Similarly, the influenza virus leads to head congestion by infecting your nose, throat and lungs, and causing nasal swelling. People often confuse a cold with the flu because their symptoms are similar. However, flu symptoms often come on quicker and are more severe, resulting in a fever, body aches, chills and more.

A Sinus Infection

Sometimes a runny nose and nasal swelling are actually a result of sinus congestion. Head and sinus congestion have different causes and treatments, but a sinus infection occurs when the swelling in your nose interferes with your sinuses’ ability to drain, causing a mucus buildup that attracts bacteria and other germs. If your cold symptoms haven’t improved after a week, see your doctor. You could be developing a sinus infection.

How to Relieve a Head Cold and Head Congestion

If you start to feel bad from nasal swelling or a stuffy nose, you can take steps to improve your symptoms and make yourself more comfortable. Here are some remedies for head congestion. Be sure to talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns.

Rest

Whether you catch the cold or flu, what your body needs most is rest. Go to bed early, take naps when needed, and don’t be afraid to take time off work or keep your children home from school. Not only will this prevent you from overexerting yourself, but it also helps avoid spreading your germs to others.

Stay Hydrated

Drinking lots of fluids is key to helping your immune system function properly, so consume even more than you do when healthy. Water, fruit juices with vitamin C, clear broth or warm lemon water with honey do the best job of keeping you hydrated and loosening congestion. Alcoholic and caffeinated beverages like coffee or soda make dehydration worse, so avoid them until symptoms improve.

Add Moisture to the Air

Though it seems counterproductive, you don’t want your nasal passages to dry up. Dry airways can increase nasal swelling that leads to a stuffy nose and nasal congestion. Keep moisture in the air with a cool-mist vaporizer or humidifier; be sure to change the water and clean the unit properly. Steam from a shower or a hot cup of tea can also add extra moisture to the nasal passages to help with drainage.

Don’t Use Antibiotics to Treat Colds

Because colds are caused by viruses and not by bacteria, antibiotics are ineffective at treating colds. They will not relieve your symptoms and inappropriate use can lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Get Ahead of Cold Symptoms

Though there’s no promise you’ll escape cold and flu season without a runny nose or sore throat, there are some steps you can take to increase your chances of staying healthy.

  • Wash your hands frequently to help prevent coming into contact with or spreading harmful germs.
  • Disinfect your environment and frequently clean commonly touched surfaces such as sink handles, doorknobs and handrails.
  • Avoid sharing personal items, especially those that come in contact with your eyes, nose or mouth like utensils, washcloths or cups.
  • Do not come in close contact with people who have colds or other upper respiratory infections.

Overall, pursue a healthy lifestyle to boost immunity by eating nutritious food, sleeping eight hours, drinking water, exercising and managing stress.

Fight Head Congestion with SUDAFED®

Consider taking SUDAFED PE® Head Congestion+Pain. With Ibuprofen (pain reliever) and phenylephrine (nasal decongestant), this coated tablet can help provide relief from your head cold symptoms and combat pesky nasal congestion and swelling, sinus pressure, headache, fever, and body aches. Always read and follow the label carefully, and make sure the product is right for you.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

How to Treat Post-Nasal Drip At Home

Post-nasal drip occurs when your sinuses produce excess mucus discharge that runs down the back of your throat. Under normal circumstances, the glands in your nose and throat produce mucus in order to moisten your nasal membranes and fight off infection.

Post-nasal drip has many possible causes, such as the common cold, a sinus infection, or allergies. If you are experiencing symptoms regularly, be sure to speak with your healthcare provider in order to identify the cause of your symptoms and discuss post-nasal drip treatment.

Symptoms of Post-Nasal Drip

When too much mucus builds up, post-nasal drip occurs, causing the following symptoms:

  • A sensation of liquid dripping from the back of your nose and into your throat
  • Cough that tends to worsen at night and/or when you're lying down
  • Sore throat
  • Tickling, scratchy, or itchy sensation at the back of your throat
  • Hoarse voice

Post-Nasal Drip: Overview and More

Home Remedies & Lifestyle

Here's a look at several all-natural remedies often used for mild cases of post-nasal drip. It should be noted that there is a lack of research on their effects, and none of these remedies should be used as a substitute for standard care.

Keep Fluid Intake High

Thick mucus is more likely to be uncomfortable and disrupt your breathing. Thinning it out can help to reduce blockages, reducing your risk of sinus or ear infections. An easy method to thin your mucus is to drink an adequate amount of fluids each day.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that women take in about 9 cups of fluid per day, and that men drink about cups. By checking the color of your urine, it's easy to tell whether you're adequately hydrated. Urine should be a pale yellow ("straw") color. Urine that is darker can be a sign of dehydration.

It is estimated that almost 33% of American adults are inadequately hydrated.

Avoid Cigarette Smoke

Chemicals in cigarettes can irritate your nasal passages and cause mucus to build up. This is the case whether you are a smoker yourself, or whether you are exposed to secondhand smoke. Not only is cigarette smoke an irritant, but it has been found to inhibit the natural process of clearing our airways.

Use Humidifiers

Using a cool mist humidifier can help to raise the moisture level in the air. Dry air can worsen postnasal drip symptoms. The mist from a humidifier helps to moisten the tissues inside your sinuses and help to thin your secretions.

Eat Chicken Soup

Chicken soup is an old home remedy for many kinds of respiratory issues. Researchers have shown that chicken soup may have some modest anti-inflammatory effects during colds, but they note that the real benefits of chicken soup may have more to do with the psychosocial support that we receive when someone lovingly makes soup for us.

Try a Hot Shower

Some people find that the steam of a hot shower helps to decongest their sinuses. The steam may also have the added benefit of moisturizing dry sinuses and airways.

Dust and Vacuum Regularly

This can help particularly if the cause of your post-nasal drip is allergies. Dusting and vacuuming regularly can help to manage allergies that are present year-round, like animal dander, dust mites, mold, and cockroaches.

OTC Treatment

There are many over-the-counter (OTC) remedies you can try to see whether they help with post-nasal drip. These are available without a prescription.

Medications

  • Antihistamines block the inflammation that happens in an allergic reaction. Examples include older antihistamines like Benadryl (diphenhydramine) and newer ones like Zyrtec (cetirizine) and Allegra (fexofenadine).
  • Decongestants help to constrict the blood vessels in the sinuses, leading to less swelling and stuffiness. Examples include medications like Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) and Sudafed PE (phenylephrine).
  • Glucocorticoid nasal spray medications like Flonase Allergy or Rhinocort help to lower inflammation in inflamed tissues.

Saline Nasal Mist

A saline nasal spray has the advantage of directly moisturizing your sinuses and helping to thin secretions in your sinuses. Using saline is better than water because saline is more like the natural fluids in your body. Saline nasal spray has no medication in it, just salt and water.

Neti Pot

Nasal irrigation (a procedure that involves using a sterile salt-water rinse to clear the nasal passages) may help reduce post-nasal drip in people with chronic sinusitis and allergies, particularly with higher volumes of saline, such as is found with syringes, squeeze bottles, and neti pots.

A neti pot is usually made of ceramic or plastic, and it resembles a flattened teapot. The sterile saline solution is placed inside the neti pot.

Tilting your head to the side, place your head low enough that your sinuses are lower than your throat. Put the spout of the neti pot into your nostril and begin to slowly pour the saline gently into one side of the nose, and it will flow out the other. You should not use tap water or any liquid that isn't sterile in your neti pot.

How to Use a Neti Pot for Health Benefits

Salt Water Gargle

Gargling with warm salt water may help to clear mucus from the back of the throat and soothe a sore throat. Similar to using saline to wash our sinuses, gargling with salt water can help to moisturize our tissues with a liquid more like our body's natural saline.

Try stirring 1 teaspoon of salt into 8 fluid ounces (1 cup) of lukewarm water. The water does not need to be sterile for this purpose.

When to See a Healthcare Provider

Home remedies may help provide some relief from the uncomfortable symptoms of post-nasal drip. While they may offer relief in mild cases, call your healthcare provider if:

  • You have trouble breathing because you're congested.
  • You have new symptoms, or your symptoms are worsening.
  • You have a fever, severe sinus pain, or other signs of an infection (such as yellow mucus).

While post-nasal drip is sometimes temporary, if you experience symptoms regularly, be sure to talk with your healthcare provider to determine the underlying cause. 

Frequently Asked Questions

How long does post-nasal drip last?

It depends on the cause. If the cause is a virus, it should resolve soon after symptoms, but some people with allergies have ongoing issues with post-nasal drip until their allergies are resolved.

What does post-nasal drip feel like?

Post-nasal drip can make you feel like you want to constantly clear your throat, give you a cough, or make your throat feel scratchy and irritated.

How do you stop post-nasal drip cough?

The best way to stop the cough is to stop the cause of the post-nasal drip. Remedies that thin the mucus, moisturize the airways, and relieve irritation in the throat can also help.

Why does post-nasal drip cause sore throat?

Frequent mucus drainage irritates the throat, as does repeatedly coughing and clearing the throat. The germs or allergens that trigger the post-nasal drip may also affect the throat directly.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Gordon B. How much water do you need? Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Reviewed March

  2. Chang T, Ravi N, Plegue MA, Sonneville KR, Davis MM. Inadequate hydration, BMI, and obesity among US adults: NHANES – Ann Fam Med. ;14(4) doi: /afm

  3. Reh DD, Higgins TS, Smith TL. Impact of tobacco smoke on chronic rhinosinusitis – a review of the literature. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. ;2(5) doi: /alr

  4. Rennard SI, Kalil AC, Casaburi R. Chicken soup in the time of covid.Chest. ;(3) doi: /mynewextsetup.us

  5. Hamilos DL. Patient education: Chronic rhinosinusitis (Beyond the Basics). UpToDate. Updated May 30,

  6. Piromchai P, Puvatanond C, Kirtsreesakul V, Chaiyasate S, Suwanwech T. A multicenter survey on the effectiveness of nasal irrigation devices in rhinosinusitis patients.Laryngoscope Investig Otolaryngol. ;5(6) doi: /lio

Additional Reading
  • Jaruvongvanich V, Mongkolpathumrat P, Chantaphakul H, Klaewsongkram J. Extranasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis are difficult to treat and affect quality of life. Allergol Int. Apr;65(2) doi/mynewextsetup.us

  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Get the facts: Drinking water and intake. Reviewed December 3,

  • Yu JL, Becker SS. Postnasal drip and postnasal drip-related cough. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. Feb;24(1) doi/MOO

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Can You Treat a Sinus Infection at Home?

Whether it is allergies, a cold, or the flu, most of us have experienced the unique discomfort of extreme sinus congestion. While there are many things that can make it feel like someone has stuffed an entire pillow inside your face, the sinus infection is a unique form of misery that is worse than a simple common cold or seasonal allergies.

What is Sinusitis?

A sinus infection, or sinusitis, is a condition where the tissues of the sinus cavities become infected and inflamed. Symptoms tend to be similar to those of the common cold, though there are some differences. The most recognizable symptoms include:

  • pain or pressure around the eyes, cheeks, and forehead
  • bad breath
  • blocked nose
  • nasal discharge
  • sinus headache
  • a heavy cough with thick mucus
  • reduced senses of taste and smell
  • fever
  • toothache
  • yellow or green mucus when you blow your nose
  • fatigue
  • post-nasal drip

Unlike the viruses that cause the common cold, sinus infections are typically caused by bacteria, though fungi and viruses can be responsible in rare occasions.

Sinus pressure is something many people feel after coming down with a cold or the flu. This pressure is caused by the mucosal layer lining the nasal passages becoming inflamed and swollen. When this happens, normal sinus drainage stops happening, allowing bacteria or fungi to build up, causing a sinus infection. This is also the reason a bacterial infection can follow exposure to allergens such as pollen or mold.

Some people are more prone than others to sinus infections. Those with a compromised immune system may find that bacteria form more readily in the nasal passages. People prone to seasonal allergies, or those who get colds easily, are at a greater risk for sinusitis.

Can You Get Rid of a Sinus Infection Without Antibiotics?

For most healthy people, even a moderate sinus infection can be cleared up if the nasal passages are allowed to drain. There are many different over-the-counter medications and home remedies that can provide relief from nasal congestion, and in some cases sinus infections can be handled by your body’s immune system.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications to treat sinus issues fall into a few different categories depending on your symptoms. Decongestants and antihistamines are designed to help alleviate the swelling that is preventing normal sinus drainage. Pain relievers such as ibuprofen can also help with reducing swelling and inflammation. Many cold and allergy relief drugs are a combination of two or three of these components.

In recent years, decongestant nasal sprays have become more popular, but increasing research is showing there can be dangers to this form of treatment. You should always be careful when using nasal sprays, and always follow treatment directions carefully. In most cases, you should not use a nasal spray for more than three days, as there is a risk of your nasal congestion getting worse over time with long-term use of sprays.

In addition to treating the sinus blockage itself, many people find it useful to take OTC pain relievers to alleviate the facial pain caused by swollen nasal passages. While pain medication such as ibuprofen will not reduce the amount of congestion, it can help you feel better while your sinus cavities heal.

One of the most effective ways to fight off a sinus infection is also the hardest for some of us to get. A little extra rest and a few good nights’ sleep will go a long way toward helping your body fight off an infection. In many cases, this is the goal of decongestants and pain relievers, as the symptoms of a sinus infection can keep you from sleeping soundly.

How Do You Get Rid of a Sinus Infection Naturally?

For those who want to limit their intake of all medications, including over-the-counter drugs, there are several natural home remedies that can provide relief from sinus pressure.

Many home remedies for sinus infections rely on hydration of the nasal passages. This can take the form of anything from holding a warm compress to your face, keeping your head over a bowl of hot water to breath in the steam, or even taking a hot shower. Increasing the amount of moisture in the nasal cavities can help flush irritants out of your nose, which will reduce your inflammation.

One of the most popular ways to treat a sinus infection at home is with the use of a neti pot. This treatment involves nasal irrigation where the sinuses are flushed with saline solution or distilled water either by pouring water from a neti pot or injecting it carefully into the sinuses with a bulb or syringe.

Just because nasal irrigation with a neti pot or small syringe is natural does not mean it is universally safe. It is vital that you use distilled water, as further infection can result from untreated tap water being placed in the sinus cavities. The infections caused by improper use of a neti pot have resulted in death, and for this reason some medical professionals are hesitant to recommend this treatment.

How Do You Treat Chronic Sinusitis?

Whether it is seasonal allergies that return every year like clockwork, or naturally small nasal passages that do not drain readily, some people find that chronic sinusitis is a part of life. In these cases, proactive treatment with decongestants and antihistamines can help to stave off the sinus congestion that can give rise to an infection.

Changes to your home environment such as eliminating dust and mold where possible and using a humidifier can all help provide relief as well. Many people who have recurring or chronic sinusitis also make use of steam therapy or neti pots to keep their sinus passages hydrated when symptoms begin. In extreme cases, having a doctor who knows your symptoms and knows when to give prescription medications may be necessary.

When Should I Ask My Doctor About a Sinus Infection?

As with any other medical condition, it is imperative that you see a doctor if certain worrisome symptoms begin to appear. This is especially true during the ongoing COVID pandemic. While the first hint of sinus pain may not be a reason to head to the doctor, if you have been exposed to others who have tested positive or may be infected with the coronavirus, you should get tested if you begin feeling poorly. Similarly, a bit of nasal decongestion may not be cause for concern, but if you begin experiencing severe shortness of breath, get medical help immediately.

One of the reasons many people do not seek medical attention when they should is uncertainty about when they can get an appointment with their healthcare provider. At TrustCare, our many walk-in clinics are open every day of the week to make sure you can get the care you need without the hassle of making an appointment. If you are experiencing symptoms that seem like more than a bit of nasal congestion, visit one of our TrustCare locations today.

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home remedies for sinus infection sore throat

Home remedies for sinus infection sore throat -

Sinusitis (sinus infection)

Sinusitis is swelling of the sinuses, usually caused by an infection. It's common and usually clears up on its own within 2 to 3 weeks.

Medicines can help if it's taking a long time to go away.

Check if you have sinusitis

Sinusitis is common after a cold or the flu.

Symptoms of sinusitis include:

  • pain, swelling and tenderness around your cheeks, eyes or forehead
  • a blocked nose
  • reduced sense of smell
  • green or yellow mucus from your nose
  • a sinus headache
  • a high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius or above
  • toothache
  • bad breath

Signs of sinusitis in young children may also include:

  • irritability
  • difficulty feeding
  • difficulty breathing through their mouth

What the sinuses are

The sinuses are small, empty spaces behind your cheekbones and forehead. They connect to the inside of the nose.

Sinusitis causes the lining of the sinuses to swell up. This stops mucus draining into your nose and throat properly, making you feel blocked up.

Treating sinusitis yourself

You can often treat mild sinusitis without seeing a GP by:

  • getting plenty of rest
  • drinking plenty of fluids
  • taking painkillers like paracetamol or ibuprofen
  • holding a warm clean flannel over your face for a few minutes several times a day
  • cleaning your nose with a salt water solution to ease congestion
Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Sinusitis develops when mucus builds up in the cavities between the nose and head. This causes the cavities to become swollen and inflamed. The skeletal system has many air pockets or sinus cavities lined by the mucus membranes. Sinusitis disturbs the way mucus membrane drains and makes your nose stuffy and breathing difficult. Also Read: Top 3 Remedies To Try For Chronic Sinusitis

The regions around the eyes may look swollen and tender. A sinus infection or recurrent sinusitis can cause pain and pressure in your face and it may take a toll on your normal activities.

Having Breathing Trouble Due To Blocked Nose? Try Some Of Our Ayurvedic Supplements For Sinusitis!

Sinusitis relapses often which results in discomfort and pressure around the nose, poor sense of smell and taste, headache, fatigue and tiredness. Sinusitis is caused when the small hair cells that line the nose do not eliminate mucus causing blockages. Some of the causes for sinusitis include:

  • Viral or fungal or bacterial infections
  • Common cold
  • Allergies
  • Asthma
  • Other health problems like deviated nasal septum or nasal polyps

People suffering from sinusitis lookout for simple and effective home remedies to ease pain and discomfort. Home remedies and palliative measures can work effectively to calm the irritated passage and improve the flow of mucus so that you don’t feel stuffed.
essential oils for sinus

1. Essential Oils

The amazing blend of eucalyptus, lavender and lemon essential oils works as a natural decongestant aid. The strong anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties of eucalyptus oil help in lessening the inflammation and combats infection. While lavender oil is calming for the mind and lemon oil is a potent analgesic eases pain.

Mix equal quantities of all the three oils and apply it gently over the face, forehead, temples and back of the neck with your fingers.

Take a deep breath and inhale the vapours of these essential oils.

2. Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV)

The immense amount of essential nutrients present in ACV reduces the symptoms associated with sinusitis. ACV aids in balancing the pH and clears out the excess mucus that has built up in the cavities. Furthermore, antibacterial and antifungal properties of ACV assist in battling the infection.

Take 2 teaspoons of ACV with ¼ cup of water you can either drink or swill this water for better relief from sinusitis.

3. Ginger Tea

Ginger is imbued with a rich antioxidant profile which makes it an amazing natural remedy in treating sinusitis. The anti-inflammatory properties reduce the inflammation and irritation in the nasal passage. Moreover, being a natural antimicrobial agent, it helps in clearing the sinus infection. Also Read: Ginger The Healthiest Spice


Make a concoction of ginger tea by adding a few pieces of ginger in one cup of water, boil well for 10 minutes and drink this concoction thrice daily for instant relief from sinus.

4. Grapefruit Extract

Grapefruit extracts are loaded with an ample amount of vitamin C and antioxidants which bolsters the immune system. Quercetin the potent antioxidant in grapefruit extract works as a natural antihistamine. In addition, the antibacterial and antifungal properties of grapeseed extracts assist in treating sinus infections.

Mix a few drops of grapeseed extract in hot water and inhale it to get relieved from nose irritation and congestion.

5. Honey

The vast reserve of the antimicrobial agent in honey work against bacteria, fungus and viruses that causes sinus infections. Honey can calm the nasal passage, irritated throat and clear the excess mucus causing sinus. 

Blend a teaspoon of honey with 1 teaspoon of lemon juice and drink this mixture twice daily to get relief from sinus.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

HEAD CONGESTION: CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS

What is Head Congestion?

Head congestion refers to the pressure and discomfort you feel from a runny or stuffy nose. Though head congestion is usually harmless, it can leave you feeling miserable and exhausted for several days.

What Causes Head Congestion?

Your head feels congested when mucus builds up, causing blood vessels in your nose to become inflamed and resulting in swollen tissues and head pressure. The cause for this extra mucus varies, but below are some common reasons you might be feeling stuffy.

A Common Cold

With more than 1 billion colds in the United States each year, it’s likely your head congestion is caused by the common cold. When you catch a cold, a virus infects your nose and throat, resulting in head cold symptoms like a runny nose, sneezing, coughing and headaches.

This virus causes your nose to make thick, clear mucus, which helps wash away the germs from your nose and sinuses. This mucus also causes the nasal swelling that feels like head pressure.

When your nose swells, it can eventually interfere with your sinuses ability to drain, causing more mucus buildup. As a result, pressure builds and leads to pain in your forehead, between or behind your eyes and even your teeth.

If you’re experiencing head congestion, you probably want to know: How long does a head cold last? Most signs of a cold go away after seven to 10 days.

The Flu

Similarly, the influenza virus leads to head congestion by infecting your nose, throat and lungs, and causing nasal swelling. People often confuse a cold with the flu because their symptoms are similar. However, flu symptoms often come on quicker and are more severe, resulting in a fever, body aches, chills and more.

A Sinus Infection

Sometimes a runny nose and nasal swelling are actually a result of sinus congestion. Head and sinus congestion have different causes and treatments, but a sinus infection occurs when the swelling in your nose interferes with your sinuses’ ability to drain, causing a mucus buildup that attracts bacteria and other germs. If your cold symptoms haven’t improved after a week, see your doctor. You could be developing a sinus infection.

How to Relieve a Head Cold and Head Congestion

If you start to feel bad from nasal swelling or a stuffy nose, you can take steps to improve your symptoms and make yourself more comfortable. Here are some remedies for head congestion. Be sure to talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns.

Rest

Whether you catch the cold or flu, what your body needs most is rest. Go to bed early, take naps when needed, and don’t be afraid to take time off work or keep your children home from school. Not only will this prevent you from overexerting yourself, but it also helps avoid spreading your germs to others.

Stay Hydrated

Drinking lots of fluids is key to helping your immune system function properly, so consume even more than you do when healthy. Water, fruit juices with vitamin C, clear broth or warm lemon water with honey do the best job of keeping you hydrated and loosening congestion. Alcoholic and caffeinated beverages like coffee or soda make dehydration worse, so avoid them until symptoms improve.

Add Moisture to the Air

Though it seems counterproductive, you don’t want your nasal passages to dry up. Dry airways can increase nasal swelling that leads to a stuffy nose and nasal congestion. Keep moisture in the air with a cool-mist vaporizer or humidifier; be sure to change the water and clean the unit properly. Steam from a shower or a hot cup of tea can also add extra moisture to the nasal passages to help with drainage.

Don’t Use Antibiotics to Treat Colds

Because colds are caused by viruses and not by bacteria, antibiotics are ineffective at treating colds. They will not relieve your symptoms and inappropriate use can lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Get Ahead of Cold Symptoms

Though there’s no promise you’ll escape cold and flu season without a runny nose or sore throat, there are some steps you can take to increase your chances of staying healthy.

  • Wash your hands frequently to help prevent coming into contact with or spreading harmful germs.
  • Disinfect your environment and frequently clean commonly touched surfaces such as sink handles, doorknobs and handrails.
  • Avoid sharing personal items, especially those that come in contact with your eyes, nose or mouth like utensils, washcloths or cups.
  • Do not come in close contact with people who have colds or other upper respiratory infections.

Overall, pursue a healthy lifestyle to boost immunity by eating nutritious food, sleeping eight hours, drinking water, exercising and managing stress.

Fight Head Congestion with SUDAFED®

Consider taking SUDAFED PE® Head Congestion+Pain. With Ibuprofen (pain reliever) and phenylephrine (nasal decongestant), this coated tablet can help provide relief from your head cold symptoms and combat pesky nasal congestion and swelling, sinus pressure, headache, fever, and body aches. Always read and follow the label carefully, and make sure the product is right for you.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Sinusitis

Most people with sinusitis don't need to see their GP. The condition is normally caused by a viral infection that clears up on its own.

Your symptoms will usually pass within two or three weeks (acute sinusitis) and you can look after yourself at home.

If the condition is severe, gets worse, or doesn't improve (chronic sinusitis), you may need additional treatment from your GP or a hospital specialist. This can be difficult to treat and it may be several months before you're feeling better.

Looking after yourself at home

If your symptoms are mild and have lasted less than a week or so, you can usually take care of yourself without seeing your GP.

The following tips may help you feel better until you recover:

  • Take over-the-counter painkillers such as paracetamol and ibuprofen to relieve a high temperature and pain – check the leaflet that comes with your medication first to check it's suitable, and never give aspirin to children under 16 years of age.
  • Use over-the-counter decongestant nasal sprays or drops to help unblock your nose and allow you to breathe more easily – these shouldn't be used for more than a week at a time.
  • Apply warm packs to your face to soothe your pain and help mucus drain from your sinuses.
  • Regularly clean the inside of your nose with a salt water solution to help unblock your nose and reduce nasal discharge.

Cleaning inside your nose

You can clean the inside of your nose using either a home-made salt water solution or a solution made with sachets of ingredients bought from a pharmacy.

To make the solution at home, mix a teaspoon of salt and a teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda into a pint of boiled water that has been left to cool. To rinse your nose:

  • wash and dry your hands
  • stand over a sink, cup the palm of one hand and pour a small amount of the solution into it
  • sniff the water into one nostril at a time

Repeat these steps until your nose feels more comfortable (you may not need to use all of the solution). You should make a fresh solution each day. Don't re-use a solution made the day before.

Special devices you can use instead of your hand are also available for pharmacies. If you choose to use one of these, make sure you follow the manufacturer's instructions about using and cleaning it.

Treatments from your GP

See your GP if your symptoms are severe, don't start to improve within 7 to 10 days, or are getting worse. They may recommend additional treatment with corticosteroid drops or sprays, or antibiotics.

If these treatments don't help, you GP may refer you to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist for an assessment and to discuss whether surgery is a suitable option.

Corticosteroid drops or sprays

Corticosteroids, also known as steroids, are a group of medications that can help to reduce inflammation.

If you have persistent symptoms of sinusitis, your GP may prescribe steroid nasal drops or sprays to help reduce the swelling in your sinuses. These may need to be used for several months.

Possible side effects include nasal irritation, a sore throat and nosebleeds.

Antibiotics

If your GP thinks your sinuses may be infected with bacteria, they will prescribe a course of antibiotic tablets or capsules to treat the infection.

You'll usually need to take these for a week, although sometimes a longer course may be prescribed.

Possible side effects of antibiotics include feeling and being sick, diarrhoea and abdominal (tummy) pain.

Surgery

If your symptoms don't improve despite trying the treatments mentioned above, a type of surgery called functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) may be recommended. This is a procedure to improve the drainage of mucus from your sinuses.

FESS is usually carried out under general anaesthetic. During the procedure, the surgeon will insert an endoscope into your nose. This is a thin tube with a lens at one end that magnifies the inside of your nose. It will allow the surgeon to see the opening of your sinuses and insert small surgical instruments.

The surgeon will then either:

  • remove any tissues, such as nasal polyps (growths), that are blocking the affected sinus
  • inflate a tiny balloon in the drainage passages from your sinuses to widen them, before the balloon is deflated and removed (this is known as a balloon catheter dilation)

Potential side effects and risks of these procedures include temporary discomfort and crusting inside the nose, bleeding from the nose and infection. Make sure you discuss the risks with your surgeon beforehand.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) also provides information about balloon catheter dilation for chronic sinusitis.

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How to Treat Post-Nasal Drip At Home

Post-nasal drip occurs when your sinuses produce excess mucus discharge that runs down the back of your throat. Under normal circumstances, the glands in your nose and throat produce mucus in order to moisten your nasal membranes and fight off infection.

Post-nasal drip has many possible causes, such as the common cold, a sinus infection, or allergies. If you are experiencing symptoms regularly, be sure to speak with your healthcare provider in order to identify the cause of your symptoms and discuss post-nasal drip treatment.

Symptoms of Post-Nasal Drip

When too much mucus builds up, post-nasal drip occurs, causing the following symptoms:

  • A sensation of liquid dripping from the back of your nose and into your throat
  • Cough that tends to worsen at night and/or when you're lying down
  • Sore throat
  • Tickling, scratchy, or itchy sensation at the back of your throat
  • Hoarse voice

Post-Nasal Drip: Overview and More

Home Remedies & Lifestyle

Here's a look at several all-natural remedies often used for mild cases of post-nasal drip. It should be noted that there is a lack of research on their effects, and none of these remedies should be used as a substitute for standard care.

Keep Fluid Intake High

Thick mucus is more likely to be uncomfortable and disrupt your breathing. Thinning it out can help to reduce blockages, reducing your risk of sinus or ear infections. An easy method to thin your mucus is to drink an adequate amount of fluids each day.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that women take in about 9 cups of fluid per day, and that men drink about cups. By checking the color of your urine, it's easy to tell whether you're adequately hydrated. Urine should be a pale yellow ("straw") color. Urine that is darker can be a sign of dehydration.

It is estimated that almost 33% of American adults are inadequately hydrated.

Avoid Cigarette Smoke

Chemicals in cigarettes can irritate your nasal passages and cause mucus to build up. This is the case whether you are a smoker yourself, or whether you are exposed to secondhand smoke. Not only is cigarette smoke an irritant, but it has been found to inhibit the natural process of clearing our airways.

Use Humidifiers

Using a cool mist humidifier can help to raise the moisture level in the air. Dry air can worsen postnasal drip symptoms. The mist from a humidifier helps to moisten the tissues inside your sinuses and help to thin your secretions.

Eat Chicken Soup

Chicken soup is an old home remedy for many kinds of respiratory issues. Researchers have shown that chicken soup may have some modest anti-inflammatory effects during colds, but they note that the real benefits of chicken soup may have more to do with the psychosocial support that we receive when someone lovingly makes soup for us.

Try a Hot Shower

Some people find that the steam of a hot shower helps to decongest their sinuses. The steam may also have the added benefit of moisturizing dry sinuses and airways.

Dust and Vacuum Regularly

This can help particularly if the cause of your post-nasal drip is allergies. Dusting and vacuuming regularly can help to manage allergies that are present year-round, like animal dander, dust mites, mold, and cockroaches.

OTC Treatment

There are many over-the-counter (OTC) remedies you can try to see whether they help with post-nasal drip. These are available without a prescription.

Medications

  • Antihistamines block the inflammation that happens in an allergic reaction. Examples include older antihistamines like Benadryl (diphenhydramine) and newer ones like Zyrtec (cetirizine) and Allegra (fexofenadine).
  • Decongestants help to constrict the blood vessels in the sinuses, leading to less swelling and stuffiness. Examples include medications like Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) and Sudafed PE (phenylephrine).
  • Glucocorticoid nasal spray medications like Flonase Allergy or Rhinocort help to lower inflammation in inflamed tissues.

Saline Nasal Mist

A saline nasal spray has the advantage of directly moisturizing your sinuses and helping to thin secretions in your sinuses. Using saline is better than water because saline is more like the natural fluids in your body. Saline nasal spray has no medication in it, just salt and water.

Neti Pot

Nasal irrigation (a procedure that involves using a sterile salt-water rinse to clear the nasal passages) may help reduce post-nasal drip in people with chronic sinusitis and allergies, particularly with higher volumes of saline, such as is found with syringes, squeeze bottles, and neti pots.

A neti pot is usually made of ceramic or plastic, and it resembles a flattened teapot. The sterile saline solution is placed inside the neti pot.

Tilting your head to the side, place your head low enough that your sinuses are lower than your throat. Put the spout of the neti pot into your nostril and begin to slowly pour the saline gently into one side of the nose, and it will flow out the other. You should not use tap water or any liquid that isn't sterile in your neti pot.

How to Use a Neti Pot for Health Benefits

Salt Water Gargle

Gargling with warm salt water may help to clear mucus from the back of the throat and soothe a sore throat. Similar to using saline to wash our sinuses, gargling with salt water can help to moisturize our tissues with a liquid more like our body's natural saline.

Try stirring 1 teaspoon of salt into 8 fluid ounces (1 cup) of lukewarm water. The water does not need to be sterile for this purpose.

When to See a Healthcare Provider

Home remedies may help provide some relief from the uncomfortable symptoms of post-nasal drip. While they may offer relief in mild cases, call your healthcare provider if:

  • You have trouble breathing because you're congested.
  • You have new symptoms, or your symptoms are worsening.
  • You have a fever, severe sinus pain, or other signs of an infection (such as yellow mucus).

While post-nasal drip is sometimes temporary, if you experience symptoms regularly, be sure to talk with your healthcare provider to determine the underlying cause. 

Frequently Asked Questions

How long does post-nasal drip last?

It depends on the cause. If the cause is a virus, it should resolve soon after symptoms, but some people with allergies have ongoing issues with post-nasal drip until their allergies are resolved.

What does post-nasal drip feel like?

Post-nasal drip can make you feel like you want to constantly clear your throat, give you a cough, or make your throat feel scratchy and irritated.

How do you stop post-nasal drip cough?

The best way to stop the cough is to stop the cause of the post-nasal drip. Remedies that thin the mucus, moisturize the airways, and relieve irritation in the throat can also help.

Why does post-nasal drip cause sore throat?

Frequent mucus drainage irritates the throat, as does repeatedly coughing and clearing the throat. The germs or allergens that trigger the post-nasal drip may also affect the throat directly.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Gordon B. How much water do you need? Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Reviewed March

  2. Chang T, Ravi N, Plegue MA, Sonneville KR, Davis MM. Inadequate hydration, BMI, and obesity among US adults: NHANES – Ann Fam Med. ;14(4) doi: /afm

  3. Reh DD, Higgins TS, Smith TL. Impact of tobacco smoke on chronic rhinosinusitis – a review of the literature. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. ;2(5) doi: /alr

  4. Rennard SI, Kalil AC, Casaburi R. Chicken soup in the time of covid.Chest. ;(3) doi: /mynewextsetup.us

  5. Hamilos DL. Patient education: Chronic rhinosinusitis (Beyond the Basics). UpToDate. Updated May 30,

  6. Piromchai P, Puvatanond C, Kirtsreesakul V, Chaiyasate S, Suwanwech T. A multicenter survey on the effectiveness of nasal irrigation devices in rhinosinusitis patients.Laryngoscope Investig Otolaryngol. ;5(6) doi: /lio

Additional Reading
  • Jaruvongvanich V, Mongkolpathumrat P, Chantaphakul H, Klaewsongkram J. Extranasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis are difficult to treat and affect quality of life. Allergol Int. Apr;65(2) doi/mynewextsetup.us

  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Get the facts: Drinking water and intake. Reviewed December 3,

  • Yu JL, Becker SS. Postnasal drip and postnasal drip-related cough. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. Feb;24(1) doi/MOO

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Can You Treat a Sinus Infection at Home?

Whether it is allergies, a cold, or the flu, most of us have experienced the unique discomfort of extreme sinus congestion. While there are many things that can make it feel like someone has stuffed an entire pillow inside your face, the sinus infection is a unique form of misery that is worse than a simple common cold or seasonal allergies.

What is Sinusitis?

A sinus infection, or sinusitis, is a condition where the tissues of the sinus cavities become infected and inflamed. Symptoms tend to be similar to those of the common cold, though there are some differences. The most recognizable symptoms include:

  • pain or pressure around the eyes, cheeks, and forehead
  • bad breath
  • blocked nose
  • nasal discharge
  • sinus headache
  • a heavy cough with thick mucus
  • reduced senses of taste and smell
  • fever
  • toothache
  • yellow or green mucus when you blow your nose
  • fatigue
  • post-nasal drip

Unlike the viruses that cause the common cold, sinus infections are typically caused by bacteria, though fungi and viruses can be responsible in rare occasions.

Sinus pressure is something many people feel after coming down with a cold or the flu. This pressure is caused by the mucosal layer lining the nasal passages becoming inflamed and swollen. When this happens, normal sinus drainage stops happening, allowing bacteria or fungi to build up, causing a sinus infection. This is also the reason a bacterial infection can follow exposure to allergens such as pollen or mold.

Some people are more prone than others to sinus infections. Those with a compromised immune system may find that bacteria form more readily in the nasal passages. People prone to seasonal allergies, or those who get colds easily, are at a greater risk for sinusitis.

Can You Get Rid of a Sinus Infection Without Antibiotics?

For most healthy people, even a moderate sinus infection can be cleared up if the nasal passages are allowed to drain. There are many different over-the-counter medications and home remedies that can provide relief from nasal congestion, and in some cases sinus infections can be handled by your body’s immune system.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications to treat sinus issues fall into a few different categories depending on your symptoms. Decongestants and antihistamines are designed to help alleviate the swelling that is preventing normal sinus drainage. Pain relievers such as ibuprofen can also help with reducing swelling and inflammation. Many cold and allergy relief drugs are a combination of two or three of these components.

In recent years, decongestant nasal sprays have become more popular, but increasing research is showing there can be dangers to this form of treatment. You should always be careful when using nasal sprays, and always follow treatment directions carefully. In most cases, you should not use a nasal spray for more than three days, as there is a risk of your nasal congestion getting worse over time with long-term use of sprays.

In addition to treating the sinus blockage itself, many people find it useful to take OTC pain relievers to alleviate the facial pain caused by swollen nasal passages. While pain medication such as ibuprofen will not reduce the amount of congestion, it can help you feel better while your sinus cavities heal.

One of the most effective ways to fight off a sinus infection is also the hardest for some of us to get. A little extra rest and a few good nights’ sleep will go a long way toward helping your body fight off an infection. In many cases, this is the goal of decongestants and pain relievers, as the symptoms of a sinus infection can keep you from sleeping soundly.

How Do You Get Rid of a Sinus Infection Naturally?

For those who want to limit their intake of all medications, including over-the-counter drugs, there are several natural home remedies that can provide relief from sinus pressure.

Many home remedies for sinus infections rely on hydration of the nasal passages. This can take the form of anything from holding a warm compress to your face, keeping your head over a bowl of hot water to breath in the steam, or even taking a hot shower. Increasing the amount of moisture in the nasal cavities can help flush irritants out of your nose, which will reduce your inflammation.

One of the most popular ways to treat a sinus infection at home is with the use of a neti pot. This treatment involves nasal irrigation where the sinuses are flushed with saline solution or distilled water either by pouring water from a neti pot or injecting it carefully into the sinuses with a bulb or syringe.

Just because nasal irrigation with a neti pot or small syringe is natural does not mean it is universally safe. It is vital that you use distilled water, as further infection can result from untreated tap water being placed in the sinus cavities. The infections caused by improper use of a neti pot have resulted in death, and for this reason some medical professionals are hesitant to recommend this treatment.

How Do You Treat Chronic Sinusitis?

Whether it is seasonal allergies that return every year like clockwork, or naturally small nasal passages that do not drain readily, some people find that chronic sinusitis is a part of life. In these cases, proactive treatment with decongestants and antihistamines can help to stave off the sinus congestion that can give rise to an infection.

Changes to your home environment such as eliminating dust and mold where possible and using a humidifier can all help provide relief as well. Many people who have recurring or chronic sinusitis also make use of steam therapy or neti pots to keep their sinus passages hydrated when symptoms begin. In extreme cases, having a doctor who knows your symptoms and knows when to give prescription medications may be necessary.

When Should I Ask My Doctor About a Sinus Infection?

As with any other medical condition, it is imperative that you see a doctor if certain worrisome symptoms begin to appear. This is especially true during the ongoing COVID pandemic. While the first hint of sinus pain may not be a reason to head to the doctor, if you have been exposed to others who have tested positive or may be infected with the coronavirus, you should get tested if you begin feeling poorly. Similarly, a bit of nasal decongestion may not be cause for concern, but if you begin experiencing severe shortness of breath, get medical help immediately.

One of the reasons many people do not seek medical attention when they should is uncertainty about when they can get an appointment with their healthcare provider. At TrustCare, our many walk-in clinics are open every day of the week to make sure you can get the care you need without the hassle of making an appointment. If you are experiencing symptoms that seem like more than a bit of nasal congestion, visit one of our TrustCare locations today.

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