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Home remedies for flu


home remedies for flu

12 Flu Natural Remedies, Including Best Foods · 1. Vitamin C (1, mg 3–4x daily) · 2. Vitamin D3 (2, IU daily) · 3. Echinacea (1, mg 2–3x. 9 Home Remedies to Relieve Flu Symptoms · 1. Drink plenty of fluids. Staying hydrated is one of the most important ways to manage flu. · 2. Get. ' Another oldie: try a mustard plaster for chest congestion. Grind up three tablespoons of mustard seeds, add water to make a paste, and then.
home remedies for flu

Home remedies for flu -

11 Popular Natural Remedies for the Common Cold

The common cold is an infection of your nose and throat caused by viruses. We typically catch between two and four colds a year.

Symptoms of the common cold, which usually appear one to three days after being exposed to a cold virus include a runny nose, cough, nasal congestion, sore throat, sneezing, watery eyes, mild headache, mild fatigue, body aches, and fever less than degrees.

Cold Remedies

Here is a look at 11 of the more popular natural remedies for the prevention and treatment of the common cold. In addition to these remedies, certain foods may also help to boost the immune system and additional remedies may be recommended for cough relief and post-nasal drip.

Keep in mind that scientific support for the claim that any remedy can treat colds is lacking and that alternative medicine should not be used as a substitute for standard care. If you're considering the use of any remedy for a cold, make sure to consult your physician first.

1) Zinc Lozenges

Zinc is an essential mineral that is required by more than enzymes in our bodies. It’s found naturally in foods such as meat, liver, seafood, and eggs. The full recommended daily allowance (RDA) is 12 mg for women and 15 mg for men, an amount found in a typical multivitamin.

Zinc lozenges are often found in health stores, online, and in some drug stores marketed as cold remedies. A number of studies have found that zinc helped to reduce the duration of cold symptoms, especially if people started taking it within 24 hours after cold symptoms appear. Zinc also reduced the severity of symptoms and decreased the duration of symptoms by three to four days. The problem is that many of these zinc studies have had flaws, so better-quality studies are needed. Zinc lozenges may work by blocking the cold virus from replicating (preventing it from spreading) or by impairing the ability of the cold virus to enter cells in the nose and throat.

The zinc lozenges used in the studies contained a minimum of mg of elemental zinc. The lozenges were taken every two hours during the day, starting immediately after the onset of cold symptoms. The studies that found zinc to be ineffective may have used a dose of zinc that was too low or had taste-enhancing compounds known to decrease the effectiveness of zinc, such as citric acid (found in citrus fruit), tartaric acid, sorbitol, or mannitol.

Zinc lozenges usually contain either zinc gluconate or zinc acetate, providing mg of elemental zinc in each lozenge. It's typically recommended that people take one lozenge every two to four hours during the day for a maximum of six to 12 lozenges a day.

Side effects of zinc may include nausea and an unpleasant taste in the mouth. Zinc lozenges are not recommended to prevent colds or for long-term use, because zinc supplements in excess of 15 mg per day may interfere with the absorption of the mineral copper and result in a copper deficiency.

2) Vitamin D

There is some evidence suggesting that people with higher levels of vitamin D may have a reduced risk of catching a common cold.

3) Astragalus

Astragalus root has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine to strengthen immunity and prevent colds and flu. Studies have found that astragalus has antiviral properties and stimulates the immune system, although there have been no clinical trials examining the effectiveness of astragalus against colds in humans.

Astragalus is also an antioxidant and has been suggested for conditions such as heart disease. It's being investigated as a possible herbal treatment for people with health conditions that weaken their immune systems.

Astragalus can be found in capsule, tea, or extract form at health food stores or as a dried root in Chinese herbal shops and some health food stores. The dried root can be difficult to find.

Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners usually recommend taking astragalus to prevent colds and to avoid it if you're already sick. A bowl of soup boiled with astragalus root is often recommended once or more per week throughout the winter to prevent colds.

Astragalus may increase the potency of antiviral medications such as acyclovir or interferon, thereby worsening the potential side effects of these drugs (such as possible kidney failure and other side effects). It could also possibly counteract immune-suppressing drugs such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Neosar) or corticosteroids. It may lower blood glucose or blood pressure, increasing the effects of blood pressure or diabetes medications.

Uses of Astragalus for Health

4) Garlic

Garlic is one of the more popular home cures for colds. Many cultures have a home remedy for the cold using garlic, whether it’s chicken soup with lots of garlic, a drink made with raw crushed garlic, or if it just involves eating raw garlic.

The cold-fighting compound in garlic is thought to be allicin, which has demonstrated antibacterial and antifungal properties. Allicin is what gives garlic its distinctive hot flavor. To maximize the amount of allicin, fresh garlic should be chopped or crushed, and it should be raw. It’s also available in pill form.

In one study involving people, participants received either a garlic supplement or a placebo for 12 weeks between November and February. People who took garlic reduced the risk of catching a cold by more than half. The study also found that garlic reduced the recovery time in people who caught a cold. More research is needed to corroborate these results.

Garlic does have some possible side effects and safety concerns. Bad breath and body odor are perhaps the most common side effects; however, dizziness, sweating, headache, fever, chills, and runny nose have also been reported. Large amounts may irritate the mouth or result in indigestion.

Garlic supplements should be avoided by people with bleeding disorders, two weeks before or after surgery, or by those taking "blood-thinning" medications such as warfarin (Coumadin) or supplements believed to affect blood clotting such as vitamin E or ginkgo.

Garlic may also lower blood glucose levels and increase the release of insulin, so it should be used with caution by people taking drugs that lower blood sugar. People with allergies to plants in the lily family (including onion, leeks, and chives) should avoid garlic. Pregnant women should avoid garlic in supplement form because it may increase the risk of bleeding.

5) Vitamin C

In , Linus Pauling, PhD, proposed the theory that people had individual requirements for various vitamins and some needed amounts higher than the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs). Pauling proposed that 1, mg of vitamin C daily could reduce the incidence of colds for most people. Since then, vitamin C has become a popular cold remedy.

A review by the Cochrane Collaboration examined whether vitamin C supplements in doses of mg or more a day could reduce the incidence, duration, or severity of the common cold. The researchers analyzed 30 previously published studies (involving a total of 11, participants) that met their quality criteria. They found that vitamin C didn’t appear to prevent the common cold. There was a slight reduction in the length and severity of cold symptoms. It appeared to markedly reduce the risk of catching a cold in people involved brief, intense physical activity (such as marathon running or skiing), or in those exposed to cold temperatures.

Vitamin C in amounts over 2, mg may cause diarrhea, loose stools, and gas.

Health Benefits of Vitamin C

6) Honey

Honey is a popular home remedy for cough and colds in many cultures. A new study in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine provides the first evidence showing that honey may help to calm children's coughs and help them sleep better. Researchers gave children with colds either honey, honey-flavored cough medicine, or no treatment. All of the children got better, but honey consistently scored best in parents' rating of their children's cough symptoms.

The researchers say that honey may work by coating and soothing an irritated throat and it’s believed to have antioxidant and antibacterial effects. Dark-colored honey, such as the buckwheat honey used in the study, is particularly high in antioxidants.

Honey isn't recommended for infants younger than 1 year because of the risk of botulism. Regular use of honey at night may also promote cavities developing.

7) Echinacea

Although recent findings question the use of echinacea for colds and flu, it’s still one of the most popular herbs used today. A study by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that echinacea did little to prevent or shorten the common cold. There were many critics of the study, who say that the study shouldn't be used as evidence that echinacea doesn't work. The Cochrane Collaboration conducted a review of 15 studies on echinacea, however, and found that it wasn't more effective than a placebo at preventing colds.

Although there are several types of echinacea, the above-ground parts (the leaves, flowers, and stems) of echinacea purpurea have been subject to the most research.

Herbalists often recommend taking echinacea every two to three hours with a total daily dose of three or more grams per day at the first sign of symptoms. After several days, the dose is usually reduced and continued for the following week. Echinacea is also an ingredient in Airborne, a supplement containing vitamins and herbs sold over the counter.

8) Ginseng

Although there are many types of ginseng, one cultivated in North America called Panax quinquefolius or “North American ginseng" has become popular as a remedy for colds and flu. Compounds called polysaccharides and ginsenosides are thought to be the active constituents in ginseng. One of the more popular ginseng products is Cold-fX.

Two studies tested Cold-fX in nursing home residents, who received either Cold-fX or a placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of people who contracted the flu and no difference in the severity or duration of the flu. The researchers analyzed the results of the two studies together and only then did the results show that Cold-fX reduced the incidence of the flu. Although it's popular and some people swear by it, large, well-designed, independent trials are needed to determine the safety and effectiveness of this product.

There is some concern that ginseng may reduce the effectiveness of "blood-thinning" (anticlotting or antiplatelet) drugs such as warfarin (Coumadin) or aspirin. It may interact with diabetes medications, antidepressants known as MAO inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs (e.g., chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), olanzapine (Zyprexa)), drugs that stimulate the central nervous system (used to treat conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, narcolepsy, obesity, and heart conditions) and estrogen replacement therapy or oral contraceptives.

Ginseng root is thought to have estrogen-like properties and is usually not recommended for people with hormone-related conditions such as uterine fibroids, endometriosis, and cancers of the breast, ovaries, uterus or prostate. People with heart conditions, schizophrenia, or diabetes also shouldn’t take ginseng root unless under a doctor’s supervision. The manufacturer of Cold-fX indicates on their website that because their product isn't a whole plant extract but contains a certain compound found in ginseng, it doesn't have the side effects and safety concerns commonly associated with ginseng; although that's possible, there isn't published safety data confirming these claims.

What Is American Ginseng?

9) Ginger

Ginger root is another folk remedy for a cough, colds, and sore throat. It's used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat coughs and is also for colds accompanied by a runny nose with a clear nasal discharge, headache, neck and shoulder aches, and a white tongue coating. In Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India, ginger is also used for coughing and colds.

Hot ginger tea is a popular home remedy for cold symptoms and sore throat. Honey and lemon are sometimes added.

Although normal amounts of ginger in food rarely causes side effects, excessive amounts may cause heartburn and indigestion. People with gallstones, bleeding disorders and those taking "blood-thinning" (anticlotting and antiplatelet) medications such as aspirin and warfarin (Coumadin) should consult a doctor before taking ginger. Ginger should be avoided two weeks before or after surgery.

10) Elderberry

Elderberry (Sambucus nigra) is a herb that has a long history of use as a folk remedy for colds, sinus infections, and the flu. In preliminary lab studies, elderberry extracts have been found to fight off viruses. There has been limited research done and much of it involves the flu virus. Researchers believe that anthocyanins, compounds found naturally in elderberries, maybe the active component that strengthens the immune system and blocks the flu virus from sticking to our cells.

Health food stores carry elderberry juice, syrup, and capsules. Side effects, although rare, may include mild indigestion or allergic reactions.

Only commercially prepared extracts of elderberry berries should be used, because the fresh leaves, flowers, bark, young buds, unripe berries, and roots contain cyanide and could potentially result in cyanide poisoning.

Elderberry for Cold Symptoms

11) Eucalyptus Steam Inhalation

A steam inhalation with eucalyptus oil may help to alleviate symptoms from colds and flu. It is thought to work by thinning mucus in the respiratory tract.

If You Love Essential Oils, Make Sure You're Not Allergic

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Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

Additional Reading
  • Douglas RM, Hemilä H, Chalker E, Treacy B. Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. Jul 18;(3):CD

  • Linde K, Barrett B, Wolkart K, Bauer R, Melchart D. Echinacea for preventing and treating the common cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 1 (): CD

  • Predy GN, Goel V, Lovlin R, Donner A, Stitt L, Basu TK. Efficacy of an extract of North American ginseng containing poly-furanosyl-pyranosyl-saccharides for preventing upper respiratory tract infections: a randomized controlled trial. CMAJ ():

  • Silk R, LeFante C. Safety of zinc gluconate glycine (Cold-Eeze) in a geriatric population: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Am J Ther. ():

  • Zakay-Rones Z, Thom E, Wollan T, Wadstein J. Randomized study of the efficacy and safety of oral elderberry extract in the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. J Int Med Res. ():

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Are there any home remedies for the flu?

There are many natural home remedies that can help alleviate flu symptoms. These include:

  • Hydrating
  • Soup
  • Relaxing – be a couch potato!
  • Breathing moist air – a humidifier
  • Cough drops, throat lozenges and hard candies
  • Gargling with salt water

Other questions related to Flu

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Safe home remedies for your child's cough, cold, or flu

Lots of rest (all ages)

How this helps:

It takes energy to fight an infection, and that can wear out a child (and even adults). When your child rests, he's healing, which is exactly what he needs to do.

What you need:

  • A comfortable place for your child to rest
  • Quiet activities to occupy him

What to do:

Read to your child, or play an audiobook or music while he rests. Encourage quiet activities like coloring or finger rhymes (like "The Itsy Bitsy Spider").

Sometimes a change of scenery, such as a tent in the living room or a pillow fort in the corner of your office, is helpful. If the weather is nice, set up a comfortable place in the yard or on the porch.

Baby sleep tips:

Don't worry if your baby is sleeping more than usual while he's sick. Let him go to bed a little earlier than his usual bedtime or sleep in a little later, if you can. He may even want an extra nap &#; just make sure it doesn't interfere with his bedtime.

At the same time, it can be challenging to get an uncomfortably sick baby to sleep soundly. Here are some tips that may help him get better-quality sleep:

  • Try not to be out and about at nap time. Keep things as quiet and unstimulating as possible during his usual sleep times so that he can drift off easily.
  • Get him as comfy as you can before he falls asleep. For example, use a bulb syringe or nasal aspirator if he's stuffed up and humidify his room (see below).
  • Give him a warm bath. It's calming and may help relieve congestion, too.

Extra fluids (all ages)

How this helps:

Drinking plenty of fluids prevents dehydration. It may also help thin your child's nasal secretions, making it easier to flush them out.

What you need:

  • Breast milk, formula, water, or other clear fluids

What to do:

If your baby is younger than 12 months, simply breastfeeding or formula feeding more frequently is the best way to keep her well hydrated. And if your baby is having trouble at the breast or bottle because of stuffiness, try suctioning her nose first. If that doesn't help, you might try giving her expressed milk or formula in a cup.

For toddlers and older children, offer plain water. You can also give fruit smoothies or ice pops made from percent juice; follow the recommended juice amounts set by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

Caution:

Stick to breast milk or formula for babies younger than 6 months unless your doctor tells you otherwise. Babies that young don't need water, and too much could actually be harmful.

Humidity to help thin mucus (all ages)

How this helps:

Breathing moist air helps loosen the mucus in the nasal passages. A warm bath has the added benefit of relaxing your child.

What you need:

  • A vaporizer, a cool-mist humidifier, or a steamy bathroom

What to do:

Use a vaporizer or a cool-mist humidifier in your child's bedroom when he's sleeping, resting, or playing in the room.

Caution:

Thoroughly clean and dry your humidifier every day. Mold and bacteria can accumulate inside it, and these can then spray into the air when you run the humidifier.

Instead of using a vaporizer or humidifier, you can give your little one a warm bath in a steamy bathroom. Let a hot shower run for a few minutes before getting the tub ready. Let him play in the bath as long as he likes (supervised, of course).

If it's not bath time, create your own steam room:

  1. Close the bathroom door.
  2. Use a towel to block the gap under the door.
  3. Run hot water in the tub or shower for a few minutes.
  4. Sit in the steamy room with your child for about 15 minutes.

Saline drops and nasal aspirator (all ages)

How this helps:

When kids are too young to blow their nose well, saline drops and a nasal aspirator can clear the nose. Using an aspirator works well for young babies, especially if a stuffy nose interferes with breastfeeding or bottle feeding. (Try using it about 15 minutes beforehand.) But if your older child doesn't mind the procedure, there's no reason not to do it.

What you need:

  • A nasal aspirator. This can be a simple rubber bulb syringe or a device with tubing that allows you to suction out the mucus with a mouthpiece.
  • Saline (salt water) nose drops or saline spray for infants and children. Both are available at pharmacies without a prescription.

You also can prepare saline drops at home. The AAP suggests mixing 1/2 teaspoon table salt with 1 cup warm water (see caution below).

Caution: 

When making saline drops, the FDA recommends using only store-bought distilled or sterile water, or tap water that you've boiled for three to five minutes and cooled until lukewarm. Organisms in untreated tap water can survive in nasal passages and cause serious infection. Bacteria can grow in the solution, so don't keep it for more than 24 hours.

What to do:

To administer saline drops:

  1. Tip your child's head back, or lay her on her back with a rolled-up towel supporting her head.
  2. Squeeze two or three drops of saline solution into each nostril.
  3. Gently massage your child's nostrils. Wait a minute or two for the saline solution to thin and soften the mucus before suctioning.

To suction with a bulb syringe:

  1. Squeeze the bulb of the syringe, then gently insert the rubber tip into her nostril. Some doctors recommend also gently closing off the other nostril with your finger to get better suction from the bulb syringe.
  2. Slowly release the bulb to collect mucus and saline solution.
  3. Remove the syringe and squeeze the bulb to expel the mucus into a tissue.
  4. Wipe the syringe and repeat with the other nostril.
  5. Repeat if necessary.

To suction with a tube-based nasal aspirator:

  1. Make sure a clean filter is in place. (This prevents you from sucking mucus or bacteria through the tube into your mouth.)
  2. Place the tube end against your baby's nostril, creating a seal.  
  3. Place the mouthpiece in your mouth and gently suck out the mucus.
  4. Clean out the device and add a clean filter for next time.

Some tips:

  • Don't suction your child's nose more than a few times a day or you might irritate the nasal lining.
  • Don't use saline drops for more than four days in a row because they can dry out her nose over time, making things worse.
  • You can also use the bulb syringe or aspirator without saline.
  • If your baby gets really upset when you use an aspirator, try using just the saline drops instead. Squirt a small amount into her nose, then gently massage her nose and use a cotton swab to swipe just within the outer edge of her nostrils. Be careful not to insert the swab inside her nostrils.
  • If your child's nose is irritated from rubbing or blowing, apply a little petroleum jelly or other child-safe ointment on the outside of her nose.

Caution:

Don't use nasal decongestant sprays on your baby or young child. Doctors don't recommend them for children younger than 6 and often don't advise them for older kids either. Nasal decongestant sprays can have side effects in young children and may cause a rebound effect, making congestion worse in the long run.

Elevating the head (12 months and up)

How this helps:

Elevating your child's head (if he is 12 months or older) while he rests can help him breathe more comfortably.

What you need:

  • Towels or pillows to raise the head of the mattress, or pillows to raise your toddler or older child's head

What to do:

If your child sleeps in a crib, place a couple of towels or a slim pillow underneath the head of the mattress on the crib springs. Don't try to raise the legs of the crib because this could make the crib unstable.

If your child sleeps in a big-kid bed, raise the head of the bed by sliding towels or a pillow underneath the mattress. This creates a more gradual, comfortable slope than extra pillows, and it's safer, too.

Another option: If your grade-schooler needs to be propped up while he sleeps, he may be more comfortable in a recliner.

Caution:

  • Do not angle your child's sleeping surface if he's younger than 12 months. To prevent the risk of SIDS, your baby should be placed flat on his back to sleep; never prop him up. (He could slide or roll into a position that might make breathing difficult.)
  • Whether it's a crib or a bed, don't overdo it. If your child's a restless sleeper, he might flip around so that his feet are higher than his head, defeating the purpose.

Warm liquids and chicken soup (6 months and up)

How this helps:

Warm, clear liquids can be very soothing and help relieve congestion. Studies have shown that chicken soup, both canned and homemade, actually relieves cold symptoms such as aches, fatigue, congestion, and fever. Broth is a good alternative for babies who are still getting accustomed to solid foods.

What you need:

  • Warm water, broth, soup, or chamomile tea

What to do:

Serve liquids warm, not hot.

Caution:

Consult your healthcare provider before trying herbal teas other than chamomile because not all "natural" products are safe.

Chilled beverages and soft foods (12 months and up)

How this helps:

Sipping a cold smoothie can help your child's throat feel better. And soft foods, like pudding, may be easier to swallow than the usual fare. It may also be a way to get her some nourishment and hydration when she otherwise isn't feeling like eating or drinking.

What you need:

  • Slushies, milkshakes, crushed ice, pudding, ice cream, yogurt, applesauce, and other cold, soft treats. If your kid is old enough to handle an ice pop, try making your own from yogurt or fruit juice.

What to do:

Offer your child an icy cold treat when she complains of a sore throat or when she hasn't been eating or drinking much.

Caution:

Your doctor may recommend giving throat-cooling cough drops or hard candy to children who are at least 4 years old, but don't give them to younger children, who may choke on them. Also, don't exceed the maximum daily number of cough drops recommended by the manufacturer.

Honey for cough (12 months and up)

How this helps:

Honey coats and soothes the throat and helps tame a cough. Some studies suggest honey works better than commercial cough syrups at reducing coughing.

What you need:

  • Honey
  • Lemon (optional)
  • Hot water

What to do:

Mix honey with hot water and a squeeze of lemon (which adds a little vitamin C), then let the drink cool until it's lukewarm. You can also give your child honey straight from a spoon. The AAP recommends these dosages:

  • Ages 1 to 5: 1/2 teaspoon
  • Ages 6 to 1 teaspoon
  • Ages 12 and older: 2 teaspoons

Because honey is sticky and sugary, have your child brush his teeth after he takes it, especially if you give it to him at bedtime.

Caution:

Never give honey to a baby younger than 1 year old. In rare cases, it can cause infant botulism, a dangerous and sometimes fatal illness.

Mentholated rub (2 years and up)

How this helps:

These rubs may ease breathing and coughing when the warmth of your child's body helps release the medication into the air for her to breathe.

What you need:

What to do:

Cover your child's chest and front of the neck (throat) with a thick layer of the rub. Store the container out of your kid's reach.

Nose blowing (2 years and up)

How this helps:

Clearing mucus from your child's nose helps her breathe and sleep more easily, and it can generally make her more comfortable.

What you need:

What to do:

Many kids don't master this skill until they're at least 4, but some can do it around age 2.

Tips for teaching nose blowing:

  • Demonstrate how to do it. For some kids, that's all it takes.
  • Explain that blowing her nose is "smelling backward."
  • Have your child hold one nostril shut and practice gently blowing air out one side.
  • Teach her to blow gently and explain that blowing too hard can hurt her ears.
  • Teach her to throw used tissues in the trash and to wash her hands or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer gel after blowing her nose.
  • Be sure she knows not to rub her eyes after blowing her nose (so she doesn't end up with an eye infection).

If your child's nose is sore from all the sniffling and blowing, you can rub a little petroleum jelly or other child-safe ointment around her nostrils.

Learn more about how to teach your child to blow her nose.

Gargling with salt water (4 years and up)

How this helps:

Gargling with salt water is a time-honored way to soothe a sore throat. It also helps clear mucus from the throat.

What you need:

  • Warm salt water
  • Lemon (optional)

Dissolve 1/2 teaspoon salt in a glass of warm water and stir. Add a squirt or two of fresh lemon juice if your child likes the taste.

Your child must be old enough to learn to gargle. For many kids, that means school age or older, but some children can manage it sooner.

What to do:

Aim to have your child gargle three or four times a day while he's sick. Have a younger child gargle only if he's willing and it makes him feel better.

A few tips for teaching your child to gargle:

  • Practice with plain water.
  • Tell your child to tilt his head up and try to hold the water in the back of his throat without swallowing it.
  • Once he's comfortable doing that, have him try to make gargling sounds in his throat. Show him what that looks and sounds like by demonstrating a gargle yourself.
  • Remind him to spit out the water rather than swallow it.

Neti pot (4 years and up)

How this helps:

A neti pot flushes a mild saline solution through the nasal passages, moisturizing the area and thinning, loosening, and rinsing away mucus. Think of it as nasal irrigation.

What you need:

  • Neti pot. This looks like a very small watering can or teapot and is typically ceramic, metal, or plastic. You can buy neti pots at drugstores, natural-food stores, and online.
  • Saline solution. Either store-bought or homemade works. If you make your own, follow the recipe recommended above for use with bulb syringes. Note: The solution that may come with the neti pot might be too strong for a child.

Caution:

Use only store-bought distilled or sterile water, or boiled and cooled tap water. Untreated tap water may contain organisms that are safe to drink because stomach acid kills them but can survive in nasal passages and cause serious infection. Boil tap water for three to five minutes, then cool to lukewarm. After boiling, tap water can be stored in a clean, covered container for use within 24 hours.

Don't force a child who's not interested. This needs to be a very gentle procedure to prevent upsetting her or possibly hurting her nasal passages if she struggles. The procedure isn't painful but does feel strange at first. It's definitely not for babies or young toddlers, and older children (and even adults) might not go for it.

What to do:

Practice on yourself before teaching your child to use a neti pot. You may also want to watch videos of people using a neti pot to see how it works.

Here's the basic method:

  • Fill the neti pot with warm water or saline solution (see caution above).
  • Bending over a sink, tilt your head to one side, breathe through your mouth, and place the spout of the pot deep in the top nostril. The water will flow gently through the nasal cavity and out the other nostril.
  • Repeat on the other side.

Let your child watch you use it, and then help her if she's up for it. Tilt your child's head sideways over the sink, and place the spout of the pot in her top nostril. Then gently pour water or saline solution from the neti pot through the nasal passages to clean and moisturize them. This may take a little trial and error, but it's easy once you get the hang of it. (At first you may want to practice with your child in the tub or shower.)

Caution:

Make sure you clean the neti pot well after each use.

Nasal strips (5 years and up)

How this helps:

Like the nasal strips made for adults, kids' versions (sized for small noses) reportedly use gentle pressure to lift the nostrils so that breathing is easier while sleeping. They don't contain any medication.

What you need:

  • Package of nasal strips made for children

What to do:

Place the strips as directed across your child's nose at bedtime. Remove them in the morning.

Lots of TLC (all ages)

One thing that most kids will appreciate when they're suffering from a cold or flu is extra love and attention.

Keep in mind that you don't always need to treat cold and flu symptoms. If your child seems unfazed by the stuffy nose or cough, it's okay to skip the suctioning, gargling, warm liquids, and other remedies and let the illness run its course. When it comes to helping your child feel better, good old TLC may be the best of all remedies.

Learn more

How can I reduce my child's fever without using medicine?

Age-by-age guide to kids' fever, cough, and cold medicines

Why the doctor won't prescribe antibiotics for your baby's cold

Five natural remedies that really work

Tips for taking your child's temperature

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Everyday Health. mynewextsetup.us Accessed June 16, mynewextsetup.us

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  • Foods To Boost the Immune System. Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Accessed June 17, mynewextsetup.us

  • Miller LG. Herbal Medicinals: Selected Clinical Considerations Focusing on Known or Potential Drug-Herb Interactions. Arch Intern Med. ;(20) doi/archinte

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  • Common Colds: Protect Yourself and Others. mynewextsetup.us mynewextsetup.us Accessed June 26,

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    Feed a Cold

    Amid the current pandemic, the thought of having a mere cold almost seems quaint. But why suffer more than necessary? Grandmothers all over the world swear by home remedies to help their families feel better when a cold strikes. The therapies take different forms, but the ingredients are similar: Ginger, turmeric, and lemon are considered anti-inflammatory. Hot peppers relieve congestion, and cumin is believed to boost the immune system. None substitute for a doctor's care in the event of a serious illness, nor are they guaranteed to work, but consider trying them with bed rest and plenty of fluids. If avoiding a cold proves impossible, these home remedies could save you money on cold medicines that mask the cold symptoms but might not cure a cold any better than ingredients already in the kitchen. 

    Related:12 Frugal Home Remedies for Fighting the Common Cold

    Chicken Soup

    Though often referred to as "Jewish penicillin," this home remedy is used in practically every country and culture — probably because there are some studies that indicate it actually lessens cold symptoms. Commercially processed or takeout soup is okay but can't beat the homemade stuff. Make it with plenty of garlic and onions, which are anti-inflammatory (and delicious). 

    Related:30 Things You Need to Know About Cold and Flu Season

    Onions and Honey

    Loving abuelitas in the Dominican Republic prepare a cough syrup made from onions and honey as one of their natural cold remedies. Onions have expectorant qualities that loosen the mucus that often accompanies a cold. Honey is a well-known throat soother, as well as an immune system booster. The blog Step to Health has two recipes to try, one of which also uses lemon juice. Note: With youngsters, honey should be given only to children older than 1 year old as it may contain Clostridium botulinum spores that can lead to infant botulism.

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    Ginger and Turmeric Tea

    To make this tea for colds and stomach ailments, chop up fresh ginger and boil it in water for 15 minutes — 1 teaspoon per cup of water. Add an equal amount of turmeric, which contains curcumin, an anti-inflammatory that has also been shown to have antiviral effects. Sweeten with honey and lemon. You can also use powdered ginger and turmeric — one-third teaspoon for each cup of water.

    Black Pepper

    Simple spices are key to many natural cold remedies. In India, a few peppercorns are added to ginger and turmeric tea at the boiling stage for patients who are coughing. In addition to being an antimicrobial, black pepper is thought to lessen the severity of a cold by breaking up mucus in the respiratory tract, helping it be expelled. Black pepper is also put in boiling water so the steam can be inhaled to clear sinus congestion. 

    Related:15 Simple Ways to Fend Off Colds and Flu

    Hot Sake

    A most unusual remedy comes from Japan, where sake is heated very hot and combined with raw egg and sugar, sometimes with a slice of ginger, to become a soothing and warming tamagozake (egg sake). If nothing else, it can help with the sleeplessness a cold so often brings.

    Ginger Soup

    Taking the cold-curing ingredients of chicken soup and boosting them with ginger is common in China and other places. If a pot of chicken soup is too much, try takeout egg drop soup with a teaspoon of fresh grated ginger added. A recipe from mynewextsetup.us can be cooked up in less than an hour. 

    Related:How to Keep Kids From Getting Sick at School

    Pepper and Juice

    Cayenne pepper is used as an expectorant to help break up mucus (and mixing one-eighth teaspoon in an 8-ounce glass of fresh orange juice can help alleviate a scratchy sore throat). It's a major ingredient in "immunity tea" that is claimed to prevent colds and other diseases from taking hold in the first place. Immunity tea also contains ginger and lemon. (Lemon juice is a good source of vitamin C.) A recipe from the nutritionist Kimberly Snyder uses stevia as a sweetener, but you can use honey instead. 

    Apple Cider Vinegar

    Apple cider vinegar is having something of a moment, with one of its uses as a natural cold remedy. A tablespoon of apple cider vinegar added to a glass of warm water is said to help ward off viruses by making the body more alkaline. Although there's no scientific basis for this, it could help you feel better by loosening mucus. 

    Related:Ridiculous Health Care Fads

    Garlic Tea

    Some swear by whole garlic cloves for decongestion, but eating garlic is not for everyone. An old Italian remedy is more appetizing: Bring a pot of water (about a quart) to a boil. Add five or more peeled and smashed cloves of garlic and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the juice of two lemons and a bit of honey to make it palatable. Drinking this several times a day will destroy the cold in a few days, nonnas agree.

    Hot Toddy

    Toddies are great winter drinks even for people who don't have colds. A mynewextsetup.us recipe shows how to make a mug at a time with whiskey (usually bourbon) enlivened with immune-system boosting lemon and throat-soothing honey. It's heated with boiling water to warm the bones as well as clear the sinuses. Naturally, it has other pleasant side effects. Drink enough and you briefly won't care if you're sick — but drinking too much can cause dehydration, which will make cold symptoms worse.

    Chili

    Cumin is believe to boost the immune system, chili peppers relieve congestion, and, if it's hot enough, chili induces a good sweat, making it an ideal food for people with a cold. There are nearly as many recipes for chili as there are people who make it. 

    Related:Can You Handle These 15 Hot and Spicy Dishes?

    Cloves

    Cloves help loosen phlegm and are high in antioxidants — among other potential health benefits. Some people suggest popping a clove in your mouth at the first sign of a cough and sucking on it until the flavor is gone. Others swear by a homemade cough syrup with clove, honey, and cinnamon, which is an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant. (Find a recipe on the wellness blog Red & Honey.)

    Salt

    Salt contains plenty of healthful minerals, including zinc, which is said to be anti-inflammatory and able to shorten the duration of some colds, although evidence is mixed. Tapping the power of salt water could be worth a try. Gargling a half-teaspoon of salt dissolved in 8 ounces of warm water is an effective way to soothe a scratchy sore throat. For sinus problems and stuffed noses, mix table salt with distilled or sterilized water and use the salt water solution to ease nasal congestion.

    Fire Cider

    This potent and indeed fiery brew infuses ingredients such as garlic, ginger, onion, horseradish, and a hot pepper in apple cider vinegar. A recipe from The Kitchn won't be ready for at least three weeks, so plan to make it ahead of time to keep on hand. Take a few tablespoons at the beginning of a cold, or take a shot daily through cold season to ward off illness. If it's too potent, it can be mixed with water.

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us
  • Understanding a Common Cold Virus. National Institutes of Health (NIH). Published May 22, Accessed June 12, mynewextsetup.us

  • Home Remedies: Self-help for sinusitis. mynewextsetup.us Accessed June 16, mynewextsetup.us

  • In-Depth Reports - Penn State Hershey Medical Center - Sinusitis - Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Accessed June 16, mynewextsetup.us?productid=10&pid=10&gid=

  • How does drinking hot liquids help a cold or the flu? Accessed June 16, mynewextsetup.us

  • Besedovsky L, Lange T, Born J. Sleep and immune function. Pflüg Arch - Eur J Physiol. ;(1) doi/s

  • Can a neti pot relieve your cold and sinus symptoms? Mayo Clinic. Fifth third atm customer service number June 12, mynewextsetup.us

  • Does Gargling Wlth Salt Water Ease a Sore Throat? WebMD. Accessed June 12, mynewextsetup.us

  • How to Use a Humidifier for Sinus the Right Way

    Home remedies for the flu

    It’s that time of year when you or your classmates have to miss a day of class thanks to the flu. It’s a virus that will go away on its own for the most part, but it’s worth buying a few over-the-counter medications to treat annoying symptoms. Apart from pharmaceuticals, there are alternate remedies to help you, and you can already find them in the cupboards of your kitchen or on the shelves of any local grocery store!

    As students, many of us don’t have the privilege to miss even one day of class because we’ll fall behind. This is why having classmates’ phone numbers is always a https www suntrust online banking backup and you should email your professors about your absence as soon as possible. And if your professor still fails you for not showing up to an exam for having a degree fever &#; by all means show up and sneeze on their face. Just kidding. Don’t do that. Simply, only if it’s an emergency and you know you did your best to be courteous, involve the chairs of your department. They are here to help you.

    We asked CSUN students what are some of their recommended home remedies. Based on the answers posted on our Instagram, here are a few tips to beat the flu:

    Stay home, hydrated, and rest
    Should you fall under the weather, as a responsible human, staying in bed is the best thing you can do for yourself and for the people around you. Your friends are not being mean, they want you to get better and they just don’t want to get sick, too. The same goes for them — if you don’t want to shake their hand, it’s out of courtesy to not get them sick, not because you suddenly turned into a germaphobe. Drink lots of water — especially if you have a fever. Staying in bed also becomes a good excuse to binge-watch shows.

    Honey with lime
    The go-to remedy to smooth out that sore throat. The popularity of these two ingredients as remedies stem from their nutritional properties. Honey is known to have antimicrobial elements and limes are packed with vitamin C. It’s good to take these items prior to getting a cold, or right after, home remedies for flu they will make you feel good while your immune system does most of the fighting.

    Ginger tea
    Ginger has anti-inflammatory properties that could also help relieve your flu symptoms. When going through a throat infection, it could help to soothe your tonsils and home remedies for flu warmth, when taken in the form of tea, could alleviate some of that congestion. If tea is not your thing, try slicing the ginger in small pieces and eat it with warm water or get some tablets from the store.

    Soup or broth
    When combating the flu, warm foods are your best friend. Soups are filled with delicious vegetables and noodles that will fill you up and rehydrate you as you stay home and rest. Try to not go for the cup of noodles and get something more authentic. Of course, avoid anything cold, which is bound to make you feel worse.

    Vapor Rub
    When all else fails, Vicks’ classic product will help you fall asleep at night to that minty fragrance rubbed all over your chest, which you probably won’t be able to smell, anyway. You can’t go wrong with grandma’s go-to remedies, so perhaps you may want to keep that tradition going. Choose what works best for you to cope with your flu and hopefully you allied savings bank contact number get better soon.

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    Are there any home remedies for the flu?

    There are many natural home remedies that can help alleviate flu symptoms. These include:

    • Hydrating
    • Soup
    • Relaxing – be a couch potato!
    • Breathing moist air – a humidifier
    • Cough drops, throat lozenges and hard candies
    • Gargling with salt water

    Other questions related to Flu

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    • Understanding and Coping with Anger

      Anger is a normal human emotion, but if it’s frequent or intense it can harm your physical and mental health and damage your relationships. Learn ways to stay home remedies for flu and keep anger from escalating.

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    11 Popular Natural Remedies for the Common Cold

    The common cold is an infection of your nose and throat caused by viruses. We typically catch between two and four colds a year.

    Symptoms of the common cold, which usually appear one to three days after being exposed to a cold virus include a runny nose, cough, nasal congestion, sore throat, sneezing, watery eyes, mild headache, mild fatigue, body aches, and fever less than degrees.

    Cold Remedies

    Here is a look at 11 of the more popular natural remedies for the prevention and treatment of the common cold. In addition to these remedies, certain foods may also help to boost the immune system and additional remedies may be recommended for cough relief and post-nasal drip.

    Keep in mind that scientific support for the claim that any remedy can treat colds is lacking and that alternative medicine should not be used as a substitute for standard care. If you're considering the use of any remedy for a cold, make sure to consult your physician first.

    1) Zinc Lozenges

    Zinc is an essential mineral that is required by more than enzymes in our bodies. It’s found naturally in foods such as meat, liver, seafood, and eggs. The full recommended daily allowance (RDA) is 12 mg for women and 15 mg for men, an amount found in a typical multivitamin.

    Zinc lozenges are often found in health stores, online, and in some drug stores marketed as cold remedies. A number of studies have found that zinc helped to reduce the duration of cold symptoms, especially if people started taking it within 24 hours after cold symptoms appear. Zinc also reduced the severity of symptoms and decreased the duration of symptoms by three to four days. The problem is that many of these zinc studies have had flaws, so better-quality studies are needed. Zinc lozenges may work by blocking the cold virus from replicating (preventing it from spreading) or by impairing the ability of the cold virus to enter cells in the nose and throat.

    The zinc lozenges used in the studies contained a minimum of mg of elemental zinc. The lozenges were taken every two hours during the day, starting immediately after the onset of cold symptoms. The studies that found zinc to be ineffective may have used a dose of zinc that was too low or had taste-enhancing compounds known to decrease the effectiveness of zinc, such as citric acid (found in citrus fruit), tartaric acid, sorbitol, or mannitol.

    Zinc lozenges usually contain either zinc gluconate or zinc acetate, providing mg of elemental zinc in each lozenge. It's typically recommended that people take one lozenge every two to four hours during the day for a maximum of six to 12 lozenges a day.

    Side effects of zinc may include nausea and an unpleasant taste in the mouth. Zinc lozenges are not recommended to prevent colds or for long-term use, because zinc supplements in excess of 15 mg per day may interfere with the absorption of the mineral copper and result in a copper deficiency.

    2) Vitamin D

    There is some evidence suggesting that people with higher levels of vitamin D may have a reduced risk of catching a common cold.

    3) Astragalus

    Astragalus root has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine to strengthen immunity and prevent colds and flu. Studies have found that astragalus has antiviral properties and stimulates the immune system, although there have been no clinical trials examining the effectiveness of astragalus against colds in humans.

    Astragalus is also an antioxidant and has been suggested for conditions such as heart disease. It's being investigated as a possible herbal treatment for people with health conditions that weaken their immune systems.

    Astragalus can be found in capsule, tea, or extract form at health food stores or as a dried root in Chinese herbal shops and some health food stores. The dried root can be difficult to find.

    Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners usually recommend taking astragalus to prevent colds and to avoid it if you're already sick. A bowl of soup boiled with astragalus root is often recommended once or more per week throughout the winter to prevent colds.

    Astragalus may increase the potency of antiviral medications such as acyclovir or interferon, thereby worsening the potential side effects of these drugs (such as possible kidney failure and other side effects). It could also possibly counteract immune-suppressing drugs such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Neosar) or corticosteroids. It may lower blood glucose or blood pressure, increasing the effects of blood pressure or diabetes medications.

    Uses of Astragalus for Health

    4) Garlic

    Garlic is one of the more popular home cures for colds. Many cultures have a home remedy for the cold using garlic, whether it’s chicken soup with lots of garlic, a drink made with raw crushed garlic, or if it just involves eating raw garlic.

    The cold-fighting compound in garlic is thought to home remedies for flu allicin, which has demonstrated antibacterial and antifungal properties. Allicin is what gives garlic its distinctive hot flavor. To maximize the amount of allicin, fresh garlic should be chopped or crushed, and it should be raw. It’s also available in pill form.

    In one study involving people, participants received either a garlic supplement or a placebo for 12 weeks between November and February. People who took garlic reduced the risk of catching a cold by more than half. The study also found that garlic reduced the recovery time in people who caught a cold. More research is needed to corroborate these results.

    Garlic does have some possible side effects and safety concerns. Bad breath and body odor are perhaps the most common side effects; however, dizziness, sweating, headache, fever, chills, and runny nose have also been reported. Large amounts may irritate the mouth or result in indigestion.

    Garlic supplements should be avoided by people with bleeding disorders, two weeks before or after surgery, or by those taking "blood-thinning" medications such as warfarin (Coumadin) or supplements believed to affect blood clotting such as vitamin E or ginkgo.

    Garlic may also lower blood glucose levels and increase the release of insulin, so it should be used with caution by people taking drugs that lower blood sugar. People with allergies to plants in the lily family (including onion, leeks, and chives) should avoid garlic. Pregnant women should avoid garlic in supplement form because it may increase the risk of bleeding.

    5) Vitamin C

    InLinus Pauling, Home remedies for flu, proposed the theory that people had individual requirements for various vitamins and some needed amounts higher than the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs). Pauling proposed that 1, mg of vitamin C daily could reduce the incidence of colds for most people. Since then, vitamin C has become a popular cold remedy.

    A review by the Cochrane Collaboration examined whether vitamin C supplements in doses of mg or more a day could reduce the incidence, duration, or severity of the common cold. The researchers analyzed 30 previously published studies (involving a total of 11, participants) that met their quality criteria. They found that vitamin C didn’t appear to prevent the common cold. There was a slight reduction in the length and severity of cold symptoms. It appeared to markedly reduce the risk of catching a cold in people involved brief, intense physical activity (such as marathon running or skiing), home remedies for flu in those exposed to cold temperatures.

    Vitamin C in amounts over 2, mg may cause diarrhea, loose stools, and gas.

    Health Benefits of Vitamin C

    6) Honey

    Honey is a popular home remedy for cough and colds in many cultures. A new study in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine provides the first evidence showing that honey may help to calm children's coughs and help them sleep better. Researchers gave children with colds either honey, honey-flavored cough medicine, or no treatment. All of the children got better, but honey consistently scored best in parents' rating of their children's cough symptoms.

    The researchers say that honey may work by coating and soothing an irritated throat and it’s believed to have antioxidant and antibacterial effects. Dark-colored honey, such as the buckwheat honey used in the study, is particularly high in antioxidants.

    Honey isn't recommended for infants younger than 1 year because of the risk of botulism. Regular use of honey at night may also promote cavities developing.

    7) Echinacea

    Although recent findings question the use of echinacea for colds and flu, it’s still one of the most popular herbs used today. A study by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that echinacea did little to prevent or shorten the common cold. There were many critics of the study, who say that the study shouldn't be used as evidence that echinacea doesn't work. The Cochrane Collaboration conducted a review of 15 studies on echinacea, however, and found that it wasn't more effective than a placebo at preventing colds.

    Although there are several types of echinacea, the above-ground parts (the leaves, flowers, and stems) of echinacea purpurea have been subject to the most research.

    Herbalists often recommend home remedies for flu echinacea every two to three hours with a total daily dose of three or more grams per day at the first sign of symptoms. After several days, the dose is usually reduced and continued home remedies for flu the following week. Echinacea is also an ingredient in Airborne, a supplement containing vitamins and herbs sold over the counter.

    8) Ginseng

    Although there are many types of ginseng, one cultivated in North America called Panax quinquefolius or “North American ginseng" has become popular as a remedy for colds and flu. Compounds called polysaccharides and ginsenosides are thought to be the active constituents in ginseng. One of the more popular ginseng products is Cold-fX.

    Two studies tested Cold-fX in nursing home residents, who received either Cold-fX or a placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of people who contracted the flu and no difference in the severity or duration of the flu. The researchers analyzed the results of the two studies together and only then did the results show that Cold-fX reduced the incidence of the flu. Although it's popular and some people swear by it, large, well-designed, independent trials are needed to determine the safety and effectiveness of this product.

    There is some concern that ginseng may reduce the effectiveness of "blood-thinning" (anticlotting or antiplatelet) drugs such as warfarin (Coumadin) or aspirin. It may interact with diabetes medications, antidepressants known as MAO inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs (e.g., chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), olanzapine (Zyprexa)), drugs that stimulate the central nervous system (used to treat conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, narcolepsy, obesity, and heart conditions) and estrogen replacement therapy or oral contraceptives.

    Ginseng root is thought to have estrogen-like properties and is usually not recommended for people with hormone-related conditions such as uterine fibroids, endometriosis, and cancers of the breast, ovaries, uterus or prostate. People with heart conditions, schizophrenia, or diabetes also shouldn’t take ginseng root unless under a doctor’s supervision. The manufacturer of Cold-fX indicates on their website that because their product isn't a whole plant extract but contains a certain compound found in ginseng, it doesn't have the side effects and safety concerns commonly associated with ginseng; although that's possible, there isn't published safety data confirming these claims.

    What Is American Ginseng?

    9) Ginger

    Ginger root is another folk remedy for a cough, colds, and sore throat. It's used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat coughs and is also for colds accompanied by a runny nose with a clear nasal discharge, headache, neck and shoulder aches, and a white tongue coating. In Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India, ginger is also used for coughing and colds.

    Hot ginger tea is a popular home remedy for cold symptoms and sore throat. Honey and lemon are sometimes added.

    Although normal amounts of ginger in food rarely causes side effects, excessive amounts may cause heartburn and indigestion. People with gallstones, bleeding disorders and those taking "blood-thinning" (anticlotting and antiplatelet) medications such as aspirin and warfarin (Coumadin) should consult a doctor before taking ginger. Ginger should be avoided two weeks before or after surgery.

    10) Elderberry

    Elderberry (Sambucus nigra) is call wells fargo customer service please herb that has a long history of use as a folk remedy for pnc virtual wallet sign in, sinus infections, and the flu. In preliminary lab studies, elderberry extracts have been found to fight off viruses. There has been limited research done and much of it involves the home remedies for flu virus. Researchers believe that anthocyanins, compounds found naturally in elderberries, maybe the active component that strengthens the immune system and blocks the flu virus from sticking to our cells.

    Health food stores carry elderberry juice, walmart eye center mexico mo, and capsules. Side effects, although rare, may include mild indigestion or allergic reactions.

    Only commercially prepared extracts of elderberry berries should be used, because the fresh leaves, flowers, bark, young buds, unripe berries, and roots contain cyanide and could potentially result in cyanide poisoning.

    Elderberry for Cold Symptoms

    11) Eucalyptus Steam Inhalation

    A steam inhalation with eucalyptus oil may help to alleviate symptoms from colds and flu. It is thought to work by thinning mucus in the respiratory tract.

    If You Love Essential Oils, Make Sure You're Not Allergic

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    Verywell Health uses only high-quality care credit customer service phone, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

    Additional Reading
    • Douglas RM, Hemilä H, Chalker E, Treacy B. Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. Jul 18;(3):CD

    • Linde K, Barrett B, Wolkart K, Bauer R, Melchart D. Echinacea for preventing and treating the common cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 1 (): CD

    • Predy GN, Goel V, Lovlin R, Donner A, Stitt L, Basu TK. Efficacy of an extract of North American ginseng home remedies for flu poly-furanosyl-pyranosyl-saccharides for preventing upper respiratory tract infections: a randomized controlled trial. CMAJ ():

    • Silk R, LeFante C. Safety of zinc gluconate glycine (Cold-Eeze) in a geriatric population: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Am J Ther. ():

    • Zakay-Rones Z, Home remedies for flu E, Wollan T, Wadstein J. Randomized study of the efficacy and safety of oral elderberry extract in the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. J Int Med Res. ():

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    4 Natural Home Remedies for Treating the Common Cold and Flu

    Cold and Flu

    Getting the common cold or flu can be a tiresome impediment in your daily routine. For the most part, all you need to do is rest to get better. However, it would not hurt if your ailment went away faster, would it? As it turns out, there are many home remedies that can shorten the lifespan of your cold or flu. Let’s take a look at what these are and how they can be useful in treating the common cold and flu.

    Taking vitamin C is among the most popular remedies for treating the common cold. As per studies, vitamin C can shorten the duration of your cold symptoms and help you recover more quickly. You can include orange juice in your diet to improve your vitamin C intake while suffering from a cold. Vitamin C also plays a vital role in boosting your immune system.

    Water is essential for keeping your throat, mouth, and airways moist. This allows your body to remove the phlegm and mucus more easily and helps you recover. Therefore, make sure you stay hydrated when suffering from the common cold or flu. Besides drinking water, you can also take coconut water, herbal tea, soup, broth, and fresh juice.

    There are many herbal remedies that can be used for treating the common cold and flu.  According to research, taking Elderberry extract can be very helpful for people suffering from the flu. It can reduce the duration of your illness by two to three days. This is because Elderberry contains compounds called flavonoids. These help stimulate the immune system. The herb also acts on a cellular level and prevents the influenza virus from adhering to your cell receptors.

    You can also take Echinacea extract for treating the common cold. The herb contains a variety of chemical compounds such as alkylamides, alkamides, and phenols. These compounds possess anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties that help the body fight cold symptoms. They also stimulate your immune system.

    Taking steam is another popular home remedy for the treatment of respiratory illnesses. It is particularly helpful if you are suffering from congestion. The warm moist flow of air can have a soothing effect on your sinuses, throat, lungs, and nose. You can also add some vapor rub to the water for additional benefits. Make sure you take necessary precautions when taking steam. If you keep your face or hands too close to the steam, you may burn yourself.

    There are many natural home remedies that can be helpful in treating the common home remedies for flu and flu. You can increase your vitamin C intake, inhale steam, and drink lots of water. You can also try herbal remedies in the form of Echinacea extract and Elderberry extract. Make sure you rest your body as well.

    If you require further advice on the treatment of flu and the common cold, book an appointment with a physician at Health One Family Medicine.

    Visit mynewextsetup.us or call for more information.

    Author

    Health One Family Medicine

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