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Home remedies for depression headache


home remedies for depression headache

Migraines are more common in women than men and mostly affect those in the year age bracket. Tension headaches. A tension headache is. Release stress and headache with easy and effective Yoga poses only on Mind Body Soul. Learn how to do simple yoga poses which will help you. Use this guide to help you talk to your healthcare provider about medicines called antidepressants that can help treat depression.
home remedies for depression headache

Home remedies for depression headache -

Natural Remedies for Tension Headaches

Tension headaches are the most common type of headache. They usually cause a mild to moderate dull, achy pain. The pain can feel like a tight band around the entire head or occur in a specific area, such as the back of the neck or the base of the skull. Accompanying symptoms may include tenderness in the scalp, neck, and shoulders, fatigue, irritability, and difficulty sleeping.

A number of factors can trigger tension headaches, including stress, insomnia, changes in sleep routine, depression, anxiety, skipping meals, poor posture, certain medications, physical inactivity, clenching or grinding teeth, or being in an uncomfortable body position for a prolonged time.

In addition, conditions affecting the muscles or joints of the neck and shoulders and hormone fluctuations related to pregnancy, menstrual periods, or menopause can trigger headaches.

Occasionally, headaches may indicate a severe medical condition such as a brain tumor or rupture of a weakened blood vessel, called an aneurysm. That's why if you are experiencing headaches, it's important to see your healthcare provider for an evaluation.

Natural Remedies

Complementary and alternative therapies are popular among people with headaches. In a survey published in the journal Headache, people with chronic tension headaches were interviewed about their use of complementary and alternative therapies. Forty percent of people had used natural therapy in the past, the most popular being chiropractic ( percent) followed by acupuncture ( percent) and massage ( percent). Only percent of those interviewed, however, perceived complementary and alternative therapies as being beneficial.

Although studies have been conducted on acupuncture, chiropractic, and massage, there haven't been enough well-designed placebo-controlled studies to be able to conclude that any of these therapies are effective for headaches. Here is more information about each therapy.

Acupuncture

According to traditional Chinese medicine, pain results from blocked energy along energy pathways of the body, which are unblocked when acupuncture needles are inserted along these invisible pathways.

Although we don't know exactly how acupuncture works, some of the theories proposed are that acupuncture releases natural pain-relieving opioids, sends signals that calm the sympathetic nervous system, and triggers the release of neurotransmitters (brain chemicals) and hormones.

An acupuncture treatment generally costs between $60 and $ Acupuncture is tax-deductible (it's considered a medical expense) and some insurance plans pay for acupuncture.

Be sure to speak with your healthcare provider before trying acupuncture. Side effects may include soreness, bruising, or bleeding at the needle location. Acupuncture may also cause temporary tiredness. Although rare, the needle may break or injure an internal organ or structure. Acupuncture may not be safe if you have a bleeding disorder or are taking "blood-thinning" medication.

If you want to try acupuncture, plan ongoing one to three times a week for several weeks initially.

Chiropractic

Doctors of chiropractic are healthcare professionals that focus primarily on disorders of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems and the effects of these disorders on overall health.

Emphasizing the healing power of the body, chiropractic is a hands-on approach most often used for neuromuscular complaints, such as back and neck pain, joint pain, and headaches.

The hallmark of chiropractic care is the "spinal manipulation", which is also called a "chiropractic adjustment." The purpose of the adjustment is to restore joint position and mobility by manually applying a controlled force to a restricted joint.

This restores proper function, relieves pressure on the surrounding nerves, reduces pain and muscle tightness, and allows tissues to heal.

Side effects may include mild soreness, which should resolve within one to two days. People with osteoporosis, a history of spinal surgery, vascular disease, stroke, or symptoms of nerve damage such as numbness, tingling, or loss of strength should consult their healthcare provider before seeking chiropractic.

Many doctors of chiropractic also use other therapies, such as ultrasound, electric stimulation, massage, or soft tissue manipulation.

Massage Therapy

Massage therapy is the application of pressure to the muscles and soft tissues of the body for relaxation and health.

It is used for a variety of conditions such as stress-related illness, sleep disorders, pain, headaches, high blood pressure, diabetes, post-operative swelling, and depression.

Massage therapy by a trained and licensed therapist is generally safe. Be sure that your massage therapist has your complete health history. People with cancer, recent or unhealed fractures, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, deep vein thrombosis, cancer, recent heart attack, burns or open wounds, or who are pregnant should speak to their healthcare provider before having a massage.

Side effects of massage may include temporary soreness, pain, and fatigue. Very rarely, massage may cause internal bleeding, temporary paralysis, and nerve damage, usually resulting from massage by an improperly qualified person.

Other Natural Remedies

  • Aromatherapy
  • Biofeedback
  • Hypnosis
  • Herbs
  • Mind-body Techniques
  • Prolotherapy
  • Reflexology
  • Therapeutic Touch

Seek medical attention immediately, especially if you experience the following symptoms or any other symptom that concerns you:

  • Severe, sudden headache
  • Fever, stiff neck, rash, confusion, seizures, double vision, difficulty speaking, weakness, or numbness
  • Headache after a head injury

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Levin M. Herbal treatment of headache. Headache. ;52 Suppl – doi/jx

  2. Zhu H. Acupoints Initiate the Healing Process. Med Acupunct. ;26(5)– doi/acu

  3. Zhang R, Lao L, Ren K, Berman BM. Mechanisms of acupuncture-electroacupuncture on persistent pain. Anesthesiology. ;(2)– doi/ALN

  4. Ernst G, Strzyz H, Hagmeister H. Incidence of adverse effects during acupuncture therapy-a multicentre survey. Complement Ther Med. ;11(2)– doi/s(03)

  5. Bryans R, Descarreaux M, Duranleau M, et al. Evidence-based guidelines for the chiropractic treatment of adults with headache. J Manipulative Physiol Ther. ;34(5)– doi/mynewextsetup.us

  6. Quinn C, Chandler C, Moraska A. Massage therapy and frequency of chronic tension headaches. Am J Public Health. ;92(10)– doi/ajph

  7. Zainuddin Z, Newton M, Sacco P, Nosaka K. Effects of massage on delayed-onset muscle soreness, swelling, and recovery of muscle function. J Athl Train. ;40(3)–

Additional Reading
  • Ernst E. Manual therapies for pain control: chiropractic and massage. Clin J Pain. ():

  • Fernandez-de-Las-Penas C, Alonso-Blanco C, Cuadrado ML, Miangolarra JC, Barriga FJ, Pareja JA. Are manual therapies effective in reducing pain from tension-type headache?: a systematic review. Clin J Pain ():

  • Melchart D, Streng A, Hoppe A, Brinkhaus B, Witt C, Wagenpfeil S, Pfaffenrath V, Hammes M, Hummelsberger J, Irnich D, Weidenhammer W, Willich SN, Linde K. Acupuncture in patients with tension-type headache: randomised controlled trial. BMJ. ():

  • Rossi P, Di Lorenzo G, Faroni J, Malpezzi MG, Cesarino F, Nappi G. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with chronic tension-type headache: results of a headache clinic survey. Headache. ():

  • Vickers AJ, Rees RW, Zollman CE, McCarney R, Smith CM, Ellis N, Fisher P, Van Haselen R. Acupuncture for chronic headache in primary care: large, pragmatic, randomised trial. BMJ. ():

  • Melchart D, Linde K, Fischer P, White A, Allais G, Vickers A, Berman B. Acupuncture for recurrent headaches: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Cephalalgia. ():
Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Q&#;A with Dr. Dawn Buse on Migraine, Depression &#; Anxiety

Q&A with Dawn Buse, PhD

Dawn Buse, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and the director of behavioral medicine at the Montefiore Headache Center, and a professor in the department of neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. With accomplishments that include two Wolff Awards and scientific abstracts, Dr. Buse has earned a reputation as a fierce advocate for patients with headache and facial pain. We sat down with Dr. Buse at the 59th Annual Scientific Meeting to talk about her work addressing and treating depression and anxiety in migraine patients, and about what the entire medical community must know in order to properly assess and treat these patients.

Understanding the relationship between migraine, depression and anxiety with Dawn Buse, PhD

AHS: What do we know about the relationship between depression and migraine?

DB: Depression and migraine share a common relationship, and one may actually come before the other. That may not mean that one causes the other, but it could be a predisposer. We know that people with migraine are about five times more likely to develop depression than someone without migraine. We also know that someone who has depression is about three times more likely to have migraine later in life than someone without depression.

AHS: What about anxiety and migraine? What’s the relationship there?

DB: Migraine is an unpredictable illness that impacts people&#;s lives in every dimension, making it common for people who have it to also experience anxiety. They don&#;t know when the next attack is coming, so of course there&#;s going to be anxiety over not only that, but what the headache will impact. Is it going to affect work or school? Is it going to affect an important family event or a vacation, or something even bigger? We find that about 20% of people with episodic migraine or migraine on 14 or fewer days a month, and between 30% and 50% of people with chronic migraine, also have anxiety. On top of that, even more people have symptoms of anxiety: The worry over when the will attack come, the feeling of helplessness or hopelessness about their ability to control their lives and make plans, and their feelings of frustration and rumination that come up when just thinking about the many ways migraine affects their life.

AHS: What are some of the misconceptions people have about migraine, depression and anxiety and how they interrelate?

DB: When we talk about migraine, depression and anxiety occurring together, we have to be very careful not to make patients feel like how they’re feeling is their fault. These things co-occur because they share underlying biologic and neurochemical mechanisms. There&#;s a reason why the nervous system and the brain have these conditions together, and it&#;s very logical that you&#;re going to feel sad, down and frustrated when you&#;re living with a chronic disease like migraine. You&#;re also going to worry about when the next attack will come, what your future may hold, and how migraine will continue to affect your life. It makes sense that these conditions might travel together, but we can’t blame this person’s illness—and subsequently their depression or anxiety—on weakness.

AHS: Can common migraine medications, either acute or preventative, trigger feelings of depression?

DB: The good news is that the medications that we use for migraine typically don&#;t trigger or worsen depression. It&#;s more likely that the migraine attacks themselves and the effect the illness has on your life is what is worsening the depression.

AHS: What do doctors and general practitioners need to know about the relationship between migraine anxiety and depression?

DB: Depression and anxiety are highly comorbid with migraine. They may both be a pre-disposer and a consequence of migraine, or it could be a shared biologic underpinning. It&#;s valuable to assess and track patients’ levels of depression and anxiety, and the good news is that all three conditions are treatable with effective medication, as well as affective psychological and behavioral treatments.

However, both depression and anxiety may interfere with [migraine] treatment outcomes as they can affect adherence, motivation and may also interact with treatments in various ways. It is absolutely worth assessing depression and anxiety and either treating it or referring for treatment. There is every reason to believe that since they co-occur with migraine at such high rates—since they increase with migraine frequency and severity—that decreasing depression and anxiety may improve migraine outcomes as well. In addition, it will improve a patient’s quality of life and reduce disability.

AHS: How will increased awareness, education and understanding in the medical community help these patients receive better treatment?

DB: Increased awareness that depression and anxiety are common with migraine will help all of us better care for and treat our patients. It&#;s important to keep in mind that these are common comorbidities and to ask our patients about them. Patients may not volunteer this information because they think it&#;s not relevant. They may also be embarrassed and stigmatized, making it even less likely that they will willingly divulge this information. If we don&#;t ask about it, we can&#;t assess it, document it or treat it. We have to let patients know that these comorbidities are common and that this is a normal experience for people living with a chronic, debilitating disease.

 

Dr. Buse has a personal website full of resources for both patients and healthcare professionals. For additional headache-specific information and resources, visit the American Headache Society’s website.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Tea Wisdom

1. Chamomile tea

Chamomile is a soothing herbal tea that’s great to drink when you have a headache. Chamomile works to reduce inflammation, which can cause headache pain. Chamomile has also been shown to help lessen stress and anxiety, which can often be a contributing factor to headaches.

Our chamomile teas

Egyptian Chamomile Herbal Tea, Lavender Lullaby Herbal Tea, Honeybush Hot Cider Herbal Tea

2. Peppermint tea

Peppermint has been shown to help treat tension-type headaches, which are the most common type of headaches. A soothing cup of tea can reduce pain and help you to relax when you’re suffering from a headache. Peppermint is often blended with other herbs and spices like lavender and ginger for additional healing and therapeutic effects. Other benefits of peppermint tea include increasing alertness, calming upset stomachs, and reducing stress.

Our Peppermint teas

Lemon Mint Menage Black Tea, Peppermint Herbal Tea, Alice’s Peppermint Party Herbal Tea, Sing Your Song Herbal Tea, Lavender Mint Herbal Tea, Chocolate Mint Rooibos Herbal Tea

3. Ginger tea

Ginger is a potent herb that is full of health benefits and has been used as a component of herbal medicine for centuries. Studies have shown that ginger can help to reduce headache pain. Other benefits of ginger tea include boosting the immune system, increasing energy, and reducing inflammation.

Our ginger teas

Masala Chai Black Tea, Solstice Spice Black Tea, Linda’s Lemon Ginger Green Tea, Atomic Gold Herbal Tea, Sing Your Song Herbal Tea, Rooibos Chai Herbal Tea

4. Clove tea

Cloves are a pungent spice that are often featured in spiced tea blends like herbal and caffeinated versions of chai. Cloves have been shown to reduce headache pain and have an analgesic effect. Cloves also have antiviral and antimicrobial properties that can help to protect you against illness.

Our clove teas

Masala Chai Black Tea, Solstice Spice Black Tea, Mulled Wine Fruit Blend Herbal Tea, Rooibos Chai Herbal Tea

5. Turmeric tea

The active ingredient in turmeric is curcumin. Curcumin has been shown to have neuroprotective effects, and can help to mitigate migraine and headache pain. Turmeric adds a bright golden hue to any tea its added to, and has a woody, earthy taste that is complemented by other spices.

Our turmeric teas

Turmeric Mango Green Tea, Atomic Gold Herbal Tea

6. Lavender tea

Lavender is a soothing medicinal herb that has been used in herbal medicine to treat a wide variety of illnesses, from headaches to anxiety and depression. Studies have shown that lavender aromatherapy can help to treat migraine headaches and reduce headache severity.

Our lavender teas

Earl Grey Lavender Black Tea, Miss Violet Purple Leaf Tea, Lavender Lullaby Herbal Tea, Lavender Mint Herbal Tea, Tuscan Sun Herbal Tea

7. Other herbal teas

Even if a tea doesn’t contain a beneficial herbal ingredient like those listed above, a nice cup of herbal tea can still have a soothing effect that helps to reduce pain. Herbal tea is also a great way to stay hydrated, and dehydration can contribute to headaches.

8. Caffeinated teas

Caffeinated teas like black, green, white, and oolong teas may also help relieve symptoms if you’re suffering from a headache. All teas made from the camellia sinensis plant contain caffeine, which can help increase the effectiveness of over the counter pain medication and soothe headache symptoms. However, you should proceed with caution when using caffeine to treat a headache - sometimes, too much caffeine can make a headache even worse, and regular caffeine consumption is sometimes linked with an increased occurrence of headaches and migraines.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Rumination: The danger of dwelling

By Denise Winterman
BBC News Magazine

The UK's biggest ever online test into stress, undertaken by the BBC's Lab UK and the University of Liverpool, has revealed that rumination is the biggest predictor of the most common mental health problems in the country.

A bit of self-reflection can be a good thing, say psychologists. But just how serious can it get when introspection goes awry and thoughts get stuck on repeat, playing over and over in the mind?

Rumination and self-blame have long been accepted by health professionals as part of the problems that can lead to depression and anxiety - the two most common mental health problems in the UK, according to the Mental Health Foundation.

But new research has demonstrated just how significant and serious their impact on mental health can be.

The findings of a ground-breaking study, published in the journal PLOS ONE today, suggest that brooding too much on negative events is the biggest predictor of depression and anxiety and determines the level of stress people experience. The research even suggests a person's psychological response is a more important factor than what has actually happened to them.

A total of 32, people from countries took part in the online stress test devised by the BBC's Lab UK and psychologists at the University of Liverpool, making it the biggest study of its kind ever undertaken in the UK.

"We found that people who didn't ruminate or blame themselves for their difficulties had much lower levels of depression and anxiety, even if they'd experienced many negative events in their lives," says Peter Kinderman, who led the study and is a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Liverpool.

"Dwelling on negative thoughts and self blame have previously been recognised as important when it comes to mental health, but not to the extent this study has shown.

"The findings suggest both are crucial psychological pathways to depression and anxiety."

The human mind is an extremely complex machine and it's generally accepted there is no single cause for depression and anxiety by professionals in the field. But some factors have more impact than others.

The study found traumatic life events, such as abuse or childhood bullying, were the biggest cause of anxiety and depression when dwelled upon. This is followed by family history, income and education. Next comes relationship status and social inclusion.

"But these didn't merely 'cause' depression and anxiety," he says.

"The most important way in which these things led to depression and anxiety was by leading a person to ruminate and blame themselves for the problem.

"This shows how psychological issues are part of the routes to the development of problems, not merely that people become ill and then show changes in their psychology."

Rumination was found to be more damaging than self blame. Having thoughts stuck on replay in her head is something Teresa (not her real name), 50, from Essex, struggles with and has done for years.

"When I don't feel on top of things in my life I start to find it harder to switch negative thoughts off," she says.

"If I'm stressed at work or home it's as if the negative thoughts swamp my mind and I can't rationalise them. I get angry with myself for allowing them to run through my head."

Teresa has been married for over 20 years and has two children. But despite having a happy home life, she says there have still been times when the negative thoughts have become overwhelming.

"There have been a couple points in my life when I have really struggled to cope. Negative thoughts and things from the past came back to haunt me.

"Both times I went to my doctor for help but was offered antidepressants. I didn't want to go down that road. I have tried to develop my own coping mechanisms over the years. I find being outside and with nature helps me a lot. It seems to calm what's in my head."

Rumination is sometimes referred to as a "silent" mental health problem because its impact is often underestimated. But it plays a big part in anything from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) to eating disorders.

And the impact of mental health problems is huge. They affect one person in every four during their lifetime and are the leading cause of disability globally, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). In alone they are estimated to have cost $ trillion (£ trillion) globally by the World Economic Forum.

In the UK one in four people will experience some kind of mental health problem in any one year, according to the Mental Health Foundation. Anxiety and depression are the most common problems.

So what does the new study mean for people who have serious problems with ruminating and those treating them?

"Obviously it is just one study, and other people will have other important contributions, but we believe our findings are very significant," says Kinderman.

It's important to get across what the findings mean for the average person, says Dr Ellie Pontin, a clinical psychologist and research associate at the University of Liverpool, who was also involved in the study.

"It's actually a really positive message and should give people hope," she says.

"It can be very hard to be told your problems are because of what you have experienced in the past or your genetics, things you can't change. The way you think and deal with things can be changed."

Other professionals agree. They argue that such studies highlight the need to put psychological services at the heart of the health system.

"This is a positive message," says Angela Clow, professor of psychophysiology at the University of Westminster.

"And helping someone tackle negative thought processes is not something that has to be done exclusively by clinical psychologists.

"Other health professionals can be trained to deliver simple psychological help and techniques. It doesn't have to cost a lot of money."

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Источник: mynewextsetup.us

How to Relieve Neck Pain Caused by Stress

Stress. Anxiety. Low moral support. All of these and other psychosocial factors have been linked as potential causes of neck pain.1,2 When tension and stress build in the neck, muscles may feel tight or achy. Neck pain may also spread to the shoulder or be accompanied by a headache. Let’s explore some ways to reduce this type of neck pain.

See Stress-Related Back Pain

If stress-induced neck pain does not subside after a week or two of self-care, see your doctor for diagnosis and treatment. SeeTreatment for Neck Pain

7 tips to tackle stress-related neck pain

By focusing on ways to treat both the mind and the body, you can help lessen stress and the toll it can take on you. Try these methods to manage stress-related neck pain:

  1. Neck stretches

    If done regularly, stretching exercises for the neck can loosen muscle tightness and maintain or expand range of motion for the neck. Try these 2 stretches to get started.

    See Neck Stretches

  2. Therapy or support group

    Cognitive behavioral therapy has proven benefits for helping to develop healthy thought patterns, but even a support group or online forum where you can share your concerns and receive support can help you manage day-to-day stressors.

    Visit our Back and Neck Pain Support Group to find online support.

  3. Meditation

    Practicing meditation is a good way to calm your thoughts and anxieties. Look for a guided meditation video on YouTube or attend a class to learn how.

    See Healing Benefits of Yoga

  1. Enlisting help from family and friends

    You don’t have to tackle stress alone; let your family and friends help carry the load. Be clear about ways they can help you—ask if a friend can run an errand for you, or assign your children extra chores around the house during stressful periods.
  2. Massage

    Massage is not only relaxing and stress-relieving overall, but it can specifically ease the tightness of the muscles of the neck and shoulders.

    See Massage Chairs for Pain Relief

  3. Exercise

    Exercise is good for your body and mind. It releases endorphins, a hormone that dulls pain and generates feelings of well-being.

    See Low-Impact Aerobic Exercise

  4. Prioritizing

    You’re not a superhero—let inconsequential things go if they’re taking a toll on your health. Focus on what’s most important and don’t worry if things further down the priority list get delayed or left undone for a while.

If your stress-induced neck pain is not relieved by a week or two of self-care, see your doctor. He or she can offer other treatment options and diagnose possible underlying conditions.

Learn more

Stiff Neck Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

9 Lesser-Known Tips for Easing Neck Pain

References

  • mynewextsetup.usman S, Carroll L, Cassidy DJ, Schubert J, Nygren A. The Bone and Joint Decade Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders. Eur Spine J. ; 17(Suppl 1): 5. doi: /s
  • mynewextsetup.us R, Wiest C, Clark K, Cook C, Horn M. Identifying risk factors for first-episode neck pain: A systematic review. Musculoskelet Sci Pract. Feb; doi: /mynewextsetup.us
Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Q&#;A with Dr. Dawn Buse on Migraine, Depression &#; Anxiety

Q&A with Dawn Buse, PhD

Dawn Buse, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and the director of behavioral medicine at the Montefiore Headache Center, and a professor in the department of neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. With accomplishments that include two Wolff Awards and scientific abstracts, Dr. Buse has earned a reputation as a fierce advocate for patients with headache and facial pain. We sat down with Dr. Buse at the 59th Annual Scientific Meeting to talk about her work addressing and treating depression and anxiety in migraine patients, and about what the entire medical community must know in order to properly assess and treat these patients.

Understanding the relationship between migraine, depression and anxiety with Dawn Buse, PhD

AHS: What do we know about the relationship between depression and migraine?

DB: Depression and migraine share a common relationship, and one may actually come before the other. That may not mean that one causes the other, but it could be a predisposer. We know that people with migraine are about five times more likely to develop depression than someone without migraine. We also know that someone who has depression is about three times more likely to have migraine later in life than someone without depression.

AHS: What about anxiety and migraine? What’s the relationship there?

DB: Migraine is an unpredictable illness that impacts people&#;s lives in every dimension, making it common for people who have it to also experience anxiety. They don&#;t know when the next attack is coming, so of course there&#;s going to be anxiety over not only that, but what the headache will impact. Is it going to affect work or school? Is it going to affect an important family event or a vacation, or something even bigger? We find that about 20% of people with episodic migraine or migraine on 14 or fewer days a month, and between 30% and 50% of people with chronic migraine, also have anxiety. On top of that, even more people have symptoms of anxiety: The worry over when the will attack come, the feeling of helplessness or hopelessness about their ability to control their lives and make plans, and their feelings of frustration and rumination that come up when just thinking about the many ways migraine affects their life.

AHS: What are some of the misconceptions people have about migraine, depression and anxiety and how they interrelate?

DB: When we talk about migraine, depression and anxiety occurring together, we have to be very careful not to make patients feel like how they’re feeling is their fault. These things co-occur because they share underlying biologic and neurochemical mechanisms. There&#;s a reason why the nervous system and the brain have these conditions together, and it&#;s very logical that you&#;re going to feel sad, down and frustrated when you&#;re living with a chronic disease like migraine. You&#;re also going to worry about when the next attack will come, what your future may hold, and how migraine will continue to affect your life. It makes sense that these conditions might travel together, but we can’t blame this person’s illness—and subsequently their depression or anxiety—on weakness.

AHS: Can common migraine medications, either acute or preventative, trigger feelings of depression?

DB: The good news is that the medications that we use for migraine typically don&#;t trigger or worsen depression. It&#;s more likely that the migraine attacks themselves and the effect the illness has on your life is what is worsening the depression.

AHS: What do doctors and general practitioners need to know about the relationship between migraine anxiety and depression?

DB: Depression and anxiety are highly comorbid with migraine. They may both be a pre-disposer and a consequence of migraine, or it could be a shared biologic underpinning. It&#;s valuable to assess and track patients’ levels of depression and anxiety, and the good news is that all three conditions are treatable with effective medication, as well as affective psychological and behavioral treatments.

However, both depression and anxiety may interfere with [migraine] treatment outcomes as they can affect adherence, motivation and may also interact with treatments in various ways. It is absolutely worth assessing depression and anxiety and either treating it or referring for treatment. There is every reason to believe that since they home remedies for depression headache with migraine at such high rates—since they increase with migraine frequency and severity—that decreasing depression and anxiety may improve migraine outcomes as well. Home remedies for depression headache addition, it will improve a patient’s quality of life and reduce disability.

AHS: How will increased awareness, education and understanding in the medical community help these patients receive better treatment?

DB: Increased awareness that depression and anxiety are common with migraine will help all of us better care for and treat our patients. It&#;s important to keep in mind that these are common comorbidities and to ask our patients about them. Patients may not volunteer this information because they think it&#;s not relevant. They may also be embarrassed and stigmatized, making it even less likely that they will willingly divulge this information. If we don&#;t ask about it, we can&#;t assess it, document it or treat it. We have to let patients know that these comorbidities are common and that this is a normal experience for people living with a chronic, debilitating disease.

 

Dr. Buse has a personal website full of resources for both patients and healthcare professionals. For additional headache-specific information and resources, visit the American Headache Society’s website.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

How to Fight Depression Without Medication

For many people living with depression, prescription medications can be life-saving drugs. Antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like Prozac (fluoxetine) and Zoloft (sertraline), are the most widely prescribed medication for depression, and while they are often effective, they can have side effects and be expensive depending on your health insurance coverage.

There are many ways to counter some of the symptoms of depression that don't involve prescription medications. If you have depression, you might like to try managing it naturally without medication or supplement your antidepressant with other options. If so, check out these natural alternatives and then talk to your doctor about which might make sense as part of your treatment regimen.

This article discusses some natural treatments that may help fight depression including lifestyle changes and supplements. It also covers other strategies you might try such as practicing mindfulness or enhancing your home environment.

Get More Sleep

Sleep and mood go hand in hand. Get too little of the former and the latter is bound to be affected whether you have depression or not. To support your emotional well-being, make sure you have what sleep experts call "good sleep hygiene."

This means you keep consistent bedtimes and wake-up times, your bedroom is set up for sound sleep (it's dark, quiet, and uncluttered), you have a relaxing bedtime routine that doesn't involve sitting in front of a screen, and so on.

Whether you can't seem to get any sleep or can't seem to stop sleeping, there are steps you can take to try to improve the quality of your sleep:

  • Give yourself unemployment card services phone number to unwind before you go to bed; do something relaxing and avoid stressful tasks or thoughts.
  • Go to bed at the same time each night, and set an alarm so that you wake at the same time each morning.
  • Have a consistent bedtime routine.
  • Turn off your devices and try reading a book for a few minutes.

Also, try to spend a little time outside each day, even on days when you are tempted to draw the shades and hide indoors. Light plays an important role in regulating sleep cycles and circadian rhythms, so a lack of sunshine may be making it more difficult to sleep at night.

Cut Back on Caffeine

Coffee, tea, soda, and even chocolate are steeped in caffeine. It's fine to consume a reasonable amount of caffeine in the morning if you enjoy it, but avoid it after late afternoon so it doesn't interfere with sleep.

If you do tend to rely on caffeine, try cutting back gradually in order to avoid unpleasant symptoms of caffeine withdrawal. When you are craving a soda or cup of coffee, try going for a short walk around the block instead.

What to Know About Caffeine Use

Get More Vitamin D

There's some evidence that a vitamin D deficiency could play a role in depression. If you aren't getting enough vitamin D through your diet and lifestyle (like sun exposure), ask your doctor if you should try taking a supplement.

Certain nutrient deficiencies can play a role in depression symptoms. If you are having a difficult time spending enough time outdoors or if overcast weather conditions make it hard to get sunshine, a supplement may be useful.

Try Natural Remedies

Some research suggests that there are natural antidepressants that may be helpful for reducing symptoms of depression. For treating mild to moderate depression, dietary supplements such as St. John's Wort, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM-e), and 5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) may be worth a try.

Research has shown that St. John's wort is more effective than a placebo at relieving symptoms in those with mild-to-moderate depression.

Omega-3 fatty acids have also been investigated for their potential impact on depression. One study found that taking omega-3 supplements may help reduce symptoms of depression in both adults and children, although researchers are not entirely sure how or why.

While natural remedies can be good options for depression treatment, you should always consult your healthcare provider before taking them. Just because they're available without a prescription and are touted as natural doesn't mean they're always safe.

Additionally, research on some of these natural antidepressants remains inconclusive and some may cause unwanted side effects or drug interactions. For example, mixing St. John's wort with an SSRI such as Prozac can lead to a complication called serotonin syndrome. Also, SAM-e carries a risk for hypomania/mania in bipolar disorder.

Recap

Some herbs anthonys edmonds happy hour other supplements may work as natural antidepressants, but that does not mean that they are safe and appropriate for everyone or come without side effects. The effectiveness of these natural remedies is also not always clear, so always talk to your doctor first.

Tap Into Your Spirituality

Religion can be an impactful source of support for many people dealing with depression, but there is no need to join a church, synagogue, or mosque unless you wish to. Simple daily practices such as meditation or adding to a list of things you're grateful can help boost mood and overall well-being.

Meditation can have a range of beneficial effects such as lowering stress levels and helping people to become more aware of their thoughts and reactions.

Research indicates that an intervention called mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), which combines elements of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with mindfulness meditation, can be helpful in treating depression and preventing future relapses of symptoms.

Studies also suggest that different types of mindfulness meditative practices can also be effective in the treatment of depression.

There are many different types of meditation, but you can get started with a simple meditative exercise with these steps:

  1. Sit comfortably.
  2. Close your eyes.
  3. Breathe naturally.
  4. Focus on how your body feels while you breathe.
  5. When your mind wanders, redirect your attention back to your breathing.

8 Meditation Techniques to Try

Get More Exercise 

Getting more exercise doesn't have to mean training for a marathon, but it does mean putting in a half-hour or so of low-intensity activity each day, which has been found to be effective in improving mood and quality of life. Even better, take it outdoors. Fresh air and sunshine are especially healing for folks dealing with a special form of depression known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

While research has shown that regular physical activity can be effective in both the prevention and treatment of depression, it can be hard to start an exercise habit when you're depressed. Lack of energy and low mood may mean that you simply feel too fatigued to get up and get active.

Some things that you can try to stick to your habit:

  • Enlist a friend.Ask a loved one to walk with you or do another form of exercise at least a few times a week. Having the support of a friend can not only help get you into a routine, but it can also help you maintain those social connections when you are feeling down.
  • Remind yourself of the benefits. Getting started is tough, but doing it is something that will help you feel better in the long term.
  • Start small. Try walking for just a few minutes each day, then work on gradually increasing your walks.

How Physical Exercise Benefits Mental Health

Avoid Alcohol

Alcohol in and of itself is a depressant. Drinking can interfere with sleep, and quality sleep is a key to battling the blues. While alcohol might seem like a quick fix to escape what you are feeling, it can homes for sale in natomas sacramento ca make many of the symptoms of depression feel much worse.

Not only that, but it can decrease inhibitions and potentially lead to risky behaviors and bad decisions that can have long-term consequences.

If you're taking any sort of antidepressant, you really shouldn't drink at all. Alcohol doesn't interact well with medication.

If you have been misusing alcohol or other substances and need help quitting, talk to your doctor. You may also have an alcohol or substance use disorder. Withdrawal symptoms may temporarily worsen symptoms of depression, so you may need extra assistance as you go through the recovery process.

How Substance Use Can Lead to Mood Disorders

Eat 'Good Mood' Food

What you eat can have a direct effect on how you think and feel. Make sure to eat a well-balanced diet that's rich in nutrients. A nutritionist or dietitian can help you analyze your eating habits and pinpoint potential nutrient deficiencies that could contribute to depression.

Some foods that may be especially beneficial when you have depression include:

  • Fish: Research has found that people who ate a diet high in fish were less likely to have symptoms of depression. Fish are high in omega-3 fats, which play a role in helping neurotransmitters such as serotonin work in the brain.
  • Nuts: Nuts are also a good source of omega-3 fats and one study indicated that people who ate walnuts were 26% less likely to have symptoms of depression.
  • Probiotics: Research is increasingly pointing to a connection between gut and brain health. Foods high in probiotics include yogurt, kefir, kimchi, and kombucha.

Foods That Help Fight Depression

Change Your Thoughts

Pollyanna-ish as it may sound, thinking good thoughts can help you feel good. Your thoughts truly do have a direct bearing on your mood. If you're struggling with negativity, consider seeing a therapist to help you learn ways to counter it.

One of the most popular and effective treatments used in the treatment of depression is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). This form of psychotherapy focuses on identifying negative thinking patterns and then replacing them with more positive ones. There are different ways that you can practice some of these ideas on your own.

Learn to Recognize Negative Thinking

Sometimes these thoughts can be obvious, such as times when you berate or criticize yourself. Other times, they can be more subtle. You might find yourself engaging in things like catastrophizing or all-or-nothing thinking.

Catastrophizing involves always anticipating negative outcomes. All-or-nothing thinking means that you think of things as either successes or failures with no in-between. Once you get better at recognizing these cognitive patterns, you can start working on some healthier replacements.

Reframe Your Thoughts home remedies for depression headache When you find yourself having a negative thought, consciously reframe it in a positive way. For example, you might replace something like "This will never work" with something more positive such as, "Here are a few things that I can try that will help me get started." Shifting your focus to your strengths and abilities can help you maintain a more positive mindset.

Recap

CBT is an effective treatment for depression that focuses on identifying and changing negative thought patterns that contribute to feelings of depression. You can try these strategies on your own by becoming more aware of negative thinking and shifting them to be more realistic and positive.

Tips for Changing Negative Thinking

Get a Handle on Stress

Stress can drive up levels of a brain chemical called cortisol, which has been found to be higher in folks with depression. There are lots of strategies for coping with stress, such as time management, meditation, and biofeedback training.

Some stress-relieving activities that you might want to incorporate into your daily life include:

  • Deep breathing: A few minutes to slow your breathing and focus your attention on your body in the moment can help you get a better handle on your worries.
  • Exercise: Regular physical activity is a great way to blow off steam.
  • Progressive muscle relaxation: This process involves intentionally tightening muscles throughout the body, holding that tension for several counts, and then releasing that tension until the muscles are completely relaxed. With regular practice, you may be able to learn how to intentionally relax your body fairly quickly whenever you are feeling tense.

Learning to manage your stress takes time and practice. Talk to your doctor or therapist about other strategies you might try to minimize the stress and your response to it.

Stress Management Techniques for All Types of Stress

Add Greenery to Your Home or Office

You may also find it helpful to add indoor plants to your home or office environment. Natural settings are associated with improved mental well-being, so it makes sense that "bringing the outdoors in" might help improve your mood. 

Studies have shown home remedies for depression headache adding indoor plants to your home or office can help in a variety of ways, including:

  • Improving the workplace: Research has shown that office spaces enhanced with indoor plants improve worker concentration and workplace satisfaction.
  • Reducing stress levels: Another study found that actively interacting with indoor plans by caring for them can reduce both physiological and psychological stress.
  • Decreasing depression and anxiety: Research has found that students who spent most of their time at home during the COVID pandemic had better mental health if they were exposed to more green plants. While about a third of the participants reported symptoms of moderate depression, those exposed to more greenery had lower levels of depression and anxiety.

Choosing certain plants may provide additional benefits. For example, research suggests that the scent of a lavender plant can help people feel calmer and more relaxed. No matter what type of plants you choose, greenery can be a great way to beautify your surroundings and potentially improve your mood.

What Houseplants Can Do for Your Mental Health

Tend to Your Social Life

When you're depressed, there's no reason to go it alone, and there are all sorts of reasons to reach out to friends and family. Make plans with loved ones and keep those dates. Join a club or sign up for a group activity such as a local dodgeball league or a French class.

Other things you might try:

  • Join a support group. Talking to other people who are going through similar experiences and challenges can be informative and helpful.
  • Schedule activities. Having routines can be helpful when you home remedies for depression headache going through depression. Create a daily schedule that includes spending time with others. You are more likely to stick to it if it's a scheduled event.
  • Volunteer.Joining a cause that you care about is a great way to meet new people and expand your social circle.

The problem is that depression often causes people to withdraw, which only further exacerbates feelings of isolation and loneliness. Even when you don't feel like going out or being social, try reaching out in whatever way is most comfortable for you. Enlist a few of your closest loved ones who understand what you are experiencing.

Doing the things you used to do might not bring you quite the same enjoyment when you are depressed, but getting out of the house and spending time with people who care about you can help you feel better.

Try New Things

Depression often zaps your interest and motivation to explore new things. You might find it helpful to develop a list of things you might like to try, then work through them one at a time. You might have to compel yourself to try them, and you might find that you don't necessarily have the motivation to pursue new things beyond your initial attempt.

But over time, you might find that something sparks your interest or helps you feel more motivated. It's not always easy, but consider making it a goal to try at least one new thing each week. It may help you fight off a sense of boredom and give you something to look forward to.

Have a Daily Routine

The symptoms of depression can also make it difficult to stick to a schedule, but research suggests that having a routine can be critical for mental health. Maintaining a routine can also help you hold on to a sense of normalcy and stability when you are dealing with feelings of depression, stress, or anxiety.

Not having a daily routine, on the other hand, can increase your feelings of stress and leave you feeling overwhelmed and unable to focus. So work on having a schedule that includes the basic things you need to get done as well as plenty of self-care.

Listen to Upbeat Music

There's no doubt that music can have an impact on how you feel, so choosing the right music when you're feeling down might be an effective way of lifting your mood.

Research has found people who are depressed may have a tendency to choose music that intensifies rumination, sadness, and emotion-focused coping. So while you might be tempted to turn to somber tearjerkers when you're feeling down, consider listening to more upbeat songs to boost your mood and inspire positive feelings.

Summary

Depression is a serious condition that may grow worse over time if left untreated. There are a number of natural ways to combat feelings of depression if you don't want to take prescription antidepressant medication. These strategies can also be helpful when used to complement treatments that may include psychotherapy and medication. 

You should talk to your doctor or therapist to find the best approach to treating your depression. Many lifestyle changes such as eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and getting enough sleep may help improve your symptoms. Always talk to your healthcare provider before taking any supplements to treat depression, since these might have side effects of their own or may interfere with or interact with other medications you may be taking.

A Word From Verywell

Always take symptoms of depression seriously as depression doesn't just go away on its own. While there are many things you can do to support your mental health, don't try to just handle your symptoms alone. Talk to your doctor and discuss some of the self-help strategies that may support your treatment.

Get Advice From The Verywell Mind Podcast

Hosted by Editor-in-Chief and therapist Amy Morin, LCSW, this episode of The Verywell Mind Podcast shares how to find the courage to face depression, featuring Olympic gold medalist Laurie Hernandez.

Follow Now: Apple Podcasts / Spotify / Google Podcasts / RSS

The Best Online Therapy Programs We've tried, tested and written unbiased reviews of the best online therapy programs including Talkspace, Betterhelp, and Regain.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Mind uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

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  2. Wams EJ, Woelders T, Marring I, et al. Linking light exposure and subsequent sleep: A field polysomnography study in humans. Sleep. ;40(12). doi/sleep/zsx

  3. Parker GB, Brotchie H, Graham RK. Vitamin D and depression. J Affect Disord. ; doi/mynewextsetup.us

  4. Young, SN. Are SAMe and 5-HTP safe and effective treatments for depression?. J Psychiatry Neurosci. ;28(6) PMID

  5. Linde K, Kriston L, Rücker G, et al. Efficacy and acceptability of pharmacological treatments for depressive disorders in primary care: Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Ann Fam Med. ; 13(1) doi/afm

  6. Deacon G, Kettle C, Hayes D, Dennis C, Tucci J. Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the treatment of depression. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. ;57(1) doi/

  7. Izzo AA. Drug interactions with St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum): A review of the clinical evidence. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. ;42(3) doi/cpp

  8. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAMe): In Depth. Updated December

  9. Segal ZV, Bieling P, Young T, et al. Antidepressant monotherapy vs sequential pharmacotherapy and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, or placebo, for relapse prophylaxis in recurrent depression. Arch Gen Psychiatry. ;67(12) doi/archgenpsychiatry

  10. Goyal M, Singh S, Sibinga EM, et al. Meditation programs for psychological stress and well-being: A systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Intern Med. ;(3) doi/jamainternmed

  11. Kelly P, Williamson C, Niven AG, Hunter R, Mutrie N, Richards J. Walking on sunshine: Scoping review of the evidence for walking and mental health. Br J Sports Med. ;52(12) doi/bjsports

  12. Carek, PJ, Laibstain, SE, and Carek, SM. Exercise for the treatment of depression and anxiety.The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine. ;41(1) doi/PMc

  13. Armeli S, Sullivan TP, Tennen H. Drinking to cope motivation as a prospective predictor of negative affect. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. ;76(4) doi/jsad

  14. Li F, Liu X, Zhang D. Fish consumption and risk of depression: A meta-analysis. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. ; doi/jech

  15. Arab, L, Guo, R, and Elashoff, D. Lower depression scores among walnut consumers in NHANES. Nutrients. ; 11(2): E doi/nu

  16. Evrensel A, Ceylan ME. The gut-brain axis: The missing link in depression. Clinical Psychopharmacology and Neuroscience. ;13(3) doi/cpn

  17. Oar EL, Johnco C, Ollendick TH. Cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents. Psychiatr Clin North Am. ;40(4) doi/mynewextsetup.us

  18. Wichmann S, Kirschbaum C, Böhme C, Petrowski K. Cortisol stress response in post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, and major depressive disorder patients. Psychoneuroendocrinology. ;doi/mynewextsetup.usen

  19. Klainin-Yobas P, Nuang Oo W, Ying P, Yew S, Lau Y. Effects of relaxation interventions on depression and anxiety among older adults: A systematic review. Aging Ment Health. ;19(12) doi/

  20. Wolf KL, Robbins AST. Metro nature, environmental health, and economic value. Environmental Health Perspectives. ;(5) doi/ehp

  21. Nieuwenhuis M, Knight C, Postmes T, Haslam SA. The relative benefits of green versus lean office space: Three field experiments. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied. ;20(3) doi/xap

  22. Lee MS, Lee J, Park BJ, Miyazaki Y. Interaction with indoor plants may reduce psychological and physiological stress by suppressing autonomic nervous system activity in young adults: A randomized crossover study. J Physiol Anthropol. ;34(1) doi/s

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Источник: mynewextsetup.us

How to Relieve Neck Pain Caused by Stress

Stress. Anxiety. Low moral support. All of these and other psychosocial factors have been linked as potential causes of neck pain.1,2 When tension and stress build in the neck, muscles may feel tight or achy. Neck pain may also spread to the shoulder or be accompanied by a headache. Let’s explore some ways to reduce this type of neck pain.

See Stress-Related Back Pain

If stress-induced neck pain does not subside after a week or two of self-care, see your doctor for diagnosis and treatment. SeeTreatment for Neck Pain

7 tips to tackle stress-related neck pain

By focusing on ways to treat both the mind and the body, you can help lessen stress and the toll it can take on you. Try these methods to manage stress-related neck pain:

  1. Neck stretches

    If done regularly, stretching exercises for the neck can loosen muscle tightness and maintain or expand range of motion for the neck. Try these 2 stretches to get started.

    See Neck Stretches

  2. Therapy or support group

    Cognitive behavioral therapy has proven benefits for helping to develop healthy thought patterns, but even a support group or online forum where you can share your concerns and receive support can help you manage day-to-day stressors.

    Visit our Back and Neck Pain Support Group to find online support.

  3. Meditation

    Practicing meditation is a good way to calm your thoughts and anxieties. Look for a guided meditation video on YouTube or attend a class to learn how.

    See Healing Benefits of Yoga

  1. Enlisting help from family and friends

    You don’t have to tackle stress alone; let your family and friends help carry the load. Be clear about ways they can help you—ask if a friend can run an errand for you, or assign your children extra chores around the house during stressful periods.
  2. Massage

    Massage is not only relaxing and stress-relieving overall, but it can specifically ease the tightness of the muscles of the neck and shoulders.

    See Massage Chairs for Pain Relief

  3. Exercise

    Exercise is good for your body and mind. It releases endorphins, a hormone that dulls pain and generates feelings of well-being.

    See Low-Impact Aerobic Exercise

  4. Prioritizing

    You’re not a superhero—let inconsequential things go if they’re taking a toll on your health. Focus on what’s most important and don’t worry if things further down the priority list get delayed or left undone for a while.

If your stress-induced neck pain is not relieved by a week or two of self-care, see your doctor. He or she can offer other treatment options and diagnose possible underlying conditions.

Learn more

Stiff Neck Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

9 Lesser-Known Tips for Easing Neck Pain

References

  • mynewextsetup.usman S, Carroll L, Cassidy DJ, Schubert J, Nygren A. The Bone and Joint Decade Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders. Eur Spine J. ; 17(Suppl 1): 5. doi: /s
  • mynewextsetup.us R, Wiest C, Clark K, Home remedies for depression headache C, Horn M. Identifying risk factors for first-episode neck pain: A systematic review. Musculoskelet Sci Pract. Feb; doi: /mynewextsetup.us
Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Rumination: The danger of dwelling

By Denise Winterman
BBC News Magazine

The UK's biggest ever online test into stress, undertaken by the BBC's Lab UK and the University of Liverpool, has revealed that rumination is the biggest predictor of the most common mental health problems in the country.

A bit of self-reflection can be a good thing, say psychologists. But just how serious can it get when introspection goes awry and thoughts get stuck on repeat, playing over and over in the mind?

Rumination and self-blame have long been accepted by health professionals as part of the problems that can lead to depression and anxiety - the two most common mental health problems in the UK, according to the Mental Health Foundation.

But new research has demonstrated just how significant and serious their impact on mental health can be.

The findings of a ground-breaking study, published in the journal PLOS ONE today, suggest that brooding too much on negative events is the biggest predictor of depression and anxiety and determines the level of stress people experience. The research even suggests a person's psychological response is a more important factor than what has actually happened to them.

A total of 32, people from countries took part in the online stress test devised by the BBC's Lab UK and psychologists at the University of Liverpool, making it the biggest study of its kind ever undertaken in the UK.

"We found that people who didn't ruminate or blame themselves for their difficulties had much lower levels of depression and anxiety, even if they'd experienced many negative events in their lives," says Peter Kinderman, who led the study and is a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Liverpool.

"Dwelling on negative thoughts and self blame have previously been recognised as important when it comes to mental health, but not to the extent this study has shown.

"The findings suggest both are crucial psychological pathways to depression and anxiety."

The human mind is an extremely complex machine and it's jose feliciano 2019 accepted there is no single cause for depression and anxiety by professionals in the field. But some factors have more impact than others.

The study found traumatic life events, such as abuse or childhood bullying, were the biggest cause of anxiety and depression when dwelled upon. This is followed by family history, income and education. Next comes relationship status and social inclusion.

"But these didn't merely 'cause' depression and anxiety," he says.

"The most important way in which these things led to depression and anxiety was by leading a person to ruminate and blame themselves for the problem.

"This shows how psychological issues are part of the routes to the development of problems, not merely that people become ill and then show changes in their psychology."

Rumination was found to be more damaging than self blame. Having thoughts stuck on replay in her head is something Teresa (not her real name), 50, from Essex, struggles with and has done for years.

"When I don't feel on top of things in my life I start to find it harder to switch negative thoughts off," she says.

"If I'm stressed at work or home it's as if the negative thoughts swamp my mind and I can't rationalise them. I get angry with myself for allowing them to run through my head."

Teresa has been married for over 20 years and has two children. But despite having a happy home life, she says there have still been times when the negative thoughts have become overwhelming.

"There home remedies for depression headache been a couple points in my life when I have really struggled to cope. Negative thoughts and things from the past came back to haunt me.

"Both times I went to my doctor for help but was offered antidepressants. I didn't want to go down that road. I have tried to develop my own coping mechanisms over the years. I find being outside and with nature helps me a lot. It seems to calm what's in my head."

Rumination is sometimes referred to as a "silent" mental health problem because its impact is often underestimated. But it plays a big part in anything from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) to eating disorders.

And the impact of mental health problems is huge. They affect one person in every four during their lifetime and are the leading cause of disability globally, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). In alone they are estimated to have cost $ trillion (£ trillion) globally by the World Economic Forum.

In the UK one in four people will experience some kind of mental health problem in any one year, according to the Mental Health Foundation. Anxiety and depression are the most common problems.

So what does the new study mean for people who have serious problems with ruminating and those treating them?

"Obviously it is just one study, and other people will have other important contributions, but we believe our findings are very significant," says Kinderman.

It's important to get across what the findings mean for the average person, says Dr Ellie Pontin, a clinical psychologist and research associate at the University of Liverpool, who was also involved in the study.

"It's actually a really positive message and should give people hope," she says.

"It can be very hard to be told your problems are because of what you have experienced in the past or your genetics, things you can't change. The way you think and deal with things can be changed."

Other professionals agree. They argue that such studies highlight the need to put psychological services at the heart of the health system.

"This is a positive message," says Angela Clow, professor of psychophysiology at the University of Westminster.

"And helping someone tackle negative thought processes is not something that has to be done exclusively by clinical psychologists.

"Other health professionals can be trained to deliver simple psychological help and techniques. It doesn't have to cost a lot of money."

Follow @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter and on Facebook

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Источник: mynewextsetup.us

St. John's wort

Hypericum perforatum; Klamathweed

St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) has a history of use as a medicine dating back to ancient Greece, where it was used for a range of illnesses, including various nervous disorders. St. John's wort also has antibacterial, antioxidant, and antiviral properties. Because of its anti-inflammatory properties, it has been applied to the skin to help heal wounds and burns. St. John's wort is one of the most commonly purchased herbal products in the United States.

In recent years, St. John's wort has been studied extensively as a treatment for depression. Most studies show that St. John's wort may help treat mild-to-moderate depression, and has fewer side effects than most other prescription antidepressants. But it interacts with a number of medications, so it should be taken only under the guidance of a health care provider.

DO NOT use herbs to treat severe depression -- where you have trouble functioning day to day, or have thoughts of harming yourself or others. Always see a doctor if your depression is making it hard for you to function (See "Precautions" section).

Depression

There is good evidence that St. John's wort may reduce symptoms in people with mild-to-moderate, but not severe (or major) depression. In many studies it seems to work as well as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a popular type of antidepressant often prescribed to treat depression. SSRIs include fluoxetine (Prozac), citalopram (Celexa), and sertraline (Zoloft). In addition, St. John's wort doesn't seem to cause loss of sex drive, one of the most common side effects of antidepressants.

St. John's wort contains several chemicals, including hypericin, hyperforin, and flavonoids. Researchers aren't exactly sure how St. John's wort works. Some have suggested that the herb acts similar to an SSRI, increasing the availability of the brain chemicals serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. These neurotransmitters help improve mood. Scientists thought that hypericin was responsible, but now they believe that other chemicals in St. John's wort may help.

Not all studies agree, however. In one study, St. John's wort was found to be no more effective than placebo for treating depression. But these studies should be weighed against the majority that have found St. John's wort helps depression. For example, in the same study, Zoloft also failed to show any benefit in treating depression. Many other studies have compared St. John's wort to Prozac, Celexa, paroxetine (Paxil), and Zoloft, and found that the herb works as well as the drugs. Other studies are ongoing.

Other Uses

St. John's wort has also shown promise in treating the following conditions, a few of which are related to depression.

  • Premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Research suggests that St. John's wort may help relieve physical and emotional symptoms of PMS in some women, including cramps, irritability, food cravings, and breast tenderness. One study reported a 50% reduction in symptom severity.
  • Menopause. There's some evidence to suggest that St. John's wort, combined with black cohosh, helps improve mood and anxiety during menopause.
  • Seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Used alone, St. John's wort has improved mood in people with SAD, a type of depression that occurs during the winter months because of lack of sunlight. SAD is usually treated with light therapy. Research shows that using St. John's wort together with phototherapy works even better.
  • Eczema, wounds, minor burns, hemorrhoids. St. John's wort has antibacterial properties and may also help fight inflammation. Applied topically (to the skin), it may relieve symptoms associated with minor wounds and skin irritation.
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), social phobia. One early open-label study found that taking St. John's wort mg, 2 times a day for 12 weeks improved OCD symptoms. However, other studies show that St. John's wort doesn't improve OCD.

Plant Description

St. John's wort is a shrubby plant with clusters of yellow flowers that have oval, elongated petals. Scientists believe it is native to Europe, parts of Asia and Africa, and the western United States. The plant gets its name because it is often in full bloom around June 24, the day traditionally celebrated as the birthday of John the Baptist. Both the flowers and leaves are used as medicine.

What's It Made Of?

The best-studied active components are hypericin and pseudohypericin, found in both the leaves and flowers. However, researchers are not sure whether these components are responsible for St. John's wort's healing properties. Scientists are studying St. John's wort's essential oils and flavonoids.

Available Forms

St. John's wort can be obtained in many forms: capsules, tablets, tinctures, teas, and oil-based skin lotions. Chopped or powdered forms of the dried herb are also available. Most products are standardized to contain % hypericin.

How to Take It

Pediatric

Most studies on St. John's wort have been conducted in adults. However, one study (more than children under age 12) indicated that St. John's wort may be a safe and effective way of treating mild-to-moderate symptoms of depression in children. Never give your child St. John's wort without medical supervision. Children who are being treated with St. John's wort should be carefully monitored for side effects, such as allergic reactions or upset stomach. You should not try to treat depression in a child without a doctor's help because depression can be a serious illness.

Adult

  • Dry herb (in capsules or tablets). The usual dose for mild depression and mood disorders is mg (standardized to % hypericin extract), 3 times per day, with meals. St. John's wort is available in time-release capsules.
  • St. John's wort is also available as a liquid extract or tea. Ask your doctor to help you find the right dose.

It may take 3 to 6 weeks to feel any effects from St. John's wort.

DO NOT stop taking St. John's wort all at once because that may cause unpleasant side effects. Gradually lower the dose before stopping.

Precautions

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, can trigger side effects and can interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should take herbs with care, under the supervision of a health care provider.

St. John's wort is often used to treat depression. If your depression is causing problems with your daily life, or you are having thoughts of suicide or of harming yourself or others, you need to see a doctor immediately. St. John's wort should not be used to treat severe depression.

You should see a doctor to make sure you have the right diagnosis before taking St. John's wort. Your doctor can help you determine the right dose and make sure you are not taking medications that might interact with St. John's wort.

Side effects from St. John's wort are generally mild and include stomach upset, hives or other skin rashes, fatigue, restlessness, headache, dry mouth, and feelings of dizziness or mental confusion. St. John's wort can also make the skin overly sensitive to sunlight, called photodermatitis. If you have light skin and are taking St. John's wort, wear long sleeves and a hat when in the sun, and use a sunscreen with at least SPF 15 or higher. Avoid sunlamps, tanning booths, and tanning beds.

Other potential concerns about St. John's wort are that it may interfere with getting pregnant or make infertility worse; that it may make police chase edmond ok of ADD and ADHD worse, especially among people taking methylphenidate; that it may increase the risk of psychosis in people with schizophrenia; and that it may contribute to dementia in people with Alzheimer disease. More research is needed.

Since St. John's wort can interact with medications used during surgery, you should stop taking it at least 5 days or more before surgery. Make sure your doctor and surgeon know you are taking St. John's wort.

DO NOT take St. John's wort if you have bipolar disorder. For people with major depression, there's some concern that taking St. John's wort may increase the risk for mania.

Women who are pregnant, trying to become pregnant, or breastfeeding should not take St. John's wort.

Possible Interactions

St. John's wort interacts with a large number of medications. In most cases, St. John's wort makes the medication less effective. In other cases, St. John's wort may make the effects of a medication stronger.

If you are being treated with any medications, you should not use St. John's wort without first talking to your doctor. St. John's wort may interact with many different medications, including but not limited to the following:

Antidepressants

St. John's wort may interact with medications used to treat depression or other mood disorders, including tricyclic antidepressants, SSRIs, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Taking St. John's wort with these medications tends to increase side effects, and could lead to a dangerous condition called serotonin syndrome. DO NOT take St. John's wort with other antidepressants, including:

  • SSRIs: Citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft)
  • Tricyclics: Amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), imipramine (Tofranil)
  • MAOIs: Phenelzine, (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate)
  • Nefazodone (Serzone)

Allergy drugs (antihistamines)

St. John's wort may reduce levels of these drugs in the body, making them less effective:

  • Loratadine (Claritin)
  • Cetirizine (Zyrtec)
  • Fexofenadine (Allegra)

Clopidogrel (Plavix)

Theoretically, taking St. John's wort along with clopidogrel may increase the risk of bleeding.

Dextromethorphan (cough bank of america financial center houston tx St. John's wort at the same time as dextromethorphan, a cough suppressant found in many over-the-counter cough and cold medicines, can increase the risk of side effects, including serotonin syndrome.

Digoxin

St. John's wort may lower levels of the medication and make it less effective. DO NOT take St. John's wort if you take bank of hawaii ala moana that suppress the immune system

St. John's wort can reduce the effectiveness of these medications, which are taken after organ transplant, or to control autoimmune diseases. There have been many reports of home remedies for depression headache blood levels dropping in those with a heart or kidney transplant, even leading to rejection of the transplanted organ.

  • Adalimumab (Humira)
  • Azathioprine (Imuran)
  • Cyclosporine
  • Etanercept (Enbrel)
  • Methotrexate
  • Mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept)
  • Tacrolimus (Prograf)

Drugs to fight HIV

St. John's wort appears to interact with at least two kinds of medications used to treat HIV and AIDS: protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The Food and Drug Administration recommends that St. John's wort not be used with any type of antiretroviral medication used to treat HIV or AIDS.

Birth control pills

There have been reports of breakthrough bleeding in women on birth control pills who were also taking St. John's wort. It is possible that the herb might make birth control pills less effective, leading to unplanned pregnancies.

Aminolevulinic acid

This medication makes your skin more sensitive to sunlight. St. John's wort also increases skin sensitivity to light. Together, they may have a dangerous impact on skin sensitivity to the sun.

Reserpine

Based on animal studies, St. John's wort may interfere with reserpine's ability to treat high blood pressure.

Sedatives

St. John's wort can increase the effect of drugs that have a sedating effect, including:

  • Anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin (Dilantin) and valproic acid (Depakote)
  • Barbiturates
  • Benzodiazepines, such as diazepam (Valium)
  • Drugs to treat insomnia, such as zolpidem (Ambien), zaleplon (Sonata), eszopiclone (Lunesta), and ramelteon (Rozerem)
  • Tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline (Elavil)
  • Alcohol

Alprazolam (Xanax)

St. John's wort may speed up the breakdown of Xanax in the body, making it less effective.

Theophylline

St. John's wort can lower levels of this medication in the blood. Theophylline is used to open the airways in people with asthma, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis.

Triptans (used to treat migraines)

St. John's wort can increase the risk of side effects, including serotonin syndrome, when taken with these medications:

  • Naratriptan (Amerge)
  • Rizatriptan (Maxalt)
  • Sumatriptan (Imitrex)
  • Zolmitriptan (Zomig)

Warfarin (Coumadin)

St. John's wort reduces the effectiveness of warfarin, an anticoagulant (blood thinner).

Other drugs

Because St. John's wort is broken down by certain liver enzymes, it may interact with other drugs that are broken down by the same enzymes. Those drugs may include:

  • Antifungal drugs, such as ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fluconazole (Diflucan)
  • Statins (drugs taken to lower cholesterol), including atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), and simvastatin (Zocor)
  • Imatinib (Gleevac) -- may make Gleevac less effective
  • Irinotecan (Camptosar) -- may speed up the rate at which Camptosar is broken down by the body, making it less effective
  • Some calcium channel blockers (taken to lower blood pressure)
  • Any medication broken down by the liver

Supporting Research

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Kobak KA, Taylor LV, Bystritsky A, et al. St John's wort versus placebo in obsessive-compulsive disorder: results from a double-blind study. Int Clin Psychopharmacol. ;

Kobak KA, Taylor LV, Warner G, Futterer R. St. John's wort versus placebo in social phobia: results from a placebo-controlled pilot study. J Clin Psychopharmacol. ;

Kumar A, Singh A. Protective effect of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) extract on hour sleep deprivation-induced anxiety-like behavior and oxidative damage in mice. Planta Med. ;

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Ruschitzka F, Meier PJ, Turina M, et al. Acute heart transplant rejection due to Saint John's wort [letter]. Lancet. ,

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Chamomile is a soothing herbal tea that’s great to drink when you have a headache. Chamomile works to reduce inflammation, which can cause headache pain. Chamomile has also been shown to help lessen stress and anxiety, which can often be a contributing factor to headaches.

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