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is organic soy milk bad for you

Hi Marzena. Organic soy is non-GMO soy. Hi there! What brand of soy milk do you recommend? Finding it difficult to find one without natural. In recent years the food industry has wasted no time in extolling soya's alleged health benefits, claiming it can lower cholesterol, help with. Without meat, fish, eggs, or dairy, soy products (think edamame, tofu, miso, soy milk, and soy cheese) are now a more mainstream staple in the.

: Is organic soy milk bad for you

Is organic soy milk bad for you
Is organic soy milk bad for you
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Is organic soy milk bad for you
Is organic soy milk bad for you

Men’s Health Does An “About Face” On Soy…And Rightly So!

Men’s Health magazine, which once suggested male readers should avoid soy, has now come out with an article touting the benefits of soy consumption. Is organic soy milk bad for you, it’s about time.

While it is fair to say that no single article, be it intended for health professionals or the lay public, is responsible for the myth is organic soy milk bad for you soy causes male feminization, a article in Men’s Health warrants being singled out.1 The title alone reveals the hyperbolic tone of the article: “Is this the most dangerous food for men?” And the article itself includes this text: “But there may be a hidden dark side to soy, one that has the power to undermine everything it means to be male.”

Much of the article focused on a case-report published in that described an older man who developed feminizing effects, including gynecomastia, allegedly as a result of his soy consumption.2 The article also cited a small pilot epidemiologic study published in that found soy intake was associated with lower sperm counts among men attending an infertility clinic.3

While this very long article did briefly mention that the male in question consumed 3 quarts of soymilk per day, it failed to mention that 12 cups of soymilk is a ridiculous amount of soy to consume, and that it is about 9 times more soy than older Japanese men (following a traditional diet) typically consume.4 Furthermore, it’s pretty obvious given the number of calories the soymilk would have provided, that soy consumption occurred in the context of a completely unbalanced is organic soy milk bad for you likely nutrient deficient diet. Instead of focusing on the excessive amount of soy consumed, the article discussed the feminizing effects as if they would occur in response to more sensible and modest amounts of soy. And therefore, it appeared as though soy represents a threat to men who even infrequently consumed soy.

The article was so biased against soy, for the first and only time I actually spoke with an editor of the magazine to complain. After butting heads for a is organic soy milk bad for you minutes, he told me, in effect: “We have to come out with articles every month.” The clear meaning was that the pressure to publish attention-grabbing stories causes one to diverge from the science to varying degrees.

Better late than never. Fast forward 9 years to an article in Men’s Health (mynewextsetup.us) published earlier this year in which the benefits of soymilk were highlighted by citing a peer-reviewed article which concluded that of the many plant milks evaluated, soymilk comes out on top nutritionally, as it comes closest to matching the nutrient content of cow’s milk.5 More importantly, the article in Men’s Health also went on to say that “phytoestrogens (the family of plant-based hormones that isoflavones belong to) have also been linked to a dip in testosterone when you down too much — but before you freak out, know that up to four servings a day isn’t a big deal, Men’s Health nutrition advisor Alan Aragaon, M.S. explained to us previously.” Aragon had made that point in an article in Men’s Health published in December of (mynewextsetup.us)

Once something is ingrained in the public’s mind it is not easily dislodged. The retraction or correction to any story typically gets a lot less coverage and has a lot less impact than the original story. But to be clear, clinical studies show that neither soy nor isoflavones lower levels of testosterone6 or raise estrogen levels7 in men. In some of the studies conducted, the equivalent of as much as six servings of soy per day didn’t result in any hormonal disturbances.

And what about that previously mentioned small study linking soy to lower sperm counts?3 The clinical studies show that isn’t the case.8,9 In fact, even the research group that published those initial findings about lowered sperm counts3 subsequently found that soyfood intake in men was unrelated is organic soy milk bad for you clinical outcomes among couples presenting at an infertility clinic.10

Finally, long-term studies show that in response to resistance exercise training such as weight lifting, soy protein promotes muscle mass and strength to a similar extent as whey protein, which is considered to be the gold standard in the weight-lifting community.11,12 When considering all the data, it’s pretty obvious that not only should men not fear consuming soy but they would be wise to consider incorporating soy into their diet as research suggests soy may reduce risk of developing prostate cancer.13

It may be that the damage done to the image of soy by that article in Men’s Health may never be completely undone.1 But at least Men’s Health is beginning to portray soy in a way that is consistent with the scientific literature.

References

  1. Thorton J. Is this the most dangerous food for men? Men&#;s Health (June).
  2. Martinez J, Lewi JE. An unusual case of gynecomastia associated with soy product consumption. Endocr Pract. ;
  3. Chavarro JE, Toth TL, Sadio SM, Hauser R. Soy food and isoflavone intake in relation to semen quality parameters among men from an infertility clinic. Hum Reprod. ;
  4. Messina M, Nagata C, Wu AH. Estimated Asian adult soy protein and isoflavone intakes. Nutr Cancer. ;
  5. Vanga SK, Raghavan V. How well do plant based alternatives fare nutritionally compared to cow&#;s milk? Journal of food science and technology. ;
  6. Hamilton-Reeves JM, Vazquez G, Duval SJ, Phipps WR, Kurzer MS, Messina MJ. Clinical studies show no effects of soy protein or isoflavones on reproductive hormones in men: results of a meta-analysis. Fertil Steril. ;
  7. Messina M. Soybean isoflavone exposure does not have feminizing effects on men: a critical examination of the clinical evidence. Fertil Steril. ;
  8. Mitchell JH, Cawood E, Kinniburgh D, Provan A, Collins AR, Irvine DS. Effect of a phytoestrogen food supplement on reproductive health california financial partners normal males. Clin Sci (Lond). ;
  9. Beaton LK, McVeigh BL, Dillingham BL, Lampe JW, Duncan AM. Soy protein isolates of varying isoflavone content do not adversely affect semen quality in healthy young men. Fertil Steril. ;
  10. Minguez-Alarcon L, Afeiche MC, Chiu YH, et al. Male soy food intake was not associated with in vitro fertilization outcomes among couples attending a fertility center. Andrology. ;
  11. Candow DG, Burke NC, Smith-Palmer T, Burke DG. Effect of whey and soy protein supplementation combined with resistance training in young adults. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism. ;
  12. Denysschen CA, Burton HW, Horvath PJ, Leddy JJ, Browne RW. Resistance training with soy vs whey protein supplements in hyperlipidemic males. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. ;
  13. Applegate CC, Rowles JL, Ranard KM, Jeon S, Erdman JW. Soy consumption and the risk of prostate cancer: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrients. ;

 

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Why are people concerned about men drinking soya milk?

Soya milk is a tasty and easily available alternative to dairy products, so it’s popular among people on a dairy-free diet. However, soya contains chemicals called soya isoflavones which are a source of phytoestrogens, and these have oestrogenic effects on the body – which is why we include soya isoflavones in our Menopause Support tablets.

For men, this has become a big concern, with some claiming that the phytoestrogens found in soya isoflavones can have feminising effects on men, such as breast enlargement and emotional changes, as well as cause problems such as erectile dysfunction, low sperm function and reduced libido. 

On the flip-side, many people on dairy-free and vegan diets thrive on soya milk and other soya products with no adverse effects. Karris McCulloch at TheVeganKind claims 'Soya yoghurts, soya milk, tofu and meat replacements are all consumed by our family regularly and we have absolutely no concerns whatsoever of the safety of soya consumption for either men or women. It's becoming more and more widely accepted that the ill effects of soya on men are factually incorrect.'

So what truth is there in these concerns, and is it safe for men to drink soya milk or eat soya-based products?

What we know about soya products

It’s true that soya contains phytoestrogens which act like oestrogen in the body. However, their oestrogenic effect is very weak – between 50 and 20, times weaker than natural oestrogen! This can actually be really useful for women during the menopause, as phytoestrogen supplements like our own Menopause Support can gently support oestrogen levels. But don't worry, you won't find as many phytoestrogens in soya foods as you would in a supplement.

We know that soya products are widely consumed in Eastern countries, and the populations in these countries tend to be generally healthier with less hormone-related problems – women are less prone to PMS and tend to have an easier menopause, whilst men are less prone to problems like BPH, or enlarged prostate. However, it is important to remember that soya is not the only thing that makes Eastern diets so healthy – they are generally much lower in refined carbohydrates, richer in fresh vegetables and high in fish too.

It’s also important to consider what type of soya products these cultures traditionally consume. Fermented soya, such as miso and tempeh are most widely consumed, while soya milk is fairly uncommon. Fermenting soya increases its nutritional value so it's likely that many of the health benefits associated with soya products in the East are actually in reference to fermented soya.

We know that soya milk also contains antinutrients, which can hinder the absorption of minerals such as magnesium and calcium. The fermentation process helps to reduce these antinutrients too.

Tempeh is a fermented form of soya.

What does the research say?

The good news is that research seems to suggest that soya has no adverse effects on men in terms of hormone disruption, sexual health or feminisation.

Two reports analysed a number of studies to assess the extent to which soya and soya isoflavones have an effect on male hormones and related conditions. 

One of these concluded that there were ‘no significant effects of soya protein or isoflavone intake’ on male sex hormone levels.

Another report found that soya did not affect oestrogen or testosterone levels in men, did not affect sperm counts and did not increase the risk of erectile dysfunction. 

The reports noted that while some adverse effects have been seen in animal studies, these animals process and react differently to soya than humans, and the same effects have not been found in similar studies on humans.

However, these reports don’t make a distinction between the different types of soy, with both including a range of studies which used different types of soya, from soya isoflavone supplements, to soya foods, to isolated soya proteins. We know that different types of soya have different levels of phytoestrogens, which skews these results slightly.

So what’s the verdict on soya milk?

Glass of soya milk

Considering that the oestrogenic effect of soya isoflavones is anywhere from 50 to 20, times weaker than natural oestrogen, you’d have to drink an awful lot of soya milk to begin seeing hormonal effects. Plus, dairy milk contains lots of hormones and growth factors too so soya milk is still a better alternative. 

However, just as we recommend reducing (or avoiding altogether) your intake of dairy, we’d also recommend limiting your intake of soya milk. Some soya milk in your morning cereal or in your tea/coffee is fine, but we wouldn’t recommend drinking pints of it throughout the day.

This is partly because soya milk tends to be highly processed in the UK and can often contain additional salt, sugar, preservatives and other nasty chemicals. It is also often made from non-organic or even GM soybeans. As we mentioned earlier, soya milk is an unfermented form of soya so it can also contain high levels of antinutrients. 

However, we would recommend consuming more fermented soya products as these have lots of great health benefits! The fermentation process increases nutritional value and also reduces the levels of anti-nutrients to create a much healthier end product. Tempeh, natto and miso make great additions to a healthy diet.

What benefits does fermented soya have?

Soya is rich in nutrients such as protein, vitamins, minerals and fibre, and is a much healthier alternative to meat and dairy. 

Fermented soya is also a natural probiotic, as the fermentation process encourages the growth of healthy bacteria. When ingested, these healthy bacteria can promote better digestion, which can have knock-on effects on the immune system, energy levels and overall nutrition.

Soya is also thought to be good for a healthy heart, since it contains omegas and can help to reduce cholesterol. 

Soya for BPH/Enlarged Prostate

If you have BPH (an enlarged prostate) or are looking to promote a healthier prostate to prevent conditions like BPH from developing, then soya is something you should definitely think about eating more of. Soya is rich in plant compounds known as phytosterols which have been shown to reduce the risk of prostate enlargement.

The highest rates of prostate disease are observed in Western countries such as the United States, whereas the lowest rates are seen in Asian countries such as Singapore. While this could be down to factors such as genetics, one likely explanation is diet, and we know that Asian diets tend to be full of soya-based products.

Replacing some of your meat and dairy intake with soya-based products such as tofu, miso, tempeh and soya milk can also reduce the risk of BPH, since eating red meat daily has been revealed to increase the risk of BPH by 38%. Dairy is also a known inflammatory which can aggravate conditions like BPH and prostatitis.

For more diet tips, read our article on eating for a healthy prostate.

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The Dark Side of Soy

As someone who is conscious of her health, I spent 13 years cultivating a vegetarian diet. I took time to plan and balance meals that included products such as soy milk, soy yogurt, tofu, and Chick&#;n patties. I pored over labels looking for words I couldn&#;t pronounce&#;occasionally one or two would pop up. Soy protein isolate? Great! They&#;ve isolated the protein from the soybean to make it more concentrated. Hydrolyzed soy protein? I never successfully rationalized that one, but I wasn&#;t too worried. After all, in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved labeling I found on nearly every soy product I purchased: &#;Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol that include 25 grams of soy protein a day may reduce the risk of heart disease.&#; Soy ingredients weren&#;t only safe&#;they were beneficial.

After years of consuming various forms of soy nearly every day, I felt reasonably fit, but somewhere along the line I&#;d stopped menstruating. I couldn&#;t figure out why my stomach became so upset after I ate edamame or why I was often moody and bloated. It didn&#;t occur to me at the time to question soy, heart protector and miracle food.

When I began studying holistic health and nutrition, I kept running across risks associated with eating soy. Endocrine disruption? Check. Digestive problems? Check. I researched soy&#;s deleterious effects on thyroid, fertility, hormones, sex drive, digestion, and even its potential to contribute to certain cancers. For every study that proved a connection between soy and reduced disease risk another cropped up to challenge the claims. What was going on?

&#;Studies showing the dark side of soy date back years,&#; says clinical nutritionist Kaayla Daniel, author of The Whole Soy Story (New Trends, ). &#;The FDA-approved health claim pleased big business, despite massive evidence showing risks associated with soy, and against the protest of the FDA&#;s own top scientists. Soy is a $4 billion [U.S.] industry that&#;s taken these health claims to the bank.&#; Besides promoting heart health, the industry says, soy can alleviate symptoms associated with menopause, reduce the risk of certain cancers, and lower levels of LDL, the &#;bad&#; cholesterol.

Epidemiological studies have shown that Asians, particularly in Japan and China, have a lower incidence of breast and prostate cancer than people in the United States, is organic soy milk bad for you many of these studies credit a traditional diet that includes soy. But Asian diets include small amounts&#;about nine grams a day&#;of primarily fermented soy products, such as miso, natto, and tempeh, and some tofu. Fermenting soy creates health-promoting probiotics, the good bacteria our bodies need to maintain digestive and overall wellness. By contrast, in the United States, processed soy food snacks or shakes can contain over 20 grams of nonfermented soy protein in one serving.

&#;There is important information on the cancer-protective values of soy,&#; says clinical nutritionist Ed Bauman, head of Bauman Clinic in Sebastopol, California, and director of Bauman College. Bauman cautions against painting the bean with a broad brush. &#;As with any food, it can have benefits in one system and detriments in another. [An individual who is sensitive to it] may have an adverse response to soy. And not all soy is alike,&#; he adds, referring to processing methods and quality.

&#;Soy is not a food that is native to North America or Europe, and you have issues when you move food from one part of the world to another,&#; Bauman says. &#;We fare better when we eat according to our ethnicity. Soy is a viable food, but we need to look at how it&#;s used.&#;

Once considered a small-scale poverty food, soy exploded onto the American market. Studies&#;some funded by the industry&#;promoted soy&#;s ability to lower disease risk while absolving guilt associated with eating meat. &#;The soy industry has come a long way from when hippies were boiling up the beans,&#; says Daniel.

These days the industry has discovered ways to use every part of the bean for profit. Soy oil has become the base for most vegetable oils; soy lecithin, the waste product left over after the soybean is processed, is used as an emulsifier; soy flour appears in baked and packaged goods; different forms of processed soy protein are added to everything from animal feed to muscle-building protein powders. &#;Soy protein isolate was invented for use in cardboard,&#; Daniel says. &#;It hasn&#;t actually been approved as a food ingredient.&#;

Soy is everywhere in our food supply, as the star in cereals and health-promoting foods and hidden in processed foods. Even if you read every label and avoid cardboard boxes, you are likely to find soy in your supplements and vitamins (look out for vitamin E derived from soy oil), in foods such as canned tuna, soups, sauces, breads, meats (injected under poultry skin), and chocolate, and in pet food and body-care products. It hides in tofu dogs under aliases such as textured vegetable protein, hydrolyzed vegetable protein, and lecithin&#;which is troubling, since the processing required to hydrolyze soy protein into vegetable protein produces excitotoxins such as glutamate (think MSG) and aspartate (a component of aspartame), which cause brain-cell death.

Soy also is one of the foods&#;in addition to wheat, corn, eggs, milk, nuts, and shellfish&#;most likely to cause allergic reactions. Is organic soy milk bad for you people equate food allergies with anaphylaxis, or a severe emergency immune response, but it is possible to have a subclinical sensitivity, which can lead to health problems over time (and is exacerbated by the lack of variety common in today&#;s American diet).

&#;People can do an empirical food sensitivity test by eliminating the food for a period of time and reintroducing it to see if there&#;s an immune response, but most don&#;t do this,&#; says Bauman. &#;Genetically modified (GM) soy is the most problematic, and that&#;s probably what most people are eating if they&#;re not paying attention. People can develop sensitivity to a food that has antigens or bacteria not originally in the food chain, as is the case with GM foods.&#;

Yet avoiding GM soy doesn&#;t mean all is well, Daniel says: &#;One question I get all the time is, ?What if I only eat organic soy?&#; The assumption is that GM soy is problematic and organic is fine. Certainly, organic is better, but the bottom line is that soybeans naturally contain plant estrogens, toxins, and antinutrients, and you can&#;t remove those.&#;

The highest risk is for infants who are fed soy formula. &#;It&#;s the only thing they&#;re eating, they&#;re very small, and they&#;re at a key stage developmentally,&#; says Daniel. &#;The estrogens in soy will affect the hormonal development of these children, and it will certainly affect their growing brains, reproductive systems, and thyroids.&#; Soy formula also contains large amounts of manganese, which has been linked to attention deficit disorder and neurotoxicity in infants. The Israeli health ministry recently issued an advisory stating that infants should avoid soy formula altogether.

Antinutrients in soy block enzymes needed for digestion, and naturally occur-ring phytates block absorption of essential minerals. This is most worrisome for vegans and vegetarians who eat soy as their main source of protein, and for women in menopause who up their soy intake through supplements.

Soy contains phytochemicals&#;plant nutrients with disease-fighting activity&#;called isoflavones. Studies claim isoflavones can mimic the body&#;s own estrogens, raising a woman&#;s estrogen levels, which fall after menopause, causing hot flashes and other symptoms. On the other hand, isoflavones may also block the body&#;s estrogens, which can help reduce high estrogen levels, therefore reducing risk for breast cancer or uterine cancer before menopause. (High estrogen levels have been linked to cancers of the reproductive system in women.)

Although soy&#;s isoflavones may have an adaptogenic effect (contributing to an estrogen-boosting or -blocking effect where needed), they also have the potential to promote hormone-sensitive cancers in some people. Studies on the effects of isoflavones on human estrogen levels are conflicting, and it&#;s possible that they affect people differently. In men, soy has been shown to lower testosterone levels and sex drive, according to Daniel.

Bauman believes processed soy foods are problematic but maintains that soy is organic soy milk bad for you beneficial hormone-mediating effects. &#;People are largely convenience-driven,&#; he says. &#;We&#;re looking at this whole processed-food convenience market and we&#;re making generalizations about a plant. Is soy the problem, or is it the handling and packaging and processing of the plant that&#;s the problem?

&#;Primary sources of food are a good thing. Once there was a bean, but then it got cooked and squeezed and the pulp was separated out, and it was heated and processed for better shelf life and mouth feel. Soy milk is second or third level in terms of processing.&#;

Bauman&#;s eating-for-health approach calls for a variety of natural and seasonal unprocessed whole foods, including soy in moderation, tailored to individual biochemistry and sensitivities. &#;Using soy as part of a diet can bring relief for perimenopause, for example,&#; he says. &#;Throw out the soy and you throw out the isoflavones.&#; (It is possible to obtain plant estrogens to a is organic soy milk bad for you extent from other foods, such as lima beans or flax.) &#;The literature is extensive on the benefits of soy, and that should always be stated, just as the hazards should be. That&#;s science. These studies are not ridiculous or contrived, but take a look at them. Who&#;s funding them?&#; asks Bauman.

&#;There are a lot of problems with these studies,&#; Daniel says, adding that the heart health claim was an industry-funded initiative. &#;Even if there is positive information, and even if these studies are well designed, we need to weigh that against the fact that we&#;ve also got really good studies showing the dangers. Better safe than sorry is the precautionary principle. Possible bene-fits are far outweighed by proven risks.&#;

Daniel and Bauman agree on the benefits of variety. &#;My experience as a clinical nutritionist is that people who have a varied diet go fish card game how many cards not to get into trouble,&#; says Daniel.

&#;We like to demonize certain foods in this society,&#; says Bauman. &#;If you want to find a fault, you&#;ll find it. The bottom line is: What is a healthy diet?&#;

Reprinted from Terrain (Spring ), published by Berkeley&#;s Ecology Center. Dedicated to fine feature writing about environmental issues, Terrain is distributed free throughout Northern California. Subscriptions: $15/yr. (3 issues) from San Pablo Ave., Berkeley, CA ; mynewextsetup.us



Soy &#;Nuggets&#;

Tofu
Soy milk, curdled and pressed into cubes of varying firmness. Often used as meat substitute. A nonfermented product, tofu contains antinutrients, which can block absorption of essential minerals.

Miso
Fermented soybean paste, used in soups and sauces. Rich in probiotics, good bacteria that aid vitamin absorption. Miso is high in sodium but is considered one of the healthiest soy products.

Soybean Oil
To extract oil, soybeans are superheated, ground, pressed, mixed with chemicals, and washed in a centrifuge. Soybean oil accounts for 80 percent of all liquid oils consumed annually in the United States.

Soy Milk
A processed beverage made of ground soybeans mixed with water and boiled, which removes some toxins. Sugar is added to improve flavor. An eight-ounce serving contains up to 35 milligrams of isoflavones, which may change estrogen levels and hormonal function.

Snack Food
Highly processed, a source of trans fat. Check your labels: Potato chips, tortilla crisps, and many other deep-fried things have been cooked in soy oil&#;straight up or partially hydrogenated.

Tempeh
Whole soybeans walmart eye center mexico mo into loaves, which are then fermented. Often used as a meat substitute. Tempeh is rich in B vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids.

Fast Food
A source of hidden soy. Processed soy proteins extend some burgers and chicken (nuggets, patties, even &#;grilled breasts&#;). Buns contain soy oil and to a lesser extent soy flour and lecithin. Soy oil also appears in dressings and dips, in American &#;cheese,&#; and as the No. 2 ingredient in fries. There&#;s even soy in Big Mac&#;s secret sauce: Soybean oil nets top billing.

Edamame
Whole soybeans, commonly boiled in the pod and eaten as a snack. Most commercial edamame has been preheated to make digestion easier, but it still contains antinutrients.

Image by Mo Riza, licensed under Creative Commons. 


Want more? Read the rest of Utne Reader&#;s July/August package on the secrets of soy:

  • How Much Is Too Much?
    Clinical nutritionist Kaayla Daniel on the Dos and Don&#;ts of soy consumption
    interview by Mary Vance, from Terrain
  • Whole New Diet
    A health-savvy cookbook shows how to get away from processed foods
    by Julie Hanus
  • Biofuel&#;s Big Bean
    How large-scale soy is threatening the environment and a South American way of life
    by April Howard and Benjamin Dangl, from In These Times

Published on Jul 1,

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Soy milk should be more than a consolation prize for people who don't want dairy, but a lot of the options out there are chalky, bland, and nothing like actual milk. Enter: Chef Shigetoshi “Jack” Nakamura of the famed Nakamura in NYC. While senior food editor Chris Morocco was testing Nakamura's totally delicious chilled ramen for BA's July issue, Nakamura introduced us to his secret weapon: a Japanese soy milk that adds the richest and most flavorful texture to cold soups. “We didn’t know it was possible for soy milk to taste that good,” Morocco said of the nutty, cream-like drink that costs nearly $20 per quart.

Needless to say, we were desperate to find a more affordable and available soy milk that even came close. We bought six brands from our nearest grocery store, all organic, unsweetened, and unflavored. Then we gathered around a counter in our test kitchen and sipped them (in Dixie cups, naturally) to find our favorites. The ones that stood out had a refreshingly grassy flavor and coated our mouths the way a proper glass of whole milk should. Keep an eye out for these next time you're at the supermarket.

Best Overall: Silk

This thick, full-bodied product stands alone, both as a beverage and a cooking ingredient. Use it in a bowl of brothy beans or stir it into turmeric-ginger chicken soup. Its nutty richness and luscious mouthfeel are the closest match to real cow’s milk, partially thanks to gellan gum, a vegan-friendly thickener that gives it superior body.

Runner-up: Edensoy

For the purists, there’s Edensoy. While it doesn’t quite have the same luxurious texture as Silk, the brand delivers similar creaminess and appealing clean flavor with just two ingredients: purified water and organic soy beans. Channel its savory, vegetal side by swapping it out for coconut milk in sweet potato-miso soup or pay up its sweet side by turning it into overnight oats.

Third Place: West Soy

One taster said, “This tastes like whole milk of soy.” We were impressed by its thick body and pleasant nuttiness. We also liked its simple ingredient list: just filtered water and organic soy beans.

Honorable Mention: Whole Foods

Some of the other soy milks we tried had a strange aftertaste, but this drink's clean finish and mildly beany flavor set it apart from the rest. We could imagine this in a bowl of cereal or added to the earthy chickpea flour in a cromlet.

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Is organic soy milk bad for you -

The Truth About Non-GMO Soy: A Nutritional Powerhouse

No sooner did the FDA take the highly unusual step of allowing a health claim
to be made for soy as a food in , than it came under attack by a vocal minority of
“concerned citizens”—some of whom were found to represent a narrow segment of the
food industry threatened by soy’s profits. …. [C]onsiderable misinformation
now contaminates the discussion of soy’s real impact on health. Instead of enjoying the broad
range of benefits, many aging individuals are unnecessarily fearful of consuming soy products.
~ Life Extension Magazine July  (Oscar Rodriguez, references)

Do you believe that soy, a plant protein derived from the soybean (a legume), is unhealthy? Or are you just confused about whether it offers any health benefits? The controversy that arose after the FDA allowed a health claim for soy in resulted in substantial amounts of clinical research. Below is information (especially relevant for vegetarians, vegans, and post-menopausal women) that can help you decide whether including soy in your diet, as a food or dietary supplement, is right for you.

The FDA-Allowed Health Claim
In April , the FDA updated in the Code of Federal Regulations (21CFR) its allowed health claim for soy related to coronary heart disease (CHD), which it describes as “one of the most common and serious forms of cardiovascular disease” that “refers to diseases of the heart muscle and supporting blood vessels.” According to the FDA, “diets high in saturated fat and cholesterol are associated with increased levels of blood total and LDL-cholesterol and, thus, with increased risk of CHD.” While the impact of high cholesterol on CHD [versus other factors, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) levels] is itself controversial, it is nevertheless important to note for purposes of this article that the FDA allows health claims similar to this model: “Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol that include 25 grams of soy protein a day may reduce the risk of heart disease. One serving of [name of food] provides __ grams of soy protein.” The claim does not reference soy isoflavones, discussed below.

The Many Soy Forms & The Importance of Organic/Non-GMO
Whole soybeans, which must be consumed cooked, are rich in essential amino acids, B vitamins, vitamin K, minerals (potassium, magnesium, calcium, selenium, copper, iron, phosphorous, manganese), and fiber. Soy is available in many food forms and in supplements, including as: soy milk; soy protein powder; soy nuts; edamame; tofu; fermented soy products (miso, tempeh, natto); soy lecithin (food/supplements); and soy isoflavones (supplement). It also can be “hidden” in refined ( forms of regularly consumed foods such as meat products, bakery goods, chocolate, and breakfast cereals.

Soy is one of five major GMO food crop varieties, the others being corn, canola, cotton, and sugar beets. GMO stands for “genetically modified organisms”, which refers to any food product that has been altered at the gene level. Specifically, scientists insert bacterial genes in GM plants, allowing them to survive an otherwise deadly dose of weed killer. GM crops thus have higher herbicide residues. According to the American Academy of Environmental Medicine, animal studies prove that “GM foods pose a serious health risk in the areas of toxicology, allergy and immune function, reproductive health, and metabolic, physiologic and genetic health and are without benefit.” As of the writing of this article, the use of GMOs is prohibited in organic products. (USDA Blog, May ) It is most prudent to consume only organic/non-GMO soy.

The Soy Controversy
Below are some of the principal anti-soy arguments and their scientifically supported counterarguments.

Myth #1 &#; Soy causes or increases the risk of cancer.
Soy contains isoflavones (genistein, daidzein), antioxidant polyphenols that are viewed as phytoestrogens (estrogens from plants) because of their molecular similarity to estradiol, one type of carcinogenic estrogen.

Estrogen influences cells through estrogen receptors. Soy critics focus on isoflavones’ action on estrogen receptors, failing to consider that the body has more than one type, each which affects the body differently. Until relatively recently, only one estrogen receptor (ER-alpha) had been discovered. Overexpression of ER-alpha has been implicated in various cancers, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, and colon cancer. In the late s, scientists discovered a second estrogen receptor (ER-beta), expression of which appears to counteract many of the cancer-causing activities of ER-alpha. The discovery of ER-beta estrogen receptors, their cancer-inhibiting effects, and the preferential influence of isoflavones on these receptors, in addition to extensive human epidemiological and clinical studies, indicate a favorable soy isoflavone –cancer connection. Even the American Cancer Society recognizes that soy isoflavones have anti-estrogenic, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties (mynewextsetup.us, McCullough ), and some studies show that isoflavones are breast cancer protective (JAMA Dec) (Eur J Cancer. Mar; enhances tamoxifen).

Soy might also lower the risk of other cancers, including prostate cancer (Urology Sept), colon cancer (Mol Cancer Nov; genistein/ indolecarbinol) (Am J Clin Nutr. Feb; colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women), and endometrial cancer (J Korean Med Sci Apr).

Myth #2 &#; Isoflavones disrupt sex hormones.
The phytoestrogens in soy primarily affect ER-beta estrogen receptors, which have been shown to inhibit the detrimental effects associated with hormonal imbalance (Med Hypotheses. Mar). According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, “there is no conclusive evidence from animal, adult human, or infant populations that dietary soy isoflavones may adversely affect human development, reproduction, or endocrine function.” (AAP Policy Rev. May ) Moreover, “Literature reviews and clinical studies of infants fed soy protein-based infant formulas raise no clinical concerns with respect to nutritional adequacy, sexual development, thyroid disease, immune function, or neurodevelopment.” (AAP Policy Rev. May ).

Myth #3 – Soy causes thyroid dysfunction.
Following the announcement of the occurrence of goiter in a single infant on a pure soy diet (N Engl J Med. Feb), soy critics extrapolated the risk to the general population. While soy isoflavones inhibit an enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis, they do not cause poor thyroid function in otherwise healthy individuals who have adequate iodine intake. (Thyroid July; Thyroid. Feb)

Like fiber supplements and some medications, however, soy isoflavones may prevent absorption of some of the iodine normally used to make thyroid hormone. Those who frequently consume large amounts of soy thus may need slightly more iodine in their diets. (Note, however, that excess iodine can slow thyroid function.) Also, soy can reduce the absorption of hypothyroid medications, and thyroid expert Stephen E. Langer, MD, recommends that hypothyroid patients minimize soy consumption “until their condition is corrected or supplemented with thyroid hormone.” Andrew Weil, MD, advises that a hypothyroid patient can safely eat one soy serving per day at least three hours apart from thyroid medication intake.

Clinically Supported Evidence of Soy Benefits
While the soy food and supplements controversy continues (certain soy supplements have proven safe and effective in this writer’s clinical practice, and Julian Whitaker, MD, favors them, while Andrew Weil, MD, and the American Cancer Society feel that additional and long-term research is needed), ample scientific studies document that soy consumption provides benefits in connection with various health conditions, including: (1) Inflammation (linked to type 2 diabetes, obesity, cancer, and cardiovascular disease) (Cancer Causes Control Jun) (J Acad Nutr Diet. Sept) (2) Cardiovascular Disease (i.e., hypertension, atherosclerosis, reduced blood flow, high cholesterol/LDL) (Mol Aspects Med. Dec) (J. Nutr. Mar); (3) Menopausal Symptoms (Menopause , Vol. 18, No. 7; mixed study results; more relief from supplements high in genistein and the daidzein metabolite S-equol) (J Med Food. Spring; soy foods/supplements); (4) Osteoporosis (Nutr Res. Jan) (Eur J Nutr. Sept); and (5) Kidney Disease (Renal & Urology News Dec) (Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. )

In considering whether to incorporate soy foods or supplements into your diet, consider all of the evidence, your doctor’s specific guidance, and whether a soy allergy or intolerance may be a factor. While rarely life threatening, soy allergy/intolerance is common, especially among children, and can manifest as tingling in the mouth, eczema or other dermatitis, breathing difficulties, digestive problems, skin flushing, or swelling (mynewextsetup.us).

The statements in this article have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Unless otherwise stated herein or otherwise supported by specific research, the natural remedies discussed herein are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Submitted by Michael Dworkin, PD, CCN, a Registered Pharmacist and State Certified Clinical Nutritionist (CT Cert. No. ), with J. Erika Dworkin, Certified Lifestyle Educator and Board Cert. Holistic Nutrition (Cand.). Owner of the Manchester Parkade Health Shoppe (, Middle Turnpike West, Manchester, CT, mynewextsetup.us), Pharmacist Dworkin has been guiding patients since and is available for consultation by appointment. Erika is available to speak to groups. All statements in this article are research-based and references are available upon request.  

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Why are people concerned about men drinking soya milk?

Soya milk is a tasty and easily available alternative to dairy products, so it’s popular among people on a dairy-free diet. However, soya contains chemicals called soya isoflavones which are a source of phytoestrogens, and these have oestrogenic effects on the body – which is why we include soya isoflavones in our Menopause Support tablets.

For men, this has become a big concern, with some claiming that the phytoestrogens found in soya isoflavones can have feminising effects on men, such as breast enlargement and emotional changes, as well as cause problems such as erectile dysfunction, low sperm function and reduced libido. 

On the flip-side, many people on dairy-free and vegan diets thrive on soya milk and other soya products with no adverse effects. Karris McCulloch at TheVeganKind claims 'Soya yoghurts, soya milk, tofu and meat replacements are all consumed by our family regularly and we have absolutely no concerns whatsoever of the safety of soya consumption for either men or women. It's becoming more and more widely accepted that the ill effects of soya on men are factually incorrect.'

So what truth is there in these concerns, and is it safe for men to drink soya milk or eat soya-based products?

What we know about soya products

It’s true that soya contains phytoestrogens which act like oestrogen in the body. However, their oestrogenic effect is very weak – between 50 and 20, times weaker than natural oestrogen! This can actually be really useful for women during the menopause, as phytoestrogen supplements like our own Menopause Support can gently support oestrogen levels. But don't worry, you won't find as many phytoestrogens in soya foods as you would in a supplement.

We know that soya products are widely consumed in Eastern countries, and the populations in these countries tend to be generally healthier with less hormone-related problems – women are less prone to PMS and tend to have an easier menopause, whilst men are less prone to problems like BPH, or enlarged prostate. However, it is important to remember that soya is not the only thing that makes Eastern diets so healthy – they are generally much lower in refined carbohydrates, richer in fresh vegetables and high in fish too.

It’s also important to consider what type of soya products these cultures traditionally consume. Fermented soya, such as miso and tempeh are most widely consumed, while soya milk is fairly uncommon. Fermenting soya increases its nutritional value so it's likely that many of the health benefits associated with soya products in the East are actually in reference to fermented soya.

We know that soya milk also contains antinutrients, which can hinder the absorption of minerals such as magnesium and calcium. The fermentation process helps to reduce these antinutrients too.

Tempeh is a fermented form of soya.

What does the research say?

The good news is that research seems to suggest that soya has no adverse effects on men in terms of hormone disruption, sexual health or feminisation.

Two reports analysed a number of studies to assess the extent to which soya and soya isoflavones have an effect on male hormones and related conditions. 

One of these concluded that there were ‘no significant effects of soya protein or isoflavone intake’ on male sex hormone levels.

Another report found that soya did not affect oestrogen or testosterone levels in men, did not affect sperm counts and did not increase the risk of erectile dysfunction. 

The reports noted that while some adverse effects have been seen in animal studies, these animals process and react differently to soya than humans, and the same effects have not been found in similar studies on humans.

However, these reports don’t make a distinction between the different types of soy, with both including a range of studies which used different types of soya, from soya isoflavone supplements, to soya foods, to isolated soya proteins. We know that different types of soya have different levels of phytoestrogens, which skews these results slightly.

So what’s the verdict on soya milk?

Glass of soya milk

Considering that the oestrogenic effect of soya isoflavones is anywhere from 50 to 20, times weaker than natural oestrogen, you’d have to drink an awful lot of soya milk to begin seeing hormonal effects. Plus, dairy milk contains lots of hormones and growth factors too so soya milk is still a better alternative. 

However, just as we recommend reducing (or avoiding altogether) your intake of dairy, we’d also recommend limiting your intake of soya milk. Some soya milk in your morning cereal or in your tea/coffee is fine, but we wouldn’t recommend drinking pints of it throughout the day.

This is partly because soya milk tends to be highly processed in the UK and can often contain additional salt, sugar, preservatives and other nasty chemicals. It is also often made from non-organic or even GM soybeans. As we mentioned earlier, soya milk is an unfermented form of soya so it can also contain high levels of antinutrients. 

However, we would recommend consuming more fermented soya products as these have lots of great health benefits! The fermentation process increases nutritional value and also reduces the levels of anti-nutrients to create a much healthier end product. Tempeh, natto and miso make great additions to a healthy diet.

What benefits does fermented soya have?

Soya is rich in nutrients such as protein, vitamins, minerals and fibre, and is a much healthier alternative to meat and dairy. 

Fermented soya is also a natural probiotic, as the fermentation process encourages the growth of healthy bacteria. When ingested, these healthy bacteria can promote better digestion, which can have knock-on effects on the immune system, energy levels and overall nutrition.

Soya is also thought to be good for a healthy heart, since it contains omegas and can help to reduce cholesterol. 

Soya for BPH/Enlarged Prostate

If you have BPH (an enlarged prostate) or are looking to promote a healthier prostate to prevent conditions like BPH from developing, then soya is something you should definitely think about eating more of. Soya is rich in plant compounds known as phytosterols which have been shown to reduce the risk of prostate enlargement.

The highest rates of prostate disease are observed in Western countries such as the United States, whereas the lowest rates are seen in Asian countries such as Singapore. While this could be down to factors such as genetics, one likely explanation is diet, and we know that Asian diets tend to be full of soya-based products.

Replacing some of your meat and dairy intake with soya-based products such as tofu, miso, tempeh and soya milk can also reduce the risk of BPH, since eating red meat daily has been revealed to increase the risk of BPH by 38%. Dairy is also a known inflammatory which can aggravate conditions like BPH and prostatitis.

For more diet tips, read our article on eating for a healthy prostate.

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The Dark Side of Soy

As someone who is conscious of her health, I spent 13 years cultivating a vegetarian diet. I took time to plan and balance meals that included products such as soy milk, soy yogurt, tofu, and Chick&#;n patties. I pored over labels looking for words I couldn&#;t pronounce&#;occasionally one or two would pop up. Soy protein isolate? Great! They&#;ve isolated the protein from the soybean to make it more concentrated. Hydrolyzed soy protein? I never successfully rationalized that one, but I wasn&#;t too worried. After all, in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved labeling I found on nearly every soy product I purchased: &#;Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol that include 25 grams of soy protein a day may reduce the risk of heart disease.&#; Soy ingredients weren&#;t only safe&#;they were beneficial.

After years of consuming various forms of soy nearly every day, I felt reasonably fit, but somewhere along the line I&#;d stopped menstruating. I couldn&#;t figure out why my stomach became so upset after I ate edamame or why I was often moody and bloated. It didn&#;t occur to me at the time to question soy, heart protector and miracle food.

When I began studying holistic health and nutrition, I kept running across risks associated with eating soy. Endocrine disruption? Check. Digestive problems? Check. I researched soy&#;s deleterious effects on thyroid, fertility, hormones, sex drive, digestion, and even its potential to contribute to certain cancers. For every study that proved a connection between soy and reduced disease risk another cropped up to challenge the claims. What was going on?

&#;Studies showing the dark side of soy date back years,&#; says clinical nutritionist Kaayla Daniel, author of The Whole Soy Story (New Trends, ). &#;The FDA-approved health claim pleased big business, despite massive evidence showing risks associated with soy, and against the protest of the FDA&#;s own top scientists. Soy is a $4 billion [U.S.] industry that&#;s taken these health claims to the bank.&#; Besides promoting heart health, the industry says, soy can alleviate symptoms associated with menopause, reduce the risk of certain cancers, and lower levels of LDL, the &#;bad&#; cholesterol.

Epidemiological studies have shown that Asians, particularly in Japan and China, have a lower incidence of breast and prostate cancer than people in the United States, and many of these studies credit a traditional diet that includes soy. But Asian diets include small amounts&#;about nine grams a day&#;of primarily fermented soy products, such as miso, natto, and tempeh, and some tofu. Fermenting soy creates health-promoting probiotics, the good bacteria our bodies need to maintain digestive and overall wellness. By contrast, in the United States, processed soy food snacks or shakes can contain over 20 grams of nonfermented soy protein in one serving.

&#;There is important information on the cancer-protective values of soy,&#; says clinical nutritionist Ed Bauman, head of Bauman Clinic in Sebastopol, California, and director of Bauman College. Bauman cautions against painting the bean with a broad brush. &#;As with any food, it can have benefits in one system and detriments in another. [An individual who is sensitive to it] may have an adverse response to soy. And not all soy is alike,&#; he adds, referring to processing methods and quality.

&#;Soy is not a food that is native to North America or Europe, and you have issues when you move food from one part of the world to another,&#; Bauman says. &#;We fare better when we eat according to our ethnicity. Soy is a viable food, but we need to look at how it&#;s used.&#;

Once considered a small-scale poverty food, soy exploded onto the American market. Studies&#;some funded by the industry&#;promoted soy&#;s ability to lower disease risk while absolving guilt associated with eating meat. &#;The soy industry has come a long way from when hippies were boiling up the beans,&#; says Daniel.

These days the industry has discovered ways to use every part of the bean for profit. Soy oil has become the base for most vegetable oils; soy lecithin, the waste product left over after the soybean is processed, is used as an emulsifier; soy flour appears in baked and packaged goods; different forms of processed soy protein are added to everything from animal feed to muscle-building protein powders. &#;Soy protein isolate was invented for use in cardboard,&#; Daniel says. &#;It hasn&#;t actually been approved as a food ingredient.&#;

Soy is everywhere in our food supply, as the star in cereals and health-promoting foods and hidden in processed foods. Even if you read every label and avoid cardboard boxes, you are likely to find soy in your supplements and vitamins (look out for vitamin E derived from soy oil), in foods such as canned tuna, soups, sauces, breads, meats (injected under poultry skin), and chocolate, and in pet food and body-care products. It hides in tofu dogs under aliases such as textured vegetable protein, hydrolyzed vegetable protein, and lecithin&#;which is troubling, since the processing required to hydrolyze soy protein into vegetable protein produces excitotoxins such as glutamate (think MSG) and aspartate (a component of aspartame), which cause brain-cell death.

Soy also is one of the foods&#;in addition to wheat, corn, eggs, milk, nuts, and shellfish&#;most likely to cause allergic reactions. Most people equate food allergies with anaphylaxis, or a severe emergency immune response, but it is possible to have a subclinical sensitivity, which can lead to health problems over time (and is exacerbated by the lack of variety common in today&#;s American diet).

&#;People can do an empirical food sensitivity test by eliminating the food for a period of time and reintroducing it to see if there&#;s an immune response, but most don&#;t do this,&#; says Bauman. &#;Genetically modified (GM) soy is the most problematic, and that&#;s probably what most people are eating if they&#;re not paying attention. People can develop sensitivity to a food that has antigens or bacteria not originally in the food chain, as is the case with GM foods.&#;

Yet avoiding GM soy doesn&#;t mean all is well, Daniel says: &#;One question I get all the time is, ?What if I only eat organic soy?&#; The assumption is that GM soy is problematic and organic is fine. Certainly, organic is better, but the bottom line is that soybeans naturally contain plant estrogens, toxins, and antinutrients, and you can&#;t remove those.&#;

The highest risk is for infants who are fed soy formula. &#;It&#;s the only thing they&#;re eating, they&#;re very small, and they&#;re at a key stage developmentally,&#; says Daniel. &#;The estrogens in soy will affect the hormonal development of these children, and it will certainly affect their growing brains, reproductive systems, and thyroids.&#; Soy formula also contains large amounts of manganese, which has been linked to attention deficit disorder and neurotoxicity in infants. The Israeli health ministry recently issued an advisory stating that infants should avoid soy formula altogether.

Antinutrients in soy block enzymes needed for digestion, and naturally occur-ring phytates block absorption of essential minerals. This is most worrisome for vegans and vegetarians who eat soy as their main source of protein, and for women in menopause who up their soy intake through supplements.

Soy contains phytochemicals&#;plant nutrients with disease-fighting activity&#;called isoflavones. Studies claim isoflavones can mimic the body&#;s own estrogens, raising a woman&#;s estrogen levels, which fall after menopause, causing hot flashes and other symptoms. On the other hand, isoflavones may also block the body&#;s estrogens, which can help reduce high estrogen levels, therefore reducing risk for breast cancer or uterine cancer before menopause. (High estrogen levels have been linked to cancers of the reproductive system in women.)

Although soy&#;s isoflavones may have an adaptogenic effect (contributing to an estrogen-boosting or -blocking effect where needed), they also have the potential to promote hormone-sensitive cancers in some people. Studies on the effects of isoflavones on human estrogen levels are conflicting, and it&#;s possible that they affect people differently. In men, soy has been shown to lower testosterone levels and sex drive, according to Daniel.

Bauman believes processed soy foods are problematic but maintains that soy has beneficial hormone-mediating effects. &#;People are largely convenience-driven,&#; he says. &#;We&#;re looking at this whole processed-food convenience market and we&#;re making generalizations about a plant. Is soy the problem, or is it the handling and packaging and processing of the plant that&#;s the problem?

&#;Primary sources of food are a good thing. Once there was a bean, but then it got cooked and squeezed and the pulp was separated out, and it was heated and processed for better shelf life and mouth feel. Soy milk is second or third level in terms of processing.&#;

Bauman&#;s eating-for-health approach calls for a variety of natural and seasonal unprocessed whole foods, including soy in moderation, tailored to individual biochemistry and sensitivities. &#;Using soy as part of a diet can bring relief for perimenopause, for example,&#; he says. &#;Throw out the soy and you throw out the isoflavones.&#; (It is possible to obtain plant estrogens to a lesser extent from other foods, such as lima beans or flax.) &#;The literature is extensive on the benefits of soy, and that should always be stated, just as the hazards should be. That&#;s science. These studies are not ridiculous or contrived, but take a look at them. Who&#;s funding them?&#; asks Bauman.

&#;There are a lot of problems with these studies,&#; Daniel says, adding that the heart health claim was an industry-funded initiative. &#;Even if there is positive information, and even if these studies are well designed, we need to weigh that against the fact that we&#;ve also got really good studies showing the dangers. Better safe than sorry is the precautionary principle. Possible bene-fits are far outweighed by proven risks.&#;

Daniel and Bauman agree on the benefits of variety. &#;My experience as a clinical nutritionist is that people who have a varied diet tend not to get into trouble,&#; says Daniel.

&#;We like to demonize certain foods in this society,&#; says Bauman. &#;If you want to find a fault, you&#;ll find it. The bottom line is: What is a healthy diet?&#;

Reprinted from Terrain (Spring ), published by Berkeley&#;s Ecology Center. Dedicated to fine feature writing about environmental issues, Terrain is distributed free throughout Northern California. Subscriptions: $15/yr. (3 issues) from San Pablo Ave., Berkeley, CA ; mynewextsetup.us



Soy &#;Nuggets&#;

Tofu
Soy milk, curdled and pressed into cubes of varying firmness. Often used as meat substitute. A nonfermented product, tofu contains antinutrients, which can block absorption of essential minerals.

Miso
Fermented soybean paste, used in soups and sauces. Rich in probiotics, good bacteria that aid vitamin absorption. Miso is high in sodium but is considered one of the healthiest soy products.

Soybean Oil
To extract oil, soybeans are superheated, ground, pressed, mixed with chemicals, and washed in a centrifuge. Soybean oil accounts for 80 percent of all liquid oils consumed annually in the United States.

Soy Milk
A processed beverage made of ground soybeans mixed with water and boiled, which removes some toxins. Sugar is added to improve flavor. An eight-ounce serving contains up to 35 milligrams of isoflavones, which may change estrogen levels and hormonal function.

Snack Food
Highly processed, a source of trans fat. Check your labels: Potato chips, tortilla crisps, and many other deep-fried things have been cooked in soy oil&#;straight up or partially hydrogenated.

Tempeh
Whole soybeans pressed into loaves, which are then fermented. Often used as a meat substitute. Tempeh is rich in B vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids.

Fast Food
A source of hidden soy. Processed soy proteins extend some burgers and chicken (nuggets, patties, even &#;grilled breasts&#;). Buns contain soy oil and to a lesser extent soy flour and lecithin. Soy oil also appears in dressings and dips, in American &#;cheese,&#; and as the No. 2 ingredient in fries. There&#;s even soy in Big Mac&#;s secret sauce: Soybean oil nets top billing.

Edamame
Whole soybeans, commonly boiled in the pod and eaten as a snack. Most commercial edamame has been preheated to make digestion easier, but it still contains antinutrients.

Image by Mo Riza, licensed under Creative Commons. 


Want more? Read the rest of Utne Reader&#;s July/August package on the secrets of soy:

  • How Much Is Too Much?
    Clinical nutritionist Kaayla Daniel on the Dos and Don&#;ts of soy consumption
    interview by Mary Vance, from Terrain
  • Whole New Diet
    A health-savvy cookbook shows how to get away from processed foods
    by Julie Hanus
  • Biofuel&#;s Big Bean
    How large-scale soy is threatening the environment and a South American way of life
    by April Howard and Benjamin Dangl, from In These Times

Published on Jul 1,

RELATED ARTICLES

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Increasing Lactose Intolerance Creating Opportunities in Dairy Alternatives Market

This article is written and sponsored by Transparency Market Research.

Rising cases of lactose intolerance, increasing health consciousness among consumers, and changing lifestyles appear likely to bolster growth in the global dairy alternatives market.

Veganism, for example, is becoming increasingly popular among consumers, which is estimated to fuel demand for dairy substitutes. Because of the agricultural production base for plant-based sources, the Asia Pacific region is expected to lead the global dairy alternatives market. Many people believe that a vegan diet is nutritious and, as a result, they choose to drink dairy alternatives like rice milk, almond milk, soy milk, and other plant-based milks instead of traditional dairy milk.

Vegans and those who largely consume nutritious food are the main consumers of dairy alternatives, which are expected to spur the category’s development. Many large economies, including the U.S. and the U.K., have witnessed a significant growth in the vegan population in recent years. Consumers in developed economies appear to prefer plant-based milk products because they provide energy, aid in weight control, and enhance food palatability.

Almond Milk on the Rise

Almond milk is becoming extremely prevalent among young people who are vegan, or whom follow a ketogenic diet. Due to its high lipids, protein, and fiber content, almond milk is a rich dairy alternative that’s predicted to grow in popularity in the near term. Almond milk also helps control blood pressure and provides health advantages for the heart and skin.

Unsweetened dairy alternatives are becoming more popular, as customers attempt to eliminate the excess calories brought on by added sugar. Dairy alternatives are also being used by consumers to reduce their calorie intake, because traditional dairy products are often fairly rich. Consumers who want to reduce weight are increasingly opting for almond or soy milk. This, in turn, is projected to help grow the global dairy alternatives market.

Beverage Producers Introducing Innovative Products

The milk-based dairy alternatives product segment, specifically,is likely to lead the market and is expected to account for a considerable revenue share in the year ahead. New, unique beverages are utilizing dairy alternatives, as beverage makers attempt to increase market capitalization.

It also appears that modern consumers seek a variety of dairy-free beverage options. Lactose-intolerant consumers also seek flavored beverages.

Meanwhile, rising demand for dairy alternatives-based cheese items, such as soy-based cream cheese and sour cream, is likely to further drive demand for the dairy alternatives segment.

Asia Pacific to Observe High Growth due to Increasing Disposable Income

The global dairy alternatives market was led by Asia Pacific in recent years, and that region is likely to account for a significant share of market revenue moving forward. The demand for dairy alternatives in Asia Pacific is expected to only increase, due to its growing population, as well as the increasing amount of disposable income for many consumers in China, Japan, and India. Increased occurrences of lactose intolerance, combined with increased health concerns about dangerous compounds found in dairy products, are expected to drive demand for non-dairy alternatives in that region. In addition, according to American Cancer Society, Inc. traditional soy foods including such as tofu, edamame, tempeh, and soymilk have been shown to reduce the incidence of breast cancer, particularly in Asian women.

In Europe, meanwhile, the growing elderly population has resulted in an increasing preference for milk-based dairy alternatives. .

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Men’s Health Does An “About Face” On Soy…And Rightly So!

Men’s Health magazine, which once suggested male readers should avoid soy, has now come out with an article touting the benefits of soy consumption. Well, it’s about time.

While it is fair to say that no single article, be it intended for health professionals or the lay public, is responsible for the myth that soy causes male feminization, a article in Men’s Health warrants being singled out.1 The title alone reveals the hyperbolic tone of the article: “Is this the most dangerous food for men?” And the article itself includes this text: “But there may be a hidden dark side to soy, one that has the power to undermine everything it means to be male.”

Much of the article focused on a case-report published in that described an older man who developed feminizing effects, including gynecomastia, allegedly as a result of his soy consumption.2 The article also cited a small pilot epidemiologic study published in that found soy intake was associated with lower sperm counts among men attending an infertility clinic.3

While this very long article did briefly mention that the male in question consumed 3 quarts of soymilk per day, it failed to mention that 12 cups of soymilk is a ridiculous amount of soy to consume, and that it is about 9 times more soy than older Japanese men (following a traditional diet) typically consume.4 Furthermore, it’s pretty obvious given the number of calories the soymilk would have provided, that soy consumption occurred in the context of a completely unbalanced and likely nutrient deficient diet. Instead of focusing on the excessive amount of soy consumed, the article discussed the feminizing effects as if they would occur in response to more sensible and modest amounts of soy. And therefore, it appeared as though soy represents a threat to men who even infrequently consumed soy.

The article was so biased against soy, for the first and only time I actually spoke with an editor of the magazine to complain. After butting heads for a few minutes, he told me, in effect: “We have to come out with articles every month.” The clear meaning was that the pressure to publish attention-grabbing stories causes one to diverge from the science to varying degrees.

Better late than never. Fast forward 9 years to an article in Men’s Health (mynewextsetup.us) published earlier this year in which the benefits of soymilk were highlighted by citing a peer-reviewed article which concluded that of the many plant milks evaluated, soymilk comes out on top nutritionally, as it comes closest to matching the nutrient content of cow’s milk.5 More importantly, the article in Men’s Health also went on to say that “phytoestrogens (the family of plant-based hormones that isoflavones belong to) have also been linked to a dip in testosterone when you down too much — but before you freak out, know that up to four servings a day isn’t a big deal, Men’s Health nutrition advisor Alan Aragaon, M.S. explained to us previously.” Aragon had made that point in an article in Men’s Health published in December of (mynewextsetup.us)

Once something is ingrained in the public’s mind it is not easily dislodged. The retraction or correction to any story typically gets a lot less coverage and has a lot less impact than the original story. But to be clear, clinical studies show that neither soy nor isoflavones lower levels of testosterone6 or raise estrogen levels7 in men. In some of the studies conducted, the equivalent of as much as six servings of soy per day didn’t result in any hormonal disturbances.

And what about that previously mentioned small study linking soy to lower sperm counts?3 The clinical studies show that isn’t the case.8,9 In fact, even the research group that published those initial findings about lowered sperm counts3 subsequently found that soyfood intake in men was unrelated to clinical outcomes among couples presenting at an infertility clinic.10

Finally, long-term studies show that in response to resistance exercise training such as weight lifting, soy protein promotes muscle mass and strength to a similar extent as whey protein, which is considered to be the gold standard in the weight-lifting community.11,12 When considering all the data, it’s pretty obvious that not only should men not fear consuming soy but they would be wise to consider incorporating soy into their diet as research suggests soy may reduce risk of developing prostate cancer.13

It may be that the damage done to the image of soy by that article in Men’s Health may never be completely undone.1 But at least Men’s Health is beginning to portray soy in a way that is consistent with the scientific literature.

References

  1. Thorton J. Is this the most dangerous food for men? Men&#;s Health (June).
  2. Martinez J, Lewi JE. An unusual case of gynecomastia associated with soy product consumption. Endocr Pract. ;
  3. Chavarro JE, Toth TL, Sadio SM, Hauser R. Soy food and isoflavone intake in relation to semen quality parameters among men from an infertility clinic. Hum Reprod. ;
  4. Messina M, Nagata C, Wu AH. Estimated Asian adult soy protein and isoflavone intakes. Nutr Cancer. ;
  5. Vanga SK, Raghavan V. How well do plant based alternatives fare nutritionally compared to cow&#;s milk? Journal of food science and technology. ;
  6. Hamilton-Reeves JM, Vazquez G, Duval SJ, Phipps WR, Kurzer MS, Messina MJ. Clinical studies show no effects of soy protein or isoflavones on reproductive hormones in men: results of a meta-analysis. Fertil Steril. ;
  7. Messina M. Soybean isoflavone exposure does not have feminizing effects on men: a critical examination of the clinical evidence. Fertil Steril. ;
  8. Mitchell JH, Cawood E, Kinniburgh D, Provan A, Collins AR, Irvine DS. Effect of a phytoestrogen food supplement on reproductive health in normal males. Clin Sci (Lond). ;
  9. Beaton LK, McVeigh BL, Dillingham BL, Lampe JW, Duncan AM. Soy protein isolates of varying isoflavone content do not adversely affect semen quality in healthy young men. Fertil Steril. ;
  10. Minguez-Alarcon L, Afeiche MC, Chiu YH, et al. Male soy food intake was not associated with in vitro fertilization outcomes among couples attending a fertility center. Andrology. ;
  11. Candow DG, Burke NC, Smith-Palmer T, Burke DG. Effect of whey and soy protein supplementation combined with resistance training in young adults. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism. ;
  12. Denysschen CA, Burton HW, Horvath PJ, Leddy JJ, Browne RW. Resistance training with soy vs whey protein supplements in hyperlipidemic males. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. ;
  13. Applegate CC, Rowles JL, Ranard KM, Jeon S, Erdman JW. Soy consumption and the risk of prostate cancer: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrients. ;

 

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

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The Dark Side of Soy

As someone who is conscious of her health, I spent 13 years cultivating a vegetarian diet. I took time to plan and balance meals that included products such as soy milk, soy yogurt, tofu, and Chick&#;n patties. I pored over labels looking for words I couldn&#;t pronounce&#;occasionally one or two would pop up. Soy protein isolate? Great! They&#;ve isolated the protein from the soybean to make it more concentrated. Hydrolyzed soy protein? I never successfully rationalized that one, but I wasn&#;t too worried. After all, in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved labeling I found on nearly every soy product I purchased: &#;Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol that include 25 grams of soy protein a day may reduce the risk of heart disease.&#; Soy ingredients weren&#;t only safe&#;they were beneficial.

After years of consuming various forms of soy nearly every day, I felt reasonably fit, but somewhere along the line I&#;d stopped menstruating. I couldn&#;t figure out why my stomach became so upset after I ate edamame or why I was often moody and bloated. It didn&#;t occur to me at the time to question soy, heart protector and miracle food.

When I began studying holistic health and nutrition, I kept running across risks associated with eating soy. Endocrine disruption? Check. Digestive problems? Check. I researched soy&#;s deleterious effects on thyroid, fertility, hormones, sex drive, digestion, and even its potential to contribute to certain cancers. For every study that proved a connection between soy and reduced disease risk another cropped up to challenge the claims. What was going on?

&#;Studies showing the dark side of soy date back years,&#; says clinical nutritionist Kaayla Daniel, author of The Whole Soy Story (New Trends, ). &#;The FDA-approved health claim pleased big business, despite massive evidence showing risks associated with soy, and against the protest of the FDA&#;s own top scientists. Soy is a $4 billion [U.S.] industry that&#;s taken these health claims to the bank.&#; Besides promoting heart health, the industry says, soy can alleviate symptoms associated with menopause, reduce the risk of certain cancers, and lower levels of LDL, the &#;bad&#; cholesterol.

Epidemiological studies have shown that Asians, particularly in Japan and China, have a lower incidence of breast and prostate cancer than people in the United States, and many of these studies credit a traditional diet that includes soy. But Asian diets include small amounts&#;about nine grams a day&#;of primarily fermented soy products, such as miso, natto, and tempeh, and some tofu. Fermenting soy creates health-promoting probiotics, the good bacteria our bodies need to maintain digestive and overall wellness. By contrast, in the United States, processed soy food snacks or shakes can contain over 20 grams of nonfermented soy protein in one serving.

&#;There is important information on the cancer-protective values of soy,&#; says clinical nutritionist Ed Bauman, head of Bauman Clinic in Sebastopol, California, and director of Bauman College. Bauman cautions against painting the bean with a broad brush. &#;As with any food, it can have benefits in one system and detriments in another. [An individual who is sensitive to it] may have an adverse response to soy. And not all soy is alike,&#; he adds, referring to processing methods and quality.

&#;Soy is not a food that is native to North America or Europe, and you have issues when you move food from one part of the world to another,&#; Bauman says. &#;We fare better when we eat according to our ethnicity. Soy is a viable food, but we need to look at how it&#;s used.&#;

Once considered a small-scale poverty food, soy exploded onto the American market. Studies&#;some funded by the industry&#;promoted soy&#;s ability to lower disease risk while absolving guilt associated with eating meat. &#;The soy industry has come a long way from when hippies were boiling up the beans,&#; says Daniel.

These days the industry has discovered ways to use every part of the bean for profit. Soy oil has become the base for most vegetable oils; soy lecithin, the waste product left over after the soybean is processed, is used as an emulsifier; soy flour appears in baked and packaged goods; different forms of processed soy protein are added to everything from animal feed to muscle-building protein powders. &#;Soy protein isolate was invented for use in cardboard,&#; Daniel says. &#;It hasn&#;t actually been approved as a food ingredient.&#;

Soy is everywhere in our food supply, as the star in cereals and health-promoting foods and hidden in processed foods. Even if you read every label and avoid cardboard boxes, you are likely to find soy in your supplements and vitamins (look out for vitamin E derived from soy oil), in foods such as canned tuna, soups, sauces, breads, meats (injected under poultry skin), and chocolate, and in pet food and body-care products. It hides in tofu dogs under aliases such as textured vegetable protein, hydrolyzed vegetable protein, and lecithin&#;which is troubling, since the processing required to hydrolyze soy protein into vegetable protein produces excitotoxins such as glutamate (think MSG) and aspartate (a component of aspartame), which cause brain-cell death.

Soy also is one of the foods&#;in addition to wheat, corn, eggs, milk, nuts, and shellfish&#;most likely to cause allergic reactions. Most people equate food allergies with anaphylaxis, or a severe emergency immune response, but it is possible to have a subclinical sensitivity, which can lead to health problems over time (and is exacerbated by the lack of variety common in today&#;s American diet).

&#;People can do an empirical food sensitivity test by eliminating the food for a period of time and reintroducing it to see if there&#;s an immune response, but most don&#;t do this,&#; says Bauman. &#;Genetically modified (GM) soy is the most problematic, and that&#;s probably what most people are eating if they&#;re not paying attention. People can develop sensitivity to a food that has antigens or bacteria not originally in the food chain, as is the case with GM foods.&#;

Yet avoiding GM soy doesn&#;t mean all is well, Daniel says: &#;One question I get all the time is, ?What if I only eat organic soy?&#; The assumption is that GM soy is problematic and organic is fine. Certainly, organic is better, but the bottom line is that soybeans naturally contain plant estrogens, toxins, and antinutrients, and you can&#;t remove those.&#;

The highest risk is for infants who are fed soy formula. &#;It&#;s the only thing they&#;re eating, they&#;re very small, and they&#;re at a key stage developmentally,&#; says Daniel. &#;The estrogens in soy will affect the hormonal development of these children, and it will certainly affect their growing brains, reproductive systems, and thyroids.&#; Soy formula also contains large amounts of manganese, which has been linked to attention deficit disorder and neurotoxicity in infants. The Israeli health ministry recently issued an advisory stating that infants should avoid soy formula altogether.

Antinutrients in soy block enzymes needed for digestion, and naturally occur-ring phytates block absorption of essential minerals. This is most worrisome for vegans and vegetarians who eat soy as their main source of protein, and for women in menopause who up their soy intake through supplements.

Soy contains phytochemicals&#;plant nutrients with disease-fighting activity&#;called isoflavones. Studies claim isoflavones can mimic the body&#;s own estrogens, raising a woman&#;s estrogen levels, which fall after menopause, causing hot flashes and other symptoms. On the other hand, isoflavones may also block the body&#;s estrogens, which can help reduce high estrogen levels, therefore reducing risk for breast cancer or uterine cancer before menopause. (High estrogen levels have been linked to cancers of the reproductive system in women.)

Although soy&#;s isoflavones may have an adaptogenic effect (contributing to an estrogen-boosting or -blocking effect where needed), they also have the potential to promote hormone-sensitive cancers in some people. Studies on the effects of isoflavones on human estrogen levels are conflicting, and it&#;s possible that they affect people differently. In men, soy has been shown to lower testosterone levels and sex drive, according to Daniel.

Bauman believes processed soy foods are problematic but maintains that soy has beneficial hormone-mediating effects. &#;People are largely convenience-driven,&#; he says. &#;We&#;re looking at this whole processed-food convenience market and we&#;re making generalizations about a plant. Is soy the problem, or is it the handling and packaging and processing of the plant that&#;s the problem?

&#;Primary sources of food are a good thing. Once there was a bean, but then it got cooked and squeezed and the pulp was separated out, and it was heated and processed for better shelf life and mouth feel. Soy milk is second or third level in terms of processing.&#;

Bauman&#;s eating-for-health approach calls for a variety of natural and seasonal unprocessed whole foods, including soy in moderation, tailored to individual biochemistry and sensitivities. &#;Using soy as part of a diet can bring relief for perimenopause, for example,&#; he says. &#;Throw out the soy and you throw out the isoflavones.&#; (It is possible to obtain plant estrogens to a lesser extent from other foods, such as lima beans or flax.) &#;The literature is extensive on the benefits of soy, and that should always be stated, just as the hazards should be. That&#;s science. These studies are not ridiculous or contrived, but take a look at them. Who&#;s funding them?&#; asks Bauman.

&#;There are a lot of problems with these studies,&#; Daniel says, adding that the heart health claim was an industry-funded initiative. &#;Even if there is positive information, and even if these studies are well designed, we need to weigh that against the fact that we&#;ve also got really good studies showing the dangers. Better safe than sorry is the precautionary principle. Possible bene-fits are far outweighed by proven risks.&#;

Daniel and Bauman agree on the benefits of variety. &#;My experience as a clinical nutritionist is that people who have a varied diet tend not to get into trouble,&#; says Daniel.

&#;We like to demonize certain foods in this society,&#; says Bauman. &#;If you want to find a fault, you&#;ll find it. The bottom line is: What is a healthy diet?&#;

Reprinted from Terrain (Spring ), published by Berkeley&#;s Ecology Center. Dedicated to fine feature writing about environmental issues, Terrain is distributed free throughout Northern California. Subscriptions: $15/yr. (3 issues) from San Pablo Ave., Berkeley, CA ; mynewextsetup.us



Soy &#;Nuggets&#;

Tofu
Soy milk, curdled and pressed into cubes of varying firmness. Often used as meat substitute. A nonfermented product, tofu contains antinutrients, which can block absorption of essential minerals.

Miso
Fermented soybean paste, used in soups and sauces. Rich in probiotics, good bacteria that aid vitamin absorption. Miso is high in sodium but is considered one of the healthiest soy products.

Soybean Oil
To extract oil, soybeans are superheated, ground, pressed, mixed with chemicals, and washed in a centrifuge. Soybean oil accounts for 80 percent of all liquid oils consumed annually in the United States.

Soy Milk
A processed beverage made of ground soybeans mixed with water and boiled, which removes some toxins. Sugar is added to improve flavor. An eight-ounce serving contains up to 35 milligrams of isoflavones, which may change estrogen levels and hormonal function.

Snack Food
Highly processed, a source of trans fat. Check your labels: Potato chips, tortilla crisps, and many other deep-fried things have been cooked in soy oil&#;straight up or partially hydrogenated.

Tempeh
Whole soybeans pressed into loaves, which are then fermented. Often used as a meat substitute. Tempeh is rich in B vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids.

Fast Food
A source of hidden soy. Processed soy proteins extend some burgers and chicken (nuggets, patties, even &#;grilled breasts&#;). Buns contain soy oil and to a lesser extent soy flour and lecithin. Soy oil also appears in dressings and dips, in American &#;cheese,&#; and as the No. 2 ingredient in fries. There&#;s even soy in Big Mac&#;s secret sauce: Soybean oil nets top billing.

Edamame
Whole soybeans, commonly boiled in the pod and eaten as a snack. Most commercial edamame has been preheated to make digestion easier, but it still contains antinutrients.

Image by Mo Riza, licensed under Creative Commons. 


Want more? Read the rest of Utne Reader&#;s July/August package on the secrets of soy:

  • How Much Is Too Much?
    Clinical nutritionist Kaayla Daniel on the Dos and Don&#;ts of soy consumption
    interview by Mary Vance, from Terrain
  • Whole New Diet
    A health-savvy cookbook shows how to get away from processed foods
    by Julie Hanus
  • Biofuel&#;s Big Bean
    How large-scale soy is threatening the environment and a South American way of life
    by April Howard and Benjamin Dangl, from In These Times

Published on Jul 1,

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Soy Lecithin In Chocolate: Why Is It So Controversial?

In the fine chocolate industry there is a tendency to have strong, fierce, "black-or-white" kind of opinions on every subject. Whether it's CCN, raw chocolate or Fairtrade certifications, nobody is afraid to take sides when it comes to certain hot topics. Chocoholics are passionate creatures, indeed.

But there is a subject that makes even the most confident minds wonder. It's not entirely positive or entirely negative. Discussions about it could go on and on for days, and also experts are not quite sure where to stand. 

The protagonist of such controversy? A mysterious additive called Soy Lecithin.

Should we stay away from chocolate that contains soy lecithin?

The reason why soy lecithin is such a debatable ingredient is because it can be seen as either:

  • a practical tool that makes the bean-to-bar process easier,

or 

  • an unnecessary addition to cut corners in a cheap and lazy way.

Before figuring out the right answer and forming any judgement, let's analyze soy lecithin from every perspective. First of all, let's see WHAT soy lecithin exactly is.

Technically, soy lecithin is a phospholipid (shall we just call it "fat"?) derived from soybeans. Practically, it's an industrial waste product: it is extracted from the sludge that is left after the soy oil undergoes a degumming process.

This is why soy lecithin is the most common type of lecithin on the market; it's a byproduct which is easily and inexpensively derived from soybean oil manufacturing (the lion's share of vegetable oils in North America). Physically, it presents itself in liquid form as a yellow-brownish fatty substance with a fairly thick viscosity.

Next: WHERE can we find soy lecithin?Soy lecithin is found in way more products than we might think, especially packaged foods. Manufacturers like this additive so much because it serves two convenient purposes:

  • it's an emulsifier. The goal of an emulsifier is to bind somewhat equal parts of water and oil together, which they ordinarily would never do. That's why we often see it in creamy salad dressings, mayonnaise, reduced-fat buttery spreads and other foods that have a hefty portion of oil.

  • it's a surfactant. The goal of a surfactant is to reduce the surface tension of liquids, which allows them to spread out faster and be absorbed quicker. For this reason, soy lecithin is often added to cake and other baking mixes so that water stirs more easily, with fewer stubborn lumps in the batter.

Now that we have a better understanding of soy lecithin, let's see HOW it is used in the manufacturing of chocolate. 

Soy lecithin has no "emulsifying" purposes in chocolate, since the latter doesn't contain any water (although it can fix water problems caused by humidity). The main purpose of adding soy lecithin to chocolate is to lower its viscosity. This gives a more workable consistency to the chocolate, which becomes easier to temper and to mold. The same result could be achieved by adding cocoa butter, which is unfortunately way more expensive. 

If you read the ingredients list of a chocolate bar, you will see that soy lecithin (if present) is listed among the very last ingredients. This is because a little lecithin goes a long way. Chocolate makers only need to add a tiny amount to their creations. If % or % additional cocoa butter is needed to thin down a coating, only % of lecithin would be needed to get the same result. However, there is a limit for lecithin. After 0,5%, the reducing effects on viscosity stop and can even start to go the other way and increase the viscosity. But chocolate makers never surpass that amount anyway.

The best time to add soy lecithin to the chocolate is at the last stage (in the melangeur or conching machine), since it takes only a few minutes for the lecithin to incorporate. 

Soy lecithin in its liquid state.

After gathering all these details, time has come to understand WHY some chocolate makers use soy lecithin in their creations and why others don't.

Let's start with the positive attributes:

  1. As mentioned above, soy lecithin lowers the viscosity of the chocolate. What does it mean? It means that the chocolate becomes "thinner" and its flow properties are improved. Chocolate with soy lecithin has a more workable consistency that makes it easier to temper and to mold. This makes the job of the chocolate maker easier.

  2. Soy lecithin and cocoa butter are added to the chocolate with pretty much the same purpose. Again, to make the chocolate flow better during the bean-to-bar process. However, soy lecithin wins over cocoa butter for price and quantity. Cocoa butter is way more expensive and is needed in larger quantities to achieve the same result. Replacing cocoa butter with soy lecithin makes the entire process less expensive.

  3. Soy lecithin is particularly useful to chocolate manufacturers who use larger machine setups. Since it reduces viscosity, chocolate with soy lecithin works better through large pipes and machines. This addition prevents the chocolate (especially the one with a high percentage of cacao) from getting stuck somewhere along the process without moving.

  4. As we mentioned, soy lecithin does not behave like an emulsifier (binding water and oil) in chocolate. But sometimes, either due to a lighter roast, humidity or because of certain ingredients (some sugars and milk powder) that easily absorb water, water does make it into the chocolate. The addition of a small amount of lecithin keeps the water from causing problems such as seizing or thickening the chocolate.

  5. Soy lecithin also improves the shelf life of a chocolate product, increasing its profitability, and improves sugar crystallization, keeping the chocolate from blooming too easily.

Now onto the negative attributes that make soy lecithin an unwanted addition for many professionals and consumers:

Soy lecithin makes chocolate easier to work with, but what about changes in flavor and texture?
  1. If on one side soy lecithin makes the bean-to-bar process easier, on the other side it alters the texture and the taste of the chocolate. Regarding texture, many consumers complain that soy lecithin confers a "waxy" consistency to the chocolate. This is nothing similar to the creaminess and the roundness that added cocoa butter would give to the chocolate. It is more a candle-like, plastic consistency that is not always pleasant for the palate. Also, adding soy lecithin doesn't help with bringing out the intrinsic aromas of cacao. If cocoa butter helps to bring flavors to the taste buds, soy lecithin is said to actually flatten tasting notes and contribute to the standardization of the chocolate.

  2. Soy lecithin naturally occurs in soybeans, but the way it is produced is nothing natural. To get it from the soybeans, it needs to be extracted with harsh chemical solvents, like hexane and acetone. Moreover, soy lecithin is bleached to transform the color from a dirty brownish hue to a light yellow. Being the result of industrial activities and containing toxic solvent residues, it is understandable why chocolate consumers wouldn't want it in their bodies.

  3. Commercial soy these days is almost always genetically modified. So unless the label says 'organic soy lecithin', it probably came from a genetically modified soybean. Organic lecithin is produced using a mechanical process without the use of chemical solvents. However, its cost is way higher than commercial soy lecithin, probably defeating the purpose of substituting it to cocoa butter in the first place.

You would expect to see 'allergens' among the negative attributes of soy lecithin ("Allergic to soy? Avoid soy lecithin!"). However, the matter is more complicated than that. The Food Allergy Research and Resource Program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has this to say:

"Soybeans are well-recognized as allergenic foods, and the soybean allergens are found in the protein fraction. But the vast majority of this protein is actually removed in the soy lecithin manufacturing process.

Apparently, soy lecithin does not contain sufficient soy protein residues to provoke allergic reactions in the majority of soy-allergic consumers. Many allergists do not even advise their soybean-allergic patients to avoid soybean lecithin when it is included as an ingredient on food products."

Many other medical sources confirm that the risk for an allergic reaction to soy lecithin and soy oils is low, but a reaction can occur. Studies show that most people who have an allergy to soy may eat products that contain soy lecithin and soy oils. Therefore, only individuals with an extreme allergy to soy or that are extremely sensitive to soy should stay away from chocolate containing soy lecithin. 

In conclusion, there are as many reasons to be in favor of soy lecithin as there are to be against it. It is included in such small quantities that it might be ok to add it to chocolate. But since it's an artificial ingredient, many won't find it a good fit for craft chocolate. However, it could make things easier for chocolate makers who already have to face so many difficulties. But yet again, it alters the purity of chocolate and its original flavor and texture. 

As you can see, developing a strong opinion on soy lecithin is not an easy task.

What do you think of soy lecithin in chocolate?

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Why are people concerned about men drinking soya milk?

Soya milk is a tasty and easily available alternative to dairy products, so it’s popular among people on a dairy-free diet. However, soya contains chemicals called soya isoflavones which are a source of phytoestrogens, and these have oestrogenic effects on the body – which is why we include soya isoflavones in our Menopause Support tablets.

For men, this has become a big concern, with some claiming that the phytoestrogens found in soya isoflavones can have feminising effects on men, such as breast enlargement and emotional changes, as well as cause problems such as erectile dysfunction, low sperm function and reduced libido. 

On the flip-side, many people on dairy-free and vegan diets thrive on soya milk and other soya products with no adverse effects. Karris McCulloch at TheVeganKind claims 'Soya yoghurts, soya milk, tofu and meat replacements are all consumed by our family regularly and we have absolutely no concerns whatsoever of the safety of soya consumption for either men or women. It's becoming more and more widely accepted that the ill effects of soya on men are factually incorrect.'

So what truth is there in these concerns, and is it safe for men to drink soya milk or eat soya-based products?

What we know about soya products

It’s true that soya contains phytoestrogens which act like oestrogen in the body. However, their oestrogenic effect is very weak – between 50 and 20, times weaker than natural oestrogen! This can actually be really useful for women during the menopause, as phytoestrogen supplements like our own Menopause Support can gently support oestrogen levels. But don't worry, you won't find as many phytoestrogens in soya foods as you would in a supplement.

We know that soya products are widely consumed in Eastern countries, and the populations in these countries tend to be generally healthier with less hormone-related problems – women are less prone to PMS and tend to have an easier menopause, whilst men are less prone to problems like BPH, or enlarged prostate. However, it is important to remember that soya is not the only thing that makes Eastern diets so healthy – they are generally much lower in refined carbohydrates, richer in fresh vegetables and high in fish too.

It’s also important to consider what type of soya products these cultures traditionally consume. Fermented soya, such as miso and tempeh are most widely consumed, while soya milk is fairly uncommon. Fermenting soya increases its nutritional value so it's likely that many of the health benefits associated with soya products in the East are actually in reference to fermented soya.

We know that soya milk also contains antinutrients, which can hinder the absorption of minerals such as magnesium and calcium. The fermentation process helps to reduce these antinutrients too.

Tempeh is a fermented form of soya.

What does the research say?

The good news is that research seems to suggest that soya has no adverse effects on men in terms of hormone disruption, sexual health or feminisation.

Two reports analysed a number of studies to assess the extent to which soya and soya isoflavones have an effect on male hormones and related conditions. 

One of these concluded that there were ‘no significant effects of soya protein or isoflavone intake’ on male sex hormone levels.

Another report found that soya did not affect oestrogen or testosterone levels in men, did not affect sperm counts and did not increase the risk of erectile dysfunction. 

The reports noted that while some adverse effects have been seen in animal studies, these animals process and react differently to soya than humans, and the same effects have not been found in similar studies on humans.

However, these reports don’t make a distinction between the different types of soy, with both including a range of studies which used different types of soya, from soya isoflavone supplements, to soya foods, to isolated soya proteins. We know that different types of soya have different levels of phytoestrogens, which skews these results slightly.

So what’s the verdict on soya milk?

Glass of soya milk

Considering that the oestrogenic effect of soya isoflavones is anywhere from 50 to 20, times weaker than natural oestrogen, you’d have to drink an awful lot of soya milk to begin seeing hormonal effects. Plus, dairy milk contains lots of hormones and growth factors too so soya milk is still a better alternative. 

However, just as we recommend reducing (or avoiding altogether) your intake of dairy, we’d also recommend limiting your intake of soya milk. Some soya milk in your morning cereal or in your tea/coffee is fine, but we wouldn’t recommend drinking pints of it throughout the day.

This is partly because soya milk tends to be highly processed in the UK and can often contain additional salt, sugar, preservatives and other nasty chemicals. It is also often made from non-organic or even GM soybeans. As we mentioned earlier, soya milk is an unfermented form of soya so it can also contain high levels of antinutrients. 

However, we would recommend consuming more fermented soya products as these have lots of great health benefits! The fermentation process increases nutritional value and also reduces the levels of anti-nutrients to create a much healthier end product. Tempeh, natto and miso make great additions to a healthy diet.

What benefits does fermented soya have?

Soya is rich in nutrients such as protein, vitamins, minerals and fibre, and is a much healthier alternative to meat and dairy. 

Fermented soya is also a natural probiotic, as the fermentation process encourages the growth of healthy bacteria. When ingested, these healthy bacteria can promote better digestion, which can have knock-on effects on the immune system, energy levels and overall nutrition.

Soya is also thought to be good for a healthy heart, since it contains omegas and can help to reduce cholesterol. 

Soya for BPH/Enlarged Prostate

If you have BPH (an enlarged prostate) or are looking to promote a healthier prostate to prevent conditions like BPH from developing, then soya is something you should definitely think about eating more of. Soya is rich in plant compounds known as phytosterols which have been shown to reduce the risk of prostate enlargement.

The highest rates of prostate disease are observed in Western countries such as the United States, whereas the lowest rates are seen in Asian countries such as Singapore. While this could be down to factors such as genetics, one likely explanation is diet, and we know that Asian diets tend to be full of soya-based products.

Replacing some of your meat and dairy intake with soya-based products such as tofu, miso, tempeh and soya milk can also reduce the risk of BPH, since eating red meat daily has been revealed to increase the risk of BPH by 38%. Dairy is also a known inflammatory which can aggravate conditions like BPH and prostatitis.

For more diet tips, read our article on eating for a healthy prostate.

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The Truth About Non-GMO Soy: A Nutritional Powerhouse

No sooner did the FDA take the highly unusual step of allowing a health claim
to be made for soy as a food in , than it came under attack by a vocal minority of
“concerned citizens”—some of whom were found to represent a narrow segment of the
food industry threatened by soy’s profits. …. [C]onsiderable misinformation
now contaminates the discussion of soy’s real impact on health. Instead of enjoying the broad
range of benefits, many aging individuals are unnecessarily fearful of consuming soy products.
~ Life Extension Magazine July  (Oscar Rodriguez, references)

Do you believe that soy, a plant protein derived from the soybean (a legume), is unhealthy? Or are you just confused about whether it offers any health benefits? The controversy that arose after the FDA allowed a health claim for soy in resulted in substantial amounts of clinical research. Below is information (especially relevant for vegetarians, vegans, and post-menopausal women) that can help you decide whether including soy in your diet, as a food or dietary supplement, is right for you.

The FDA-Allowed Health Claim
In April , the FDA updated in the Code of Federal Regulations (21CFR) its allowed health claim for soy related to coronary heart disease (CHD), which it describes as “one of the most common and serious forms of cardiovascular disease” that “refers to diseases of the heart muscle and supporting blood vessels.” According to the FDA, “diets high in saturated fat and cholesterol are associated with increased levels of blood total and LDL-cholesterol and, thus, with increased risk of CHD.” While the impact of high cholesterol on CHD [versus other factors, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) levels] is itself controversial, it is nevertheless important to note for purposes of this article that the FDA allows health claims similar to this model: “Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol that include 25 grams of soy protein a day may reduce the risk of heart disease. One serving of [name of food] provides __ grams of soy protein.” The claim does not reference soy isoflavones, discussed below.

The Many Soy Forms & The Importance of Organic/Non-GMO
Whole soybeans, which must be consumed cooked, are rich in essential amino acids, B vitamins, vitamin K, minerals (potassium, magnesium, calcium, selenium, copper, iron, phosphorous, manganese), and fiber. Soy is available in many food forms and in supplements, including as: soy milk; soy protein powder; soy nuts; edamame; tofu; fermented soy products (miso, tempeh, natto); soy lecithin (food/supplements); and soy isoflavones (supplement). It also can be “hidden” in refined ( forms of regularly consumed foods such as meat products, bakery goods, chocolate, and breakfast cereals.

Soy is one of five major GMO food crop varieties, the others being corn, canola, cotton, and sugar beets. GMO stands for “genetically modified organisms”, which refers to any food product that has been altered at the gene level. Specifically, scientists insert bacterial genes in GM plants, allowing them to survive an otherwise deadly dose of weed killer. GM crops thus have higher herbicide residues. According to the American Academy of Environmental Medicine, animal studies prove that “GM foods pose a serious health risk in the areas of toxicology, allergy and immune function, reproductive health, and metabolic, physiologic and genetic health and are without benefit.” As of the writing of this article, the use of GMOs is prohibited in organic products. (USDA Blog, May ) It is most prudent to consume only organic/non-GMO soy.

The Soy Controversy
Below are some of the principal anti-soy arguments and their scientifically supported counterarguments.

Myth #1 &#; Soy causes or increases the risk of cancer.
Soy contains isoflavones (genistein, daidzein), antioxidant polyphenols that are viewed as phytoestrogens (estrogens from plants) because of their molecular similarity to estradiol, one type of carcinogenic estrogen.

Estrogen influences cells through estrogen receptors. Soy critics focus on isoflavones’ action on estrogen receptors, failing to consider that the body has more than one type, each which affects the body differently. Until relatively recently, only one estrogen receptor (ER-alpha) had been discovered. Overexpression of ER-alpha has been implicated in various cancers, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, and colon cancer. In the late s, scientists discovered a second estrogen receptor (ER-beta), expression of which appears to counteract many of the cancer-causing activities of ER-alpha. The discovery of ER-beta estrogen receptors, their cancer-inhibiting effects, and the preferential influence of isoflavones on these receptors, in addition to extensive human epidemiological and clinical studies, indicate a favorable soy isoflavone –cancer connection. Even the American Cancer Society recognizes that soy isoflavones have anti-estrogenic, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties (mynewextsetup.us, McCullough ), and some studies show that isoflavones are breast cancer protective (JAMA Dec) (Eur J Cancer. Mar; enhances tamoxifen).

Soy might also lower the risk of other cancers, including prostate cancer (Urology Sept), colon cancer (Mol Cancer Nov; genistein/ indolecarbinol) (Am J Clin Nutr. Feb; colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women), and endometrial cancer (J Korean Med Sci Apr).

Myth #2 &#; Isoflavones disrupt sex hormones.
The phytoestrogens in soy primarily affect ER-beta estrogen receptors, which have been shown to inhibit the detrimental effects associated with hormonal imbalance (Med Hypotheses. Mar). According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, “there is no conclusive evidence from animal, adult human, or infant populations that dietary soy isoflavones may adversely affect human development, reproduction, or endocrine function.” (AAP Policy Rev. May ) Moreover, “Literature reviews and clinical studies of infants fed soy protein-based infant formulas raise no clinical concerns with respect to nutritional adequacy, sexual development, thyroid disease, immune function, or neurodevelopment.” (AAP Policy Rev. May ).

Myth #3 – Soy causes thyroid dysfunction.
Following the announcement of the occurrence of goiter in a single infant on a pure soy diet (N Engl J Med. Feb), soy critics extrapolated the risk to the general population. While soy isoflavones inhibit an enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis, they do not cause poor thyroid function in otherwise healthy individuals who have adequate iodine intake. (Thyroid July; Thyroid. Feb)

Like fiber supplements and some medications, however, soy isoflavones may prevent absorption of some of the iodine normally used to make thyroid hormone. Those who frequently consume large amounts of soy thus may need slightly more iodine in their diets. (Note, however, that excess iodine can slow thyroid function.) Also, soy can reduce the absorption of hypothyroid medications, and thyroid expert Stephen E. Langer, MD, recommends that hypothyroid patients minimize soy consumption “until their condition is corrected or supplemented with thyroid hormone.” Andrew Weil, MD, advises that a hypothyroid patient can safely eat one soy serving per day at least three hours apart from thyroid medication intake.

Clinically Supported Evidence of Soy Benefits
While the soy food and supplements controversy continues (certain soy supplements have proven safe and effective in this writer’s clinical practice, and Julian Whitaker, MD, favors them, while Andrew Weil, MD, and the American Cancer Society feel that additional and long-term research is needed), ample scientific studies document that soy consumption provides benefits in connection with various health conditions, including: (1) Inflammation (linked to type 2 diabetes, obesity, cancer, and cardiovascular disease) (Cancer Causes Control Jun) (J Acad Nutr Diet. Sept) (2) Cardiovascular Disease (i.e., hypertension, atherosclerosis, reduced blood flow, high cholesterol/LDL) (Mol Aspects Med. Dec) (J. Nutr. Mar); (3) Menopausal Symptoms (Menopause , Vol. 18, No. 7; mixed study results; more relief from supplements high in genistein and the daidzein metabolite S-equol) (J Med Food. Spring; soy foods/supplements); (4) Osteoporosis (Nutr Res. Jan) (Eur J Nutr. Sept); and (5) Kidney Disease (Renal & Urology News Dec) (Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. )

In considering whether to incorporate soy foods or supplements into your diet, consider all of the evidence, your doctor’s specific guidance, and whether a soy allergy or intolerance may be a factor. While rarely life threatening, soy allergy/intolerance is common, especially among children, and can manifest as tingling in the mouth, eczema or other dermatitis, breathing difficulties, digestive problems, skin flushing, or swelling (mynewextsetup.us).

The statements in this article have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Unless otherwise stated herein or otherwise supported by specific research, the natural remedies discussed herein are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Submitted by Michael Dworkin, PD, CCN, a Registered Pharmacist and State Certified Clinical Nutritionist (CT Cert. No. ), with J. Erika Dworkin, Certified Lifestyle Educator and Board Cert. Holistic Nutrition (Cand.). Owner of the Manchester Parkade Health Shoppe (, Middle Turnpike West, Manchester, CT, mynewextsetup.us), Pharmacist Dworkin has been guiding patients since and is available for consultation by appointment. Erika is available to speak to groups. All statements in this article are research-based and references are available upon request.  

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Men’s Health Does An “About Face” On Soy…And Rightly So!

Men’s Health magazine, which once suggested male readers should avoid soy, has now come out with an article touting the benefits of soy consumption. Well, it’s about time.

While it is fair to say that no single article, be it intended for health professionals or the lay public, is responsible for the myth that soy causes male feminization, a article in Men’s Health warrants being singled out.1 The title alone reveals the hyperbolic tone of the article: “Is this the most dangerous food for men?” And the article itself includes this text: “But there may be a hidden dark side to soy, one that has the power to undermine everything it means to be male.”

Much of the article focused on a case-report published in that described an older man who developed feminizing effects, including gynecomastia, allegedly as a result of his soy consumption.2 The article also cited a small pilot epidemiologic study published in that found soy intake was associated with lower sperm counts among men attending an infertility clinic.3

While this very long article did briefly mention that the male in question consumed 3 quarts of soymilk per day, it failed to mention that 12 cups of soymilk is a ridiculous amount of soy to consume, and that it is about 9 times more soy than older Japanese men (following a traditional diet) typically consume.4 Furthermore, it’s pretty obvious given the number of calories the soymilk would have provided, that soy consumption occurred in the context of a completely unbalanced and likely nutrient deficient diet. Instead of focusing on the excessive amount of soy consumed, the article discussed the feminizing effects as if they would occur in response to more sensible and modest amounts of soy. And therefore, it appeared as though soy represents a threat to men who even infrequently consumed soy.

The article was so biased against soy, for the first and only time I actually spoke with an editor of the magazine to complain. After butting heads for a few minutes, he told me, in effect: “We have to come out with articles every month.” The clear meaning was that the pressure to publish attention-grabbing stories causes one to diverge from the science to varying degrees.

Better late than never. Fast forward 9 years to an article in Men’s Health (mynewextsetup.us) published earlier this year in which the benefits of soymilk were highlighted by citing a peer-reviewed article which concluded that of the many plant milks evaluated, soymilk comes out on top nutritionally, as it comes closest to matching the nutrient content of cow’s milk.5 More importantly, the article in Men’s Health also went on to say that “phytoestrogens (the family of plant-based hormones that isoflavones belong to) have also been linked to a dip in testosterone when you down too much — but before you freak out, know that up to four servings a day isn’t a big deal, Men’s Health nutrition advisor Alan Aragaon, M.S. explained to us previously.” Aragon had made that point in an article in Men’s Health published in December of (mynewextsetup.us)

Once something is ingrained in the public’s mind it is not easily dislodged. The retraction or correction to any story typically gets a lot less coverage and has a lot less impact than the original story. But to be clear, clinical studies show that neither soy nor isoflavones lower levels of testosterone6 or raise estrogen levels7 in men. In some of the studies conducted, the equivalent of as much as six servings of soy per day didn’t result in any hormonal disturbances.

And what about that previously mentioned small study linking soy to lower sperm counts?3 The clinical studies show that isn’t the case.8,9 In fact, even the research group that published those initial findings about lowered sperm counts3 subsequently found that soyfood intake in men was unrelated to clinical outcomes among couples presenting at an infertility clinic.10

Finally, long-term studies show that in response to resistance exercise training such as weight lifting, soy protein promotes muscle mass and strength to a similar extent as whey protein, which is considered to be the gold standard in the weight-lifting community.11,12 When considering all the data, it’s pretty obvious that not only should men not fear consuming soy but they would be wise to consider incorporating soy into their diet as research suggests soy may reduce risk of developing prostate cancer.13

It may be that the damage done to the image of soy by that article in Men’s Health may never be completely undone.1 But at least Men’s Health is beginning to portray soy in a way that is consistent with the scientific literature.

References

  1. Thorton J. Is this the most dangerous food for men? Men&#;s Health (June).
  2. Martinez J, Lewi JE. An unusual case of gynecomastia associated with soy product consumption. Endocr Pract. ;
  3. Chavarro JE, Toth TL, Sadio SM, Hauser R. Soy food and isoflavone intake in relation to semen quality parameters among men from an infertility clinic. Hum Reprod. ;
  4. Messina M, Nagata C, Wu AH. Estimated Asian adult soy protein and isoflavone intakes. Nutr Cancer. ;
  5. Vanga SK, Raghavan V. How well do plant based alternatives fare nutritionally compared to cow&#;s milk? Journal of food science and technology. ;
  6. Hamilton-Reeves JM, Vazquez G, Duval SJ, Phipps WR, Kurzer MS, Messina MJ. Clinical studies show no effects of soy protein or isoflavones on reproductive hormones in men: results of a meta-analysis. Fertil Steril. ;
  7. Messina M. Soybean isoflavone exposure does not have feminizing effects on men: a critical examination of the clinical evidence. Fertil Steril. ;
  8. Mitchell JH, Cawood E, Kinniburgh D, Provan A, Collins AR, Irvine DS. Effect of a phytoestrogen food supplement on reproductive health in normal males. Clin Sci (Lond). ;
  9. Beaton LK, McVeigh BL, Dillingham BL, Lampe JW, Duncan AM. Soy protein isolates of varying isoflavone content do not adversely affect semen quality in healthy young men. Fertil Steril. ;
  10. Minguez-Alarcon L, Afeiche MC, Chiu YH, et al. Male soy food intake was not associated with in vitro fertilization outcomes among couples attending a fertility center. Andrology. ;
  11. Candow DG, Burke NC, Smith-Palmer T, Burke DG. Effect of whey and soy protein supplementation combined with resistance training in young adults. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism. ;
  12. Denysschen CA, Burton HW, Horvath PJ, Leddy JJ, Browne RW. Resistance training with soy vs whey protein supplements in hyperlipidemic males. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. ;
  13. Applegate CC, Rowles JL, Ranard KM, Jeon S, Erdman JW. Soy consumption and the risk of prostate cancer: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrients. ;

 

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Comments

  1. Hamara jagaa kaa 3 owner hain. Mummy, My Elder Brother & Me as younger Brother and we both unmarried. Kya me PMAY kaa laabh uthaa saktaa hun.

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