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Pregnant women 1st trimester


pregnant women 1st trimester

Persistent or unusual headaches · Persistent nausea and vomiting Nausea and Vomiting During Early Pregnancy Up to 80% of pregnant women have nausea and vomiting. At this point in the first trimester, you'll receive a positive pregnancy test! You may be starting to feel bloated, crampy, tired, and moody. Monitor Your Emotional Health. The emotional rollercoaster that comes with raised hormone levels during pregnancy is expected by every pregnant woman. But if.

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pregnant women 1st trimester

Do’s and Don’ts of Your First Trimester

After finding out you&#;re pregnant (congrats mommy-to-be!), you may start to feel a little anxious. What can you do? What can you not do? What foods and drinks should you avoid? With so much information out there, it can quickly become overwhelming. That is exactly why we’ve put together this list of do’s and don’ts for your first trimester, so you can make the best possible decisions for you and your baby during this important phase of pregnancy.

DO start taking folic acid supplements

You’ll want to start taking folic acid supplements as soon as you find out that you’re pregnant. This provides essential nutrients that helps protect the baby’s brain and spinal cord. You may also want to start taking prenatal vitamins. 

DO prepare for morning sickness

Despite its name, morning sickness can last all day typically during the first trimester. While not all women are plagued with morning sickness during pregnancy, many are so it’s best to get ready for it ahead of time. 

There are teas specifically formulated to combat nausea and vomiting in pregnant women. If you find that you’re prone to morning sickness, you can brew yourself a cup each morning. There are also morning sickness hard candies that you can eat in addition to your cup of tea or instead of it.

If you find that you have mild morning sickness, then you can take measures like eating small and frequent meals and sticking to foods that are bland and simple. If you find that it is severe you should talk to your OBGYN immediately.

DO learn about health insurance and pick a provider

If you already have health insurance, you should look into the plans for prenatal care and delivery expenses. If healthcare is provided by your job, look into the benefits offered by the health insurance company. 

From there, it’s time to choose an OBGYN or a midwife. The reason it’s advised to look into health insurance first is because they likely have a list of participating providers. A good way to find a healthcare provider is through recommendations from friends and family. Ensure they are under your health insurance plan and, if possible, meet with a few to see if they are a good fit. 

DO set up your first prenatal appointment

Before your appointment, make a note of the first day of your last period as bike repair at home near me will ask you this, and write down any questions that you may have for your doctor. If there are diseases or disorders on either the father’s side of the family or yours, these are a great thing to discuss with your doctor. 

You should also make sure to consult your doctor about any medications you are on to make sure they are safe for pregnant women. Continue to do this throughout your pregnancy if you are prescribed different medications, including over-the-counter ones. Mention any herbs, vitamins, or other supplements you take. 

DO limit stress

It’s so easy to get overwhelmed in the first few months of pregnancy with lists of things you have to do. But stress is bad for your health and for the baby’s development so you’ll want to avoid it as much as possible. 

Easier said than done, right? Well, there are a few measures you can take in order to make this process easier for yourself:

  • Take everything day-by-day. For example, instead of doing everything all at once, take it in stride and do one thing every day to get prepared for the new baby’s arrival.
  • Practice deep breathing. When you are starting to feel stressed, don’t let yourself get too worked up. It’s normal! Instead, take a few deep, calming breaths and refocus your intentions. 
  • Use a pregnancy planner. This will help you to stay organized and abreast of the things you have to do so that you can reduce stress. 

DO cultivate better santander online banking login problems you haven’t already read our general list of do’s and don’ts for pregnancy, you should give it a look. There are things that will be important throughout your pregnancy. We included the importance of exercise (you may need to modify your workouts to accommodate your pregnancy), eating healthy, and getting enough sleep. Those are extremely important in the healthy development of your baby and in maintaining your pregnant women 1st trimester health. But it’s not enough to start doing that in your 3rd trimester and hoping that’s enough. You need to start now, during your first trimester. 

  • Exercise: Between the nausea and low energy, working out may be the last thing you feel like doing. But it’s important to get up and move as it makes for a more comfortable pregnancy and can help reduce complications.
  • Get lots of sleep: Being pregnant is very demanding on your body and being a new mom is even more so. Make sure you are getting enough sleep to help you prepare.
  • Eat healthy: It’s essential that you are eating a healthy and balanced diet so that you are getting all the nutrients that you and your baby need. 

DO talk to your partner about parenting and budgeting

This is going to look different for all couples because everyone goes into parenthood with their own ideas and practices. One good way to tackle this is to sit down and both write a list of what parenting means to you and what each of you saw from your mother and father. Then, come together and agree on practices that add value to the baby’s life and help raise your child positively.

It’s also important that you talk about how you plan to handle the baby’s expenses. It’s no secret that babies can be expensive with all the diapers, food, toys, and baby gear, in addition to saving for when the baby grows up. Check where you can trim your budget now and make adjustments to save money that can be used for your baby.

DON’T paint the nursery

It’s an exciting step to get to decorate the baby’s room but the chemicals and solvents in paint can be toxic and harmful. If you do insist on painting, use natural or organic paints walking the west highland way in 4 days ensure the room is well-ventilated.

DON’T consume foods that may be harmful to you or your baby

We go much more in-depth in our article on the top 11 foods to avoid during pregnancy so be sure to check that out.

DON’T smoke or breathe in secondhand smoke

Cigarette smoke is linked to many complications that may include cancers, premature delivery, low birth weight, miscarriage, sudden infant deather syndrome, and learning or behavioral disabilities as the baby grows and develops. You should not be doing any recreational drugs as they can be harmful and toxic to you and the baby. 

DON’T stay in the same position for an extended period of time

Do not sit or stand for long periods of time as it can hurt your ankles and veins. Take frequent breaks to move around and keep your legs elevated after you’ve been on your feet for a while.

DON’T drink alcohol

Alcohol can pass through the placenta and umbilical cord and affect the baby’s developing brain and organs. Regular consumption of alcohol during pregnancy can lead to premature birth, brain damage, miscarriage, stillbirth, and life-long debilitation.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Changes in Your Body During Pregnancy: First Trimester

Path to well being

How do I know I’m pregnant?

A missed period is often the first sign of pregnancy. You may have some other physical signs as well. These include mild cramping and a little bleeding when the fertilized egg implants itself in your uterus.

If you’ve missed your period and think you may be pregnant, you can take a home pregnancy test. These tests are very accurate if you take them a few days after you expected to get your period. Call your doctor if the test is positive.

Why do I feel so tired?

Feeling very tired is another common symptom of early pregnancy. Your body is working hard to adjust to all the new physical changes. This can cause extreme fatigue. You may need to sleep longer than usual at night. If possible, you can take short naps during the day. Your energy will most likely return in the second trimester of pregnancy.

What is morning sickness?

Morning sickness consists of nausea and what credit score you need for amazon credit card. It is caused by pregnancy hormones. Many pregnant people have it to some degree in their first trimester. Despite what it sounds, morning sickness pregnant women 1st trimester occur at any time of day. Certain foods or smells might make you feel sick and sometimes vomit. Some people seem to feel sicker when their stomachs are empty. Morning sickness usually goes away by the second trimester.

There are over-the-counter vitamins and herbal supplements that may help with morning sickness. Taking vitamin B6 may help with nausea, even though it may not prevent vomiting. Ginger supplements also may relieve nausea.

What other changes can I expect during the first trimester?

Frequent urination. Towards the end of the first trimester, you will feel like urinating more often. This is because your growing uterus pushes on your bladder. You may even leak a little urine when you cough or sneeze.

Lightheadedness. Your body is working overtime to make extra blood to support your baby. This can cause you to feel dizzy or lightheaded. Hunger, weakness, or stress can cause these symptoms as well.

Heartburn. The muscles that break down food become more relaxed during pregnancy. Hormone changes also slow down this process. Food also stays in your stomach longer to give your body more time to absorb nutrients. All these things can cause or worsen heartburn.

Constipation. You should be taking a daily prenatal vitamin that contains iron. The iron in the vitamin can lead to constipation. The slow process of breaking down food also can cause constipation, gas, and bloating. Your doctor may suggest taking fiber supplements or a stool softener to provide relief. Make sure you drink plenty of water (about eight glasses per day). Tell your doctor if you have severe problems. They may switch you to a different prenatal vitamin.

Visible veins. Your body makes extra blood and your heart pumps faster to meet the needs of pregnancy. This can cause the blue veins in your belly, breasts, and legs to become more noticeable. You may develop spider veins on your face, neck, or arms. These are tiny blood vessels that branch out from a central area, like the legs of a spider.

Skin changes. You may notice that your skin looks more rosy and shiny. Some people call this a “pregnancy glow.” It is caused by increased blood circulation. Pregnancy hormones can cause extra oil on your skin. It may cause you to have flares of acne.

Breast changes. Most people notice changes in their breasts early in pregnancy. The hormones in your body change to prepare for breastfeeding. As this occurs, your breasts may feel tender and swollen. You might notice small bumps forming in the area around your nipples. Your breasts will continue to grow and change throughout your pregnancy. They may feel even bigger and fuller later on.

Vaginal changes. The lining of your vagina will become thicker and less sensitive. You may notice a thin, white discharge. This is normal during pregnancy. Mild vaginal bleeding (spotting) is also normal and common. However, you should call your doctor if you have vaginal bleeding. If the bleeding is heavy or painful, pregnant women 1st trimester to the emergency room.

A growing belly. Your waistline will begin to expand as your baby and uterus grow larger. Depending on your size before pregnancy, you may not notice this change until the second trimester. It is normal to gain no or little weight in your first trimester.

Emotional symptoms. Your hormones are on overload during pregnancy. You might feel moody, forgetful, or unable to focus. Fatigue and stress can increase these symptoms.

Things to consider

Keep in mind that each pregnancy experience is unique. Even the same person may have different changes in their multiple pregnancies. For each change, your symptoms may pregnant women 1st trimester mild or severe. Do not worry if the changes do not happen at a certain time. Talk pregnant women 1st trimester your doctor if you have any concerns.

When to see your doctor

Contact your doctor if you think or know you are pregnant. They will make an appointment to confirm your pregnancy and talk to you about prenatal care.

You should also contact your doctor if your morning sickness and vomiting are severe enough to cause weight loss.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • Am I pregnant?
  • How far along am I in my pregnancy?
  • What kinds of physical and emotional changes should I expect?
  • Are my symptoms normal?
  • Are there any risks that I should be aware of?
  • Which prenatal vitamin do you recommend I take?

Resources

American Academy of Family Physicians: Taking Care of You and Your Baby While You’re Pregnant

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

First Trimester Pregnancy Tips

Pregnancy Fatigue

In the first trimester, your body produces a lot of progesterone, which acts as a sedative. Combine that with the fact that your body’s working to increase your blood supply—your pulse quickens by 10–15 beats per chase bank tyler tx it’s no surprise you’re tired. You’ve got a lot going on! Don’t worry, once the baby's placenta is formed by the end of your third month, you should have more energy.

Tips for Dealing with Pregnancy Fatigue:

  • Rest as much as possible
  • Drink enough water and snack nutritiously if you sleep through mealtime
  • Try to exercise for energy boosts, but check with your doctor before beginning any new exercise program

First Trimester Nausea

Morning sickness isn’t just for mornings—lucky you! The queasiness stems from a rise walking the west highland way in 4 days your estrogen level and affects 50–90% of expectant moms.

Tips for Dealing with First Trimester Nausea: 

  • Keep something in your stomach at all times—even if eating is the last thing you want to do. Crackers, cereal, ginger tea, or fruit can all help settle your stomach
  • Avoid greasy foods and foods with strong flavors or smells
  • If you're vomiting, remember to rehydrate with fluids
  • Call your doctor if the nausea and vomiting become severe, especially if you’re unable to keep food or chevy chase bank near me inside of you over 4–6 hours

Frequent Urination

As your uterus increases in size, it puts more pressure on your bladder.

Tips for Dealing with Frequent Urination in the First Trimester: 

  • Stop drinking fluids a few hours before bedtime
  • Reduce bladder irritants such as carbonated beverages, citrus, and caffeine

First Trimester Constipation

These first trimester issues are caused by the hormones your body uses during pregnancy, which are also slowing down your intestinal tract.

Tips for Easing First Trimester Constipation: 

  • Drink plenty of water and eat high-fiber foods
  • Exercise can help your body stay energized and regular. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any new exercise program

Breast Tenderness

Blame it on the hormone surge. Again.

Tips for Easing Breast Tenderness in the First Trimester:

  • Wear a support or athletic bra, even at night if necessary.
  • Make sure you change your bra size as needed. Women often change bra sizes multiple times throughout their pregnancy

First Trimester Headaches and Dizziness

Your increased blood supply and soaring hormone levels can cause headaches and light-headedness during the first few months of pregnancy. As your body gets used to the hormone levels, the headaches should subside. In the meantime, follow some of these first trimester pregnancy tips to get relief.

Tips for Easing Headaches and Dizziness in the First Trimester:

  • For sinus headaches, apply a warm compress to the front and sides of your face or forehead
  • For tension headaches, try a cold compress on the back of your neck
  • Try to relax, and be sure to snack throughout the day to keep your blood sugar levels steady
  • Ask your doctor about baby-friendly medications for headache relief, such as Tylenol

Hopefully, these first trimester pregnancy tips will help bring you some comfort and make this time more exciting than symptom-laden. Find out which issues will dissipate in your second trimester.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

What to Eat When You're Pregnant: First Trimester

Welcome to the first trimester of pregnancy, complete with morning sickness, exhaustion, breast pain and all the carbs. Before you even see a positive test, your body is already changing. And, even though it's an exciting time for most expecting moms, the physical symptoms can be a real drag. We break down what is actually going on in your body during those first 13 weeks, which nutrients to load up on, and what to do if you feel sick from sunup to sundown.

Don't Miss:What to Eat and Avoid When You're Pregnant

What's Going On in Your Body

Before you even get pregnant, you can (and should) prepare your body to grow a healthy baby. Folic acid is the most important nutrient to have on your radar even before conception. "Folic acid is an important vitamin that helps prevent neural tube defects. Women need to take at least mcg of folic acid daily starting at least one month prior to conception and throughout the duration of the pregnancy. Most prenatal vitamins include mcg of folic acid, but always look at the label when choosing a vitamin or supplement to be certain," said Sara Tingle, N.P.-C, a family nurse practitioner in Athens, Georgia.

Folic acid can be obtained pregnant women 1st trimester a variety of foods, such as beans, lentils, fortified cereals and dark leafy greens, but you should still take a prenatal vitamin to make sure you're getting adequate amounts.

Once you see that plus sign, you are already about four weeks pregnant, since pregnancy dating is counted from the first day of your last period. The first trimester includes the first 13 weeks. "Physically, the body is experiencing a surge in pregnancy hormones, specifically estrogen and progesterone, which can cause feelings of nausea and morning sickness," said Crystal Karges, M.S., R.D.N., a San Diego-based private practice dietitian and lactation consultant. Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is also on the rise. This hormone is the one detected on your at-home pregnancy test, and some believe it is responsible for nausea and frequent urination.

Progesterone slows down muscle movement in the body, which can lead to constipation for some women. You may also experience light bleeding as the embryo implants in the uterus, but it is nothing to worry about unless bleeding is severe, in which pregnant women 1st trimester you should contact your doctor. Also, expect very sore breasts. Your body is already ramping up for milk production.

There is a lot going on during these first 13 weeks. In fact, by the end of the first trimester, your baby will weigh one ounce and have arms and legs. Fingernails, toenails and reproductive organs will also start to form. It's no wonder you are tired.

Important Nutrients

Peanut Butter & Jelly Smoothie

Recipe to Try:Peanut Butter & Jelly Smoothie

Folic acid: Found in beans, citrus fruits, green leafy vegetables and your prenatal vitamin.

Calcium: Found in dairy (milk, yogurt and cheese) and dark leafy greens.

Iron: Found in meat, poultry, seafood, beans and greens.

Choline: Found in red meat and eggs.

Vitamin B Found in meat, poultry, seafood, as well as fortified breads and cereals.

Omega-3 fatty acids: Found in fatty fish, chia seeds, flax seeds and fortifed foods.

Pregnant charter com pay my bill not, food is your fuel, and that fuel is extremely important as you grow a human being inside of you. The baby eats what you eat, and the baby needs vitamins and minerals to support growth of its tiny brain and bones. Specifically, "Nutrients needed during the first trimester to support a healthy pregnancy include calcium (about 1, mg/day), folate ( mcg/day), and iron (27 mg/day)," said Karges. "These increased nutrient needs can typically be met by eating a diet that offers a wide variety of healthy foods and supplementing with a prenatal vitamin."

"Because your baby's nervous system is starting to develop, it is also important to get adequate amounts of choline, B12 and omega-3 fatty acids," said Ingrid Anderson, R.D.N., founder of Results Dietetics. "Sources of these nutrients include eggs, salmon and walnuts."

Although your body is hard at work, you do not need any extra calories until the second trimester. However, it is normal to gain 3 to 5 pounds in the first trimester due to increased blood and fluid volume.

Don't Miss:27 Pregnancy Power Foods to Eat More Of

When You Can't Stomach Vegetables

Recipe to Try: Raspberry-Peach-Mango Smoothie Bowl

Morning sickness is common for many women during the first trimester. News flash: it doesn't just happen in the morning. You can feel nauseous at any time of day, and anything can trigger it. Food aversions are also common and can be related to nausea. "Helpful tips for managing nausea include avoiding an empty stomach, eating a smaller amount of food more frequently, eating lower-fat foods, and drinking plenty of fluids," said Lindsey Janeiro, R.D.N., C.L.C., dietitian and owner of Nutrition to Fit. "Eating foods that are easier for the body to digest can also help with nausea, such as rice, applesauce, fresh fruit, multigrain crackers/bread, clear-based broths and soups, potatoes, yogurt and dry, bland multigrain cereals," said Karges. Also: "Vitamin B6 has been shown to ease nausea," according to Anderson. But check with your doctor before adding any supplements.

Many women can't stand the thought of a fruit or vegetable and just want comfort food during the first trimester. If this sounds like you, "try incorporating some health into the foods you are craving," said Anderson. "For example: if you are craving french fries, try cutting sweet potatoes into sticks, drizzling oil and sprinkling salt on them and baking them in the oven until they are crispy. Or if ice cream is more your thing, try blending a frozen banana with a small amount of milk to create an ice-cream-like texture and taste." Your diet doesn't have to be perfect during pregnancy. When you are feeling good, seize the opportunity to eat your fruits and vegetables. When you aren't feeling so great, reach for the comfort food.

Overall, "it's important to eat foods that you can tolerate and that feel good in your body," Karges said. Do the best you can. "Sometimes that means having a salad with that pizza you're craving, and sometimes that means simply eating whatever you can keep down," said Janeiro. If nausea or food aversions persist for a long time and you feel your baby is not getting adequate nutrients, be sure to talk to your doctor.

Foods That Help with Nausea:

&#x; Cold foods: yogurt, smoothies, frozen union savings bank mt washington Ginger

&#x; Peppermint

&#x; Lemon

&#x; Bland foods

Exercise During the First Trimester

Rumor has pregnant women 1st trimester that you should cut back on exercise during pregnancy, but this is not true. You can continue anything you were doing before, as long as you listen to your body and stop if you start to feel light-headed, dizzy or shaky. In fact, exercise is beneficial for mama and baby. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that pregnant women exercise 20 to 30 minutes every day with a mix of cardio and strength. Exercising during pregnancy can prevent excessive weight gain, reduce risk of gestational diabetes, decrease likelihood of a C-section and improve postpartum recovery time. Take advantage of the times you are feeling good and get moving, but don't stress if you can't work out every day. Rest is equally important.

Related:What Cramping During Your First Trimester May Mean

Exercises To Try:

&#x; Walking

&#x; Swimming

&#x; Strength training

&#x; Stationary biking

&#x; Yoga

&#x; Pilates

Watch: How to Make a Healthy Smoothie Bowl

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Just in Time Parenting

For most couples, sex is an important, special part of their relationship. Having sex will not hurt your baby, unless you have been told otherwise by your doctor.

During pregnancy, there are usually changes in your interest in having sex and the pleasure you and your partner get from sex. Nausea, fatigue, vomiting, changes in body shape, and fear of hurting the baby are all things that affect how couples feel about sex during pregnancy.

Some partners might feel jealous because the mother-to-be is getting a lot of attention. These feelings may affect your partner’s sexual interest. You should talk openly and honestly with each other about these feelings.

Remember to keep the lines of communication open about your sex life, as well as other issues. Talking it out can solve problems and bring you closer emotionally. If you have questions or concerns, discuss them with your doctor. Your doctor will be able to give you advice and tell you if there are any medical reasons not to have sex during your pregnancy.


Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Your first trimester guide

Tips for the first 13 weeks of your pregnancy.

Congratulations – you’re about to be a mother! Becoming a parent is an exciting and rewarding experience, but it can also feel overwhelming at times and you likely have lots of questions. That’s to be expected and we hope pregnant women 1st trimester guide will be a useful companion throughout your pregnancy. During the first 13 week of pregnancy, your body is growing and changing, and so is your baby’s. Here’s what to know as you start this amazing journey together.

How you're feeling

Your body is about to undergo some major changes as it prepares to grow a new life.

You may start to experience symptoms such as nausea or fatigue – or you may find that you have an increased level of energy! Listen to your body and make adjustments to your routines as needed. Every woman is different, and so is each pregnancy.

Early signs and symptoms of pregnancy

The earliest sign of pregnancy is a missed period for women who have a regular monthly menstrual cycle. Sometimes, implantation bleeding can occur. This is a bleed very pregnant women 1st trimester to a light period or spotting. Though this is completely normal, you should check with your health-care pregnant women 1st trimester if you experience any bleeding during your pregnancy.

You may also begin experiencing a handful of the symptoms below early on in your pregnancy such as fatigue, nausea or more frequent urination.

Common symptoms

The changes in your hormones during your first weeks of pregnancy affect your whole body. While no two pregnancies are the same, some symptoms you may experience during your first trimester include:

  • Breast tenderness
  • Extreme changes in mood
  • Nausea or vomiting (morning sickness)
  • Frequent urination
  • Weight gain or loss
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Headaches
  • Heartburn
  • Leg cramps
  • Lower back and pelvic pain
  • Cravings for certain foods
  • New dislike of certain foods
  • Constipation

Self care

Symptoms in early pregnancy can be uncomfortable to say the least. For some relief, give these tips a try after checking with your health care provider first. Remember, choices should always be made based on your preferences and what is available to you.

  • For nausea or vomiting, try ginger, chamomile, vitamin B6 and/or acupuncture.
  • For leg cramps, try magnesium or calcium.
  • For constipation, if dietary modifications suggested by your health-care provider are not working, wheat bran or other fibre supplements can be used for relief.

Healthy foods and regular exercise are important for your entire pregnancy. Continue your daily physical activity for as long as you feel comfortable doing so. The more active you are during pregnancy, the easier it will be for you to adapt to your changing body. Make sure to nourish your and your baby’s growing bodies with nutritious food. Make sure you are getting adequate energy, protein, vitamins and minerals by eating a variety of healthy foods, including vegetables, meat, beans, nuts, pasteurized dairy and fruit.

>Read What to eat when pregnant

How your baby is growing

This period is the most crucial to your baby’s development. During the first trimester, your baby’s internal systems and body are beginning to take shape. These early organ and bodily developments include:

  • Brain and spine
  • Inner ear
  • Cardiac tissue
  • Genitals
  • Fingernails
  • Liver
  • Eyelids
  • Pancreas
  • Kidneys
  • Cartilage for the hands, feet and limbs
  • Muscles of the mouth, eyes and nose
  • Webbed fingers and toes
  • Lungs

Fetal growth can vary significantly for a number of reasons, but during the first trimester, your baby will grow from about cm ( in) at the end of the first month (smaller than a grain of rice) to around 10 cm (4 in) by the end of week 12 and will weigh around 28 g (1 oz) [Figures from the Cleveland Clinic]. For information for your country, please refer to your ministry of health.

When should I meet with my health-care provider?

You should schedule at least one appointment with your health-care provider during your first 12 weeks of pregnancy, ideally as early as possible. For recommendations in your country, please check with your ministry of health or health provider.

Things to look out for

While all women experience pregnancy differently, you should speak to your health-care provider if you experience:

  • Severe cramping
  • A fever over 38° C (° F)
  • Odorous vaginal discharge
  • Painful urination
  • Vaginal bleeding
  • Severe vomiting
Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Pregnant women 1st trimester -

What to Eat When You're Pregnant: First Trimester

Welcome to the first trimester of pregnancy, complete with morning sickness, exhaustion, breast pain and all the carbs. Before you even see a positive test, your body is already changing. And, even though it's an exciting time for most expecting moms, the physical symptoms can be a real drag. We break down what is actually going on in your body during those first 13 weeks, which nutrients to load up on, and what to do if you feel sick from sunup to sundown.

Don't Miss:What to Eat and Avoid When You're Pregnant

What's Going On in Your Body

Before you even get pregnant, you can (and should) prepare your body to grow a healthy baby. Folic acid is the most important nutrient to have on your radar even before conception. "Folic acid is an important vitamin that helps prevent neural tube defects. Women need to take at least mcg of folic acid daily starting at least one month prior to conception and throughout the duration of the pregnancy. Most prenatal vitamins include mcg of folic acid, but always look at the label when choosing a vitamin or supplement to be certain," said Sara Tingle, N.P.-C, a family nurse practitioner in Athens, Georgia.

Folic acid can be obtained through a variety of foods, such as beans, lentils, fortified cereals and dark leafy greens, but you should still take a prenatal vitamin to make sure you're getting adequate amounts.

Once you see that plus sign, you are already about four weeks pregnant, since pregnancy dating is counted from the first day of your last period. The first trimester includes the first 13 weeks. "Physically, the body is experiencing a surge in pregnancy hormones, specifically estrogen and progesterone, which can cause feelings of nausea and morning sickness," said Crystal Karges, M.S., R.D.N., a San Diego-based private practice dietitian and lactation consultant. Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is also on the rise. This hormone is the one detected on your at-home pregnancy test, and some believe it is responsible for nausea and frequent urination.

Progesterone slows down muscle movement in the body, which can lead to constipation for some women. You may also experience light bleeding as the embryo implants in the uterus, but it is nothing to worry about unless bleeding is severe, in which case you should contact your doctor. Also, expect very sore breasts. Your body is already ramping up for milk production.

There is a lot going on during these first 13 weeks. In fact, by the end of the first trimester, your baby will weigh one ounce and have arms and legs. Fingernails, toenails and reproductive organs will also start to form. It's no wonder you are tired.

Important Nutrients

Peanut Butter & Jelly Smoothie

Recipe to Try:Peanut Butter & Jelly Smoothie

Folic acid: Found in beans, citrus fruits, green leafy vegetables and your prenatal vitamin.

Calcium: Found in dairy (milk, yogurt and cheese) and dark leafy greens.

Iron: Found in meat, poultry, seafood, beans and greens.

Choline: Found in red meat and eggs.

Vitamin B Found in meat, poultry, seafood, as well as fortified breads and cereals.

Omega-3 fatty acids: Found in fatty fish, chia seeds, flax seeds and fortifed foods.

Pregnant or not, food is your fuel, and that fuel is extremely important as you grow a human being inside of you. The baby eats what you eat, and the baby needs vitamins and minerals to support growth of its tiny brain and bones. Specifically, "Nutrients needed during the first trimester to support a healthy pregnancy include calcium (about 1, mg/day), folate ( mcg/day), and iron (27 mg/day)," said Karges. "These increased nutrient needs can typically be met by eating a diet that offers a wide variety of healthy foods and supplementing with a prenatal vitamin."

"Because your baby's nervous system is starting to develop, it is also important to get adequate amounts of choline, B12 and omega-3 fatty acids," said Ingrid Anderson, R.D.N., founder of Results Dietetics. "Sources of these nutrients include eggs, salmon and walnuts."

Although your body is hard at work, you do not need any extra calories until the second trimester. However, it is normal to gain 3 to 5 pounds in the first trimester due to increased blood and fluid volume.

Don't Miss:27 Pregnancy Power Foods to Eat More Of

When You Can't Stomach Vegetables

Recipe to Try: Raspberry-Peach-Mango Smoothie Bowl

Morning sickness is common for many women during the first trimester. News flash: it doesn't just happen in the morning. You can feel nauseous at any time of day, and anything can trigger it. Food aversions are also common and can be related to nausea. "Helpful tips for managing nausea include avoiding an empty stomach, eating a smaller amount of food more frequently, eating lower-fat foods, and drinking plenty of fluids," said Lindsey Janeiro, R.D.N., C.L.C., dietitian and owner of Nutrition to Fit. "Eating foods that are easier for the body to digest can also help with nausea, such as rice, applesauce, fresh fruit, multigrain crackers/bread, clear-based broths and soups, potatoes, yogurt and dry, bland multigrain cereals," said Karges. Also: "Vitamin B6 has been shown to ease nausea," according to Anderson. But check with your doctor before adding any supplements.

Many women can't stand the thought of a fruit or vegetable and just want comfort food during the first trimester. If this sounds like you, "try incorporating some health into the foods you are craving," said Anderson. "For example: if you are craving french fries, try cutting sweet potatoes into sticks, drizzling oil and sprinkling salt on them and baking them in the oven until they are crispy. Or if ice cream is more your thing, try blending a frozen banana with a small amount of milk to create an ice-cream-like texture and taste." Your diet doesn't have to be perfect during pregnancy. When you are feeling good, seize the opportunity to eat your fruits and vegetables. When you aren't feeling so great, reach for the comfort food.

Overall, "it's important to eat foods that you can tolerate and that feel good in your body," Karges said. Do the best you can. "Sometimes that means having a salad with that pizza you're craving, and sometimes that means simply eating whatever you can keep down," said Janeiro. If nausea or food aversions persist for a long time and you feel your baby is not getting adequate nutrients, be sure to talk to your doctor.

Foods That Help with Nausea:

&#x; Cold foods: yogurt, smoothies, frozen fruit

&#x; Ginger

&#x; Peppermint

&#x; Lemon

&#x; Bland foods

Exercise During the First Trimester

Rumor has it that you should cut back on exercise during pregnancy, but this is not true. You can continue anything you were doing before, as long as you listen to your body and stop if you start to feel light-headed, dizzy or shaky. In fact, exercise is beneficial for mama and baby. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that pregnant women exercise 20 to 30 minutes every day with a mix of cardio and strength. Exercising during pregnancy can prevent excessive weight gain, reduce risk of gestational diabetes, decrease likelihood of a C-section and improve postpartum recovery time. Take advantage of the times you are feeling good and get moving, but don't stress if you can't work out every day. Rest is equally important.

Related:What Cramping During Your First Trimester May Mean

Exercises To Try:

&#x; Walking

&#x; Swimming

&#x; Strength training

&#x; Stationary biking

&#x; Yoga

&#x; Pilates

Watch: How to Make a Healthy Smoothie Bowl

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Pregnancy trimesters: A guide

A full-term pregnancy has three trimesters and lasts around 40 weeks — starting from the first day of the last menstrual period. In each trimester, the fetus meets specific developmental milestones.

While 40 weeks is the usual time frame, a full-term baby can be born as early as 37 weeks and as late as 42 weeks.

The defines the three trimesters as follows, though the timing can vary:

  • first trimester: 1–12 weeks
  • second trimester: 13–28 weeks
  • third trimester: 29–40 weeks

Some people also talk about a fourth trimester, which is the 3-month transitional period after delivery.

Read on for more information about what to expect during each pregnancy trimester.

Pregnancy trimester infographic


Image credit: Stephen Kelly,

The first trimester

The first trimester is the first of the pregnancy, and it is a crucial time for fetal development.

The fetus

At conception, the egg and sperm combine to form a zygote, which implants in the wall of the uterus. The zygote becomes an embryo as its cells divide and grow.

By the end of the first :

  • All the body’s major organs and structures have begun to develop.
  • The heart is beating regularly.
  • Fingers and toes have formed.
  • The fetus is around 3 inches (in) long and weighs nearly 1 ounce.
  • The nerves and muscles work together, and the fetus can make a fist.
  • The eyelids have formed and will remain closed until around week 28, to protect the eyes.

The pregnant person

A person also experiences many changes during their first trimester of pregnancy.

These :

  • fatigue
  • tender, swollen breasts
  • mood changes
  • cravings for certain foods
  • headaches
  • indigestion
  • a need to urinate more often
  • weight changes
  • constipation
  • nausea, sometimes with vomiting, known as morning sickness

Morning sickness can last throughout the first trimester and sometimes beyond. Despite its name, it does not occur only in the morning.

The second trimester

Weeks are the second trimester. The fetus goes through many changes during this time, growing to be around 1 foot long and weighing pounds.

The fetus

By the end of the second trimester, the following will have happened:

  • Meconium, the first bowel movement, has developed in the intestines.
  • The fetus can see, hear, make a sucking motion, and scratch itself.
  • Skin, hair, and nails have formed.
  • The lungs have formed but do not yet work.
  • The fetus is sleeping and waking regularly.
  • A male’s testicles will have moved to the scrotum, and a female’s eggs will have formed in the ovaries.
  • Taste buds have formed.
  • Bone marrow is making blood cells.
  • Lanugo, which is fine hair, covers the body.

The pregnant person

Many people feel more comfortable during the second trimester of pregnancy. Morning sickness and fatigue often reduce or disappear.

Meanwhile, new changes take place:

  • The abdomen expands as the fetus grows.
  • Stretch marks may appear on the abdomen, thighs, breasts, and buttocks.
  • The areola, the skin around the nipples, becomes darker.
  • The skin on the face and may darken in patches.
  • The ankles, fingers, and face may swell.
  • Itching may occur. If it happens with vomiting or yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, known as jaundice, seek medical advice.

It becomes possible to feel the baby’s movements as this trimester progresses.

The third trimester

The third trimester lasts from until delivery, which is usually around week

The fetus

Most organs and body systems have formed by now, and they will continue to grow and mature.

During this trimester:

  • The bones are hardening.
  • Movements become more noticeable.
  • The eyes are open and can sense light.
  • Lung formation becomes complete.
  • Lanugo falls away, and a waxy coating, called vernix, develops.

Toward delivery, the fetus drops lower in the person’s abdomen and usually turns head-down.

The pregnant person

The growth of the fetus can cause new discomfort at this time.

A person might also experience:

It is also normal to feel anxiety about the delivery and parenthood toward the end of a pregnancy.

The fourth trimester: Postpartum

The 3 months after delivery play a key role in the health of the person and their baby. Some people call this transitional period a fourth trimester.

While this can be an exciting time, the range of hormonal and environmental changes can pose challenges.

These challenges might :

  • recovering after delivery, especially if there are stitches
  • dealing with lochia, a discharge of blood and tissue, which may continue for several weeks
  • cramping, which may feel like menstrual cramping, especially during breastfeeding
  • adjusting to a new role of parenthood
  • learning new skills
  • having sore breasts and other difficulties related to breastfeeding
  • having fatigue, due to a loss of sleep and other factors
  • in some cases, experiencing postpartum depression

Some tips for managing include:

  • limiting visitors, if this helps
  • asking others for help
  • reducing housekeeping duties
  • resting when the baby does
  • eating regularly, as far as possible
  • raising any concerns about the baby, breastfeeding, or personal health
  • attending all followup appointments

Anyone who a persistent low mood, feelings of guilt or inadequacy, or thoughts of harming themselves or the baby should seek immediate medical care and guidance. These can be signs of postpartum depression.

Summary

Pregnancy, childbirth, and the first few months with a newborn are unlike any other time in life. They are full of new experiences, great uncertainty, upheavals, and many new emotions.

Getting regular prenatal care is vital during each trimester. A doctor can help ensure that the fetus is meeting their developmental milestones and that the pregnant person is in good health. They can also provide guidance and resources for support.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

First Trimester Pregnancy Tips

Pregnancy Fatigue

In the first trimester, your body produces a lot of progesterone, which acts as a sedative. Combine that with the fact that your body’s working to increase your blood supply—your pulse quickens by 10–15 beats per minute—and it’s no surprise you’re tired. You’ve got a lot going on! Don’t worry, once the baby's placenta is formed by the end of your third month, you should have more energy.

Tips for Dealing with Pregnancy Fatigue:

  • Rest as much as possible
  • Drink enough water and snack nutritiously if you sleep through mealtime
  • Try to exercise for energy boosts, but check with your doctor before beginning any new exercise program

First Trimester Nausea

Morning sickness isn’t just for mornings—lucky you! The queasiness stems from a rise in your estrogen level and affects 50–90% of expectant moms.

Tips for Dealing with First Trimester Nausea: 

  • Keep something in your stomach at all times—even if eating is the last thing you want to do. Crackers, cereal, ginger tea, or fruit can all help settle your stomach
  • Avoid greasy foods and foods with strong flavors or smells
  • If you're vomiting, remember to rehydrate with fluids
  • Call your doctor if the nausea and vomiting become severe, especially if you’re unable to keep food or fluids inside of you over 4–6 hours

Frequent Urination

As your uterus increases in size, it puts more pressure on your bladder.

Tips for Dealing with Frequent Urination in the First Trimester: 

  • Stop drinking fluids a few hours before bedtime
  • Reduce bladder irritants such as carbonated beverages, citrus, and caffeine

First Trimester Constipation

These first trimester issues are caused by the hormones your body uses during pregnancy, which are also slowing down your intestinal tract.

Tips for Easing First Trimester Constipation: 

  • Drink plenty of water and eat high-fiber foods
  • Exercise can help your body stay energized and regular. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any new exercise program

Breast Tenderness

Blame it on the hormone surge. Again.

Tips for Easing Breast Tenderness in the First Trimester:

  • Wear a support or athletic bra, even at night if necessary.
  • Make sure you change your bra size as needed. Women often change bra sizes multiple times throughout their pregnancy

First Trimester Headaches and Dizziness

Your increased blood supply and soaring hormone levels can cause headaches and light-headedness during the first few months of pregnancy. As your body gets used to the hormone levels, the headaches should subside. In the meantime, follow some of these first trimester pregnancy tips to get relief.

Tips for Easing Headaches and Dizziness in the First Trimester:

  • For sinus headaches, apply a warm compress to the front and sides of your face or forehead
  • For tension headaches, try a cold compress on the back of your neck
  • Try to relax, and be sure to snack throughout the day to keep your blood sugar levels steady
  • Ask your doctor about baby-friendly medications for headache relief, such as Tylenol

Hopefully, these first trimester pregnancy tips will help bring you some comfort and make this time more exciting than symptom-laden. Find out which issues will dissipate in your second trimester.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Just in Time Parenting

For most couples, sex is an important, special part of their relationship. Having sex will not hurt your baby, unless you have been told otherwise by your doctor.

During pregnancy, there are usually changes in your interest in having sex and the pleasure you and your partner get from sex. Nausea, fatigue, vomiting, changes in body shape, and fear of hurting the baby are all things that affect how couples feel about sex during pregnancy.

Some partners might feel jealous because the mother-to-be is getting a lot of attention. These feelings may affect your partner’s sexual interest. You should talk openly and honestly with each other about these feelings.

Remember to keep the lines of communication open about your sex life, as well as other issues. Talking it out can solve problems and bring you closer emotionally. If you have questions or concerns, discuss them with your doctor. Your doctor will be able to give you advice and tell you if there are any medical reasons not to have sex during your pregnancy.


Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Changes in Your Body During Pregnancy: First Trimester

Path to well being

How do I know I’m pregnant?

A missed period is often the first sign of pregnancy. You may have some other physical signs as well. These include mild cramping and a little bleeding when the fertilized egg implants itself in your uterus.

If you’ve missed your period and think you may be pregnant, you can take a home pregnancy test. These tests are very accurate if you take them a few days after you expected to get your period. Call your doctor if the test is positive.

Why do I feel so tired?

Feeling very tired is another common symptom of early pregnancy. Your body is working hard to adjust to all the new physical changes. This can cause extreme fatigue. You may need to sleep longer than usual at night. If possible, you can take short naps during the day. Your energy will most likely return in the second trimester of pregnancy.

What is morning sickness?

Morning sickness consists of nausea and vomiting. It is caused by pregnancy hormones. Many pregnant people have it to some degree in their first trimester. Despite what it sounds, morning sickness can occur at any time of day. Certain foods or smells might make you feel sick and sometimes vomit. Some people seem to feel sicker when their stomachs are empty. Morning sickness usually goes away by the second trimester.

There are over-the-counter vitamins and herbal supplements that may help with morning sickness. Taking vitamin B6 may help with nausea, even though it may not prevent vomiting. Ginger supplements also may relieve nausea.

What other changes can I expect during the first trimester?

Frequent urination. Towards the end of the first trimester, you will feel like urinating more often. This is because your growing uterus pushes on your bladder. You may even leak a little urine when you cough or sneeze.

Lightheadedness. Your body is working overtime to make extra blood to support your baby. This can cause you to feel dizzy or lightheaded. Hunger, weakness, or stress can cause these symptoms as well.

Heartburn. The muscles that break down food become more relaxed during pregnancy. Hormone changes also slow down this process. Food also stays in your stomach longer to give your body more time to absorb nutrients. All these things can cause or worsen heartburn.

Constipation. You should be taking a daily prenatal vitamin that contains iron. The iron in the vitamin can lead to constipation. The slow process of breaking down food also can cause constipation, gas, and bloating. Your doctor may suggest taking fiber supplements or a stool softener to provide relief. Make sure you drink plenty of water (about eight glasses per day). Tell your doctor if you have severe problems. They may switch you to a different prenatal vitamin.

Visible veins. Your body makes extra blood and your heart pumps faster to meet the needs of pregnancy. This can cause the blue veins in your belly, breasts, and legs to become more noticeable. You may develop spider veins on your face, neck, or arms. These are tiny blood vessels that branch out from a central area, like the legs of a spider.

Skin changes. You may notice that your skin looks more rosy and shiny. Some people call this a “pregnancy glow.” It is caused by increased blood circulation. Pregnancy hormones can cause extra oil on your skin. It may cause you to have flares of acne.

Breast changes. Most people notice changes in their breasts early in pregnancy. The hormones in your body change to prepare for breastfeeding. As this occurs, your breasts may feel tender and swollen. You might notice small bumps forming in the area around your nipples. Your breasts will continue to grow and change throughout your pregnancy. They may feel even bigger and fuller later on.

Vaginal changes. The lining of your vagina will become thicker and less sensitive. You may notice a thin, white discharge. This is normal during pregnancy. Mild vaginal bleeding (spotting) is also normal and common. However, you should call your doctor if you have vaginal bleeding. If the bleeding is heavy or painful, go to the emergency room.

A growing belly. Your waistline will begin to expand as your baby and uterus grow larger. Depending on your size before pregnancy, you may not notice this change until the second trimester. It is normal to gain no or little weight in your first trimester.

Emotional symptoms. Your hormones are on overload during pregnancy. You might feel moody, forgetful, or unable to focus. Fatigue and stress can increase these symptoms.

Things to consider

Keep in mind that each pregnancy experience is unique. Even the same person may have different changes in their multiple pregnancies. For each change, your symptoms may be mild or severe. Do not worry if the changes do not happen at a certain time. Talk to your doctor if you have any concerns.

When to see your doctor

Contact your doctor if you think or know you are pregnant. They will make an appointment to confirm your pregnancy and talk to you about prenatal care.

You should also contact your doctor if your morning sickness and vomiting are severe enough to cause weight loss.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • Am I pregnant?
  • How far along am I in my pregnancy?
  • What kinds of physical and emotional changes should I expect?
  • Are my symptoms normal?
  • Are there any risks that I should be aware of?
  • Which prenatal vitamin do you recommend I take?

Resources

American Academy of Family Physicians: Taking Care of You and Your Baby While You’re Pregnant

Источник: mynewextsetup.us
pregnant women 1st trimester

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