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barrier island outer banks

North Carolina Construction at its Best Barrier Island Investments represents the newest division at The Rosewell Group, Inc. where the focus is on. Many barrier islands are found off the U.S. Gulf and East coasts, such as the Outer Banks off North Carolina. Barrier island chains tend to form near river. Many barrier islands have been developed into popular tourist destinations, including North Carolina's Outer Banks and South Carolina's.
barrier island outer banks

Barrier island outer banks -

NCpedia". mynewextsetup.us. Retrieved
  • ^"Outer Banks Map". mynewextsetup.us. Retrieved 10 April
  • ^"Outer Banks

    North Carolina's islands: the beauty of the Outer Banks

    There is no horizon: only the odd hint indicates what is water and what is sky. A dolphin shows its back, just for a second. A pair of oystercatchers draw two cursive Ms against the blue. Otherwise, the water of the Pamlico Sound is so still, and the silence so complete, it’s a disembodying experience. Slick cam, they call it.

    From his kayak, Bob Chestnut could reach down into the shallows and pluck out any number of treasures. Through the water he can see the dark ragged outline of oyster clusters, a shimmering of scallop shells and mussels pre-opened by the birds. In the summer, families come out here with long rakes to dig for clams.

    North Carolina map.

    The Outer Banks – a narrow chain of barrier islands off the east coast of the US that separates the Atlantic from the mainland – are no secret to Southerners. Their mile stretch of beach, running from Corolla in the north to Cape Lookout in the south, is a vacation magnet for families and spring breakers alike, as well as a pilgrimage for sporting types who can kite surf or land big game fish in the warm Gulf Stream waters. And while the Banks can claim no town with a population larger than 3,, they still have a rich human history, inhabited by the Roanoke and Croatan people until the arrival of English settlers in the s – not to mention the site of the Wright Brothers’ first powered flight.

    It’s not always this quiet in Ocracoke. The weather can be rough – Hurricane Florence blew in last year. And just because the North Carolinan island is hard to get to – three hours’ drive from Raleigh, followed by an hour’s ferry ride – it doesn’t mean people don’t try. A new passenger ferry from Cape Hatteras has recently been announced, because the queue for cars can be up to three hours in summer. But the locals don’t resent the visitors, says Chestnut. “The people we get tend to be the people who appreciate it.”

    Roanoke island boasts the quaint and well-heeled town of Manteo, complete with a yachting marina and Elizabethan garden. Across the Oregon Inlet – by way of a couple of epic bridges – are Nags Head, Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills, seaside towns with connecting shorelines stacked with stilted beach houses.

    Keep driving south to Hatteras island, across the newly constructed Bonner bridge, and you are rewarded with 70 miles of protected seashore. With the blessing of the islanders, the Hatteras shoreline was designated a national park in the s and today its meeting of beach, marshland and maritime forest is a haven for wading birds, water mammals and more. “I’m anti-regulation in general,” says Chestnut, candidly. “But we have a better relationship with the park service than most.” Which is why on Hatteras and Ocracoke you are free to drive your 4WD vehicles across the golden sands, knowing that the nesting turtle population is well protected. And why while some come here to spot seals and harbour porpoises and snowy owls, others come to shoot ducks, or go flounder gigging – spearing flatfish in the shallow waters, a skill learned from the Native Americans who once used this place as a hunting ground.

    The islanders of the Outer Banks have always treasured their freedom. The waters surrounding them – known as the graveyard of the Atlantic, because their ever-shifting shoals are so perilous to shipping – were once a hideout for pirates and privateers. Edward Teach, aka Blackbeard, was killed (and then beheaded) while at anchor on Ocracoke. The island’s brewery – which makes an unexpectedly tasty oyster stout from the local catch – is named , after the year of his capture.

    Still accessible only by boat – from Hatteras to the north, or Cedar Island to the west – Ocracoke’s past has been preserved by its remoteness. “Nobody stumbles across Ocracoke,” says Chester Lynn, whose ancestors have been here for 10 generations. “I can remember the days when you had to take three ferries to get to the mainland.” Lynn sells antiques out of every room of his single-storey family home and, as one of the older residents, still speaks with the brogue that is part of the island’s Elizabethan legacy – an accent closer to northern England than the American South.

    The community spirit, too, has been preserved. In the cafes and restaurants regulars talk across tables, sharing stories of their day and asking after friends. The buildings themselves are a glimpse of the island’s s heyday, when it was a thriving fishing community and pilot town, helping trading ships to transfer their goods across the treacherous sounds on lighters.

    Back then, “Jack’s store” was the place locals gathered to collect their mail and their gossip; that it’s still standing is no surprise. Make-good-and-mend is central to the island culture. Among the quirkiest results of that attitude are the tiny, walled cemetery plots where the island’s chief families have buried their relatives.

    “The problem has always been that the water table is so high it was hard to keep people buried,” says Amy Howard, who runs the Village Craftsmen store. “A good flood could pop up a casket.” Her family traces itself back to William Howard, Blackbeard’s quartermaster. “Luckily for him he was in jail in Virginia when the big battle happened, and he got a pardon,” she says.

    Some locals claim to have seen phantom pirates out at Springer’s Point, the site of Blackbeard’s last battle; but visitors can have their own haunting experience with a boat ride to Portsmouth island, just a couple of miles away. Abandoned by humans in the s, it is now a compellingly eerie ghost village, and tour guides like Wade Austin – whose father was a ferry captain – still have living memories of Henry Pigott and Marian Babb, the last man and woman to live there.

    Austin has travelled the world, but nothing would tempt him from Ocracoke. “I’m not much of the city to begin with. I saw the world, and I came back. It’s what most people here do.”

    Essentials

    Emma John’s trip was provided by Visit North Carolina (mynewextsetup.us). She flew to Raleigh and stayed at Mayton Inn, Cary (double room from £, mynewextsetup.us) and the Cove B&B, Ocracoke (double room from £75, mynewextsetup.us). Bob Chestnut offers kayak tours from $39pp (mynewextsetup.us). Wade Austin’s Portsmouth Island Boat Tours cost $20pp (mynewextsetup.us). For more information, go to mynewextsetup.us

    Wayfaring Stranger: a Musical Journey in the American South by Emma John is published by W&N (£). Order a copy for £ at mynewextsetup.us

    Looking for a holiday with a difference? Browse Guardian Holidays to see a range of fantastic trips

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us
    island chain, United States". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved
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  • ^Wolfram, Walt; Reaser, Jeffrey (). Talkin' Tar Heel&#;: How Our Voices Tell the Story of North Carolina. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press. p.&#; ISBN&#;.
  • ^"First Settlers". mynewextsetup.us.
  • ^"Graveyard of the Atlantic - North Carolina Digital History". Retrieved 1 April
  • ^D. Moore. () "A General History of Blackbeard the Pirate, the Queen Anne's Revenge and the Adventure". In Tributaries, Volume VII, pp. 31– (North Carolina Maritime History Council)
  • ^ abcde"Gloucester vs. Outer Banks". National Geographic Channel. Retrieved 1 April
  • ^"Outer Banks Fishing". The Outer Banks of North Carolina. Retrieved 21 January
  • ^"Outer Banks Lighthouses". mynewextsetup.us.
  • ^DraftExpress - George Ackles
  • ^Emanuel Davis retires from CFL. mynewextsetup.us. Retrieved Aug 3,
  • ^Vincent, Mal (February 17, ). "The real Andy Griffith lives among us, quietly". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved September 20,
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  • ^Speckman, Emma. (Mar 6, ). Get inside the mind (and studio) of one of NC’s most prolific creators, costume designer William Ivey Long. Charlotte Five. Retrieved Aug 3,
  • External links[edit]

    Media related to Outer Banks at Wikimedia Commons Outer Banks travel guide from Wikivoyage

    Coordinates: 35°22′25″N75°29′43″W / °N °W / ;

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    Outer Banks

    Starkweather, Sarah. "Outer Banks 4 - Roanoke Island" Online at FlickrThe Outer Banks are a chain of barrier islands that skirt the coast of North Carolina from the Virginia border to Cape Lookout through Currituck, Dare, Hyde, and Carteret Counties. More than miles long, they are separated as much as 30 miles from the mainland by a series of shallow sounds. Pamlico Sound, the largest sound on the East Coast of the United States (and some say the world's largest), is 80 miles long and 15 to 30 miles wide. It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a part of the Outer Banks and drains into the Atlantic Ocean through Hatteras and Ocracoke Inlets. Albemarle Sound, the second largest (some 50 miles long and 5 to 14 miles wide), was named after George Monck, duke of Albemarle, one of the Lords Proprietors of the Carolina colony. The state's first permanent settlements were made along its northern shore. Other North Carolina sounds include Core Sound, Croatan Sound, Currituck Sound, and Roanoke Sound.

    The topography of the Outer Banks is constantly changing, as inlets open and close and beaches narrow and widen. Windswept and remote, the islands were sparsely populated until the paving of roads, the construction of bridges such as the Herbert Bonner Bridge in the s, and the institution of large-scale ferry service between Ocracoke and the mainland and Ocracoke and Hatteras islands. Once largely uninhabited except for small villages, the Outer Banks are now a popular tourist destination and the permanent home of increasing numbers of residents.

    The first inhabitants of the Outer Banks were Native Americans. Many place names, such as Hatteras, Ocracoke, Kinnakeet, Chicamacomico, Manteo, and Wanchese, bear testimony to these early residents. Native Americans on Hatteras Island befriended explorers Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe in their reconnaissance mission for Sir Walter Raleigh. Conflicts with Europeans, combined most likely with disease, led to the virtual disappearance of Native American tribes on the Outer Banks by the seventeenth century.

    During the colonial period, European settlement on most of the Outer Banks was sparse. After the English failed to establish a permanent settlement at Roanoke Island in the s, few Europeans showed interest in the Outer Banks for the next century and more. In the eighteenth century, probably the most strategic and most heavily populated area of the Outer Banks centered around the islands of Ocracoke and Portsmouth, where colonial shipping found entrance into the southern Pamlico Sound and on to coastal towns like Bath. The inlets and isolation made the Banks attractive to pirates and smugglers; famed pirate Blackbeard (Edward Teach) met his death in the sound waters off Ocracoke, one of his bases of operation. The importance of this part of the Outer Banks to shipping and travel can be seen later as well, in the construction during the early national period of the Ocracoke Lighthouse, operational in

    During the nineteenth century, the Outer Banks remained remote, physically and culturally isolated from mainland North Carolina. Generally removed from the mainstream, Outer Bankers lived a subsistence lifestyle that combined fishing, the salvaging of shipwrecks, piloting of vessels through inlets, and waterfowl hunting. A distinctive English dialect, called the Ocracoke brogue-featuring the unusual pronunciation of the vowel "i" as "oy," leading to the nickname "Hoi Toiders" for those who speak it-developed and remains as a reminder of the remoteness of past Outer Banks communities. Among the affluent planters of the Albemarle, the custom evolved of vacationing in summer at locations such as Nags Head. Nevertheless, the islands remained largely untouched by outside influences.

    During the Civil War, occupation of the various inlets along the Outer Banks made the remote islands strategically important to both the Confederacy and the Union. The latter succeeded in occupying the islands throughout most of the war.

    Changes in technology, transportation, and economy began to affect the Outer Banks in the late nineteenth century. The construction of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal by connected the upper banks with the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. After the Civil War, the canal became integral in the development of new economies on the Outer Banks. A shift from subsistence living to commercial fishing and oystering occurred, as the lives of people on the Outer Banks became intertwined with regional and national market needs and trends. The increasing presence of summer visitors at places such as Nags Head and the arrival of sport waterfowl hunters each fall along the length of the Outer Banks also marked the latter part of the nineteenth century.

    In the early twentieth century, the Outer Banks began to feel the pull of mainstream life, and their windswept beaches and dunes earned them a place in history. From January to August , Reginald A. Fessenden succeeded in sending wireless messages from a tower on Roanoke Island to Cape Hatteras and to Cape Henry, Va. He also received musical notes transmitted from Cape Hatteras. On 17 Dec. , Wilbur and Orville Wright flew an experimental motor-driven airplane for 12 seconds at Kitty Hawk, changing transportation forever. Two world wars brought submarine warfare to the coast of the Outer Banks, especially in the waters off Hatteras Island.

    The advent of the affordable automobile combined with the paving of roads, especially U.S. 12 on Bodie, Hatteras, and Ocracoke Islands, began to transform the Outer Banks in the s and s. Federal New Deal funds allowed for road paving and dune stabilization, and large tracts of land were designated in for the creation of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. This was followed just before World War II by the creation of the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    Although regions of the Outer Banks have remained among the least developed stretches of seashore on the Atlantic coast of the United States, increasing tourism and contact with the outside world has led to tremendous development in the area. Approximately 7 million visitors from around the world stay for short or extended periods in the Outer Banks, enjoying ocean activities such as swimming, hang gliding, fishing, windsurfing, and bird watching as well as cultural activities. The Outer Banks History Center in Manteo has thousands of manuscripts, pamphlets, photographs, maps, paintings, and other items related to the history of the area. Population growth in the Outer Banks has been approximately double the North Carolina average. By the year-round population of the banks had increased to more than 45, people, creating great demand for new housing, particularly in the northern areas.

    References:

    John Alexander and James Lazell, Ribbon of Sand: The Amazing Convergence of the Ocean and the Outer Banks ().

    Rodney Barfield, Seasoned by Salt: A Historical Album of the Outer Banks ().

    Dirk Frankenberg, The Nature of the Outer Banks: Environmental Processes, Field Sites, and Development Issues, Corolla to Ocracoke ().

    Thomas J. Schoenbaum, Islands, Capes, and Sounds: The North Carolina Coast (repr., ).

    David Stick, The Outer Banks of North Carolina, ().

    Stick, An Outer Banks Reader ().

    Additional Resources:

    "With a quaintness born of history, the sister barrier islands," Our State, June  mynewextsetup.us

    Image credits:

    Starkweather, Sarah. "Outer Banks 4 - Roanoke Island." Online at Flickr at mynewextsetup.us Accessed 6/28/

     

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    The Best in Outer Banks Vacation Rentals

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    Barrier Island Stations condominiums vary from one to four bedrooms. Oceanfront condominiums offer stunning views of the Atlantic Ocean. (please see individual condo descriptions for view information). Not all Barrier Island Station condos are oceanfront, but all enjoy easy beach access and private balconies. Close to Duck restaurants and shopping, Barrier Island Station is conveniently located.

    Barrier Island Station offers fantastic community amenities for your family's enjoyment. The community complex includes an outdoor pool‚ snack bar, tennis courts‚ playground‚ and grilling area, and coordinated children's activities in-season. Relax inside one of the beach gazebos and listen to the sounds of the sea, or head to the waves for a fun in the sun!

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    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    Storm closes part of N.C. barrier island road to mainland

    RODANTHE, N.C. — A section of the only road linking Hatteras Island to North Carolina's mainland was closed Sunday due to ocean and sound flooding as a storm brought high winds and rains to the coast, authorities said.

    The state Department of Transportation said that N.C. Highway 12 was closed from Rodanthe north to the Marc Basnight Bridge at Oregon Inlet, about 13 miles.

    The morning high tide contributed to ocean overwash that breached dunes protecting the road, according to DOT. Conditions didn't immediately improve, and the department said later Sunday that the stretch could remain closed through Tuesday, since crews must clear the road and rebuild washed out dunes.

    Before the storm arrived Saturday, the DOT said that it had staged equipment near potential trouble spots.

    It's not uncommon for portions of N.C. 12 to be impassable during a hurricane or other significant storm.

    The weather service posted coastal flood and high wind warnings for the Outer Banks heading south to Ocracoke Island.

    Moderate to major coastal flooding also was expected into Monday on roads and coastal properties along the southern Pamlico Sound and lower Neuse River, the weather office said.

    Источник: mynewextsetup.us

    Outer Banks

    Barrier islands in North Carolina, U.S.

    For the TV series, see Outer Banks (TV series).

    The Outer Banks, separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Currituck and Albemarle Sounds (north) and Pamlico Sound (south)

    The Outer Banks (frequently abbreviated OBX) are a mile (&#;km) string of barrier islands and spits off the coast of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia, on the east coast of the United States. They line most of the North Carolina coastline, separating Currituck Sound, Albemarle Sound, and Pamlico Sound from the Atlantic Ocean. A major tourist destination, the Outer Banks are known for their wide expanse of open beachfront and the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.[1] The seashore and surrounding ecosystem are important biodiversity zones, including beach grasses and shrubland that help maintain the form of the land.

    The Outer Banks were sites of early European settlement in the United States and remain important economic and cultural sites. Most notably the English Roanoke Colony vanished from Roanoke Island in and was the first location where an English person, Virginia Dare, was born in the Americas.[2] The hundreds of shipwrecks along the Outer Banks have given the surrounding seas the nickname Graveyard of the Atlantic. The Outer Banks were also home to the Wright brothers' first flight in a controlled, powered, heavier-than-air vehicle on December 17, , at Kill Devil Hills.[3] During the 20th century the region became increasingly important for coastal tourism.

    The Outer Banks are particularly vulnerable to sea level rise and coastal erosion, compounding existing coastal erosion caused by poor coastal management and construction practices.[4] In some locations on the banks, sea levels rose 5 inches from to [4] Some sections have significantly eroded already, with portions of Hatteras Island at 25% of its original width as of [5]Tropical storms like Hurricane Irene in have already destroyed significant infrastructure and property.[5]

    Terminology[edit]

    The term "Outer Banks" refers to the islands, shoals, and spits from Cape Lookout northward, including Core Banks, and is frequently abbreviated OBX on regional tourism marketing. In recent decades, the beaches to the south of Cape Lookout have been marketing themselves as the "Southern Outer Banks", including the marketing as SOBX; this region includes the Crystal Coast beaches of Bogue Banks. The term Inner Banks and IBX is a similarly new term to refer to the mainland communities along Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.

    Geography[edit]

    The Outer Banks is a string of peninsulas and barrier islands separating the Atlantic Ocean from mainland North Carolina. From north to south, the largest of these include: Bodie Island (which used to be an island but is now a peninsula due to tropical storms and hurricanes that closed inlets that separated it from the Currituck Banks), Pea Island (which has, at times, been contiguous with neighboring Bodie Island or Hatteras Island), Hatteras Island, Ocracoke Island, Portsmouth Island, and the Core Banks.[6] Over time, the exact number of islands and inlets changes as new inlets are opened up, often during a breach created during violent storms, and older inlets close, usually due to gradually shifting sands during the dynamic processes of beach evolution.

    The Outer Banks stretch southward from Sandbridge in Virginia Beach down the North Carolina coastline. Sources differ regarding the southern terminus of the Outer Banks. The most extensive definition includes the state's three prominent capes: Cape Hatteras, Cape Lookout, and Cape Fear.[7][8] Other sources limit the definition to two capes (Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout) and coastal areas in four counties (Currituck County, Dare County, Hyde County, and Carteret County).[9] Some authors exclude Carteret's Bogue Banks; others exclude the county entirely.[9][10][11]

    The northern part of the Outer Banks, from Oregon Inlet northward, is actually a part of the North American mainland, since the northern inlets of Bodie Island and Currituck Banks no longer exist.[12] It is separated by the Currituck Sound and the Intracoastal Waterway, which passes through the Great Dismal Swamp occupying much of the mainland west of the Outer Banks. Road access to the northern Outer Banks is cut off between Sandbridge and Corolla, North Carolina, with communities such as Carova Beach accessible only by four-wheel drive vehicles. North Carolina State Highway 12 links most of the popular Outer Banks communities in this section of the coast. The easternmost point is Rodanthe Pier in Rodanthe, NC .

    Aerial view of Outer banks (looking north), with sound on the left and ocean on the right

    The Outer Banks are not anchored to offshore coral reefs like some other barrier islands, and as a consequence, they often suffer significant beach erosion during major storms. In fact, their location jutting out into the Atlantic makes them the most hurricane-prone area north of Florida, for both landfalling storms and brushing storms offshore. Hatteras Island was cut in half on September 18, , when Hurricane Isabel washed a 2, feet ( m) wide and 15 feet (5 m) deep channel called Isabel Inlet through the community of Hatteras Village on the southern end of the island.[13] The tear was subsequently repaired and restored by sand dredging by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It was cut off once again in by Hurricane Irene. Access to the island was largely limited to boat access only from August to late October until another temporary bridge could be built.

    Three state highway bridges connect the Outer Banks to the mainland, the Wright Memorial Bridge, the oldest (built in , rehabilitated in ), carries US between Point Harbor and Kitty Hawk. William B. Umstead Bridge, the second oldest (built in , rehabilitated in ), carries US 64 between Manns Harbor on the mainland and Manteo on Roanoke Island. The newest bridge, the Virginia Dare Memorial Bridge, was completed in and carries US 64 Bypass between Manns Harbor and Roanoke Island between Manteo and Wanchese. The Melvin R. Daniels Bridge carries US 64 between Roanoke Island and Nags Head. At Whalebone Junction, the three main highways of the Outer Banks (NC 12, US , and US 64) all meet. Additionally, NC serves as the main route along Knotts Island in the extreme north; it connects only to Virginia by land.

    A number of ferries maintained by the North Carolina Department of Transportation Ferry Division also serve the Outer Banks. From north to south, these are the Knotts Island-Currituck Ferry, the Hatteras-Ocracoke Ferry, the Swan Quarter-Ocracoke Ferry, and the Cedar Island-Ocracoke Ferry. Additionally, a semi-regular emergency ferry often runs from Stumpy Point to Rodanthe to serve travelers due to frequent wash-outs of NC 12 between Nags Head and Rodanthe. Additionally, private ferries are commissioned by the National Park Service to access certain islands within the National Seashores along the outer banks, these include ferries to Portsmouth Island, to Cape Lookout Lighthouse, and various locations along Core Banks and Shackleford Banks.

    Ecology[edit]

    Vegetation[edit]

    The vegetation of the Outer Banks has biodiversity, although it is considered the northern limit for many southern plants such as wild scrub palms. In the northern part of the Outer Banks, from Virginia Beach southward past the North Carolina border to Cape Hatteras, the main types of vegetation are sea grasses, beach grasses and other beach plants including Opuntia humifusa on the Atlantic side and wax myrtles, bays, and grasses on the Sound side with areas of pine and Spanish moss-covered live oaks. Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa can be found growing wild here in the northern parts of its range on the beach. Dwarf palmettos were once indigenous to the entire Outer Banks, and they are still successfully planted and grown. Its current most northerly known native stand is on Monkey Island in Currituck County.[14][15]

    From Cape Hatteras National Seashore southward, the vegetation does include dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor), Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa; however, the area also has Cabbage palmetto (Sabal palmetto), which can be found in the north, although they are native in the southern part of the Outer Banks, specifically prevalent from Cape Hatteras and all points southward. Pindo palms and windmill palms are also planted widely throughout the Outer Banks; although, they are not indigenous to the area.

    A wide variety of native plants can be found at the Elizabethan Gardens in Manteo on Roanoke Island.[16]

    The Outer Banks are home to Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria), the roasted leaves of which were brewed into a high caffeine beverage called black drink by the Native Americans. The Outer Banks may be one of the few places where it is still consumed.[17]

    Animal life[edit]

    The islands are home to herds of feral horses, sometimes called "banker ponies", which according to local legend are descended from Spanish mustangs washed ashore centuries ago in shipwrecks. Populations are found on Ocracoke Island, Shackleford Banks, Currituck Banks, and in the Rachel Carson Estuarine Sanctuary.

    Climate[edit]

    The Outer Banks has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa). The outer banks have unusual weather patterns because of their unique geographical location. As the islands jut out from the eastern seaboard into the Atlantic Gulf Stream, the Outer Banks has a predisposition to be affected by hurricanes, Nor'easters (usually in the form of rain, and rarely snow or mixed precipitation), and other ocean-driven storms. The hardiness zone is 8b.

    The winters are typically milder than in inland areas, averaging lows in the upper 30s and highs in the lower 50s, and are more frequently overcast than in the summer. However, the exposure of the Outer Banks makes them prone to higher winds, often causing wind chills to make the apparent temperature as cold as the inland areas. The summer months average lows from the mids to highs in the upper 80s, depending on the time of the summer. The spring and fall are typically milder seasons. The fall and winter are usually warmer than areas inland, while the spring and the summer are often slightly cooler because of the moderating effects of being surrounded by water.

    Although snow is possible, averaging from 3 inches in the north to less than 1/2 inch per year in the south, there are many times when years pass between snowfalls.[18] The majority of nor'easters are "born" off the coasts of the Outer Banks.

    History[edit]

    The Outer Banks is one of the most culturally distinctive areas of the East Coast of the United States.[19] The Outer Banks were inhabited before the arrival of Europeans, with small branches of larger tribes, such as the Algonquin speaking Chowanoke, Secotan and Poteskeet living semi-nomadic lives. Oftentimes Native Americans would use the barrier islands facing the Atlantic Ocean for fishing in the summer, and reside on Roanoke Island or the North Carolina mainland in the winter.

    European explorers to the Outer Banks as far back as the s noted encountering the friendly Hatteras Island and Outer Banks Natives, noting their hospitality to foreign explorers as well as their happiness and overall quality of life. European-borne diseases and migration to the mainland were likely the main causes for the decline of the Native population.[20]

    Before bridges were built in the s, the only form of transport between or off the islands was by boat, which allowed for the islands to stay isolated from much of the rest of the mainland. This helped to preserve the maritime culture and the distinctive Outer Banks accent or brogue, which sounds more like an English accent than it does an American accent. Many "bankers" have often been mistaken for being from England or Ireland when traveling to areas outside of the Outer Banks. The brogue is more distinctive the further south one travels on the Outer Banks, with it being the thickest on Ocracoke Island and Harkers Island.

    Some residents of the Outer Banks, known as wreckers, made part of their living by scavenging wrecked ships—or by luring ships to their destruction. Horses with lanterns tied to their necks would be walked along the beach; the lanterns' up and down motion would appear to ships to represent clear water and a ship ahead; the unsuspecting captain would then drive his ship ashore following this false light.[21]Ocracoke was the last refuge of pirate Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard. It is also where the infamous pirate was killed November 22, , in a fierce battle with troops from Virginia.[22]

    Economy[edit]

    Major industries of the region include commercial fishing, boat building and tourism. Since the s, the rise of tourism has led the region to become an increasingly service-oriented economy.

    Maritime industries[edit]

    There has been a long history of fishing in the Outer Banks, dating back to the end of the 17th century.[23]Pirates ravaged the coast for the majority of the s, but once they were ridden, the local settlers used fishing as their lifeline.[23]

    In the midth century, large-scale commercial fishing erupted, mostly due to the construction of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, which simplified shipping methods for fishermen.[23]Saltwater fishing became the cash-crop of the Outer Banks, and blossomed it into a popular tourist destination.[23] In modern times, tourists will flock to the area just for the abundance of fishing opportunities.[24] Anglers, otherwise known as fishermen, have a wide range of fishing methods, some of these methods date back to when the first settlers arrived, to choose from in the Outer Banks.[23]

    Lighthouses[edit]

    There are currently 6 lighthouses in the Outer Banks[25]

    • Currituck Beach Lighthouse, located in Corolla, North Carolina
    • Roanoake Marshes Lighthouse, located in Manteo, North Carolina
    • Bodie Island Lighthouse, located south of Nags Head, North Carolina
    • Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, located in Buxton, North Carolina
    • Ocracoke Island Lighthouse, located in Ocracoke, North Carolina
    • Cape Lookout Lighthouse, located in Carteret County, North Carolina

    Communities[edit]

    Towns and communities along the Outer Banks include (listed from north to south):

    Currituck Banks[edit]

    Bodie Island[edit]

    Sunset over the Currituck Sound in Duck ()
    The Bodie Island Lighthouse (October )

    Roanoke Island[edit]

    Hatteras Island[edit]

    Ocracoke Island[edit]

    Core Banks[edit]

    Bogue Banks[edit]

    Parks[edit]

    Jockey's Ridge State Park

    [edit]

    • George Ackles (born ), professional basketball player[26]
    • Dennis Anderson (born ), professional Monster Truck driver and creator of Grave Digger
    • Marc Basnight (–), former member of the North Carolina State Senate
    • Emanuel Davis (born ), Canadian Football League defensive back[27]
    • Andy Griffith (–), actor[28]
    • Cathy Johnston-Forbes (born ), professional golfer[29]
    • Alexis Knapp (born ), actress
    • William Ivey Long (born ), costume designer for stage and film[30]
    • Edward Teach (–), notorious English pirate better known as "Blackbeard," raided on the North Atlantic and Caribbean Sea
    • Manteo (disappeared after ) influential figure in the Croatoan Nation, ambassador to England and mediator
    • Wanchese (disappeared after ) influential figure in the Roanoke Nation, opposed English colonization

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^"Campgrounds". Retrieved 1 April
    2. ^"England's First Home in the New World". Fort Raleigh National Historic Site. National Park Service.
    3. ^"Telegram from Orville Wright in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, to His Father Announcing Four Successful Flights, December 17". World Digital Library. Retrieved
    4. ^ ab"How the Outer Banks are Vanishing — and Leaving NC Defenseless Against Hurricanes". Carolina Political Review. Retrieved
    5. ^ abPEACH, SARA (July 24, ). "Rising Seas: Will the Outer Banks Survive?". National Geographic.
    6. ^"Geography of North Carolina". NC State Board of Education.
    7. ^"Geography of North Carolina". mynewextsetup.us. Retrieved
    8. ^"Library of Congress LCCN Permalink sh". mynewextsetup.us. Retrieved
    9. ^ ab"North Carolina Gazetteer

      You can watch a thematic video

      Barrier Island Station - Kitty Hawk (#3679)

       The Changing Outer Banks

      Ask almost anyone in the country to describe North Carolina’s Outer Banks and they could probably name a few images easily — the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, the wild horses, wide strips of sandy beach, and the Wright Brothers monument.

      The Outer Banks are so ingrained into our collective national consciousness that people can visualize the coastal region without ever visiting it. The irony is that while images of the Outer Banks remain the same, the islands are constantly changing. Barrier island outer banks are supposed to.

      Barrier islands are designed to move in response to storms and rising sea levels. In fact, Dr. Stanly Riggs, a coastal geologist at East Carolina University, says about 20, years ago North Carolina’s Atlantic coastline was 15 to 40 miles east of the current coast. That’s because so much water was locked up in ice sheets that sea level was feet lower than it is today.

      Riggs estimates some form of barrier islands first appeared off the coast about 7, years ago, as the seas began to rise after most of that ice had melted. The islands moved naturally westward and, as sea level rise slowed, the current version of the famous Outer Banks’ barrier islands began forming about 2, years ago. 

      The movement is gradual. As storms slice through narrow, low-lying islands, the ocean water dumps sand on the western side of the islands. All the while, wind and waves constantly move sand across the island. As the ocean side erodes and the sound — or western side — grows, the islands move educational activities for kids at home. The islands slowly roll over themselves. Riggs suggests it’s similar to the image of a bulldozer tread.

      Not much changed for years, but now that scientists say the seas are rising again the islands should resume their gradual westward movement to respond to the change. The challenge facing the Outer Banks right now is that the natural movement isn’t happening. As people have built roads and homes and jetties and dunes on the islands, the natural movement of sand has stopped. The ocean side has kept eroding but the sound side isn’t growing. It means the Outer Banks are getting narrower and some areas could eventually disappear.

      — Frank Graff

      Frank Graff is a producer/reporter with UNC-TV, focusing on North Carolina Science Now, a weekly science series that airs Wednesdays, beginning in Augustas part of North Carolina Now on UNC-TV. In addition to producing these special segments, Frank will provide additional information related to his stories through this North Carolina Science Now Reporter's Blog!


      Related Resources:


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      Источник: mynewextsetup.us
      NCpedia". mynewextsetup.us. Retrieved
    10. ^"Outer Banks Map". mynewextsetup.us. Retrieved 10 April
    11. ^"Outer Banks

      Outer Banks

      Barrier islands in North Carolina, U.S.

      For the TV series, see Outer Banks (TV series).

      The Outer Banks, separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Currituck and Albemarle Sounds (north) and Pamlico Sound (south)

      The Outer Banks (frequently abbreviated OBX) are a mile (&#;km) string of barrier islands and spits off the coast of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia, on the east coast of the United States. They line most of the North Carolina coastline, separating Currituck Sound, Albemarle Sound, and Pamlico Sound from the Atlantic Ocean. A major tourist destination, the Outer Banks are known for their wide expanse of open beachfront and the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.[1] The seashore and surrounding ecosystem are important biodiversity zones, including beach grasses and shrubland that help maintain the form of the land.

      The Outer Banks were sites of early European settlement in the United States and remain important economic and cultural sites. Most notably the English Roanoke Colony vanished from Roanoke Island in and was the first location where an English person, Virginia Dare, was born in the Americas.[2] The hundreds of shipwrecks along the Outer Banks have given the surrounding seas the nickname Graveyard of the Atlantic. The Outer Banks were also home to the Wright brothers' first flight in a controlled, powered, heavier-than-air vehicle on December 17,at Kill Devil Hills.[3] During the 20th century the region became increasingly important for coastal tourism.

      The Outer Banks are particularly vulnerable to sea level rise and coastal erosion, compounding existing coastal erosion caused by poor coastal management and construction practices.[4] In some locations on the banks, sea levels rose 5 inches from to [4] Some sections have significantly eroded already, with portions of Hatteras Island at 25% of its original width as of [5]Tropical storms like Hurricane Irene in have already destroyed significant infrastructure and property.[5]

      Terminology[edit]

      The term "Outer Banks" refers to the islands, shoals, and spits from Cape Lookout northward, including Core Banks, and is frequently abbreviated OBX on regional tourism marketing. In recent decades, the beaches to the south of Cape Lookout have been marketing themselves as the "Southern Outer Banks", including the marketing as SOBX; this region includes the Crystal Coast beaches of Bogue Banks. The term Inner Banks and IBX is a similarly new term to refer to the mainland communities along Albemarle and Pamlico Barrier island outer banks.

      Geography[edit]

      The Outer Banks is a string of peninsulas and barrier islands separating the Atlantic Ocean from mainland North Carolina. From north to south, the largest of these include: Bodie Island (which used to be an island but is now a peninsula due to tropical storms and hurricanes that closed inlets that separated it from the Currituck Banks), Pea Island (which has, at times, been contiguous with neighboring Bodie Island or Hatteras Island), Hatteras Island, Ocracoke Island, Portsmouth Island, and the Core Banks.[6] Over time, the exact number of islands and inlets changes as new inlets are opened up, often during a breach created during violent storms, and older inlets close, usually due to gradually shifting sands during the dynamic processes of beach evolution.

      The Outer Banks stretch southward from Sandbridge in Virginia Beach down the North Carolina coastline. Sources differ regarding the southern terminus of the Outer Banks. The most extensive definition includes the state's three prominent capes: Cape Hatteras, Cape Lookout, and Cape Fear.[7][8] Other sources limit the definition to two capes (Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout) and coastal areas in four counties (Currituck County, Dare County, Hyde County, and Carteret County).[9] Some authors exclude Carteret's Bogue Banks; others exclude the county entirely.[9][10][11]

      The northern part of the Outer Banks, from Oregon Inlet northward, is actually a part of the North American mainland, since the northern inlets of Bodie Island and Currituck Banks no longer exist.[12] It is separated by the Currituck Sound and the Intracoastal Waterway, which passes through the Great Dismal Swamp occupying much of the mainland west of the Outer Banks. Road access to the northern Outer Banks is cut off between Sandbridge and Corolla, North Carolina, with communities such as Carova Beach accessible only by four-wheel jose feliciano 2019 vehicles. North Carolina State Highway 12 links most of the popular Outer Banks communities in this section of the coast. The easternmost barrier island outer banks is Rodanthe Pier in Rodanthe, NC.

      Aerial view of Outer banks (looking north), with sound on the left and ocean on the right

      The Outer Banks are not anchored to offshore coral reefs like some other barrier islands, and as a consequence, they often suffer significant beach erosion during major storms. In fact, their location jutting out into the Atlantic makes them the most hurricane-prone area north of Florida, for both landfalling storms and brushing storms offshore. Hatteras Island was cut in half on September 18,when Hurricane Isabel washed a 2, feet ( m) wide and 15 feet (5 m) deep channel called Isabel Inlet through the community of Hatteras Barrier island outer banks on the southern end of the island.[13] The tear was subsequently repaired and restored by sand dredging by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It was cut off once again in by Hurricane Irene. Access to the island was largely limited to boat access only from August to late October until another temporary bridge could be built.

      Three state highway bridges connect the Outer Banks to the mainland, the Wright Memorial Bridge, the oldest (built inrehabilitated in ), carries US between Point Harbor and Kitty Hawk. William B. Umstead Bridge, the second oldest (built inrehabilitated in ), carries US 64 between Manns Harbor on the mainland and Manteo on Roanoke Island. The newest bridge, the Virginia Dare Memorial Bridge, was completed in and carries US 64 Bypass between Manns Harbor and Roanoke Island between Manteo and Wanchese. The Melvin R. Daniels Bridge carries US 64 between Roanoke Island and Nags Head. At Whalebone Junction, the three main highways of the Outer Banks (NC 12, USand US 64) all meet. Additionally, NC serves as the main route along Knotts Island in the extreme north; it connects only to Virginia by land.

      A number of ferries maintained by the North Carolina Department of Transportation Ferry Division also serve the Outer Banks. From north to south, these are the Knotts Island-Currituck Ferry, the Hatteras-Ocracoke Ferry, the Swan Quarter-Ocracoke Ferry, and the Cedar Island-Ocracoke Ferry. Additionally, a semi-regular emergency ferry often runs from Stumpy Point to Rodanthe to serve travelers due to frequent wash-outs of NC 12 jan tarrant acting coach Nags Head and Rodanthe. Additionally, private ferries are commissioned by the National Park Service to access certain islands within the National Seashores along the outer banks, these include ferries to Portsmouth Island, to Cape Lookout Lighthouse, and various locations along Core Banks and Shackleford Banks.

      Ecology[edit]

      Vegetation[edit]

      The vegetation of the Outer Banks has biodiversity, although it is considered the northern limit for many southern plants such as wild scrub palms. In the northern part of the Outer Banks, from Virginia Beach southward past the North Carolina border to Cape Hatteras, the main types of vegetation are sea grasses, beach grasses and other beach plants including Opuntia humifusa on the Atlantic side and wax myrtles, bays, and grasses on the Sound side with areas of pine and Spanish moss-covered live oaks. Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa can be found growing wild here in the northern parts of its range on the beach. Dwarf palmettos were once indigenous to the entire Outer Banks, and they are still successfully planted and grown. Its current most northerly known native stand is on Monkey Island in Currituck Barrier island outer banks Cape Hatteras National Seashore southward, the vegetation does include dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor), Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa; however, the area also has Cabbage palmetto (Sabal palmetto), which can be found in the north, although they are native in the southern part of the Outer Banks, specifically prevalent from Cape Hatteras and all points southward. Pindo palms and windmill palms are also planted widely throughout the Outer Banks; although, they are not indigenous to the area.

      A wide variety of native plants can be found at the Elizabethan Gardens in Manteo on Roanoke Island.[16]

      The Outer Banks are home to Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria), the roasted leaves of which were brewed into a high caffeine beverage called black drink by the Native Americans. The Outer Banks may be one of the few places where it is still consumed.[17]

      Animal life[edit]

      The islands are home to herds of feral horses, sometimes called "banker ponies", which according to local legend are descended from Spanish mustangs washed ashore centuries ago in shipwrecks. Populations are found on Ocracoke Island, Shackleford Banks, Currituck Banks, and in the Rachel Carson Estuarine Sanctuary.

      Climate[edit]

      The Outer Banks has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa). The outer banks have unusual weather patterns because of their unique geographical location. As the islands jut out from the eastern seaboard into the Atlantic Gulf Stream, the Outer Banks has a predisposition to be affected by hurricanes, Nor'easters (usually in the form of rain, and rarely snow or mixed precipitation), and other ocean-driven storms. The hardiness zone is 8b.

      The winters are typically milder than in inland areas, averaging lows in the upper 30s and highs in the lower 50s, and are more frequently overcast than in the summer. However, the exposure of the Outer Banks makes them prone to higher winds, often causing wind chills to make the apparent temperature as cold as the inland areas. The summer months average lows from the mids to highs in the upper 80s, depending on the time of the summer. The spring and fall are typically milder seasons. The fall and winter are usually warmer than areas inland, while the spring and the summer are often slightly cooler because of the moderating effects of being surrounded by water.

      Although snow is possible, averaging from 3 inches in the north to less than 1/2 inch per year in the south, there are many times when years pass between snowfalls.[18] The majority of nor'easters are "born" off the coasts of the Outer Banks.

      History[edit]

      The Outer Banks is one of the most culturally distinctive areas of the East Coast of the United States.[19] The Outer Banks were inhabited before the arrival of Europeans, with small branches of larger tribes, such as the Algonquin barrier island outer banks Chowanoke, Secotan and Poteskeet living semi-nomadic lives. Oftentimes Native Americans would use the barrier islands facing the Atlantic Ocean for fishing in the summer, and reside on Roanoke Island or the North Carolina mainland in the winter.

      European explorers to the Outer Banks as far back as the s noted encountering the friendly Hatteras Island and Outer Banks Natives, noting their hospitality to foreign explorers as well as their happiness and overall quality of life. European-borne diseases and migration to the mainland were likely the main causes for the decline of the Native population.[20]

      Before bridges were built in the s, the only form of transport between or off the islands was by boat, which allowed for the islands to stay isolated from much of the rest of the mainland. This helped to preserve the maritime culture and the distinctive Outer Banks accent or brogue, which sounds more like an English accent than it does an American accent. Many "bankers" have often been mistaken for being from England or Ireland when traveling to areas outside of the Outer Banks. The brogue is more distinctive the further south one travels on the Outer Banks, with it being the thickest on Ocracoke Island and Harkers Island.

      Some residents of the Outer Banks, known as wreckers, made part of their living by scavenging wrecked ships—or by luring ships to their destruction. Horses with lanterns tied to their necks would be walked along the beach; the lanterns' up and down motion would appear to ships to represent clear water and a ship ahead; the unsuspecting captain would then drive his ship ashore following this false light.[21]Ocracoke was the last refuge of pirate Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard. It is also where the infamous pirate was killed November 22,in a fierce battle with troops from Virginia.[22]

      Economy[edit]

      Major industries of the region include commercial fishing, boat building and tourism. Since the s, the rise of tourism has led the region to become an increasingly service-oriented economy.

      Maritime industries[edit]

      There has been a long history of fishing in the Outer Banks, dating back to the end of the 17th century.[23]Pirates ravaged the coast for the majority of the s, but once they were ridden, the local settlers used fishing as their lifeline.[23]

      In the midth century, large-scale commercial fishing erupted, mostly due to the construction of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, which simplified shipping methods for fishermen.[23]Saltwater fishing became the cash-crop of the Outer Banks, and blossomed it into a popular tourist destination.[23] In modern times, tourists will flock to the area just for the abundance of fishing opportunities.[24] Anglers, otherwise known as fishermen, have a wide range of fishing methods, some of these methods date back to when the first settlers arrived, to choose from in the Outer Banks.[23]

      Lighthouses[edit]

      There are currently 6 lighthouses in the Outer Banks[25]

      • Currituck Beach Lighthouse, located in Corolla, North Carolina
      • Roanoake Marshes Lighthouse, located in Manteo, North Carolina
      • Bodie Island Lighthouse, located south of Nags Head, North Carolina
      • Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, located in Buxton, North Carolina
      • Ocracoke Island Lighthouse, located in Ocracoke, North Carolina
      • Cape Lookout Lighthouse, located in Carteret County, North Carolina

      Communities[edit]

      Towns and communities along the Outer Banks include (listed from north to south):

      Currituck Banks[edit]

      Bodie Island[edit]

      Sunset over the Currituck Sound in Duck ()
      The Bodie Island Lighthouse (October )

      Roanoke Island[edit]

      Hatteras Island[edit]

      Ocracoke Island[edit]

      Core Banks[edit]

      Bogue Banks[edit]

      Parks[edit]

      Jockey's Ridge State Park

      [edit]

      • George Ackles (born ), professional basketball player[26]
      • Dennis Anderson (born ), professional Monster Truck driver and creator of Grave Digger
      • Marc Basnight (–), former member of the North Carolina State Senate
      • Emanuel Davis (born ), Canadian Football League defensive back[27]
      • Andy Griffith (–), actor[28]
      • Cathy Johnston-Forbes (born ), professional golfer[29]
      • Alexis Knapp (born ), actress
      • William Ivey Long (born ), costume designer for stage and film[30]
      • Edward Teach (–), notorious English pirate better known as "Blackbeard," raided on the North Atlantic and Caribbean Sea
      • Manteo (disappeared after ) influential figure in the Croatoan Nation, ambassador to England and mediator
      • Wanchese (disappeared after ) influential figure in the Roanoke Nation, opposed English colonization

      See also[edit]

      References[edit]

      1. ^"Campgrounds". Retrieved 1 April
      2. ^"England's First Home in the New World". Fort Raleigh National Historic Site. National Park Service.
      3. ^"Telegram from Orville Wright in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, barrier island outer banks His Father Announcing Four Successful Flights, December 17". World Digital Library. Retrieved
      4. ^ ab"How the Outer Banks are Vanishing — and Leaving NC Defenseless Against Hurricanes". Carolina Political Review. Retrieved
      5. ^ abPEACH, SARA (July 24, ). "Rising Seas: Will the Outer Banks Survive?". National Geographic.
      6. ^"Geography of North Carolina". NC State Board of Education.
      7. ^"Geography of North Carolina". mynewextsetup.us. Retrieved
      8. ^"Library of Congress LCCN Permalink sh". mynewextsetup.us. Retrieved
      9. ^ ab"North Carolina Gazetteer

        North Carolina's islands: the beauty of the Outer Banks

        There is no horizon: only the odd hint indicates what is water and what is sky. A dolphin shows its back, just for a second. A pair of oystercatchers draw two cursive Ms against the blue. Otherwise, the water of the Pamlico Sound is so still, and the silence so complete, it’s a disembodying experience. Slick cam, they call it.

        From his kayak, Bob Chestnut could reach down into the shallows and pluck out any number of treasures. Through the water he can see the dark ragged outline of oyster clusters, a shimmering of scallop shells and mussels pre-opened by the birds. In the summer, families come out here with long rakes to dig for clams.

        North Carolina map.

        The Outer Banks – a narrow chain of barrier islands off the east coast of the US that separates the Atlantic from the mainland – are no secret to Southerners. Their mile stretch of beach, running from Corolla in the north to Cape Lookout in the south, is a vacation magnet for families and spring breakers alike, as well as a pilgrimage for sporting types who can kite surf or land big game fish in the warm Gulf Stream waters. And while the Banks can claim no town with a population larger than 3, they still have a rich human history, inhabited by the Roanoke and Croatan people until the arrival of English settlers in the s – not to mention the site of the Wright Brothers’ first powered flight.

        It’s not always this quiet in Ocracoke. The weather can be rough – Hurricane Florence blew in last year. And just because the North Carolinan island is hard to get to – three hours’ drive from Raleigh, followed by an hour’s ferry ride – it doesn’t mean people don’t try. A new passenger ferry from Cape Hatteras has recently been announced, because the queue for cars can be up to three hours in summer. But the locals don’t resent the visitors, says Chestnut. “The people we get tend to be the people who appreciate it.”

        Roanoke island boasts the quaint and well-heeled town of Manteo, complete with a yachting marina and Elizabethan garden. Across the Oregon Inlet – by way of a couple of epic bridges – are Nags Head, Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills, seaside towns with connecting shorelines stacked with stilted beach houses.

        Keep driving south to Hatteras island, across the newly constructed Bonner bridge, and you are rewarded with 70 miles of protected seashore. With the blessing barrier island outer banks the islanders, the Hatteras shoreline was designated a national park in the s and today its meeting of beach, marshland and maritime forest is a haven for wading birds, water mammals and more. “I’m anti-regulation in general,” says Chestnut, candidly. “But we have a better relationship with the park service than most.” Which is why on Hatteras and Ocracoke you are free to drive your 4WD vehicles across the golden sands, knowing that the nesting turtle population is well protected. And why while some come here to spot seals and harbour porpoises and snowy owls, others come to shoot ducks, or go flounder gigging – spearing flatfish in the shallow waters, a skill learned from the Native Americans who once used this place as a hunting ground.

        The islanders of the Outer Banks have always treasured their freedom. The waters surrounding them – known as the graveyard of the Atlantic, because their ever-shifting shoals are so perilous to shipping – were once a hideout for pirates and privateers. Edward Teach, aka Blackbeard, was killed (and then beheaded) while barrier island outer banks anchor on Ocracoke. The island’s brewery – which makes an unexpectedly tasty oyster stout from the local catch – is namedafter the year of his capture.

        Still accessible only by boat – from Hatteras to the north, or Cedar Island to the west – Ocracoke’s past has been preserved by its remoteness. “Nobody stumbles across Ocracoke,” says Chester Lynn, whose ancestors have been here for 10 generations. “I can remember the days when you had to take three ferries to get to the mainland.” Lynn sells antiques out of every room of his single-storey family home and, as one of the older residents, still speaks with the brogue that is part of the island’s Elizabethan legacy – an accent closer to northern England than the American South.

        The community spirit, too, has been preserved. In the cafes and restaurants regulars talk across tables, sharing stories of their day and asking after friends. The buildings themselves are a glimpse of the island’s s heyday, when it was a thriving fishing community and pilot town, helping trading ships to transfer their goods across the treacherous sounds on lighters.

        Back then, “Jack’s store” was the place locals gathered to collect their mail and their gossip; that it’s still standing is no surprise. Make-good-and-mend is central to the island culture. Among the quirkiest results of that attitude are the tiny, walled cemetery plots where the island’s chief families have buried their relatives.

        “The problem has always been that the water table is so high it was hard to keep people buried,” says Amy Howard, who runs the Village Craftsmen store. “A good flood could pop up a casket.” Her family traces itself back to William Howard, Blackbeard’s quartermaster. “Luckily for him he was in jail in Virginia when the big battle happened, and he got a pardon,” she says.

        Some locals claim to have seen phantom pirates out at Springer’s Point, the site of Blackbeard’s last battle; but visitors can have their own haunting experience with a boat ride to Portsmouth island, just a couple of miles away. Abandoned by humans in the s, it is now a compellingly eerie ghost village, and tour guides like Wade Austin – whose father was a ferry captain – still have living memories of Henry Pigott and Marian Babb, the last man and woman to live there.

        Austin has travelled the world, but nothing would tempt him from Ocracoke. “I’m not much of the city to begin with. I saw the world, and I came back. It’s what most people here do.”

        Essentials

        Emma John’s trip was provided by Visit North Carolina (mynewextsetup.us). She flew to Raleigh and stayed at Mayton Inn, Cary (double room from £, mynewextsetup.us) and the Cove B&B, Ocracoke (double room from £75, mynewextsetup.us). Bob Chestnut offers kayak tours from $39pp (mynewextsetup.us). Wade Austin’s Portsmouth Island Boat Tours cost $20pp (mynewextsetup.us). For more information, go to mynewextsetup.us

        Wayfaring Stranger: a Musical Journey in the American South by Emma John is published by W&N (£). Order a copy for £ at mynewextsetup.us

        Looking for a holiday with a difference? Browse Guardian Holidays to see a range of fantastic trips

        Источник: mynewextsetup.us

        Map of Outer Banks North Carolina

        Sincepeople have been drawn to the undisturbed beauty found on North Carolina’s Outer Banks.

        More than years later, visitors still marvel at the quiet sanctuary that lies before them as the historical imprints our many visitors have left behind.

        The Outer Banks or OBX, mixes the past and the present into a well-kept balance of solitude and activity that is ideal for all ages and spirits.

        It is not difficult to find this chain of barrier islands along the North Carolina coast.

        The Outer Banks is a string of sandy barrier island more than miles long that bow out into the Atlantic Ocean and cup the shoreline. Our islands are filled with watery hideaways where wildlife takes refuge and nature lovers delight, quiet beaches for sport or peace, and history that dates back to America’s beginnings.

        As you will see, the Outer Banks is a destination sure to delight you with its variety of adventure, art, dinning, and history and beach fun in the towns of Duck, Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills, Nags Head, and Roanoke Island to the undeveloped shores of Hatteras Island.

        The Outer Banks is steeped in history, dating back years to our 16th century Elizabethan roots as the site of England’s first attempt at colonizing the New World from to  

        Fort Raleigh National Historic Site is widely known as the birthplace of Virginia Dare, the first English child born in the New World. Lead by Sir Walter Raleigh, the efforts to colonize the “New World” ended with the disappearance of men, women and children, a mystery that remains unsolved. 

        Their legacy and our American heritage is still celebrated every summer night at The Lost Colony on Roanoke Island.  A feast for the senses, filled with tribal dancing, swordplay, and romance. This year, the nation’s longest running outdoor drama is rolling out the red carpet for their 70th anniversary!

        The year marked the First Flight Celebration at Wright Brothers National Memorial in Kill Devil Hills, a tribute to Orville barrier island outer banks Wilbur’s achievement of mankind’s first powered flight on December 17th,   Retrace those 12 seconds that changed the world and get a bird’s eye view of the past.

        The coastal location of the Outer Banks makes it a virtual playground for adventures. You can take part in bird watching, golf, hang gliding, hiking, windsurfing and fishing in the best angling waters in the world. And when it is time for a break, few places offer the rare kind of solitude found at our pristine beaches and wildlife areas.

        There are advantages and disadvantages to staying barrier island outer banks each of the towns on the Outer Banks which is for the most part are low, sandy, and narrow islands that are just a few feet above sea level. 

        Some areas offer easy access to a large number of attractions and restaurants; other parts have nothing but sand dunes and a few homes raised up on wooden stilts. 

        Regardless of what town you decide to spend three days to a whole week in, you’re sure to have a relaxing and memorable vacation on the coast of NC.

        Divvied up into sections and listed from north to south, here are all of the towns on the Outer Banks of North Carolina!

        Corolla NC Beach Outer Banks North Carolina

        Northern Beaches

        Carova

        Only accessible by 4-wheel drive vehicle, this is the northernmost town on the Outer Banks. Here you’ll find everything from quaint cottages to massive 28 bedroom estates.

        Oh, and you’re likely to spot awild horse or two!

        Corolla

        Landmarks in this popular town include Currituck Beach Lighthouse, The Whalehead, and Historic Corolla Village. There are thousands of well-kept rental homes to choose from. Corolla is only accessible by traveling north on NC

        This town likely has the most rental homes to choose from, and is a virtual ghost town during the winter because so few people are residing in the area.

        Duck

        One of the more expensive towns to stay in on the Outer Banks. A few nice outdoor shopping complexes and home to The Blue Point, a truly exceptional place for dinner.

        The now famous Duck Donuts started in you guessed it, the town of Duck! If you are seeking adventure, consider parasailing or renting a jet ski from one of several different vendors.

        Southern Shores

        Many historic flat top houses that were built decades ago. Not a ton of vacation rental homes to choose from, but there are a few really nice ones. Many well-off locals live in Southern Shores. Town does lack public beach accesses so be careful when booking a rental home.

        Can always travel a couple miles south to Kitty Hawk if your rental is not within walking distance of the beach.

        Pier in Kill Devil Hills North Carolina Outer Banks

        Central Beaches

        Kitty Hawk

        There is so much to love about Kitty Hawk!

        Many great restaurants located here including Rundown Cafe, Bad Bean Baja Grill, Art’s Place and The Black Pelican. A portion of NC 12 in Kitty Hawk is frequently washed away about hurricanes and nor’easters. Hilton Garden Inn is in this town if you want a quick Outer Banks getaway, arguably the nicest chain hotel on the OBX.

        Kill Devil Hills

        In this OBX town, visitors can check out the Wright Brother’s National Memorial as well as Avalon Fishing Pier and Nags Head Woods.

        Visitors should consider dining at the Outer Banks Brewing Station andKill Devil Grillwhen you get hungry. In the town of Kill Devil Hills, there are more locals that call this coastal haven home year-round than any other area on the barrier islands. Come visit and you'll discover why!

        Nags Head

        The largest town in terms of acreage, Jennette’s Pier, Jockey’s Ridge State Park, and Bodie Island Lighthouse are located in Nags Head. Tale of the Whale, Tortugas Lie and Sam & Omie’s are three legendary restaurants that are also situated in the coastal haven.

        Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse Manteo NC Outer Banks

        Roanoke Island

        Manteo

        So much history in such a small town! Historic downtown Manteo is situated right on the Roanoke Sound and is the headquarters of many quirky shops and art galleries. Consider visiting Fort Raleigh National Park, North Carolina Aquarium on Roanoke Island or the Elizabethan Gardens.

        Wanchese

        Primarily a fishing town, a lot on the seafood served at restaurants on the Outer Banks comes from the docks in Wanchese. If you love seafood at a reasonable price, be sure to stop in at O’Neils Seafood Harvest in Wanchese.

        Cape Hatteras National Seashore Outer Banks NC

        Southern Beaches

        Rodanthe

        Ever read or seen the movie Nights In Rodanthe? Well this is the town where the story takes place. Be sure to snag a photo of the now famous house in the movie. You can even stay there if you are lucky enough to reserve a time. If you are an experienced kite boarder or want to learn, both Kitty Hawk and Real Watersports have kiteboarding schools in Rodanthe.

        Waves

        Situated between Rodanthe and Salvo, this combination of three towns is often referred to as the tri-villages. Surfing, windsurfing and kiteboarding are popular things to do here. Only a few shops and restaurants and headquartered in Waves.

        Salvo

        Similar to Rodanthe and Waves to the north, Salvo is know for being one of the best places on the East Coast to be if you’re into watersports. There aren’t very many business in this town, and that’s the way the locals like it.

        Buxton

        The most notable attraction in Buxton is hands downCape Hatteras Lighthouse, the tallest all-brick lighthouse in the United States which at one point was moved inland to preserve it from the encroaching Atlantic Ocean.

        Situated at the widest part of Hatteras Island, Buxton is the largest community on Hatteras Island in both terms of square footage and population.

        Frisco

        Less traffic than the central and northern beaches. Many great surfing spots that locals frequent. Miles of wide open beaches in Frisco and plenty of places to surf fish. Home to Hatteras Island’s only go kart track. Also home to the Frisco Native American Museum.

        Avon

        Surfing, fishing, kayaking and more, Avon is a great spot for those who love the ocean and water sports. Accessible by NC 12 only, there aren’t a ton of rental homes and condos or restaurants and shops in Avon – which is totally okay if you ask me.

        Just about all the rental homes in the town are towering in height because they’re held up by huge wooden stilts. Why you ask? Well, Avon tends to flood whenever there is a sizable nor’easter or tropical storm that impacts the barrier islands. Plenty of unique shorebirds to observe if you’re patient enough for bird watching.

        Hatteras Village

        If you travel south along NC 12 for long enough, you’ll encounter

        the docks at Hatteras Village which allow you to catch a ferry to Ocracoke Island. Many anglers come to this town to catch a fishing charter.

        Maritime history enthusiasts will enjoy the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum which tells some of the stories of lost and sunken ships off the coast of North Carolina. There are a few restaurants and shops worth checking out while visiting Hatteras Village.

        Ocracoke Island

        Time moves a little bit slower on Ocracoke Island. Only accessible via a 30 minute ferry that departs from Hatteras Village. Lots of small shops and restaurants to check out. Limited number of places to stay. Don’t forget to visit the small white lighthouse on the island!

        Источник: mynewextsetup.us
        barrier island outer banks

      Comments

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