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Access food bank medford oregon


access food bank medford oregon

the Family Food Access Interviews in Spring Mystic Valley Elder Services; Greater Boston Food Bank food or enough food? Yeah. To make sure that the food bank system in Oregon has enough food to support regional food banks: ACCESS in Medford for Jackson County. ACCESS provides food, housing, warmth and other essential services to Jackson County's low Medford, OR. Oregon Food Bank‏ @oregonfoodbank syysk.

Access food bank medford oregon -

West Medford Food Pantry is among 24 ACCESS pantries benefiting from Season for Sharing

MEDFORD, Ore. -- Newswatch 12's Season for Sharing campaign was started to help combat food insecurity seen across Oregon. With Market of Choice, Newswatch 12 is raising funds to feed families in Jackson County.

Donating is easy. Just choose an amount to contribute at checkout at your local Ashland or Medford Market of Choice.

Money raised goes directly to support ACCESS food assistance programs and its network of 24 food pantries in Jackson County.

The West Medford Food Pantry is among them that has already benefited from Season For Sharing. Every Tuesday, the pantry receives food from grocery stores through the ACCESS Network.

At the pantry, volunteers organize the donations and prepare bags for families for pick up between 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

The staple bags containing, soup, tuna, and rice, among other items, can sustain their needs for the week, while breads, meats, and dairy products are organized by dietary need that can last for about 4 days.

The Assistant Manager, K.C. McCoy revealed to Newswatch 12 that they serve an average of 70 families each week, and have had as many as 92 families.

McCoy said, "It's a pleasure to work here and we love our families. We try to do our best to serve them in an efficient and kind manner. Deep respect."

According to Feeding America, in Oregon, , people are facing hunger. Of that group, , are children.

The Food Programs Director for ACCESS Jackson County, Marcee Champion told Newswatch 12, rising grocery prices in the United States have also caused more people to seek food assistance.

"The thing that we're going to see the biggest impact from is the increase in the price of food."

ACCESS is currently in need of volunteers at its pantries. For ways to help out, visit mynewextsetup.us

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Amy’s Kitchen

Amy’s Kitchen was created 30 years ago from the belief that great tasting food should be available to all.

It all started when founders Rachel and Andy Berliner were pregnant with their daughter Amy, the namesake of the company. When Rachel was on bed rest during her pregnancy, Andy went looking for ready-made meals at their local natural grocery store. He couldn’t find anything organic and vegetarian that satisfied their taste so they decided to make their own. Turns out they were not the only ones in search of delicious, organic food.

Today, Amy’s takes pride in cooking great tasting, ready-made, organic and vegetarian meals for more than 14 million consumers, serving more than million meals each year. Amy’s Kitchen has remained a family-owned company and our food is made with the same care as the first day we started, just with slightly larger pots and pans.

Why Medford?
How did Amy’s choose Medford?

In the early ’s, Amy’s was experiencing significant growth &#; quickly outgrowing our Santa Rosa, California production facility. As we looked at where to open our next kitchen, it was important to keep production close to home, maintaining a strong connection with our culinary and sensory teams in order to ensure we upheld our high quality standards.

With Oregon’s friendly business climate and close proximity to California, Amy’s began exploring potential opportunities in the region. Medford quickly moved to the top of the list with unmatched cost advantages and a workforce that was already skilled in agriculture and food manufacturing, which we knew would help ensure a seamless transition for new employees.

The local Economic Development agency was also an instrumental part of Amy’s adoption into the community, guiding Amy’s through business opportunities and incentives and supporting our arrival in the region.

In , Amy’s was delighted to open our doors in the Medford region, specifically in White City, with a , square foot facility, making 25 products (all pizza) and employing employees.

How has Amy’s grown in Medford?

Since , Amy’s has grown significantly in Medford, growing our employee base to people and expanding our footprint to , square feet.

We’ve added two entrées line, a fresh pasta line, a tofu production area, as well as a canning line to make Amy’s soups, chilis and refried beans. In addition, Medford is proudly the sole producers of Amy’s gluten-free burritos. In , we also expanded our storage capabilities to match the growth in production with a , square dry and frozen food storage warehouse.

We’ve also invested in improving our environmental footprint in Medford – building a waste water treatment facility on site and incorporating cardboard and plastics recycling equipment in the plant.

Today in Medford, Amy’s has six food production lines, making different products each year, including pizzas, soups, chilis, refried beans, entrees, gluten-free burritos and non-dairy frozen desserts.

What is Amy’s doing to support the local area?

One of Amy’s core values is to ‘take care of each other.’ This extends not only to our employees, but also to their families. One of the important ways we do this is by providing comprehensive benefits for our employees and their families. In , we were Southern Oregon Business Journal 24 delighted to open our on-site Amy’s Family Health Center operated by Vera Whole Health next to our Medford Plant. The health center provides Amy’s Kitchen employees and their families free, quality primary care with no-cost medical prescriptions as well as ongoing health coaching. Amy’s Kitchen has been one of few employers nationwide to offer this level of free, convenient, high-quality, ongoing health care on-site.

Beyond our benefits program and onsite-healthcare, Amy’s also offers college scholarships to the children of our employees. Last year, for example, at a community awards ceremony, Amy’s co-founder, Andy Berliner, personally presented the scholarships to 34 students, all children of our White City employees.

In addition, Amy’s is committed to contributing to the broader local community in Medford &#; supporting the education community in and around Medford by hosting ten local teachers for an externship to learn more about the company and career opportunities that exist for their students, as well as volunteering and donating to Kids Unlimited, the North Medford High School and Jackson Elementary schools.

Finally, as a company whose purpose is to ‘make it easy and enjoyable for everyone to eat well’, Amy’s is passionate about ensuring low-income residents and people with dietary restrictions have access to the food they need. To help support this effort, we work closely with the Oregon Food Bank and ACCESS to locally donate food that goes to those in need.

Over the last 12 years, Amy’s has truly thrived in Medford and we look forward to continuing this journey with our employees, their families and the local community in the area for the long-term.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

ACCESS Food Pantry Provides food for thousands in Jackson County

MEDFORD, Ore. -- ACCESS Food Pantry in Medford has served the community of Jackson County since

The Nutrition Director at ACCESS, Marcee Champion said they typically serve about 5, people a month and see a 10 percent increase around the holidays.

ACCESS will be closed through Thanksgiving but will reopen Monday for people who will need food next month.

The pantry relies heavily on donations and volunteers, but Champion said they have had plenty of food because of the generosity of the community. Today, one local business donated eight thousand dollars to the food bank.

One main contributor to ACCESS is the United States Department of Agriculture. The guidelines it has in place make it so people receiving help must be living in Jackson County and meet the income margin for a specific family size.

Staff at ACCESS say they look forward to coming back to work after the holiday because they love helping people.

To contribute to the pantry or register for food help you can visit mynewextsetup.us

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Food Security in Oregon – Needs, Gaps and Opportunities Additional Resources

Food Security Overview and Statistics:

  • A new report by Oregon State University shows that around 25% of Oregonians experienced food insecurity in
  • This averages to about 1 million Oregonians.
  • Black, Latinx, and Indigenous households have been hit especially hard.
  • Even when Oregon’s overall food insecurity rate was at a record low in , that improvement in access to food did not extend to all communities equally.
  • Roughly 20% of Black, Latinx and Indigenous households experienced food insecurity in December , compared with 10% of the white population.

Read the full report here.

The following panelists and their affiliated organizations are all working to increase food security in Oregon: please read more about them below.   

Main Session (Recording can be found here. Due to technical difficulties, the recording for the main session begins about 5 minutes into the program.)

Rima Green

Organizations/Affiliations: Growing Gardens, Lettuce Grow Director

Growing Gardens uses the experience of growing food in schools, backyards and correctional facilities to cultivate healthy and equitable communities.

Carina Miller

Organizations/Affiliations: Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Member

Summary: The Government of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs is charged with securing and protecting the perpetual health and prosperity of the Confederated Tribes. The government fulfills its mission by preserving and strengthening the sovereign status of the Confederated Tribes, protecting the treaty and legal rights and interests of the Confederated Tribes, and creating a community and economic environment which affords every member of the Confederated Tribes the opportunity to attain good health, self-sufficiency, pride and self-esteem.

Susannah Morgan

Organizations/Affiliations: Oregon Food Bank, Executive Director

Summary: OFB collects food from farmers, manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, individuals and government sources. They distribute that food through a statewide network of food banks serving all of Oregon and Clark County, Washington.

Aaron Vargas

Organizations/Affiliations: Ecotrust, Food Equity Manager

Summary: Ecotrust’s mission is to inspire fresh thinking that creates economic opportunity, social equity, and environmental well-being. Their goal is to foster a natural model of development that creates more resilient communities, economies, and ecosystems here and around the world.

 

Breakout Sessions:

FARM-TO-SCHOOL (recording can be found here)

Farm-to-school summary: Bringing locally grown produce into schools is a fun and healthy way to get youth excited about where food comes from, how it grows, and eating fresh fruit and vegetables. Join us to learn more about successful farm to school initiatives and partnerships.

Stefan Aumack - Organizations/Affiliations: Kalapuya High School/The Bethel Farm, Co-Principal

The Bethel Farm is the result of Kalapuya High School’s sustainable agriculture class and their research into the feasibility of creating a district farm. After several attempts to locate a farm nearby for the district to purchase, it was realized that they could use the extra field space between Kalapuya HS and Prairie Mountain School.

Jaime Arredondo - Organizations/Affiliations: Oregon Farm to School and Garden Network, Board Member; CAPACES Leadership Institute (CLI), Executive Director

The Oregon Farm to School and School Garden Network’s (OFSSGN) mission is to improve the health and well-being of youth, families, farms, and the environment by supporting members of Oregon’s farm to school and school garden community the their work to incorporate healthy, local food into school meals and implement food and garden-based education.

CAPACES Leadership Institute (CLI): The CLI builds leadership in the Latino and farm working community. The CLI is a permanent part of the Oregon farmworker movement, led by PCUN. The Institute will build the leadership capacity and political consciousness to sustain and expand that movement and to propel a host of related struggles, such as immigrants’ rights

Audrey Tehan - Organizations/Affiliations: Seed to Table, Executive Director/Farm Director

Seed to Table envisions a healthy and resilient community where all people, regardless of race, gender, geography, or socioeconomic status, have access to fresh produce that is nourishing, locally grown, and keeping with their culture and preferences. From their acre farm plot they strive to model a sustainable food system while providing equitable access to fresh foods and opportunities for all to engage positively with nutritious foods

FOOD EQUITY

Food Equity Summary:  We believe all people have the right to grow and consume healthy, affordable and culturally specific foods. Join us to learn how communities are addressing food equity and striving to provide good food to everyone.

Shantae Johnson - Organizations/Affiliations: Mudbone Grown, Unity Farm Manager; Black Oregon Land Trust, OFB Pathways to Farming Program

Mudbone Grown is a black-owned farm enterprise that promotes inter-generational community-based farming that creates measurable and sustainable environmental, social, cultural, and economic impacts in communities

The Black Oregon Land Trust (BOLT) is a nonprofit creating opportunities for Black farmers in Oregon to collectively own land, build generational health and wealth, and birth sovereign, thriving communities

Javier Lara - Organizations/Affiliations: Anuhuac Program at CAPACES Leadership Institute

The Anahuac Project, formed by Capaces Leadership Insitute and supported by FHDC and Evolve with land, resources, volunteers, and residents is providing much-needed healing opportunities through a reclamation of land, identity, and history in a manner that honors indigenous farming and community traditions, while acknowledging the dynamic between land-owner and worker; privileged and oppressed.

REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEMS (recording can be found here)

Regional food systems summary:Regional food systems are increasingly important to individuals, families and communities for social, economic and environmental reasons. Join us to learn how local and regional food systems support community vitality and improve food security.

Alex Adame - Organizations/Affiliations: Jefferson County School District, Family Access Network Advocate

Family Access Network’s mission is to offer assistance, possibility and hope to Central Oregon families in need by connecting them with crucial resources that will help children flourish in school and in life.

Jordan Haas - Organizations/Affiliations: Gorge Grown Food Network, Food Security Coalition Coordinator

Gorge Grown Food Network is a group of farmers, eaters, policy-makers, educators, healthcare providers, chefs, grocers, makers, and food enthusiasts. Collectively, they aim to ensure that everyone in the community has access to fresh, healthy, local food, and that farmers have the skills, support, and infrastructure they need to succeed

Rick Gaupo - Organizations/Affiliations: Marion-Polk Food Share, President & CEO

Marion-Polk Food Share's mission is to bring people together to end hunger and its root causes. Every month, more than 46, people – including 15, children – will access emergency food through the Marion Polk Food Share partner network. This food may be a hot meal served at a shelter, a free community meal served at a church, or an emergency food box from a food pantry.

Lauren Sorg - Organizations/Affiliations: Food Roots, Tillamook, Executive Director

Founded in , Food Roots has helped build linkages among farmers, processors, educators, agencies, nonprofits, farmers markets, schools, youth groups, local government and anyone else interested in making our local food economy stronger

Tom Mulhern - Organizations/Affiliations: Food for Lane County, Executive Director

Food for Lane County is dedicated to reducing hunger by engaging their community to create access to food. They accomplish this by soliciting, collecting, rescuing, growing, preparing and packaging food for distribution through a network of social service agencies and programs; through public awareness, education and community advocacy; and through programs designed to improve the ability of low-income individuals to maintain an adequate supply of wholesome, nutritious food.

Margaret Davidson - Organizations/Affiliations: Community Connection of NE Oregon, Executive Director

The mission of Community Connection of Northeast Oregon, Inc. is to advocate for and assist senior citizens, children, low-income persons, and persons with disabilities in attaining basic human needs and in becoming more self-sufficient. This will be accomplished by providing direct client services; stimulating a more efficient use of existing resources; broadening the available resource base; and providing decent, safe, sanitary and affordable housing for low and moderate income persons

INDEPENDENT FOOD PANTRIES

Independent food pantries summary: From the basement of a church to the community kitchen, independent food pantries are a lifeline for communities. Learn how these community-led and community supported organizations are increasingly relied upon to provide basic needs across Oregon.

Ranae Staley - Organizations/Affiliations: The Giving Plate, Executive Director

The Giving Plate provides food to over 3, individuals a month, between three hunger-relief programs. Their goal is not just providing food, but offering piece of mind to their guests and allowing them to focus their resources on more than just their next

Isaak Oliansky - Organizations/Affiliations: Ashland Emergency Food Bank, Director

Ahsland Emergency Food Bank's mission is to provide food, free of charge, to residents of Ashland, Talent and surrounding rural communities, and to do so in a way that conveys respect and dignity for those being served.  The Food Bank is set up as a grocery store. People sign in – and then get a shopping cart and can shop once per month for their families.

Donna Parks - Organizations/Affiliations: Tillamook Adventist Community Services 

Tillamook Community Services is a local relief agency that provides free clothing, food, and small household goods to those in need.  This group also makes and distributes quilts and layettes for the newborn.  Shower and laundry facilities are available for the homeless population by appointment. They are an Oregon Food Pantry, the local agency for Salvation Army, as well as part of the global organization, Adventist Community Services. 

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

ACCESS &#; Medford
(Maintains a list of food banks)
mynewextsetup.us

Aviation Way Medford, OR

Cornerstone Christian Church &#; Medford
(meals, foodbox, clothing)

N Bartlett St Medford, OR

Medford Gospel Mission &#; Medford &#;
(Men)
mynewextsetup.us

W Jackson St Medford, OR

Medford Gospel Mission &#; Medford
(WomenandChildren)
mynewextsetup.us

534 N Bartlett St Medford, OR

Salvation Army &#; Medford
mynewextsetup.us

Beatty St Medford, OR

Set Free Ministries &#; Medford
(food,showers,laundry)

W 8th St Medford, OR

St. Vincent de Paul &#; Medford

N Pacific Hwy Medford, OR

Ashland Community Food Bank &#; Ashland
mynewextsetup.us

Clover Ln Ashland, OR

Uncle Food&#;s Diner &#; Ashland
mynewextsetup.us

S Mountain Ave Ashland, OR

RVCOG (Rogue Valley Council of Governments &#; Jackson County) &#; Central Point
(Meals on Wheels/Food and Friends)
mynewextsetup.us

N 1st St Central Point, OR

Upper Rogue Community Center &#; Shady Cove

Hwy62 Shady Cove, OR

Gospel Rescue Mission &#; Grants Pass
mynewextsetup.us

SW Foundry St Grants Pass, OR

Josephine County Food Bank &#; Grants Pass

SE M St Grants Pass, OR

Love in Action &#; Grants Pass
3rd Saturday of each month at RiersidePark @ in the Gazebo behind the softball field
(Serving hot meals, warm clothes, hand warmers, hygiene supplies, blankets, dogfood &#; all free ; contact is Marie)

RVCOG(Rogue Valley Council of Governments &#; Josephine County) &#; Grants Pass
(Meals on Wheels/Food and Friends)
mynewextsetup.us

Ringuette St Grants Pass, OR

Salvation Army &#; Grants Pass
mynewextsetup.us

Redwood Ave Grants Pass, OR

Rogue River Community Center &#; Rogue River
mynewextsetup.us

Broadway St Rogue River, OR

Klamath Basin Senior Citizen&#;s Association &#; Klamath Falls
(Meals on Wheels and Meals on Site)

Arthur St Klamath Falls, OR

Klamath Falls Gospel Mission – Klamath Falls
mynewextsetup.us

Walnut Ave, Klamath Falls Or,

Klamath – Lake Counties Food Bank – Klamath Falls
mynewextsetup.us

Maywood Drive, Klamath Falls Or,

Salvation Army – Klamath Falls

Maywood Dr. Klamath Falls Or, Units 12 & 13

SNAP Program –
online application at mynewextsetup.us
Self Sufficiency Offices: Self Sufficiency Offices:

  • Ashland St, Ashland, OR
  • Market St, Medford, OR
  • Avenue C, White City, OR
  • East River St, Cave Junction, OR
  • NW Hawthorne Suite B, Grants Pass, Or
  • , Klamath Ave, Suite , Klamath Falls OR

Oregon DHS Food Resources
mynewextsetup.us
( Emergency food, WIC, Home-delivered meals, nutrition education, SNAP Match Senior Farm Direct Nutrition Program, School lunch program, free summer meals for kids/teens)

Oregon Food Pantries
mynewextsetup.us (Search by city in Oregon)

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Feeding the Hungry in the Pacific Northwest

“I was sick, and my daughter was always hungry until someone told me to visit the food pantry. We literally ran out of everything the day I visited. You saved our lives, especially since I was anemic and did not have food for my year-old daughter. I will always remember your goodness.&#;

A thankful parent sent this letter earlier this year to Regional Food Bank for Jackson County, Oregon. The note was one of many it received after feeding more than 44, people last year, an increase of 10% from the previous year.

Food insecurity remains an enormous problem in the United States. Recent data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) shows that in , more than 28 million people experienced hunger in America and that nearly 12 million children — around 1 in 6 — live in homes where there aren&#;t enough healthy foods like fruits and vegetables for every member of the household. The COVID pandemic only exacerbated the issue. It&#;s estimated that nearly 60 million people visited food pantries in the past year across the U.S.

To meet the growing demand for food, food banks rely on donations, especially from food businesses like Medford, Oregon-based Harry & David, says Marcee Champion, food programs director at ACCESS, a community group that operates the Regional Food Bank and other programs.

“Harry & David donated about , pounds of food, or around 16% of our total donations,&#; she said in a recent interview.

ACCESS is not alone. Oregon Food Bank — which is part of the Oregon Food Bank Network of 21 regional banks in Oregon and Southwest Washington — also aims to eliminate hunger. Over the past year, the Network assisted million community members in Oregon and Clark County, Washington (about 1 in 4), which was double their visitors from the previous year. And it too has received Harry & David donations.

“For more than 10 years, Harry & David has donated products to Oregon Food Bank,&#; says CEO Susannah Morgan. “It is these partnerships with local, national, and international growers and food producers that make it possible for the Oregon Food Bank Network to meet the increased need for food in our community.&#;

A gift to the community

A photo of food bank with a woman holding a child while they look at cans of food.

It might seem surprising that a company known for its pears, gourmet foods, wine, and gift baskets is a major player in feeding the needy, but Harry & David has been involved in food donation programs for more than 20 years, according to John Christensen, a senior manager who helps facilitate donations at Harry & David.

Based on the advocacy group Feeding America&#;s research — a U.S. based non-profit organization dedicated to ending food insecurity — a meal is made up of pounds of food, Morgan explains. “With that equation, we would say that last year alone, Harry & David donated more than , meals worth of food.&#;

Harry & David is uniquely positioned to provide items food banks that are in short supply, says Champion.

“Harry & David donates a plethora of products, including peaches, cheese, ham and other meats,&#; she says. “We appreciate the wide range of product we receive, as well as the quality of the items. We especially love receiving fresh fruits and vegetables, such as the pears that we get in weekly this time of year.&#;

How the donations work

The donation program has evolved with the times, but the commitment remains the same. Harry & David has excess food and there are people in need.

“We want to feed people,&#; says Christensen. “It&#;s the right thing to do to take care of others.&#;

It&#;s just a matter of figuring out the logistics.

“Food banks are primarily looking for fruits and vegetables,&#; says Christensen. The company&#;s famous pears, which are grown near its headquarters in Medford, Oregon, are, not surprisingly, the top donation.

A photo of a food bank with a man on a tractor moving boxes of food.

“We also donate apples, peaches, and a lot of baked goods with shorter shelf lives,&#; he says. Harry & David also contributes smaller quantities of food it sources from around the world, including pineapples, kiwis, cherries, and mangoes from the Southern hemisphere.

How are the donations picked? “We&#;re a high-end fruit business and we have three grades,&#; says Christensen. The first grade is what you see in your gift basket — flawless and pristine. Much of their secondary grade fruit is still delicious but might have a blemish or discoloration. “It&#;s still beautiful and edible. It&#;s just not gift-grade.&#;

In most cases, donations are shipped to food bank warehouses, where they are then divided up and sent to various pantries based on need.

Says Champion: “These kinds of large donations contribute greatly to our ability to combat food insecurity in Jackson County, and donations from companies like Harry & David give us the opportunity to provide a wider variety of food than we would be able to otherwise.&#;


If you&#;re inspired to help — as we were — you can do so in several ways. You can become an advocate for kids in need, you can make a monetary donation to No Kid Hungry, or you can choose to use your shopping dollars to make a difference. We have curated a special selection of gifts this holiday and will donate 20% of the net proceeds* from each gift purchased from this collection to No Kid Hungry. Here is a sampling of what is available:

* “Net Proceeds&#; is defined as the gross sales price of the product less any and all taxes, service charges, shipping and handling charges, discounts, gift certificates, promotional gift certificates, promotional offers (e.g. airline miles, points, e-money, etc.) credits, rebates, chargebacks, refunds, credit card processing fees and gift certificate cancellations. Minimum donation of $50,

Related Posts

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Access food bank medford oregon -

ACCESS &#; Medford
(Maintains a list of food banks)
mynewextsetup.us

Aviation Way Medford, OR

Cornerstone Christian Church &#; Medford
(meals, foodbox, clothing)

N Bartlett St Medford, OR

Medford Gospel Mission &#; Medford &#;
(Men)
mynewextsetup.us

W Jackson St Medford, OR

Medford Gospel Mission &#; Medford
(WomenandChildren)
mynewextsetup.us

534 N Bartlett St Medford, OR

Salvation Army &#; Medford
mynewextsetup.us

Beatty St Medford, OR

Set Free Ministries &#; Medford
(food,showers,laundry)

W 8th St Medford, OR

St. Vincent de Paul &#; Medford

N Pacific Hwy Medford, OR

Ashland Community Food Bank &#; Ashland
mynewextsetup.us

Clover Ln Ashland, OR

Uncle Food&#;s Diner &#; Ashland
mynewextsetup.us

S Mountain Ave Ashland, OR

RVCOG (Rogue Valley Council of Governments &#; Jackson County) &#; Central Point
(Meals on Wheels/Food and Friends)
mynewextsetup.us

N 1st St Central Point, OR

Upper Rogue Community Center &#; Shady Cove

Hwy62 Shady Cove, OR

Gospel Rescue Mission &#; Grants Pass
mynewextsetup.us

SW Foundry St Grants Pass, OR

Josephine County Food Bank &#; Grants Pass

SE M St Grants Pass, OR

Love in Action &#; Grants Pass
3rd Saturday of each month at RiersidePark @ in the Gazebo behind the softball field
(Serving hot meals, warm clothes, hand warmers, hygiene supplies, blankets, dogfood &#; all free ; contact is Marie)

RVCOG(Rogue Valley Council of Governments &#; Josephine County) &#; Grants Pass
(Meals on Wheels/Food and Friends)
mynewextsetup.us

Ringuette St Grants Pass, OR

Salvation Army &#; Grants Pass
mynewextsetup.us

Redwood Ave Grants Pass, OR

Rogue River Community Center &#; Rogue River
mynewextsetup.us

Broadway St Rogue River, OR

Klamath Basin Senior Citizen&#;s Association &#; Klamath Falls
(Meals on Wheels and Meals on Site)

Arthur St Klamath Falls, OR

Klamath Falls Gospel Mission – Klamath Falls
mynewextsetup.us

Walnut Ave, Klamath Falls Or,

Klamath – Lake Counties Food Bank – Klamath Falls
mynewextsetup.us

Maywood Drive, Klamath Falls Or,

Salvation Army – Klamath Falls

Maywood Dr. Klamath Falls Or, Units 12 & 13

SNAP Program –
online application at mynewextsetup.us
Self Sufficiency Offices: Self Sufficiency Offices:

  • Ashland St, Ashland, OR
  • Market St, Medford, OR
  • Avenue C, White City, OR
  • East River St, Cave Junction, OR
  • NW Hawthorne Suite B, Grants Pass, Or
  • , Klamath Ave, Suite , Klamath Falls OR

Oregon DHS Food Resources
mynewextsetup.us
( Emergency food, WIC, Home-delivered meals, nutrition education, SNAP Match Senior Farm Direct Nutrition Program, School lunch program, free summer meals for kids/teens)

Oregon Food Pantries
mynewextsetup.us (Search by city in Oregon)

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Amy’s Kitchen

Amy’s Kitchen was created 30 years ago from the belief that great tasting food should be available to all.

It all started when founders Rachel and Andy Berliner were pregnant with their daughter Amy, the namesake of the company. When Rachel was on bed rest during her pregnancy, Andy went looking for ready-made meals at their local natural grocery store. He couldn’t find anything organic and vegetarian that satisfied their taste so they decided to make their own. Turns out they were not the only ones in search of delicious, organic food.

Today, Amy’s takes pride in cooking great tasting, ready-made, organic and vegetarian meals for more than 14 million consumers, serving more than million meals each year. Amy’s Kitchen has remained a family-owned company and our food is made with the same care as the first day we started, just with slightly larger pots and pans.

Why Medford?
How did Amy’s choose Medford?

In the early ’s, Amy’s was experiencing significant growth &#; quickly outgrowing our Santa Rosa, California production facility. As we looked at where to open our next kitchen, it was important to keep production close to home, maintaining a strong connection with our culinary and sensory teams in order to ensure we upheld our high quality standards.

With Oregon’s friendly business climate and close proximity to California, Amy’s began exploring potential opportunities in the region. Medford quickly moved to the top of the list with unmatched cost advantages and a workforce that was already skilled in agriculture and food manufacturing, which we knew would help ensure a seamless transition for new employees.

The local Economic Development agency was also an instrumental part of Amy’s adoption into the community, guiding Amy’s through business opportunities and incentives and supporting our arrival in the region.

In , Amy’s was delighted to open our doors in the Medford region, specifically in White City, with a , square foot facility, making 25 products (all pizza) and employing employees.

How has Amy’s grown in Medford?

Since , Amy’s has grown significantly in Medford, growing our employee base to people and expanding our footprint to , square feet.

We’ve added two entrées line, a fresh pasta line, a tofu production area, as well as a canning line to make Amy’s soups, chilis and refried beans. In addition, Medford is proudly the sole producers of Amy’s gluten-free burritos. In , we also expanded our storage capabilities to match the growth in production with a , square dry and frozen food storage warehouse.

We’ve also invested in improving our environmental footprint in Medford – building a waste water treatment facility on site and incorporating cardboard and plastics recycling equipment in the plant.

Today in Medford, Amy’s has six food production lines, making different products each year, including pizzas, soups, chilis, refried beans, entrees, gluten-free burritos and non-dairy frozen desserts.

What is Amy’s doing to support the local area?

One of Amy’s core values is to ‘take care of each other.’ This extends not only to our employees, but also to their families. One of the important ways we do this is by providing comprehensive benefits for our employees and their families. In , we were Southern Oregon Business Journal 24 delighted to open our on-site Amy’s Family Health Center operated by Vera Whole Health next to our Medford Plant. The health center provides Amy’s Kitchen employees and their families free, quality primary care with no-cost medical prescriptions as well as ongoing health coaching. Amy’s Kitchen has been one of few employers nationwide to offer this level of free, convenient, high-quality, ongoing health care on-site.

Beyond our benefits program and onsite-healthcare, Amy’s also offers college scholarships to the children of our employees. Last year, for example, at a community awards ceremony, Amy’s co-founder, Andy Berliner, personally presented the scholarships to 34 students, all children of our White City employees.

In addition, Amy’s is committed to contributing to the broader local community in Medford &#; supporting the education community in and around Medford by hosting ten local teachers for an externship to learn more about the company and career opportunities that exist for their students, as well as volunteering and donating to Kids Unlimited, the North Medford High School and Jackson Elementary schools.

Finally, as a company whose purpose is to ‘make it easy and enjoyable for everyone to eat well’, Amy’s is passionate about ensuring low-income residents and people with dietary restrictions have access to the food they need. To help support this effort, we work closely with the Oregon Food Bank and ACCESS to locally donate food that goes to those in need.

Over the last 12 years, Amy’s has truly thrived in Medford and we look forward to continuing this journey with our employees, their families and the local community in the area for the long-term.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

HELP UPDATES 9/15/

Remember that all the assistance is shifting and changing to meet current needs. With that in mind, here is a current list of help available.

MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES

For hour mental health crisis support: call or visit: Jackson County Mental Health S Holly St, Medford, OR mynewextsetup.us

Community Works Helpline: HELP – hour helpline

National Suicide Prevention Hotline:

Crisis Text line: mynewextsetup.us Text HOME to

Current Mental Health Providers in the Rogue Valley

SHELTERS

Jackson County Expo 1 Peninger Road, Central Point, Oregon

Ashland Christian Fellowship – 50 West Hersey St. Ashland OR Resource center for food, clothing and a hot meal. sleeping shelter for displaced or evacuated folks.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Central Point: Space for trailers/RVs and spaces inside – Taylor Rd, Central Point, OR Court House Family Fitness – N. Phoenix Rd., Medford Free showers to those affected by the fires. (Monday-Friday 9am to 7pm, Saturday and Sunday 12pm to pm) More information ext. 2

Eagle Point Community Bible Church – 27 S Shasta Ave, Eagle Point, OR Showers available for evacuees, many donated supplies, food, and more. Staffed 24 hours a day East Evans Creek Community Center – 50 people () E Evans Creek Rd, Rogue River, OR Edgewater Christian Fellowship – 50 people - () Assembly Cir, Grants Pass, OR

First Presbyterian Church - 25 people - () 85 S. Holly Street, Medford, or

Grace Baptist Church Rogue River – – E Evans Creek Rd, Rogue River, OR

Harvest Time Fellowship – 25 people for evacuation – Jerry Frasier 2nd Street Gold Hill, OR Call to confirm room

Klamath Falls Gospel Mission Mission Ave., Klamath Falls, OR Fire evacuee center with tents and cots. For more information

New Life Church of the Nazarene - 50 people and vehicles (RVs accepted) - () E. McAndrews Road, Medford, OR

North Medford High School – N. Keene Way Drive Parking lot and gym open, restrooms and showers provided

St. Vincent de Paul - 20 vehicles (RVs not accepted) - () N. Pacific Hwy, Medford

St. Anne Church parking lot in Grants Pass – NE 10th St, Grants Pass, OR

The Salvation Army HOPE House transitional shelter program site in Medford is now operating as an Evacuee Shelter while still housing program participants. We are currently housing 31 evacuees and have the capacity for 50 evacuees. Meals are being provided for evacuees at the shelter. If you need assistance please call x The Thrift Store will open SEPT 10 to evacuees to redeem clothing vouchers.

OTHER HELP

ACCESS (Medford, September 14th, ) ACCESS is collaborating with community partners to help distribute resources and provide a place for donations in Jackson County. For a full list of updates and resources please visit mynewextsetup.us

Housing Connection Portal ACCESS has created an online portal to help connect those who have homes or rooms to share with those who have been displaced by local fires. Staff will work on matching and housing. Visit mynewextsetup.us

ACCESS Fire Relief Program The ACCESS Fire Relief Program helps those in Jackson County who have lost their homes due to local wildfires. ACCESS can provide: temporary shelter assistance, deposit assistance, food assistance, temporary housing connections, and referrals to other resources. To apply call or email [email protected]

ACCESS Food and Supply Distribution - This week only ACCESS will be setting up distributions sites this week for those who have been displaced by the local fires. The items will include convenience food, personal care items, and bedding while supplies last. · North Medford Walmart Parking Lot - Tuesday and Thursday – pm · Eagle Point Walmart Parking Lot - Wednesday Friday – pm

Family Nurturing Center in downtown Medford – N Oakdale Ave, Medford, OR Hours: 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Available: food, camp gear, clothes, books, kids’ toys, shoes. Still in need of phone chargers, bags, hygiene products. South Medford Walmart (place to give/get food/resources) – Center Dr, Medford, OR

The Devereux Center (showers/meals/clothing available) is a day center offering services to the homeless and mentally ill in and around Coos Bay, Oregon. We are open from (M, T, W, & F) Newmark Avenue, Coos Bay, Oregon ()

Kids Unlimited (place to give/get food/resources) – N Riverside Ave, Medford, OR 7 Day Adventist Church (place to get clothing) – Greenwood St, Medford, OR Sunday 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Living Waters Church – East Jackson Street, Medford OR providing food, supplies, clothes and camping supplies.

New Life Church of the Nazerene – E McAndrews, Medford Basic supplies, clothing, essentials. Parking lot available for vehicles/RVs

Rogue Valley Christian Church – S Oakdale Ave, Medford, OR Offering food, resources WiFi, a place to hang out during the day.

St. Vincent de Paul - continues to offer showers and laundry services, sack lunches, groceries, clothing, household goods and traditional Social Services -- financial assistance with rent, utilities, etc. For more information, call () - () N. Pacific Hwy, Medford

Set Free Ministry W. Main St, Medford clothing, food, meals, showers/laundry services.

Klamath Falls Gospel Mission – Mission Ave., Klamath Falls, OR Bedding, pillows, toiletries, sack lunches, water bottles, and personal hygiene for evacuees. Clothing available to evacuees at no charge at our Thrift Store Klamath Ave. in Klamath Falls, Phone: Paddington Station – E Main St, Ashland, OR Free change of clothing for anyone displaced by the fire.

Carpenter Hall in Ashland – 15 S Pioneer St, Ashland, OR Available here: Pet food, personal products, household items, blankets, toys, coats

Teresa McCormick Center – S Pacific Highway, Medford, OR Teresa McCormick Center – S Pacific Highway, Medford, OR Hours: Those affected by the fires Mon-Fri 9 am to 5 pm (Clothing, hygiene, linens, some camping gear, back packs and other basic essentials). General food pantry hours: Mondays 2 pm to pm and Thursdays 10 am to 1 pm Thursdays from

Southern Oregon Fire Relief – E Main St, Medford, OR Donations and pick up. Toiletries, food, water, clothing, blankets, pillows, tooth brushes, soap, batteries, propane, camping equipment, baby supplies, school supplies.

Klamath Lake Food Bank – Maywood Dr, Klamath Falls, OR If you need food assistance please call

Ashland High School – S Mountain Ave. Ashland, OR , Collecting donations of essential items. Available for affected families to pick up between each day, including weekends.

FREE MEALS - FOOD

Ashland Middle School, Walker Avenue Ashland, OR Ashland High School, South Mountain Ave Ashland, OR

Breadboard Restaurant – N Main St, Ashland, OR Free prepared to-go meals to anyone affected

Eagle Point - Eagle Point School District: Kids FREE curbside meals Thursday and Friday, September 10th & 11th, AM - PM! FREE meals will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis to yr old children at the Lower Table Rock Campus (WC) and Hillside Elementary (EP).

Klamath Falls Gospel Mission – Mission Ave., Klamath Falls, OR Three meals daily Monday through Friday, and two meals on weekends. Fire fighters and law enforcement invited to join us, too.

Los Arcos Restaurant – Sage Rd, Medford, OR Sign Dude has teamed up with Los Arcos to feed 1st responders and people affected by the fires. Lunch on Monday, September 14, from 11 o’clock on.

Free meals for all in Medford from 11 AM PM: • North Medford High School Keene Way Dr. Medford, OR • Jefferson Elementary School Holmes Ave. Medford, OR • Howard Elementary School Mace Rd. Medford, OR • Jackson Elementary School Summit Ave. Medford, OR • Oak Grove Elementary School W. Main St. Medford, OR • Roosevelt Elementary School Queen Anne Ave. Medford, OR Smithfield’s Restaurant and Bar – 36 S 2nd St, Ashland, OR Free meals from 4 to 6 p.m. Ashland Chamber of Commerce - mynewextsetup.us

TRANSPORTATION

RVTD Expo Shuttle: RVTD is running the following routes to and from the Jackson County Expo. Passengers should look for a Valley Lift paratransit van with the RVTD logo on the side. The shuttles run Monday through Saturday every 30 minutes between AM - PM and again at PM - PM. • Central Point shuttle- runs between the Expo and Central Point Albertson's/Goodwill on Freeman Rd. The Route 40 serves this shopping center. Anyone wanting to get to the Expo should get off the Route 40 at the stop on Freeman Rd. and walk to the Goodwill to wait in front for the shuttle. • South Gateway Medford shuttle- runs between the Expo and the mynewextsetup.usy Walmart and also the S. Medford Goodwill. The S. Walmart is served by the 1X and the S. Medford Goodwill is served by the Route Anyone wanting to get to the Expo needs to wait in front of either store. RTVD Bus Route Info

9/15 RVTD has three temporary routes in place while the regular Route 10 is suspended. A Temporary Ride Guide with maps and schedules is attached.

TEMPORARY SERVICES INCLUDE: ROUTE 10 SHORT- TRAVELING BETWEEN FRONT STREET STATION AND SOUTH STAGE ROAD USING THE ROUTE 10 FOOTPRINT.

ASHLAND LOOP - A LIMITED LOOP ROUTE IS SERVING THE CITY OF ASHLAND BETWEEN THE PLAZA AND BIMART.

AN EMERGENCY 1X WILL OPERATE TRAVELING BETWEEN MEDFORD AND ASHLAND USING


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Источник: mynewextsetup.us

ACCESS collecting donations during ‘Food for Hope’ campaign


MEDFORD, Ore. – If you’re looking to give back to the community this holiday season, ACCESS is now collecting donations to stock food pantry shelves in Jackson County.

As Jackson County’s Community Action nonprofit, ACCESS aims to collect 10, pounds of food and $30, during the 38th annual Food for Hope fund drive.

“Historically, we have seen an increase in the need for food assistance over the holidays and this year is no different,” said ACCESS Food Programs Director Marcee Champion. “Every year, we rely on donations from our community during the Grocery Bag Drive to help us meet the increased need”.

ACCESS said many factors, from the pandemic to wildfires, have contributed to a greater need for food assistance.

“With food prices increasing and the lingering effects of the pandemic, there is so much need for food in our community right now,” said ACCESS Executive Director Carrie Borgen. “The Food for Hope food and fund drive helps ACCESS stock up the shelves in our food pantries so we can get it to hungry families struggling this holiday season and into the new year.”

Aside from monetary donations, ACCESS food pantries are in need of the following items:

  • Cold or Hot Cereals
  • Peanut Butter
  • Canned Meats (Tuna, Chicken)
  • Pasta
  • Canned Goods: Soups, Vegetables and Fruits

If you’d like to fill a grocery bag for a family in need, they’re available for pick-up at Food 4 Less and Sherm’s Thunderbird Markets. After the bags are filled with non-perishable items, they can be dropped off at ACCESS, Food 4 Less, Sherm’s Thunderbird Markets, Umpqua Bank locations and local fire stations by December 31st.

For a list of drop-off locations or to make a tax-deductible monetary donation, visit mynewextsetup.us

Copyright California-Oregon Broadcasting, Inc.


Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Food Security in Oregon – Needs, Gaps and Opportunities Additional Resources

Food Security Overview and Statistics:

  • A new report by Oregon State University shows that around 25% of Oregonians experienced food insecurity in
  • This averages to about 1 million Oregonians.
  • Black, Latinx, and Indigenous households have been hit especially hard.
  • Even when Oregon’s overall food insecurity rate was at a record low in , that improvement in access to food did not extend to all communities equally.
  • Roughly 20% of Black, Latinx and Indigenous households experienced food insecurity in December , compared with 10% of the white population.

Read the full report here.

The following panelists and their affiliated organizations are all working to increase food security in Oregon: please read more about them below.   

Main Session (Recording can be found here. Due to technical difficulties, the recording for the main session begins about 5 minutes into the program.)

Rima Green

Organizations/Affiliations: Growing Gardens, Lettuce Grow Director

Growing Gardens uses the experience of growing food in schools, backyards and correctional facilities to cultivate healthy and equitable communities.

Carina Miller

Organizations/Affiliations: Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Member

Summary: The Government of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs is charged with securing and protecting the perpetual health and prosperity of the Confederated Tribes. The government fulfills its mission by preserving and strengthening the sovereign status of the Confederated Tribes, protecting the treaty and legal rights and interests of the Confederated Tribes, and creating a community and economic environment which affords every member of the Confederated Tribes the opportunity to attain good health, self-sufficiency, pride and self-esteem.

Susannah Morgan

Organizations/Affiliations: Oregon Food Bank, Executive Director

Summary: OFB collects food from farmers, manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, individuals and government sources. They distribute that food through a statewide network of food banks serving all of Oregon and Clark County, Washington.

Aaron Vargas

Organizations/Affiliations: Ecotrust, Food Equity Manager

Summary: Ecotrust’s mission is to inspire fresh thinking that creates economic opportunity, social equity, and environmental well-being. Their goal is to foster a natural model of development that creates more resilient communities, economies, and ecosystems here and around the world.

 

Breakout Sessions:

FARM-TO-SCHOOL (recording can be found here)

Farm-to-school summary: Bringing locally grown produce into schools is a fun and healthy way to get youth excited about where food comes from, how it grows, and eating fresh fruit and vegetables. Join us to learn more about successful farm to school initiatives and partnerships.

Stefan Aumack - Organizations/Affiliations: Kalapuya High School/The Bethel Farm, Co-Principal

The Bethel Farm is the result of Kalapuya High School’s sustainable agriculture class and their research into the feasibility of creating a district farm. After several attempts to locate a farm nearby for the district to purchase, it was realized that they could use the extra field space between Kalapuya HS and Prairie Mountain School.

Jaime Arredondo - Organizations/Affiliations: Oregon Farm to School and Garden Network, Board Member; CAPACES Leadership Institute (CLI), Executive Director

The Oregon Farm to School and School Garden Network’s (OFSSGN) mission is to improve the health and well-being of youth, families, farms, and the environment by supporting members of Oregon’s farm to school and school garden community the their work to incorporate healthy, local food into school meals and implement food and garden-based education.

CAPACES Leadership Institute (CLI): The CLI builds leadership in the Latino and farm working community. The CLI is a permanent part of the Oregon farmworker movement, led by PCUN. The Institute will build the leadership capacity and political consciousness to sustain and expand that movement and to propel a host of related struggles, such as immigrants’ rights

Audrey Tehan - Organizations/Affiliations: Seed to Table, Executive Director/Farm Director

Seed to Table envisions a healthy and resilient community where all people, regardless of race, gender, geography, or socioeconomic status, have access to fresh produce that is nourishing, locally grown, and keeping with their culture and preferences. From their acre farm plot they strive to model a sustainable food system while providing equitable access to fresh foods and opportunities for all to engage positively with nutritious foods

FOOD EQUITY

Food Equity Summary:  We believe all people have the right to grow and consume healthy, affordable and culturally specific foods. Join us to learn how communities are addressing food equity and striving to provide good food to everyone.

Shantae Johnson - Organizations/Affiliations: Mudbone Grown, Unity Farm Manager; Black Oregon Land Trust, OFB Pathways to Farming Program

Mudbone Grown is a black-owned farm enterprise that promotes inter-generational community-based farming that creates measurable and sustainable environmental, social, cultural, and economic impacts in communities

The Black Oregon Land Trust (BOLT) is a nonprofit creating opportunities for Black farmers in Oregon to collectively own land, build generational health and wealth, and birth sovereign, thriving communities

Javier Lara - Organizations/Affiliations: Anuhuac Program at CAPACES Leadership Institute

The Anahuac Project, formed by Capaces Leadership Insitute and supported by FHDC and Evolve with land, resources, volunteers, and residents is providing much-needed healing opportunities through a reclamation of land, identity, and history in a manner that honors indigenous farming and community traditions, while acknowledging the dynamic between land-owner and worker; privileged and oppressed.

REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEMS (recording can be found here)

Regional food systems summary:Regional food systems are increasingly important to individuals, families and communities for social, economic and environmental reasons. Join us to learn how local and regional food systems support community vitality and improve food security.

Alex Adame - Organizations/Affiliations: Jefferson County School District, Family Access Network Advocate

Family Access Network’s mission is to offer assistance, possibility and hope to Central Oregon families in need by connecting them with crucial resources that will help children flourish in school and in life.

Jordan Haas - Organizations/Affiliations: Gorge Grown Food Network, Food Security Coalition Coordinator

Gorge Grown Food Network is a group of farmers, eaters, policy-makers, educators, healthcare providers, chefs, grocers, makers, and food enthusiasts. Collectively, they aim to ensure that everyone in the community has access to fresh, healthy, local food, and that farmers have the skills, support, and infrastructure they need to succeed

Rick Gaupo - Organizations/Affiliations: Marion-Polk Food Share, President & CEO

Marion-Polk Food Share's mission is to bring people together to end hunger and its root causes. Every month, more than 46, people – including 15, children – will access emergency food through the Marion Polk Food Share partner network. This food may be a hot meal served at a shelter, a free community meal served at a church, or an emergency food box from a food pantry.

Lauren Sorg - Organizations/Affiliations: Food Roots, Tillamook, Executive Director

Founded in , Food Roots has helped build linkages among farmers, processors, educators, agencies, nonprofits, farmers markets, schools, youth groups, local government and anyone else interested in making our local food economy stronger

Tom Mulhern - Organizations/Affiliations: Food for Lane County, Executive Director

Food for Lane County is dedicated to reducing hunger by engaging their community to create access to food. They accomplish this by soliciting, collecting, rescuing, growing, preparing and packaging food for distribution through a network of social service agencies and programs; through public awareness, education and community advocacy; and through programs designed to improve the ability of low-income individuals to maintain an adequate supply of wholesome, nutritious food.

Margaret Davidson - Organizations/Affiliations: Community Connection of NE Oregon, Executive Director

The mission of Community Connection of Northeast Oregon, Inc. is to advocate for and assist senior citizens, children, low-income persons, and persons with disabilities in attaining basic human needs and in becoming more self-sufficient. This will be accomplished by providing direct client services; stimulating a more efficient use of existing resources; broadening the available resource base; and providing decent, safe, sanitary and affordable housing for low and moderate income persons

INDEPENDENT FOOD PANTRIES

Independent food pantries summary: From the basement of a church to the community kitchen, independent food pantries are a lifeline for communities. Learn how these community-led and community supported organizations are increasingly relied upon to provide basic needs across Oregon.

Ranae Staley - Organizations/Affiliations: The Giving Plate, Executive Director

The Giving Plate provides food to over 3, individuals a month, between three hunger-relief programs. Their goal is not just providing food, but offering piece of mind to their guests and allowing them to focus their resources on more than just their next

Isaak Oliansky - Organizations/Affiliations: Ashland Emergency Food Bank, Director

Ahsland Emergency Food Bank's mission is to provide food, free of charge, to residents of Ashland, Talent and surrounding rural communities, and to do so in a way that conveys respect and dignity for those being served.  The Food Bank is set up as a grocery store. People sign in – and then get a shopping cart and can shop once per month for their families.

Donna Parks - Organizations/Affiliations: Tillamook Adventist Community Services 

Tillamook Community Services is a local relief agency that provides free clothing, food, and small household goods to those in need.  This group also makes and distributes quilts and layettes for the newborn.  Shower and laundry facilities are available for the homeless population by appointment. They are an Oregon Food Pantry, the local agency for Salvation Army, as well as part of the global organization, Adventist Community Services. 

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Access Food Banks

Food Pantry Network

ACCESS Food Share provides emergency food boxes to hungry families and individuals in Jackson County through a network of over 24 food pantries. The program also supplies food to over 20 agency programs serving low-income individuals.

Food Donations

ACCESS Food Share solicits, receives and distributes donated food from generous individuals, businesses and the Oregon Food Bank. These donated resources are often received from local food drives, grocery stores and gardens.

The Medford Valley Scottish Rite has long been supportive of the food collection from local members of the Scottish Rite, Shrine and other Masonic Organizations. The Scottish Rite Center is a Food Donation Collection Center during the holiday season and provides donations to the Access Organization.

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, religious creed, disability, age, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at () Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Volunteer

Share your time to end hunger

When you volunteer with Oregon Food Bank, you’re supporting access to nutritious food today, and you’re building community power to eliminate hunger for good.

Be part of a committed group of people working to end hunger.

There are opportunities to volunteer almost every day and in ways that fit with how you want to help — whether that’s packing food at one of our central locations, distributing nutritious meals in your community, making phone calls from the comfort of your home or lobbying at the state Capitol.

View calendar: Find volunteer opportunities that work for you.

View calendar

At Oregon Food Bank locations

Help pack food, provide office and event support, or advocate for policy change through opportunities at our Portland and Beaverton locations. You can meet community service requirements by volunteering with Oregon Food Bank. All volunteers must register ahead of time.

Sign upSign up

In the community

Our partner organizations provide food and support to people in your community. Whether you help unload food at a local agency or speak with neighbors about anti-hunger policy efforts, you have the opportunity to build relationships in your community while working to address hunger.

Sign upSign up

From your home

Volunteers are a driving force behind addressing hunger at its roots. From the comfort of your home, you can advocate to improve access to nutritious food and help remove barriers to employment, housing, health care and more.

Sign upSign up

With your small group

We are currently working on developing a new group volunteer registration process and will update this page as it’s completed.

In the meantime, if individuals within your group are interested in working in a repack shift in our warehouse or out in the community, each person (adults and youth) would need to sign up as an individual. Space is limited. Click HERE to search for onsite and offsite volunteer opportunities for individuals.

For group questions or inquires, please contact us below.

Contact usContact us

It’s important to have school pantries because that’s where our children are and we can distribute information about food banks. From there the information gets passed down to our neighbors, to our elderly, who also need a lot of help.

Isabel, Portland, Oregon
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Источник: mynewextsetup.us
access food bank medford oregon

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  1. Wa-alaykum assalaam warahmatullahi wabarakatuh. Thank you very much for responding to my appeal. May Allah accept your kind donation. The charity's bank details are as follows:

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