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2020 dates for jewish holidays


2020 dates for jewish holidays

according to the Jewish calendar, these dates vary on the Gregorian of Rosh Hashanah—President Donald J. Trump, September 18, All Jewish holidays begin at sunset on the first date specified and extend until Simchat Torah. OCT. Hanukkah. DEC. These holidays are both spoken of in Leviticus chapter 23, and the reason they are so important is that they deal with the topic of atonement. Whether religious.
2020 dates for jewish holidays

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The Jewish Calendar \u0026 The Five Appointed Feasts Out of 21 Years : The Return of The Messiah.

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Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur: the High Holy Days of the Jewish year

This message is one of many related to our diverse community’s numerous unique holidays, including cultural, historic, and religious observances throughout the year. I am likely to write about the holidays or cultural observances that mean the most to you as they occur throughout the year. Please let me know if you want to learn my plans about a holiday that is specifically important to you.

Together, the holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are the High Holy Days of the Jewish year. Both take place in the coming days.

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, which means “the head of the year,” is the Jewish New Year. The biblical name for this holiday is Yom Teruah. It is the traditional anniversary of the creation of the world and the creation of Adam and Eve, who are known as the biblical first man and first woman. Rosh Hashanah is also a judgment day, when Jews believe that their God considers people’s deeds from the previous year, decides what the next year will be like for them, and inscribes the results in the Book of Life for the coming year.

When is Rosh Hashanah?

Rosh Hashanah is a two-day celebration that begins on the first day of Tishrei, the seventh month of the Jewish ecclesiastical year. In , the holiday begins at sunset on Friday, September 18, and ends at sunset on Sunday, September While I am not Jewish, I am happy to note that my birthday lands right in the middle of these very important days for my Jewish friends this year.

I wrote in detail about this holiday last year. I encourage you to read it.

Rosh Hashanah marks the beginning of the 10 “Days of Awe,” which conclude with Yom Kippur.

Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the Jewish year. It concludes the 10 Days of Awe. The day is devoted to repentance for sins that were committed during the previous year.

In , Yom Kippur begins on the evening of Sunday, September 27, and ends on the evening of Monday, September

At the conclusion of Yom Kippur, there is a joyous celebration and a breaking of the fast.

Many more details about this holiday are included in my message from last year.

This year, communal observances of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur will be different from other years. The full communal celebrations will be less common and will take place with smaller groups exercising safe practices during the pandemic. For all who celebrate, the rituals of setting aside work, repentance, and purification will bring spiritual and historic meaning as they always do.

To those celebrating Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur:
Shanah Tovah! (“A good year!”)
Yom Tov! (“Have a good holy day!”)

Russ Kavalhuna
President

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

List of observances set by the Hebrew calendar

Date on Hebrew calendar Gregorian date Hebrew Name Notes TishreiSeptember , Rosh HashanahPublic holiday in Israel Tishrei September , Ten Days of Repentance3 Tishrei September 21, Fast of GedaliaPublic holiday in Israel, changes to Tishrei 4 when Tishrei 3 is Shabbat. Starts at dawn. Movable September 26, Shabbat Shuvah (Sabbath of Return, or Sabbath of Repentance) Shabbat between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur9 Tishrei September 27, Erev Yom KippurYom Kippur Eve 10 Tishrei September 28, Yom KippurPublic holiday in Israel. Unlike other fasting days, this does not move to avoid interfering with Shabbat. 14 Tishrei October 2, Erev SukkotSukkot Eve Movable October 3, Shabbat Chol Hamoed Sukkot Tishrei October , SukkotOne of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals, public holiday in Israel Tishrei (1-day communities) / Tishrei (2-day communities) October , / October , Chol HaMoedSukkotPublic holiday in Israel. Seharane is celebrated by Kurdish Jews during this time, but only in the State of Israel. Outside of Israel Seharane is celebrated after Passover. 21 Tishrei October 9, Hoshanah Rabbah22 Tishrei October 10, Shemini AtzeretPublic holiday in Israel. Includes Simchat Torah in 1-day communities. 23 Tishrei October 11, Simchat Torah2-day communities only Movable October 16, Shabbat MevorchimShabbat preceding and beginning a week containing a Rosh Chodesh1 CheshvanOctober 19, Rosh Chodesh of CheshvanMovable October 20, BahabFirst Monday of Cheshvan, starts at dawn (optional) Movable October 22, BahabFirst Thursday of Cheshvan after the first Monday, starts at dawn.(optional) Movable October 26, BahabMonday following first Thursday of Cheshvan, starts at dawn. (optional) 7 Cheshvan October 27, V'tein Tal u-Matar ("Deliver Dew and Rain") This is a prayer added to the Shemoneh Esrei prayers in Israel. If no rain has fallen by the 17th of Cheshvan, special prayers are added for rain [1]7 Cheshvan October 27, Yom HaAliyahObserved in Israeli schools on 7 Cheshvan with 10 Nisan being the public holiday in Israel. 12 Cheshvan October 30, Rabin DayPublic holiday in IsraelMovable November 13, Shabbat MevorchimShabbat preceding and beginning a week containing a Rosh Chodesh29 Cheshvan November 16, SigdPublic holiday in Israel1 KislevNovember 17, Rosh Chodesh of KislevIn years when Cheshvan has 30 days, this also includes 30 Cheshvan. 1 Kislev November 17, 1 KislevNon Rosh Chodesh related observance, Chabad sect only 6 Kislev November 22, Ben-Gurion DayPublic holiday in Israel9 Kislev November 25, 9 KislevChabad sect only 10 Kislev November 26, 10 KislevChabad sect only 19 Kislev December 5, 19 KislevChabad sect only 23 Kislev December 9, Teacher's Day in IsraelMovable December 11, Shabbat MevorchimShabbat preceding and beginning a week containing a Rosh Chodesh25 Kislev— 2 TevetDecember , HanukkahPublic holiday in Israel. Ends 3 Tevet if Kislev is short. 1 TevetDecember 16, Rosh Chodesh of Tevet5 Tevet 5 TevetChabad sect only 10 Tevet December 25, Tenth of TevetPublic holiday in Israel. Starts at dawn. Movable January 9, Shabbat MevorchimShabbat preceding and beginning a week containing a Rosh Chodesh29 Tevet January 13, Yom Kippur KatanOptional. If Yom Kippur Katan falls on a Friday or Saturday, it is moved to the preceding Thursday to avoid interfering with mynewextsetup.us at dawn. Starts at dawn. 1 ShevatJanuary 14, Rosh Chodesh of Shevat10 Shevat January 23, 10 ShevatChabad sect only Movable January 23, Shabbat ShirahShabbat that falls on or before Tu BiShvat 15 Shevat January 28, Tu BiShvatPublic holiday in Israel22 Shevat February 4, 22 ShevatChabad sect only Movable February 13, Shabbat ShekalimShabbat on or before Rosh Chodesh Adar (or Adar II in leap years) 29 Shevat February 11, Yom Kippur KatanOptional. If Yom Kippur Katan falls on a Friday or Saturday, it is moved to the preceding Thursday to avoid interfering with Shabbat. Starts at dawn. 1 AdarFebruary 12, Rosh Chodesh of Adar 7 Adar February 19, Seventh of AdarStarts at dawn. On Adar II on leap years, Adar I on non-leap years Movable February 20, Shabbat ZachorShabbat immediately preceding Purim. On leap years, this falls on the 1st of Adar II, or on the 1st of Adar II itself if it is Shabbat. Adar I on non-leap years. 13 Adar February 25, Fast of EstherPublic holiday in Israel. Starts at dawn. Can be moved to avoid conflict with the Sabbath. On Adar II on leap years, Adar I on non-leap years. 14 Adar Not celebrated Purim KatanMinor Purim celebration on Adar I during leap years. Purim itself is celebrated in Adar II. 14 Adar February 26, PurimPublic holiday in Israel On Adar II on leap years, Adar I on non-leap years. 15 Adar February 27, Shushan PurimOn Adar II on leap years, Adar I on non-leap years.\ Movable March 6, Shabbat ParahShabbat preceding Shabbat HaChodesh 29 Adar March 11, Yom Kippur KatanOptional. If Yom Kippur Katan falls on a Friday or Saturday, it is moved to the preceding Thursday to avoid interfering with Shabbat. Starts at dawn. Movable March 13, Shabbat HaChodeshShabbat on or immediately preceding Rosh Chodesh of Nisan 1 NisanMarch 14, Rosh Chodesh of NisanThis is also the New Year for the reigns of Jewish kings (in line with the national emphasis of the season), the renting of houses, and the counting involved in the prohibition against delaying the fulfillment of vows.[2]10 Nisan March 23, Yom HaAliyahPublic holiday in Israel11 Nisan March 24, 11 Nisan(Chabad sect only) 11 Nisan March 24, Education and Sharing DayUnited States14 Nisan March 25, Fast of the Firstbornon 12 Nisan when the 14th falls on Sabbath Movable March 27, Shabbat HaGadolShabbat immediately preceding Passover Nisan (1-day communities) / Nisan (2-day communities) March April 3, / March April 4, PassoverPublic holiday in Israel. One of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals. Nisan (1-day communities) / Nisan (2-day communities) March April 2, / March April 2, Chol HaMoed PesachPublic holiday in Israel. Movable April 3, Shabbat Chol Hamoed Pesach21 Nisan April 3, Shvi'i shel PesachPublic holiday in Israel. Movable April 3 - April 12, Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the HolocaustUnited States, Sunday before Yom Hashoah to following Sunday 22 Nisan (1-day communities) / 23 Nisan (2-day communities) April 4, / April 5, MimounaPublic holiday in Israel16 Nisan - 5 SivanSunset, 28 March – nightfall, 16 May, Counting the Omer23 Nisan April 5, SeharaneSeharane is celebrated by Kurdish Jews outside of Israel on this date. In the state of Israel, it is celebrated on Chol HaMoedSukkot. (see entry for that holiday) 23 Nisan (22 Nisan within Israel) April 5, (April 4, ) Shab ShalIranian Jews, end of Passover holiday. 27 Nisan sunset, April 8 – nightfall, April 9, Yom HaShoahPublic holiday in Israel. Moved to 26 or 28 Nisan when the 27th falls on Friday or Sunday respectively, interfering with Shabbat. Movable April 10, Shabbat MevorchimShabbat preceding and beginning a week containing a Rosh Chodesh1 IyarApril 13, Rosh Chodesh of Iyar2 Iyar April 14, 2 IyarChabad sect only. First Thursday of Iyar April 15, Bahab(optional) 4 Iyar Sunset, 16 April – nightfall, 17 April, Yom HazikaronPublic holiday in Israel. Might be moved to avoid conflict with Independence Day (Israel) or Shabbat. 5 Iyar April 17, Day to PraiseSame day as Independence Day (Israel), see next entry. 5 Iyar April 17, Independence Day (Israel)Public holiday in Israel. Might be moved to avoid conflict with Yom Hazikaron or Shabbat. First Monday of Iyar April 19, Bahab(optional) Monday following first Thursday of Iyar April 19th, Bahab(optional) 10 Iyar April 22, Herzl DayPublic holiday in Israel. 14 Iyar Sunset, 25 April – nightfall, 26 April, Pesach Sheni18 Iyar Sunset, 29 April – nightfall, 30 April, Lag Ba'omerPublic holiday in Israel. 28 Iyar May 10, Fast of SamuelFast is optional and is generally only observed by Chevra kadisha. Starts at dawn. 28 Iyar May 10, Jerusalem DayPublic holiday in Israel. 29 Iyar May 11, Yom Kippur KatanOptional. If Yom Kippur Katan falls on a Friday or Saturday, it is moved to the preceding Thursday to avoid interfering with Shabbat. Starts at dawn. 1 SivanMay 12, Rosh Chodesh of Sivan6 Sivan (1-day communities) / Sivan (2-day communities) May 17, / May , ShavuotOne of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals. Public holiday in Israel. 20 Sivan May 31, Fast of the Khmelnytsky massacresNot widely observed 29 Sivan June 9, Yom Kippur KatanOptional. If Yom Kippur Katan falls on a Friday or Saturday, it is moved to the preceding Thursday to avoid interfering with Shabbat. Starts at dawn. 1 TammuzJune 11, Rosh Chodesh of Tammuz3 Tammuz June 13, 3 TammuzChabad sect only Tammuz June , TammuzChabad sect only 17 Tammuz June 27, Seventeenth of TammuzCan be moved to avoid interfering with Shabbat. Public holiday in Israel. 17 Tammuz - 9 Av June July 18, The Three Weeks29 Tammuz July 9, Jabotinsky DayPublic holiday in Israel. 29 Tammuz July 9, Yom Kippur KatanOptional. If Yom Kippur Katan falls on a Friday or Saturday, it is moved to the preceding Thursday to avoid interfering with Shabbat. Starts at dawn. 1 AvJuly 10, Rosh Chodesh of Av1 Av - 9 Av July July 18, The Nine DaysMovable July 17, Shabbat ChazonShabbat immediately prior to Tisha B'Av 9 Av July 18, Tisha B'AvPublic holiday in Israel15 Av Sunset, 23 July – nightfall, 24 July Tu B'AvPublic holiday in Israel. Movable July 24, Shabat NachamuShabbat immediately following Tisha B'av 30 Av August 8, Yom Kippur KatanOptional. If Yom Kippur Katan falls on a Friday or Saturday, it is moved to the preceding Thursday to avoid interfering with Shabbat. Starts at dawn. 1 ElulAugust 9, Rosh Hashanah LaBehema and Rosh Chodesh of Elul15 Elul August 23, 15 ElulChabad sect only 18 Elul August 26, Chai ElulChabad sect only Movable August 28, Leil Selichot prayers begin under Ashkenazic tradition These prayers begin on the Saturday night before Rosh Hashanah. If, however, the first day of Rosh Hashanah falls on Monday or Tuesday, the prayers are begun the Saturday night prior to ensure that Selichot are recited at least four times. 29 Elul September 6, Erev Rosh Hashanah
Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Rosh Hashanah Jewish holiday what is it, why is it celebrated and how long does it last?

The Jewish New Year (Rosh Hashanah) is one of Judaism’s holiest periods. Meaning “head of the year”, the celebration begins on the first day of Tishrei, the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar, which normally falls during September or October. Rosh Hashanah commemorates the creation of the world and marks the beginning of the Days of Awe, a day period of introspection and repentance that culminates in the Yom Kippur holiday, also known as the Day of Atonement. Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are the two “High Holy Days” in the Jewish religion.

Rosh Hashanah in

Rosh Hashanah this year began at sundown on 18 September and will finish on nightfall on 20 September. The holiday in will start earlier with sundown on 6 September marking to start of the period with the conclusion coinciding with nightfall on 8 September.

Traditional food associated with Rosh Hashanahfeasts include round challah bread (studded with raisins) and apples dipped in honey, as well as other foods that symbolize good wishes for a sweet year ahead.

Other Rosh Hashanah traditions include the lighting of candles in the evenings, wearing new clothes and desisting from creative work along with visits to the synagogue.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Yom Kippur fast times: What time Jewish holiday starts today and meaning behind fasting

Yom Kippur, one of the most sacred dates in the Jewish religious calendar, is taking place this week and most Jews will be expected to fast.

But why does the fast last 25 hours, and how is it celebrated. Here’s everything you need to know.

What are the hours of fasting?

This year Yom Kippur begins on Wednesday 15 September and ends on Thursday 16 September.

Read More - Featured Image

You must start fasting at pm on the 15, and stop at 8pm the following day.

The fast lasts for 25 hours because it must start and end at sundown, the extra hour allows for some subjectivity with when nightfall is.

The is also the case in the Jewish faith for Shabbat, the weekly Sabbath day which lasts from sunset on Friday to Sunset on Saturday.

Yom Kippur falls on the 10th day of the Jewish month of Tishrei (September or October in the Gregorian calendar).

It marks the culmination of the Days of Repentance or Days of Awe, a day period of introspection that follows Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, which celebrates the anniversary of the creation of the world.

Why do Jewish people fast on Yom Kippur?

Yom Kippur means means Day of Atonement and it is a day to reflect on the past year and ask God’s forgiveness for any sins you may have committed.

Fasting is seen as a vehicle for reflecting on your sins and it dates back to Biblical times.

“The purpose of fasting is to bring one to repent, and true repentance brings about a change in actions. However, repenting without fasting is not enough,” Jewish educator Aliza Bulow told mynewextsetup.us

Anyone who must eat due to health reasons will not be required to fast. Children under the age of nine are also exempted.

“The same Torah which commands us to fast on Yom Kippur tells us that guarding our health is far more important than fasting on this holy day,” Jewish website Chabad says.

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men and children perform the "Tashlich" ritual in the coastal city of Netanya on September 14, during which "sins are cast into the water to the fish", ahead of the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur, the most important day in the Jewish calendar, which this year will start at sunset on September (Photo by JACK GUEZ / AFP) (Photo by JACK GUEZ/AFP via Getty Images)

The origins trace back to the story of Moses, after the people of Israel made their exodus from Egypt.

After Moses climbed Mount Sinai, God gave him two tablets containing the Ten Commandments. The first commandment told people that they should not worship anyone other than God.

However, when he descended from the mountain, Moses caught the Israelites worshipping a golden calf and shattered the holy tablets in anger.

The Israelites atoned for their idolatry and God forgave them on on the 10th day of Tishrei, which then became known as Yom Kippur.

How else is Yom Kippur celebrated?

People generally do not work or go to school on Yom Kippur.

Most of the day is spent a the synagogue, where five prayer services are held (instead of the traditional two). These are known as: Maariv, Shacharit, Musaf, Mincha and Neilah.

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Maariv includes the recital of a prayer service called Kol Nidre, which takes place on the eve of the holiday.

Yom Kippur concludes with the Neilah service and the blowing of the shofar, an ancient instrument, which marks the conclusion of the fast.

After the service, people usually break the fast and celebrate with a family meal.

It is customary to wear white, as a symbol of purity during the day.

As a way to atone and seek God’s forgiveness, some Jews make donations or volunteer their time to charity in the days leading up to the holiday.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us
Rosh Hashanah foodGetty Images

Rosh Hashanah is a special festival which celebrates Jewish New Year. It literally means 'head of the year'.

The festival lasts for two days and in it starts on Monday 6 September.

This is because the dates of Jewish festivals come from the Hebrew Calendar, so the Jewish New Year begins in autumn, as opposed to on 1 January.

Find out more about what Rosh Hashanah means and how it is traditionally celebrated below.

What does it symbolise?

Rosh Hashanah is a celebration of the creation of the world and marks making a fresh start.

It is a time for people to reflect on the past year and to ask for forgiveness for anything wrong they feel they have done.

They can also think about their priorities in life and what it important to them.

The festival also marks a time of judgment, when Jewish people believe that God balances a person's good acts over the last year with their bad acts, and decides what the coming 12 months will be like for them.

During Rosh Hashanah, people will ask themselves questions like:

• What is the most important thing in my life?

• What are the most meaningful and important things I have achieved in the last year?

• What do I hope to achieve over the coming year?

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How is it celebrated?

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During Rosh Hashanah, Jewish people will traditionally greet each other with L'shanah tovah, which means "for a good New Year".

Many Jewish families will spend some of Rosh Hashanah at a Synagogue. This is the name given to the building where Jewish people go to worship.

One of the traditions of Rosh Hashanah is to blow a big horn called a Shofar. One hundred notes are blown on the horn to create a special rhythm.

The Shofar is one of the world's oldest known wind instruments.

Children blowing the ShofarEuropean Photopress Agency

In this photo, children are seen blowing the Shofar

The sound of the Shofar marks the beginning of the ten-day period called the 'Days of Awe', which lead up to another Jewish festival called Yom Kippur.

Yom Kippur is the most solemn day in the Jewish calendar. It means Day of Atonement and people don't eat or drink for 25 hours. It's a day to reflect on the past year and ask God's forgiveness for any sins.

During Rosh Hashanah, food is also really important.

Slices of apple are dipped in honey to symbolise a sweet new year ahead. Honey cake is eaten too.

Rosh Hashanah foodGetty Images

Slices of apple are dipped in honey as part of the celebrations

The Jewish Sabbath, or holy day, is called Shabbat and it begins at sunset on Friday and lasts until nightfall on Saturday. Shabbat is Hebrew for Sabbath.

Some Jewish people make a sweet carrot stew called tzimmes, and bread called Challah (or Hallah) is baked into a round shape to symbolise the circle of life and the end of the year. This is different to the plaited bread Challah loaf which Jewish people typically eat on the Sabbath.

You might also find a pomegranate on the table because there is a tradition that they contain seeds. These represent one for each of the commandments a Jewish person is supposed to keep.

Источник: mynewextsetup.us

Rosh Hashana in the United States

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When Is Rosh Hashana ?

7SepUSATue, 7 Sep Add to calendar

Quick Facts

This year:Tue, 7 Sep
Next year:Mon, 26 Sep
Last year:Sat, 19 Sep
Type:Jewish holiday

List of dates for other years

United States holidays

United States holidays

Rosh Hashana is celebrated as the Jewish New Year among many Jewish communities worldwide. It starts days after the first day of Passover. Rosh Hashana lasts for up to two days in many communities.

Is Rosh Hashana a Public Holiday?

This is not a public holiday in the United States. Most businesses, schools, and offices are open and follow regular hours, but Jewish-run businesses and organizations might be closed.

About Rosh Hashana

Read more about Rosh Hashana.

Note: Jewish holidays begin at sundown the day before the date specified for the holiday.

While we diligently research and update our holiday dates, some of the information in the table above may be preliminary. If you find an error, please let us know.

Other Names and Languages

EnglishRosh Hashana
Arabic&#;&#;&#; &#;&#;&#;&#;&#; &#;&#;&#;&#;&#;&#;&#;
GermanRosch ha-Schana (j&#;disches Neujahr)
Hebrew&#;&#;&#; &#;&#;&#;&#;
Korean&#;&#;&#;&#;&#;/&#;&#;&#; &#;&#;
NorwegianRosh ha-shana
SpanishRosh Hashan&#;

Other Holidays in September in the United States

  • 6 Sep, Labor Day
  • 7 Sep, Rosh Hashana
  • 9 Sep, California Admission Day
  • 10 Sep, Ganesh Chaturthi
  • 11 Sep, First Responders Day
  • 12 Sep, National Grandparents Day
  • 16 Sep, Yom Kippur
  • 17 Sep, Constitution Day and Citizenship Day
  • 18 Sep, Air Force Birthday
  • 21 Sep, First Day of Sukkot
  • 22 Sep, Emancipation Day
  • 24 Sep, Native American Day
  • 26 Sep, Gold Star Mother's Day
  • 27 Sep, Last Day of Sukkot
  • 28 Sep, Shmini Atzeret
  • 29 Sep, Simchat Torah

United Nation Holiday on 7 September

Fun Holiday on 7 September

    Salami Day

    Enjoy the delicious cured and dried sausage that originated in Italy. Have it in a sandwich, as a snack or with some wine. More

Источник: mynewextsetup.us
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ACROSS AMERICA — For Jews around the world, the two-day holiday known as Rosh Hashanah begins Friday night at sundown and concludes at sundown Sunday.

Considered the beginning of the Jewish New Year and one of the most important holidays on the Jewish calendar, Rosh Hashanah is packed with special foods, traditions and mitzvahs, or commandments. One of the most important things to do on Rosh Hashanah is to hear the blowing of the shofar, or the ram's horn.

Here are five things to know about the holiday. Shanah Tovah!

Find out what's happening in Across America with free, real-time updates from Patch.

1) What is Rosh Hashanah?

The words actually mean "head of the year" and are used to mark the beginning of the Jewish New Year. Rosh Hashanah is a two-day period that culminates with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, and the holiest day on the Jewish calendar.

Find out what's happening in Across America with free, real-time updates from Patch.

The two-day period is also referred to as "The Days of Awe" and focuses on repentance and atonement.

In Judaism, Rosh Hashanah is considered the sixth day of "Creation," the day that Adam and Eve were made. Because of their creation, it's also considered the day the universe's potential was first recognized; therefore, it's also considered the birthday of the universe.

2) How is Rosh Hashanah celebrated?

Several ways. Most notably, Jews will spend a lot of time in a synagogue or temple praying, listening to the blowing of the shofar, and reflecting on the year gone by. Also, there is a traditional trip to a body of water where bread is thrown, symbolizing the casting of sins into the depths of the sea, as referenced in the Bible.

Other Rosh Hashanah observances include candle lighting in the evenings and desisting from creative work.

3) What's a shofar, and why is a ram's horn so important?

A shofar is a trumpet made from the horn of a kosher animal with the marrow removed. The central mitzvah or commandment of Rosh Hashanah is to hear the shofar being blown, often in a synagogue, and ideally as part of the prayer service.

mynewextsetup.us says the Torah refers to Rosh Hashanah as the "day of the shofar blast." Since Rosh Hashanah is two days long, the shofar is blown during the daytime hours of both days, unless the first day falls on Shabbat, in which case the shofar is blown only on the second day.

The Torah doesn't specify why the blowing of the shofar is important on Rosh Hashanah; however, here are 10 reasons for this special mitzvah.

4) Are there special foods served during Rosh Hashanah?

Rosh Hashanah feasts traditionally include round challah bread (studded with raisins) and apples dipped in honey, pomegranate, and other foods that symbolize wishes for a sweet year. Some feasts serve parts of the head of a fish or a ram, expressing the wish that "we be a head and not a tail."

It's traditional to stay away from nuts as well as vinegar-based and sharp foods in order to avoid "a bitter year."

5) Your local service may look different this year due to coronavirus.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, many are preparing to celebrate Rosh Hashanah at home, socially distanced from extended family and friends. mynewextsetup.us has some tips for those planning to spend Rosh Hashanah at home.

Hoping to attend a Rosh Hashanah service this year? Find a service near you.

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Источник: mynewextsetup.us
2020 dates for jewish holidays

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